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Encyclopedia > Grass
Cut grass growing on in the Hudson River Park
Tall grass growing wild at Lyme Park
Grass covered house in Iceland.
Grass covered house in Iceland.

Grass is a common word that generally describes a monocotyledonous green plant in the family Gramineae (Poaceae). True grasses include most plants grown as grains, for pasture, and for lawns (turf). They include some more specialised crops such as lemongrass, as well as many ornamental plants, and some weeds. They also include plants often not considered to be grasses, such as bamboos. Look up grass in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 406 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A closeup of some nice green grass growing on the Hudson Riverfront. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 406 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A closeup of some nice green grass growing on the Hudson Riverfront. ... Hudson River Park extends from 59th Street to Battery Park (New York) in Manhattan. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 493 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Tall grass growing wild at Lyme Park. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 493 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Tall grass growing wild at Lyme Park. ... The south front of Lyme Park, Cheshire as rebuilt by Giacomo Leoni. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2102x1373, 521 KB) Summary A traditional grass-covered house in Iceland in Jul or Aug 1972. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2102x1373, 521 KB) Summary A traditional grass-covered house in Iceland in Jul or Aug 1972. ... Hemerocallis flower, with three flower parts in each whorl Wheat, an economically important monocot The monocotyledons or Monocots are a group of flowering plants, (angiosperms) dominating great parts of the earth. ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies There are 7 subfamilies: Subfamily Arundinoideae Subfamily Bambusoideae Subfamily Centothecoideae Subfamily Chloridoideae Subfamily Panicoideae Subfamily Pooideae Subfamily Stipoideae The true grasses are monocotyledonous plants (Class Liliopsida) in the Family Poaceae, also known as Gramineae. ... The word grain has several meanings, most being descriptive of a small piece or particle. ... Pastureland Pasture is land with lush herbaceous vegetation cover used for grazing of ungulates as part of a farm or ranch. ... A lawn is an area of recreational or amenity land planted with grass, and sometimes clover and other plants, which are maintained at a low, even height. ... Species Over 50: see text Lemon Grass Lemon grass or lemongrass is a perennial herb used in Asian (particularly Thai, Khmer and Vietnamese) and Caribbean cooking. ... Ornamental Grasses have become increasingly popular over the last several years. ... Yellow starthistle, a thistle native to southern Europe and the Middle East that is an invasive weed in parts of North America. ... Diversity Around 91 genera and 1,000 species Subtribes Arthrostylidiinae Arundinariinae Bambusinae Chusqueinae Guaduinae Melocanninae Nastinae Racemobambodinae Shibataeinae See the full Taxonomy of the Bambuseae. ...


The term 'grass' is sometimes used to describe related plants in the rush (Juncaceae) and sedge (Cyperaceae) families, that resemble grass somewhat. It may also be used to describe completely unrelated plants, sometimes of similar appearances to grass, with leaves rising vertically from the ground, and sometimes of dissimilar appearance. Genera Andesia Distichia Juncus - Rush Luzula - Woodrush Marsippospermum Oxychloë Prionium Rostkovia The Juncaceae, or the Rush Family, is a rather small monocot flowering plant family. ... Genera See text The Family Cyperaceae, or the Sedge family, is a taxon of monocot flowering plants that superficially resemble grasses or rushes. ...


Grasses and grass-like plants have proven to be among the most versatile of life forms. Plants having grasslike structures have existed for millions of years, providing fodder for Cretaceous dinosaurs, whose fossilized dung (coprolite) contains phytoliths of a variety of grasses that include the ancestors of rice and bamboo (Piperno & Sues, 2005). Grasses have adapted to conditions in lush rain forests, dry deserts, and cold mountain steppes, and are presently the most widespread of all plant types. Plants of this type have always been important to human beings. They provide the majority of food crops, and have numerous other uses, such as feeding animals, and for lawns. There are numerous minor uses, and grasses are familiar to most human cultures. // The Cretaceous Period is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic Period (i. ... Orders Saurischia    Sauropodomorpha    Theropoda Ornithischia Dinosaurs are giant reptiles that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for most of their 165-million year existence. ... Coprolites are fossilized feces, or animal dung. ... Image of a Phytolith (bulliform) A Phytolith (Plant stone) is a rigid microscopic body that occurs in many plants. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... Diversity Around 91 genera and 1,000 species Subtribes Arthrostylidiinae Arundinariinae Bambusinae Chusqueinae Guaduinae Melocanninae Nastinae Racemobambodinae Shibataeinae See the full Taxonomy of the Bambuseae. ... A rainforest is a forested biome with high annual rainfall. ... For the act of abandoning or withdrawing support from an entity, see desertion. ... The steppe of Western Kazakhstan in early spring In physical geography, steppe (from Slavic step) is a plain without trees (apart from those near rivers and lakes); it is similar to a prairie, although a prairie is generally reckoned as being dominated by tall grasses, while short grasses are said... Human beings are defined variously in biological, spiritual, and cultural terms, or in combinations thereof. ... Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in Indonesia Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... A lawn is an area of recreational or amenity land planted with grass, and sometimes clover and other plants, which are maintained at a low, even height. ...

Contents

Grass and society

In some places, even small areas of grass are valuable. These steps were built to access grass for animal feed. Swiss-Italian region near Bignasco.
In some places, even small areas of grass are valuable. These steps were built to access grass for animal feed. Swiss-Italian region near Bignasco.

Grasses and grass-like plants have long had significance in human society, having been cultivated as food for domesticated animals for up to 10,000 years. (See grass fed beef.) They have been used for paper-making since at least 2400 BC. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3264x2448, 2398 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Grass Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3264x2448, 2398 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Grass Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... This is a list of animals that have been domesticated by humans. ... Grass fed beef is meat from cows that have been raised primarily on forage (i. ... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ...


The maintenance of a grass lawn is a sign of a homeowner's responsibility to the overall appearance of their neighborhood. Many municipalities and homeowner's associations have rules about this. Some require lawns to be maintained to certain specifications, sanctioning those who allow the grass to grow too long. In communities with drought problems, watering of lawns may be restricted to certain times of day or days of the week. A lawn is an area of recreational or amenity land planted with grass, and sometimes clover and other plants, which are maintained at a low, even height. ... Fields outside Benambra, Victoria, Australia suffering from drought conditions A drought is an extended period of months or years when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply. ...


Grass is also used in several contexts in sports, most notably with sports played on fields such as football, cricket, baseball, and rugby. In football, grass may be replaced with astroturf, an artificial substitute. Two sports, golf and tennis, are particularly dependent on the quality of the grass on which the sport is played. A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... This article is about artificial grass. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ...

Tennis play on the grass court of Wimbledon. The player's service area is heavily trodden.

In tennis, grass is grown on very hard-packed soil, and bounces may vary depending on how healthy the grass is, how recently it has been mowed, and the wear and tear of recent play. The most famous grass tennis court in the world is Centre Court at Wimbledon. Tennis, however, is usually played on clay courts, and only a few regular tennis tournaments are played on a grass court. The surface is less firm than hard courts, causing the ball to bounce lower, and so players must reach the ball faster. Due to high maintenance costs however, grass courts are now rare as they must be watered and mowed often, and take a longer time to dry after rain than hard courts. Download high resolution version (1296x864, 196 KB)Sebastien Grosjean, 10th seed, in his 3rd round match against Jan-Michael Gambill. ... Download high resolution version (1296x864, 196 KB)Sebastien Grosjean, 10th seed, in his 3rd round match against Jan-Michael Gambill. ... Wimbledon logo The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as simply Wimbledon, is the oldest and arguably most prestigious event in the sport of tennis. ...

A sea of neatly cut grass surrounds the bunkers at Filton Golf Club, Bristol, England.
A sea of neatly cut grass surrounds the bunkers at Filton Golf Club, Bristol, England.

Golf, on the other hand, is always played on grass, and is dependant on the maintenance of a very large area of well-cut grass. Grass on golf courses is kept in three distinct conditions, that of the rough, the fairway, and the putting green. Grass on the fairway is kept very short and even, allowing the player to cleanly strike the ball, while playing from the rough is a disadvantage because the grass in the rough is generally much longer, which may affect the flight of the ball. Grass on the putting is the shortest and most even of all, ideally allowing the ball to slide smoothly over the surface. An entire industry revolves around the development and marketing of grasses for golf courses. Image File history File linksMetadata Golf_bunkers_Filton. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Golf_bunkers_Filton. ...


Grass in fiction

Grass plays a central role in two important science fiction catastrophe novels from the 1940s and 1950s, Ward Moore's Greener Than You Think, in which the world is slowly taken over by unstoppable Bermuda Grass, and John Christopher's The Death of Grass, in which a plague that kills off all forms of grass threatens the survival of the human race. These novel's were both decades ahead of their time, for they also predicted that Eddie Vedder would be allergic to horses. Ward Moore (August 10, 1903 - January 28, 1978) was the working name of American author Joseph Ward Moore. ... Common Bermudagrass Species Bermuda Grass (Cynodon dactylon) - other common names include Bahama Grass, Devils Grass, Couch Grass, Indian Doab, Grama, Scutch Grass - is a highly desirable turf grass in southern climates zones 9 - 12 needed for those regions for its heat and drought tolerance. ... Samuel Youd (born February 12, 1922 in Lancashire) is a British science fiction author. ... The Death Of Grass is a 1956 post-apocalyptic science fiction novel written by John Cristopher. ...


See also

Germinating grass seedlings
Germinating grass seedlings
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Grass

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 765 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Grass Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 765 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Grass Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Subfamilies There are 7 subfamilies: Subfamily Arundinoideae Subfamily Bambusoideae Subfamily Centothecoideae Subfamily Chloridoideae Subfamily Panicoideae Subfamily Pooideae Subfamily Stipoideae The true grasses are monocotyledonous plants (Class Liliopsida) in the Family Poaceae, also known as Gramineae. ... Hemerocallis flower, with three flower parts in each whorl Wheat, an economically important monocot The monocotyledons or Monocots are a group of flowering plants, (angiosperms) dominating great parts of the earth. ... A lawn is an area of recreational or amenity land planted with grass, and sometimes clover and other plants, which are maintained at a low, even height. ... Pastureland Pasture is land with lush herbaceous vegetation cover used for grazing of ungulates as part of a farm or ranch. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Turfgrass is a type of grass. ...

References

  • Chapman, G.P. and W.E. Peat. 1992. An Introduction to the Grasses. CAB Internat., Oxon, UK.
  • Cheplick, G.P. 1998. Population Biology of Grasses. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
  • Milne, L. and M. Milne. 1967. Living Plants of the World. Chaticleer Press, N.Y.
  • Soderstrom, T.R., K.W. Hilu, C.S. Campbell, and M.E. Barkworth, eds. 1987. Grass Systematics and Evolution. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C.
  • Went, Frits W. 1963. The Plants. Time-Life Books, N.Y.

External links

  • Why is the grass green?

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