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Encyclopedia > Great American Songbook
Songwriter Harold Arlen (right) with singer Bing Crosby (left) and Decca Records owner Jack Kapp (center)

Great American Songbook is an informal term referring to the interrelated music of Broadway musical theater, the Hollywood musical, and Tin Pan Alley, in a period that begins roughly in the 1920s and tapers off around 1960 with the coming of rock and roll. Aside from the enduring popularity of this music in its original context, it also became (and remains) the central repertoire of jazz musicians. (In jazz, such tunes are simply referred to as "standards".) For its devotees, the GAS (as it is sometimes abbreviated) represents a level of musical and lyrical sophistication that has yet to be equalled. (This is sometimes – as in the writings of Gene Lees – a way of casting aspersions on rock music and everything that followed in its wake.) Image File history File links Crosby_Arlen_Kapp. ... Image File history File links Crosby_Arlen_Kapp. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Jack Kapp is the founder of Kapp Records based in New York. ... The Lion King at the New Amsterdam Theatre, 2003 Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... ... Tin Pan Alley was the name given to the collection of New York City-centered music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... The 1920s is a decade that is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Jazz standard refers to a tune that is widely known, performed, and recorded among jazz musicians. ...

Contents

The songwriters

There is no definitive list of which musicians and lyricists are part of the Great American Songbook. Major songwriters considered part of this group include, but are not limited to:

Irving Berlin, one of the most prolific composers and lyricists of the Great American Songbook.
Irving Berlin, one of the most prolific composers and lyricists of the Great American Songbook.


In his groundbreaking 1972 study of the Songbook, American Popular Song: The Great Innovators, 1900-1950, songwriter and critic Alec Wilder provided a workable list of the artists who belong in the canon, while also implying a hierarchy of their relative worth[1]: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1221x1791, 273 KB) High resolution version from http://memory. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1221x1791, 273 KB) High resolution version from http://memory. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Over the Rainbow, music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by Yip Harburg, is one of the most famous songs of the late 1930s. ... Stormy Weather is a 1933 song written by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler. ... Its Only a Paper Moon is a popular song. ... Ive Got The World On A String is a popular song. ... I Gotta Right to Sing the Blues is a popular song. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... White Christmas is an Irving Berlin song whose lyrics reminisce about White Christmases. ... Always is a classic ballad written by Irving Berlin. ... Blue Skies is a popular song, written by Irving Berlin. ... Cheek to Cheek is a song written by Irving Berlin, and first performed by Fred Astaire in the movie Top Hat (1935). ... Puttin on the Ritz is a popular song written and published in 1929 by Irving Berlin. ... Hoagland Howard Hoagy Carmichael (November 22, 1899 – December 27, 1981) was an American composer, pianist, singer, actor, and bandleader. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Georgia on My Mind is a song written in 1930 by Stuart Gorrell (lyrics) and Hoagy Carmichael (music). ... The Nearness of You is a popular song. ... Skylark Slylark is an American popular song with lyrics by Johnny Mercer and music by Hoagy Carmichael, published in 1942. ... Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington (April 29, 1899–May 24, 1974) was an American jazz composer, pianist, and band leader who has been one of the most influential figures in jazz, if not in all American music. ... Duke Ellington composed In A Sentimental Mood in 1935. ... It Dont Mean A Thing (If It Aint Got That Swing) is a 1932 (see 1932 in music) composition by Duke Ellington with lyrics by Irving Mills, now accepted as a jazz standard. ... Satin Doll is a famous jazz standard written by Johnny Mercer, Duke Ellington, and Billy Strayhorn. ... Mood Indigo is a classic jazz composition and song, with words and music by Duke Ellington, Barney Bigard, and Irving Mills [1]. The main theme was provided by Bigard, who learned it in New Orleans, Louisiana from his clarinet teacher Lorenzo Tio, who called it a Mexican Blues. Ellingtons... Sophisticated Lady is a jazz standard, composed as an instrumental in 1932 by Duke Ellington, to which words were added by Mitchell Parish and Irving Mills. ... Im Beginning to See the Light is a popular song. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Ira Gershwin (6 December 1896 – 17 August 1983) was an American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century. ... Someone to Watch over Me is a song by George and Ira Gershwin from the musical Oh, Kay!. It has been performed by artists from Frank Sinatra, Perry Como and Ella Fitzgerald to Linda Ronstadt and Melissa Manchester. ... S Wonderful is a popular song. ... Summertime is the name of an aria composed by George Gershwin for the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess. ... Embraceable You is a popular song. ... George Gershwin photograph by Edward Steichen in 1927. ... Fascinating Rhythm is a popular song. ... The Man I Love is a popular standard, with music by George Gershwin and lyrics by his brother Ira. ... They Cant Take That Away From Me is a 1937 song (see 1937 in music) written by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin and first performed by Fred Astaire in the movie Shall We Dance (1937). ... Our Love Is Here to Stay is a popular song and a jazz standard. ... Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of popular music. ... Ol Man River (music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II) is a song in the 1927 musical Show Boat that tells the story of African American hardship and struggles of the time. ... The Way You Look Tonight is a song featured in the film Swing Time, which won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1936. ... The Best Of The Columbia Years: 1943-1952 is a 1998 compilation album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. ... Smoke Gets In Your Eyes is a song written by American composer Jerome Kern and lyricist Otto Harbach for their 1933 Broadway musical Roberta. ... Johnny Mandel (born 23 November 1925 in New York) is an American composer and arranger of popular songs, film music and jazz. ... The Shadow of Your Smile (Love Theme from The Sandpiper) is a popular song. ... John Herndon Johnny Mercer (November 18, 1909 – June 25, 1976) was a popular American songwriter and singer. ... // Countless renditions of One For My Baby. ... That Old Black Magic is the third episode of the Guinevere Jones television show. ... Blues in the Night is a popular song which has become a pop standard. ... Come Rain or Come Shine is a popular song written by Harold Arlen with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Indiana. ... Night and Day is a song written by Cole Porter for the 1932 musical play The Gay Divorce. ... Ive Got You Under My Skin is a song by Cole Porter. ... Begin the Beguine is a song written by Cole Porter and introduced by June Knight in the Broadway musical Jubilee (1934). ... Lets Do It, Lets Fall in Love (1928) is the first of Cole Porters famous list songs. ... What is This Thing Called Love? is a science fiction short story by Isaac Asimov. ... Love For Sale is a jazz song by Cole Porter, from the 1930 musical The New Yorkers. ... Youre the Top is a Cole Porter song from the 1934 musical Anything Goes. ... Just One of Those Things is a popular song, written by Cole Porter in 1935 for the musical High Society. ... I Get a Kick Out of You is a song by Cole Porter, originally featured in Anything Goes (1934). ... Cole Porters Evry Time We Say Goodbye was introduced in 1944 in Billy Roses musical revue, Seven Lively Arts. ... In the Still of the Night is a popular song written by Cole Porter and published in 1937. ... Its De-Lovely is one of Cole Porters hit songs. ... My Heart Belongs to Daddy is a song written by Cole Porter in 1938. ... Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. ... Oh What a Beautiful Mornin is a song from the musical Oklahoma! written by composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist/librettist Oscar Hammerstein II. It is sung by Curly at the opening of the first scene. ... People Will Say Were In Love was written by Oscar Hammerstein II and composed by Richard Rogers for the musical Oklahoma!. It is sung by Curly McLane and Laurey Williams as a duet. ... It Might As Well Be Spring is a song featured in the 1945 film State Fair. ... If I Loved You is a popular song. ... Some Enchanted Evening was the thirteenth non short Simpsons episode released on television. ... The title Shall We Dance? may refer to one of the following. ... My Favorite Things can refer to: A song from The Sound of Music A famous interpretation of the song by John Coltrane The album on which Coltranes version was first recorded A remix of Coltranes version by Outkast on the album The Love Below This is a disambiguation... Rodgers and Hart was the songwriting team consisting of Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. ... Buffy the Vampire Slayer episode, see Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered (Buffy episode). ... My Romance is a popular song, with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Lorenz Hart. ... Have You Met Miss Jones? is a popular song. ... My Funny Valentine is a song composed by Richard Rodgers to lyrics by Lorenz Hart and is now considered a jazz standard, appearing on over 1300 albums performed by over 600 artists. ... Cover of sheet music for Blue Moon arranged by Jeff Funk, scored by SATB choir, and published by Alfred Publishing Co. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Thou Swell is a popular song and a jazz standard. ... Lover is a popular song written by Richard Rodgers, with words by Lorenz Hart. ... Where or When is a song that was written by Richard Rogers and Lorenz Hart for the 1937 Broadway musical Babes In Arms. ... This Cant Be Love is a popular song. ... Jimmy Van Heusen (January 26, 1913 - February 7, 1990), was an American composer. ... All the Way is a popular song. ... But Beautiful is a book about jazz and jazz musicians by Geoff Dyer. ... Come Fly with Me is a popular song. ... Imagination is a popular song. ... Alec Wilder (born Alexander Lafayette Chew Wilder in Rochester, New York, February 16, 1907; d. ...

Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart

Wilder's list is subjective, and focuses on composers more than lyricists. However, his work was highly influential and roughly corresponds with most people's idea of the Great American Songbook. Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of popular music. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... An autographed photo of Richard Rodgers Richard Charles Rodgers (June 28, 1902 – December 30, 1979) was one of the great composers of musical theater, best known for his song writing partnerships with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II. He wrote more than 900 published songs, and forty Broadway musicals. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Indiana. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Vincent Youmans (September 27, 1898 - April 5, 1946) was an American popular composer and Broadway producer. ... Arthur Schwartz photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Arthur Schwartz (November 25, 1900 - September 3, 1984) was an Jewish-American composer of popular music. ... Burton Lane (February 2, 1912, New York City - January 5, 1997, New York City) was a composer and lyricist. ... Hugh Martin, born on August 11, 1914 in Birmingham, Alabama is an American theatre and film composer. ... Vernon Duke (1903-1969), composer/songwriter, wrote such favorites as I Cant Get Started with lyrics by Ira Gershwin, April In Paris with lyrics by E.Y. (Yip) Harburg (1932), and What Is There To Say for The Ziegfeld Follies of 1934 also with Harburg. ... Hoagland Howard Hoagy Carmichael (November 22, 1899 – December 27, 1981) was an American composer, pianist, singer, actor, and bandleader. ... Walter Donaldson (February 15, 1893 - July 15, 1947) was a prolific United States popular songwriter, producing many hit songs of the 1910s and 1920s. ... Harry Warren (December 24, 1893 - September 22, 1981) was a music composer of many different styles. ... Isham Jones, 1922 Isham Jones (31 January 1894 – 19 October 1956) was a United States bandleader, violinist, saxophonist, bassist and songwriter. ... Jimmy McHugh (July 10, 1894 - May 23, 1969), was one of the greatest and most prolific songwriters during the 1920s-1950s. ... Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington (April 29, 1899–May 24, 1974) was an American jazz composer, pianist, and band leader who has been one of the most influential figures in jazz, if not in all American music. ... Fred E. Ahlert (19 September 1892 - 20 October 1953) was an American composer and songwriter. ... Richard A. Whiting (November 12, 1891-February 10, 1938) was a writer of popular songs. ... Ray Noble is a common personal name that can refer to different people: Ray Noble: a baseball player Ray Noble: a musician This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For others with the same name, see: John Green (disambiguation). ... Reuben Bloom (born April 24 in New York City, 1902—died March 30, 1976 in New York City) was a Jewish American composer of popular songs. ... Jimmy Van Heusen (January 26, 1913 - February 7, 1990), was an American composer. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 770 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2797 × 2178 pixel, file size: 564 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) High resolution version from http://memory. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 770 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2797 × 2178 pixel, file size: 564 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) High resolution version from http://memory. ...


It is even more difficult to determine how songwriters from the latter half of the 20th century fit into the Great American Songbook canon. Though for many people the Songbook era ended with the rock and roll revolution, some later composers, such as Henry Mancini, Burt Bacharach, and even non-Americans such as Brazilian Antonio Carlos Jobim are sometimes considered to be part of the Songbook. These, and other such composers, may more properly be considered in the context of easy listening, musical theatre, or jazz. Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... This biographical article needs additional references for verification. ... Antônio Carlos Brasileiro de Almeida Jobim (January 25, 1927 in Rio de Janeiro – December 8, 1994 in New York City), or Tom Jobim (as he is fondly known in his home country), was a Brazilian composer, arranger, singer, pianist/guitarist and one of the primary forces behind the creation... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Fantasticks is the longest-running musical in history Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


The songs

Most of the songs in the Great American Songbook are written in "verse-chorus form". The verse is a musical introduction that typically has a free musical structure, speech-like rhythms and rubato delivery. It serves as a way of leading from the surrounding (realistic) dramatic context into the more artificial world of song, and often has lyrics that are "in character" and make reference to the plot of the musical. The chorus is the central part of the song. It is usually a 32-bar AABA or ABAC form; the lyrics usually refer to more timeless situations – typically, the vicissitudes of love. This greater generality made it easier for songs to be added or subtracted from a show, or revived in a different show. (While a few songs are always performed in full verse-chorus structure – for instance, "Lush Life" – more often the verse is dropped in performances of GAS songs outside their original stage context.) This article will be merged with Italian musical terms at some point in the near future. ... The thirty-two-bar form, often shortened to AABA, is a musical form common in Tin Pan Alley songs, later popular music including rock and pop music, and jazz, though there were few instances of it in any type of popular music until the late teens, it became the principal...


Despite the narrow range of topics and moods typically dealt with in these songs, they achieved a marriage of words and music that remains one touchstone of good songwriting. The best GAS lyricists specialized in witty, urbane lyrics with teasingly unexpected rhymes; the songwriters combined memorable melodies (which could be brashly pentatonic – as in a Gershwin tune like "I Got Rhythm" – or sinuously chromatic, as in many of Cole Porter's tunes) and great harmonic subtlety – a good example being Kern's "All the Things You Are", with its winding modulations. A rhyme is a repetition of identical or similar terminal sounds in two or more different words (i. ... In telecommunications, modulation is the process of varying a periodic waveform, i. ...


The singers

The early years

Since the 1930s, many singers and musicians have explicitly recorded or performed large parts of the Great American Songbook, to the extent that interpreting material from the Songbook forms a large part of jazz and easy listening music today. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Ella Fitzgerald Songbooks were a series of eight albums released in irregular intervals between 1956 and 1964. ... A singer is a musician who uses their voice to produce music. ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ...


Ella Fitzgerald's popular and influential Songbook series on Verve in the 1950s and 60s collated 252 songs from the Songbook. Amongst other singers, influential interpreters of the Great American Songbook include Fred Astaire, Bing Crosby, Tony Bennett, Judy Garland, Frank Sinatra, Johnny Mathis, Barbra Streisand (particularly in her earlier work), Sammy Davis, Jr., Sarah Vaughan, Peggy Lee, Dinah Shore, Carmen McRae, Billie Holiday, Perry Como, Dinah Washington, Nina Simone, Vic Damone, Blossom Dearie, Cleo Laine, Jack Jones and Mel Tormé. Ella Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ... The Ella Fitzgerald Songbooks were a series of eight albums released in irregular intervals between 1956 and 1964. ... Verve Records is an American Jazz record label, founded by Norman Granz in 1956, which absorbed the catalogues of his earlier labels: Norgran Records and Clef Records (founded 1953). ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ... Superscript text Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an Oscar-nominated American film actress, considered by many to be one of the greatest singing stars of Hollywoods Golden Era of musical film, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale from The... Francis Albert Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American jazz-oriented popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor. ... John Royce Mathis (b. ... Barbra Joan Streisand (born April 24, 1942) She is an American singer, theatre and film actress, composer, liberal political activist, film producer and director. ... This article is about the entertainer. ... Sarah Lois Vaughan (nicknamed Sassy and The Divine One), (March 27, 1924 – April 3, 1990) was an American jazz singer, described as one of the greatest singers of the 20th century [1]. // Sarah Vaughan was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1924. ... Peggy Lee (May 26, 1920 – January 21, 2002) was an American jazz and traditional pop singer and songwriter and Oscar-nominated performer. ... Dinah Shore (born Frances Rose Shore February 29, 1916 - February 24, 1994) was an American singer and actress. ... Carmen Mercedes McRae (April 8, 1920–November 10, 1994) was an American jazz singer. ... Billie Holiday (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), born Eleanora Fagan and later called Lady Day was an American singer widely considered one of the greatest jazz voices of all time. ... Pierino Ronaldo Perry Como (May 18, 1912 – May 12, 2001) was an Italian American crooner during the latter half of the 20th century. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Eunice Kathleen Waymon, better known as Nina Simone (February 21, 1933–April 21, 2003), was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, and civil rights activist. ... Vic Damone (born June 12, 1928 in Brooklyn, New York) is an ItalianAmerican singer. ... Blossom Dearie (born on April 28, 1926 in East Durham, New York) is an American jazz singer. ... Dame Cleo Laine, Lady Dankworth DBE, (born Clementina Dinah Campbell on October 28, 1927 in Middlesex, England) is a scat and jazz singer and an actor. ... Jack Jones, singer Jack Jones (born John Allan Jones in January 14, 1938) is an American jazz and pop singer. ... Melvin Howard Tormé (September 13, 1925 – June 5, 1999), nicknamed The Velvet Fog, is best known as one of the great male jazz singers. ...


Contemporary musicians

Over the last couple of decades there has been a revival of the Songbook by contemporary musicians. The most notable being in 1983 with popular rock vocalist Linda Ronstadt doing her part to rehabilitate, what had been by then classified as "elevator music" and or Vintage Pop. In 1983, Stephen Holden of the New York Times wrote Ronstadt's album What's New "isn't the first album by a rock singer to pay tribute to the golden age of the pop, but is... the best and most serious attempt to rehabilitate an idea of pop that Beatlemania and the mass marketing of rock LP's for teen-agers undid in the mid-60's. In the decade prior to Beatlemania, most of the great band singers and crooners of the 40's and 50's codified a half-century of American pop standards on dozens of albums, many of them now long out-of-print."[2] Since then, vocalists such as Harry Connick, Jr., Andrea Marcovicci, Michael Feinstein, John Pizzarelli, Ysabella Brave, Diana Krall and Michael Bublé have been notable, if not always consistent, interpreters. John Stevens, a 2004 American Idol contestant, also gave exposure to this trend. Established singers in other genres have also had success in treating the Songbook, including Harry Nilsson, Carly Simon, Bette Midler, Barry Manilow, Caetano Veloso, Queen Latifah, Joni Mitchell, Boz Scaggs, Robbie Williams, Rod Stewart and Morrissey. Michael Parkinson devotes a considerable part of his BBC Radio 2 program to this genre of music. Linda Marie Ronstadt (born July 15, 1946 in Tucson, Arizona) is a popular vocalist with multiple Grammy Awards, numerous multi-platinum albums, an Emmy Award, a Tony Award nomination who has recorded over 30 studio albums. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Beatles arrival at Americas JFK Airport in 1964 has proved a particularly enduring image of Beatlemania. ... ‹ The template below (Taginfo) is being considered for deletion. ... Andrea Marcovicci (b. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... John Paul Pizzarelli Jr. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Diana Jean Krall, OC, OBC (born November 16, 1964) is a Grammy award-winning Canadian jazz pianist and singer. ... This article is about the artist. ... John Stevens on On Air with Ryan Seacrest. ... AMERICAN IDOL HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO DEATH OF SIMON ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Carly Elisabeth Simon (born June 25, 1945 in New York City) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and two-time Grammy Award winning American musician who emerged as one of the leading lights of the early 1970s singer-songwriter movement. ... Bette Midler (born December 1, 1945) is an American singer, actress, and comedian, also known to her fans as The Divine Miss M. She is named after the actress Bette Davis although Davis pronounced her first name in two syllables, and Midler uses one. ... Barry Manilow is an American singer and songwriter best known for his recordings I Write the Songs, Mandy and Copacabana. His career achievements include selling more than 75 million records worldwide. ... Caetano Veloso (born 7 August 1942) is one of the most popular and influential Brazilian composers and singers. ... Also see the Arab singer Latifa Dana Elaine Owens (born March 18, 1970 in Newark, New Jersey) is a Grammy-winning American rapper/singer, model, and Academy Award-nominated actress. ... Joni Mitchell, CC (born Roberta Joan Anderson on November 7, 1943) is a Canadian musician, songwriter, and painter. ... Boz Scaggs album cover Boz Scaggs (born William Royce Scaggs, June 8, 1944) is an American singer, songwriter and guitarist. ... For footballers with the same name, see Robbie Williams (footballer). ... Roderick David Stewart, CBE (born January 10, 1945), is a Scottish singer born and raised in London. ... Steven Patrick Morrissey (born May 22, 1959) is an English singer and songwriter from Davyhulme, near Manchester. ... Michael Parkinson CBE (born 28 March 1935) is an English journalist and television presenter. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ...


See also

The term classic pop may be used, in general, to refer to any kind of American popular music that either wholly predates the eruption of rock and roll in the mid-1950s, or to any popular music which exists concurrently to rock and roll but originated in a time before... Jazz standard refers to a tune that is widely known, performed, and recorded among jazz musicians. ... Lounge music refers to music played in the lounges and bars of hotels and casinos, or at standalone piano bars. ... Tin Pan Alley was the name given to the collection of New York City-centered music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ...

References

  1. ^ Wilder, Alec (1990). American Popular Song: The Great Innovators 1900-1950. New York & Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-501445-6. 
  2. ^ The New York Times. LINDA RONSTADT CELEBRATES THE GOLDEN AGE OF POP, By Stephen Holden Published: September 4, 1983. Retrieved on May 10, 2007.

is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

Further reading

  • Furia, Philip (1992). Poets of Tin Pan Alley. New York & Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN ISBN 0-19-507473-4. 
  • Wilder, Alec (1990). American Popular Song: The Great Innovators 1900-1950. New York & Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN ISBN 0-19-501445-6. 

External links


 
 

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