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Encyclopedia > Grand Teton National Park
Grand Teton National Park
IUCN Category II (National Park)
Location Wyoming, USA
Nearest city Jackson
Coordinates 43°44′0″N 110°48′12″W / 43.73333, -110.80333
Area 309,995 acres (1,255 km²)
Established February 26, 1929
Visitors 2,406,476 (in 2006)
Governing body National Park Service

Grand Teton National Park is a United States National Park located in northwestern Wyoming, south of Yellowstone National Park. The park is named after Grand Teton, which at 13,770 feet (4,197 m), is the tallest mountain in the Teton Range. The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... This article is about national parks. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Image File history File links US_Locator_Blank. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Jackson is a town located in the Jackson Hole valley of Teton County, Wyoming. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... The parks of the United States National Park system are one type of protected area in the United States and are operated by the U.S. National Park Service. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Yellowstone redirects here. ... Grand Teton is the highest mountain within Grand Teton National Park, and the second highest in the U.S. state of Wyoming. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... The Teton Range is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in North America. ...


The mountains were named by a French trapper who viewed them from the Idaho side of the range and called them tétons, French slang for "nipples" or "teats" (presumably referring to the shape of the peaks). It was established as a national park on February 26, 1929. The park covers 484 mi² (1,255 km²) of land and water. For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ...


There are nearly 200 miles (320 km) of trails for hikers to enjoy in Grand Teton National Park. “Miles” redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ... Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ...

Contents

Geography

The John Moulton Barn at the base of the Grand Tetons in Moose
The John Moulton Barn at the base of the Grand Tetons in Moose

Part of the Rocky Mountains, the north-south-trending Teton Range rises from the floor of Jackson Hole without any foothills along a 40 mile (65 km) long by 7 to 9 miles (11 to 15 km) wide active fault-block mountain front system. In addition to 13,770 ft (4,197 m) high Grand Teton, another eight peaks are over 12,000 ft (3,660 m) above sea level. Seven of these peaks between Avalanche and Cascade canyons make up the often-photographed Cathedral Group. Download high resolution version (1024x768, 142 KB)Grand Tetons Barns – 2004-06-19 The mormon row barns. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 142 KB)Grand Tetons Barns – 2004-06-19 The mormon row barns. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... The Teton Range is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in North America. ... Jackson Hole is a valley in the U.S. state of Wyoming. ... Other uses: Foothills are geographically defined as gradual increases in elevated land at the base of a mountain range. ... Fault block formation in the Teton Range Fault-block or fault mountains are produced when normal (near vertical) faults fracture a section of continental crust. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ...

Map of Grand Teton park

Jackson Hole is a 55 mile (90 km) long by 6 to 13 mile (10 to 20 km) wide graben valley that has an average elevation of 6,800 ft (2,070 m) with its lowest point near the south park boundary at 6350 ft (1,935 m). The valley sits east of the Teton Range and is vertically displaced downward 30,000 ft (9,100 m) from corresponding rock layers in it, making the Teton Fault and its parallel twin on the east side of the valley normal faults with the Jackson Hole block being the hanging wall and the Teton Mountain block being the footwall. Grand Teton National Park contains the major part of both blocks. A great deal of erosion of the range and sediment filling the graben, however, yields a topographic relief of only up to 7,700 ft (2,350 m). Download high resolution version (789x1112, 288 KB)NPS map File links The following pages link to this file: Grand Teton National Park Categories: United States government images ... Download high resolution version (789x1112, 288 KB)NPS map File links The following pages link to this file: Grand Teton National Park Categories: United States government images ... USGS image A graben is a depressed block of land bordered by parallel faults. ... For morphological image processing operations, see Erosion (morphology). ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ...


The glaciated range is composed of a series of horns and arêtes separated by U-shaped valleys headed by cirques and ended by moraines, making the Tetons a textbook example of alpine topography. Rubble piles left by ice age alpine glaciers impounded a series of interconnected lakes at the foot of the range (Jackson, Leigh, String, Jenny, Bradley, Taggart, and Phelps). The largest lake in the valley, Jackson Lake, was impounded by a recessional moraine left by a very large valley glacier as it retreated north out of Jackson Hole. Jackson Lake covers 25,540 acres (103.4 km²) and has a maximum depth of 438 feet (134 m). There are also over 100 alpine and backcountry lakes. Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ... A glacial horn (or, if unambiguous from context, simply a horn) is a mountain formed by glacial erosion. ... The Garden Wall, an arête in Glacier National Park (U.S.) An arête is a thin, almost knife-like, ridge of rock which is typically formed when two glaciers erode parallel U-shaped valleys. ... A cirque is an amphitheatre-like valley of glacial origin, formed by glacial erosion at the head of the glacier. ... This article is about geological phenomena. ... For discussion of land surfaces themselves, see Terrain. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ... Mount Moran and Jackson Lake Jackson Lake is a lake located in north western Wyoming in the Grand Teton National Park. ... Jenny Lake is located in Grand Teton National Park in the U.S. state of Wyoming. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ...

Map of Wyoming National Parks and landmarks, showing Grand-Teton south of Yellowstone(upper left), across the state from Cheyenne.

Just to the south is Burned Ridge, the same glacier's terminal or end moraine, which runs down the center of Jackson Hole roughly perpendicular to the range and cut in two by the Snake River. After exiting its dammed outlet at the southeast corner of Jackson Lake, the Snake runs down the valley and through the 10 mile (16 km) long glacial outwash plain south of Burned Ridge. The river's headwaters are in a part of the Teton Wilderness a short distance north in Yellowstone National Park and its destination is the Columbia River far to the west, which in turn empties into the Pacific Ocean. Terraces have been cut by the river into the moraines and outwash plain in the valley. About 50 miles (80 km) of the 1,056 miles (1,699 km) mile long Snake River winds through the park where it is fed by three major tributaries; Pacific Creek, Buffalo Fork, and the Gros Ventre River. Wyoming State Capitol in Cheyenne Cheyenne is the capital of Wyoming, a United States of America. ... For other uses, see Snake River (disambiguation). ... This article is about structures for water impoundment. ... Teton Wilderness is located in Wyoming, United States. ... Yellowstone redirects here. ... The Columbia River (French: fleuve Columbia) is a river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. ...


The local climate is a semi-arid mountain one with a yearly extreme high of 93 °F (34 °C) and extreme low of −46 °F (−43 °C). Average annual snowfall is 191 inches (490 cm) and average rainfall is 10 inches (250 mm). The coldest temperature ever recorded in Grand Teton National Park was −63 °F (−52 °C), and snow often blankets the landscape from early November to late April. In general terms, the climate of a locale or region is said to be arid when it is characterized by a severe lack of available water, to the extent of hindering or even preventing the growth and development of plant and animal life. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ...


Human history

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

Pre-history

Native American hunting parties from the northern Rocky Mountains camped along the shore of Jackson Lake around 12,000 years ago while following game. For thousands of years Jackson Hole was used as a neutral crossroads for trade and travel routes in the area. One route followed the Snake River to its source in the Yellowstone area where abundant obsidian could be found. Another major route traversed the Teton Pass at the southern end of the range, providing a shortcut to the Pacific Northwest region of what is now the United States. Also, a southern route led to the Colorado Plateaus region and the Great Basin. Chief Quanah Parker of the Quahadi Comanche Native Americans in the United States (also Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are those indigenous peoples within the territory which is now encompassed by the continental United States, and their descendants in... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Mount Moran and Jackson Lake Jackson Lake is a lake located in north western Wyoming in the Grand Teton National Park. ... This article is about economic exchange. ... For other uses, see Snake River (disambiguation). ... This article is about a type of volcanic glass. ... Teton Pass (elevation 8400 ft/2560 m), is a mountain pass located in the Teton Range near the border between southeastern Idaho and northwestern Wyoming between the towns of Jackson, Wyoming and Victor, Idaho. ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ... The Colorado Plateau, also called the Colorado Plateaus Province, is a physiographic region of the Intermontane Plateaus, roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States. ... Drainage map showing the Great Basin in orange Various Definitions of the Great Basin (NPS) Wheeler Peak in Great Basin National Park, Nevada. ...


White exploration and settlement

Mount Moran and Jackson Lake
Mount Moran and Jackson Lake

The Tetons were named by French explorers who called the three highest peaks of the range Les Trois Tetons (the three breasts). In the 18th and 19th centuries, Caucasian fur trappers and fur traders called deep valleys rimmed by high mountains "holes." One such fur trapper was named David Jackson and his favorite place to 'hole-up' was named after him in 1829. Download high resolution version (1024x768, 87 KB)Mount Moran and Jackson Lake. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 87 KB)Mount Moran and Jackson Lake. ... A fur trapper is a person who is involved the capture of wild mammals for their fur. ... An Alberta fur trader in the 1890s. ... Fljótsdalur in East Iceland, a rather flat valley In geology, a valley (also called a vale or dale) is a depression with predominant extent in one direction. ... David Edward Jackson (1788-1837) was an American pioneer, explorer, trader, and fur trapper. ...


John Colter, a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, is the first white American known to have visited the area now know as Jackson Hole as early as 1805-1806. Geologist F.V. Hayden visited the area in 1860 as part of the Raynolds expedition. In the summer of 1871 he led the first government-sponsored scientific survey of the Yellowstone area just to the north. One part of that survey, led by geologist James Stevenson, traveled into Jackson Hole via the Teton Pass before meeting up with the other half of the expedition in Yellowstone. While passing through, the team, which included Yellowstone's first superintendent N.P. Longford, photographer William Henry Jackson, and artist William Henry Holmes, among others, mapped the area and surveyed its geology and biology. These data were later included in the Hayden Survey set of reports. Private John Colter (1774–1813), a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, was the first white American to enter what is now known as Yellowstone National Park, descend into Jackson Hole and see the Grand Teton mountains, in 1808. ... Lewis and Clark redirects here. ... Ferdinand Vandeveer Hayden (September 7, 1829 - December 22, 1887) was an American geologist noted for his pioneering surveying expeditions of Rocky Mountains in the late 19th century. ... James Stevenson is a UK punk / rock guitarist currently with The Alarm, Gene Loves Jezebel and Chelsea. ... William Henry Jackson, 1862 William Henry Jackson (April 4, 1843 - June 30, 1942) was an American painter, photographer and explorer famous for his images of the American West. ... William Henry Holmes (1846 – 1933) was an American anthropologist, archaeologist, geologist and museum director. ... Cartography or mapmaking (in Greek chartis = map and graphein = write) is the study and practice of making maps or globes. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: Βιολογία - βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... A noon meal in Ferdinand V. Haydens camp of the U.& Geological Survey. ...


Homesteaders moved into Jackson Hole after the reports were published but the short growing season along with weeks of being snowed-in each winter kept all but the hardiest individuals away. One of those settlers, a rancher named Pierce Cunningham, circulated a petition to have Jackson Hole saved for the "education and enjoyment of the Nation as a whole." Broadly defined, homesteading is a lifestyle of simple, agrarian self-sufficiency. ... In agriculture, the growing season is the period of each year when crops can be grown. ...


Fight for preservation

In 1897 acting Yellowstone superintendent Colonel S.B.M. Young proposed expanding that park's borders south to encompass the northern extent of Jackson Hole in order to protect migrating herds of elk. Next year, United States Geological Survey head Charles D. Walcott suggested that the Teton Range should be included as well. Stephen Mather, director of the newly-created National Park Service and his assistant Horace Albright sent a report to Secretary of the Interior Franklin Lane in 1917 stating much the same. Wyoming Representative Frank Mondell sponsored a bill that unanimously passed the United States House of Representatives in 1918 but was killed in the United States Senate when Idaho Senator John Nugent feared that the expansion of Park Service jurisdiction would threaten sheep grazing permits. Public opposition to park expansion also mounted in and around Jackson Hole. Albright, in fact, was practically run out of Jackson, Wyoming, by angry townspeople in 1919 when he traveled there to speak in favor of park expansion. For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Stephen Mather (1867 - 1930) was a pioneering American industrialist and conservationist. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Horace M. Albright Horace Marden Albright (January 6, 1890 – March 2, 1987) was an American conservationist Horace Albright was born 1890 in Bishop, California, the son of George Albright a miner. ... Franklin Knight Lane (July 15, 1864 – May 18, 1921) was a Canadian-American Democratic politician who served as United States Secretary of the Interior. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... See: John Nugent (U.S. government agent) (1821–1880) - a journalist and agent of US President James Buchanan. ... Species See text. ... Jackson is a town located in the Jackson Hole valley of Teton County, Wyoming. ...

The Rockefellers in Grand Teton area
The Rockefellers in Grand Teton area

Local attitudes started to change that same year when proposals to dam Jenny, Emma Matilda, and Two Ocean lakes surfaced. Then on July 26, 1923, local and Park Service representatives including Albright met in Maud Noble's cabin to work on a plan to buy private lands to create a recreation area to preserve the "Old West" character of the valley. Albright was the only person who supported Park Service management; the others wanted traditional hunting, grazing, and dude-ranching activities to continue. In 1927 philanthropist John D. Rockefeller, Jr. founded the Snake River Land Company so he and others could buy land in the area incognito and have it held until the National Park Service could administer it. The company launched a campaign to purchase more than 35,000 acres (142 km²) for $1.4 million but faced 15 years of opposition by ranchers and a refusal by the Park Service to take the land. Download high resolution version (1200x782, 138 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1200x782, 138 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John D. Rockefeller Jr. ... The Snake River Land Company was a land purchasing company established in 1927 by philanthropist John D. Rockefeller, Jr. ...

Park Dedication in 1929
Park Dedication in 1929

In 1928, a Coordinating Commission on National Parks and Forests met with valley residents and reached an agreement for the establishment of a park. Wyoming Senator John Kendrick then introduced a bill to establish Grand Teton National Park. It was passed by both houses of the U.S. Congress and signed into law by U.S. President Calvin Coolidge on February 26, 1929. The 96,000 acre (388 km²) park was carved from Teton National Forest and included the Teton Range and six glacial lakes at its foot in Jackson Hole. Lobbying by cattlemen, however, meant that the original park borders did not include most of Jackson Hole (whose floor was used for grazing). Meanwhile the Park Service refused to accept the 35,000 acres (142 km²) held by the Snake River Company. Download high resolution version (1400x962, 300 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1400x962, 300 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Senator from Wyoming; born near Jacksonville, Cherokee County, Tex. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Grazing To feed on growing herbage, attached algae, or phytoplankton. ...


Discouraged by the stalemate, Rockefeller sent a letter to then U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt telling him that if the federal government did not accept the land that he intended to make some other disposition of it or to sell it in the market to any satisfactory buyers. Soon afterward on March 15, 1943 the president declared 221,000 acres (894 km²) of public land as Jackson Hole National Monument. Continued controversy over the Rockefeller gift still made it impossible for the monument to officially include that land, however. FDR redirects here. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Opposition to the monument by local residents immediately followed with criticism that the declaration was a violation of states' rights and that it would destroy the local economy and tax base. Ranchers drove 500 cattle across the newly created monument in a demonstration designed to provoke conflict. The Park Service did not respond to the stunt but the event brought national attention to the issue nonetheless. Wyoming Representative Frank A. Barrett introduced a bill to abolish the monument that passed both houses of Congress but was pocket vetoed by Roosevelt. U.S. Forest Service officials did not want to cede another large part of the Teton National Forest to the Park Service so they fought against transfer. One final act was to order forest rangers to gut the Jackson Lake Ranger Station before handing it over to park rangers. Residents in the area who supported the park and the monument were boycotted and harassed. States rights refers to the idea, in U.S. politics and constitutional law, that U.S. states possess certain rights and political powers in relation to the federal government. ... “Taxes” redirects here. ... Congressman Frank Barrett Frank Aloysius Barrett (1892-11-10 – 1962-05-30) was an American soldier, lawyer and politician. ... A pocket veto is a legislative maneuver in American federal lawmaking. ... The USDA Forest Service, a United States government agency within the United States Department of Agriculture, is under the leadership of the United States Secretary of Agriculture. ... Look up Boycott in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Other bills to abolish the monument were introduced between 1945 and 1947 but none passed. Increases in tourism money following the end of World War II has been cited as a cause of the change in local attitudes. A move to merge the monument into an enlarged park gained steam and by April, 1949, interested parties gathered the Senate Appropriation Committee chambers to finalize a compromise. The Rockefeller lands were finally transferred from private to public ownership on December 16, 1949, when they were added to the monument. A bill merging most of Jackson Hole National Monument (except for its southern extent, which was added to the National Elk Refuge) into Grand Teton National Park was signed into law by President Harry S. Truman on September 14, 1950. One concession in the law modified the Antiquities Act, limiting the future power of a president to proclaim National Monuments in Wyoming. The scenic highway that extends from the northern border of Grand Teton National Park to the southern entrance of Yellowstone National Park was named the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway to recognize Rockefeller's contribution to protecting the area. Tourist redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Elk Refuge, which was created in 1912 to promote the survival of the elk herd, lies northeast of the Town of Jackson, Wyoming. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Antiquities Act of 1906 is an act passed by the United States Congress and signed into law by Theodore Roosevelt giving the President of the United States authority to place certain lands under control of the federal government by executive order, bypassing Congressional oversight. ... For other uses, see Highway (disambiguation). ... Yellowstone redirects here. ... John D. Rockefeller, Jr. ...


A meteor on a path over the Rocky Mountains from the U.S. Southwest to Canada passed above the park area on August 10, 1972, and was filmed by a tourist with an 8-millimeter color film camera. The object was in the range of size from a car to a house and should have ended its life in a Hiroshima-sized blast, but there was never any explosion, much less a crater. Analysis of the trajectory indicated that it never came much lower than 58 kilometers off the ground, and the conclusion was that it had grazed Earth's atmosphere for about 100 seconds, then skipped back out of the atmosphere to return to its orbit around the Sun. Photo of a burst of meteors with extended exposure time A meteor is the visible path of a meteoroid that enters the Earths (or another bodys) atmosphere, commonly called a shooting star or falling star. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The mushroom cloud over Hiroshima after the dropping of Little Boy. ...


Geology

Cascade Canyon
Cascade Canyon

The rock units that make up the east face of the Teton Range are around 2500 million years old and made of metamorphosed sandstones, limestones, various shales, and interbeded volcanic deposits. Buried deep under Tertiary volcanic, sedimentary, and glacial deposits in Jackson Hole, these same Precambrian rocks are overlain by Paleozoic and Mesozoic formations that have long since been eroded away from atop the Tetons. The geology of the Grand Teton area consists of some of oldest rocks and one of the youngest mountain ranges in North America. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2448x1632, 1076 KB) Cascade Canyon at Grand Teton National Park Photograph taken and annotated by Christopher Sokolowski in August 2003. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2448x1632, 1076 KB) Cascade Canyon at Grand Teton National Park Photograph taken and annotated by Christopher Sokolowski in August 2003. ... The Teton Range is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in North America. ... Quartzite, a form of metamorphic rock, from the Museum of Geology at University of Tartu collection. ... This article is about the geological formation. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Shale Shale is a fine-grained sedimentary rock whose original constituents were clays or muds. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... Tertiary geological time interval covers roughly the time span between the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs and beginning of the most recent Ice Age, approximately 65 million to 1. ... Two types of sedimentary rock: limey shale overlain by limestone. ... Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ... Jackson Hole is a valley in the U.S. state of Wyoming. ... The Precambrian (Pre-Cambrian) is an informal name for the supereon comprising the eons of the geologic timescale that came before the current Phanerozoic eon. ... The Paleozoic Era (from the Greek palaio, old and zoion, animals, meaning ancient life) is the earliest of three geologic eras of the Phanerozoic eon. ... Mesozoic Era is one of three geologic eras of the Phanerozoic eon. ... For morphological image processing operations, see Erosion (morphology). ...


The Paleozoic-aged sediments were deposited in warm shallow seas and resulted in various carbonate rocks along with sandstones and shales. Mesozoic deposition transitioned back and forth from marine to non-marine sediments. In later Mesozoic, the Cretaceous Seaway periodically covered the region and the Sierran Arc to the west provided volcanic sediments. Carbonate rocks are a class of sedimentary rocks composed primarily of carbonate minerals. ... The Western Interior Seaway, also called the Cretaceous Seaway and the North American Inland Sea, was a huge inland sea that split the continent of North America into two halves during most of the early and mid-Cretaceous period. ...


A mountain-building episode called the Laramide orogeny started to uplift western North America 70 million years ago and eventually formed the Rocky Mountains. This erased the seaway and created fault systems along which highlands rose. Sediment eroded from uplifted areas filled-in subsiding basins such as Jackson Hole while reverse faults created the first part of the Teton Range in the Eocene epoch. Large Eocene-aged volcanic eruptions from the north in the Yellowstone-Absaroka area along with later Pleistocene-aged Yellowstone Caldera eruptions, left thick volcanic deposits in basins (see geology of the Yellowstone area). The Laramide orogeny was a period of mountain building in western North America, which started in the Late Cretaceous, 70 to 80 million years ago, and ended 35 to 55 million years ago. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Geologic faults, fault lines or simply faults are planar rock fractures, which show evidence of relative movement. ... The term sedimentary basin is used to refer to any geographical feature exhibiting subsidence and consequent infilling by sedimentation. ... This article is about volcanoes in geology. ... The Crow, also called the Absaroka or Absáalooke, are a tribe of Native Americans who historically lived in the Yellowstone river valley and now live on a reservation south of Billings, Montana, and the current chairman of the tribal council is Carl Venne. ... The Pleistocene epoch (IPA: ) on the geologic timescale is the period from 1,808,000 to 11,550 years BP. The Pleistocene epoch had been intended to cover the worlds recent period of repeated glaciations. ... The Yellowstone Caldera is a volcanic caldera in Yellowstone National Park in the United States. ...


The Teton Range started to grow along a north-south trending fault system next to Jackson Hole some 9 million years ago in the Miocene epoch. Then starting in the Pliocene, Lake Teewinot periodically filled Jackson Hole and left thick lakebed sediments. The lake was dry by the time a series of glaciations in the Pleistocene epoch saw the introduction of large glaciers in the Teton and surrounding ranges. During the coldest ice age these glaciers melded together to become part of the Canadian Ice Sheet, which carried away all soil from Jackson Hole and surrounding basins. Later and less severe ice ages created enough locally-deposited dirt in the form of moraines and till to repair much of this damage. Since then, mass wasting events such as the 1925 Gros Ventre landslide, along with slower forms of erosion, have continued to modify the area. On the floor of the Jackson Hole valley rise several landforms, one of the most conspicuous being Blacktail Butte. The Teton Range is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in North America. ... The Miocene Epoch is a period of time that extends from about 23. ... The Pliocene epoch (spelled Pleiocene in some older texts) is the period in the geologic timescale that extends from 5. ... A glaciation (a created composite term meaning Glacial Period, referring to the Period or Era of, as well as the process of High Glacial Activity), often called an ice age, is a geological phenomenon in which massive ice sheets form in the Arctic and Antarctic and advance toward the equator. ... Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... This article is about geological phenomena. ... Glacial till with tufts of grass Till is an unsorted glacial sediment. ... Mass wasting, also known as mass movement or slope movement, is the geomorphic process by which soil, regolith, and rock move downslope under the force of gravity. ... The Gros Ventre (pronounced GROW-VAUNT) landslide is located in Bridger-Teton National Forest, Wyoming, U.S. The Gros Ventre landslide is 7 miles (10 km) east of Jackson Hole valley and Grand Teton National Park. ... For morphological image processing operations, see Erosion (morphology). ... Jackson Hole is a valley in the U.S. state of Wyoming. ... Blacktail Butte is a mountain landform rising from Jackson Hole Valley within the Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. ...


Biology

Moose in Grand Teton NP near Leigh Lake
Moose in Grand Teton NP near Leigh Lake

Grand Teton National Park and areas adjacent to it host over 1000 species of vascular plants. Whitebark Pine, Limber Pine, Subalpine fir, and Engelmann Spruce survive in Tetons' alpine zone up to around 10,000 feet (~3000 m). Lodgepole Pine, Douglas Fir, and Blue Spruce are found on the valley floor, while the aspens, cottonwoods, alders, and willows commonly inhabit the moist soils along rivers and lakeshores. Download high resolution version (750x653, 125 KB)Photo taken by Daniel Mayer and released under terms of the GNU FDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (750x653, 125 KB)Photo taken by Daniel Mayer and released under terms of the GNU FDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Divisions Non-seed-bearing plants †Rhyniophyta †Zosterophyllophyta Lycopodiophyta †Trimerophytophyta Pteridophyta Superdivision Spermatophyta †Pteridospermatophyta Pinophyta Cycadophyta Ginkgophyta Gnetophyta Magnoliophyta Vascular plants (also known as tracheophytes or higher plants) are those plants that have lignified tissues for conducting water, minerals, and photosynthetic products through the plant. ... Binomial name Pinus albicaulis Engelm. ... Binomial name Pinus flexilis ( var. ... Binomial name Abies lasiocarpa (Hooker) Nuttall The Subalpine Fir (Abies lasiocarpa) is a western North American fir, native to the mountains of Yukon, British Columbia and western Alberta in Canada; southeastern Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, northeastern Nevada, and the Trinity Alps in... Binomial name Picea engelmannii Parry ex Engelm. ... Binomial name Pinus contorta Douglas Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) is a common tree in western North America. ... Species See text Douglas-fir is the common name applied to coniferous trees of the genus Pseudotsuga in the family Pinaceae. ... Binomial name Picea pungens Engelm. ... For other uses, see Aspen (disambiguation). ... Species Populus deltoides L. Populus fremontii [[]] Populus nigra L. This article is about the poplar species. ... Species About 20-30 species, see text. ... Species About 350, including: Salix acutifolia - Violet Willow Salix alaxensis - Alaska Willow Salix alba - White Willow Salix alpina - Alpine Willow Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow Salix arbusculoides - Littletree Willow Salix arctica - Arctic Willow Salix atrocinerea Salix aurita - Eared Willow Salix babylonica - Peking Willow Salix bakko Salix barrattiana...

Forests in the Teton area generally consist of two to three different tree species that grow together in a specific habitat. Edge habitat for various wildlife species is created where these different forest types merge in zones called ecotones. Some animals, such as the Red squirrel, pine marten, and black bear spend a majority of their life in forests. Other animal species, such as moose, elk (also known as the wapiti), and wolves, use the forest for shade and shelter in the day and move to sagebrush dominated areas or meadows to feed in the early mornings and evenings. Download high resolution version (1000x1338, 217 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1000x1338, 217 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... Habitat (which is Latin for it inhabits) is the place where a particular species live and grow. ... For other uses, see Ecotone (disambiguation). ... For the North American red squirrel, see American Red Squirrel. ... Binomial name Martes americana (Turton, 1806) The American Marten (Martes americana) is a North American marten sometimes also called the Pine Marten, even though it is a separate species from the European Pine Marten. ... Binomial name Pallas, 1780 Synonyms Euarctos americanus The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) is the most common bear species native to North America. ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... This article is about red deer. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call...


Soil conditions, the amount of water, slope, aspect, and elevation all help determine where different plant communities grow. Biologists divide the plants of Grand Teton National Park into these communities: forests, sagebrush flats, riparian corridors and wetlands, and alpine areas. Loess field in Germany Surface-water-gley developed in glacial till, Northern Ireland For the American hard rock band, see SOiL. For the System of a Down song, see Soil (song). ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... This article is about a community of trees. ...


Evergreen forests in the area are composed of 7 species of coniferous tree while over 900 flowering plant species dominate the Teton Range below the tree line down to the top of Jackson Hole's moraines. These moraines are composed of compact piles of unsorted rubble that have good clay content and retain moisture better than the quartzite-rich outwash plain, which allows them to support large stands of Lodgepole Pines and many other plants. This article is about plant types. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... In this view of an alpine tree-line, the distant line looks particularly sharp. ... This article is about geological phenomena. ... For other uses, see Clay (disambiguation). ... Quartzite Quartzite (from German Quarzit[1]) is a hard, metamorphic rock which was originally sandstone. ... Binomial name Pinus contorta Douglas Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) is a common tree in western North America. ...

Outwash plain areas are covered in a loose soil that doesn't hold moisture well and is therefore only able to support sparse vegetation such as sagebrush and coarse grasses. Numerous aspens, cottonwoods, and willows grow along in riparian zones outside of the outwash plain. Grasses, sedges, and wildflowers dominate in wet meadows. Download high resolution version (1517x1166, 271 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1517x1166, 271 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Species About 200 species, including: Castilleja chromosa Castilleja coccinea Castilleja miniata Castilleja mutis Castilleja pallida Castilleja is a genus of about 200 species of annual and perennial herbaceous plants in the family Scrophulariaceae, native to the west of the Americas from Alaska south to the Andes, and also northeast Asia. ... Vegetation is a general term for the plant life of a region; it refers to the ground cover provided by plants, and is, by far, the most abundant biotic element of the biosphere. ... Binomial name Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ... Subfamilies There are 7 subfamilies: Subfamily Arundinoideae Subfamily Bambusoideae Subfamily Centothecoideae Subfamily Chloridoideae Subfamily Panicoideae Subfamily Pooideae Subfamily Stipoideae The true grasses are monocotyledonous plants (Class Liliopsida) in the Family Poaceae, also known as Gramineae. ... For other uses, see Aspen (disambiguation). ... Species Populus deltoides L. Populus fremontii [[]] Populus nigra L. This article is about the poplar species. ... For other uses, see Wildflower (disambiguation). ... A meadow is a habitat of rolling or flat terrain where grasses predominate. ...


Coyotes and badgers dig burrows into the loesses, which were blown into the valley between ice ages. High alpine areas of the park support plants that are specially adapted to the harsh conditions. These hardy plants cope with wind, snow, a lack of soil, increased ultraviolet radiation, rapid and dramatic temperature shifts, and a short growing season. Growing close to the ground in mats like the Alpine Forget-me-not is a common adaptation. For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Taxidea taxus (Schreber, 1777) The American Badger, Taxidea taxus, is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European Badger. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Wind (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ultraviolet (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Myosotis alpestris Myosotis alpestris or Alpine Forget-me-not is a plant species of the genus Myosotis. ...


Selected wildlife

Grand Teton National Park is located in the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, one of the largest intact temperate zone ecosystems remaining on the planet. This means that many of the animals in the Teton area travel between the two parks and the numerous adjacent National Forests. Download high resolution version (1200x668, 163 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1200x668, 163 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Binomial name Cygnus buccinator Richardson, 1832 The Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) is the largest native North American swan. ... Greater Yellowstone is the last large, nearly intact ecosystem in the northern temperate zone of the Earth and is partly located in Yellowstone National Park. ... In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ... A coral reef near the Hawaiian islands is an example of a complex marine ecosystem. ... This article is on national forests in the United States. ...


For other uses, see Amphibian (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Dubois, 1984 The Spencers River Tree Frog, Spotted Frog, or Spotted Treefrog (Litoria spenceri) is a species of frog in the Hylidae family. ... Binomial name Pseudacris maculata Agassiz, 1850 The Boreal Chrous Frog, (Pseudacris maculata) is a species of chorus frog native to Canada from the west of Lake Superior to western Alberta and north to the North West Territories. ... Binomial name Bufo boreas The Western toad (Bufo boreas) is a large toad species, between 5. ... Binomial name Ambystoma tigrinum Green, 1825 Subspecies A. tigrinum tigrinum The Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) is a species of Mole Salamander. ... Binomial name (Schreber, 1782) Synonyms Rana pipiens The Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens[1][2], previously Rana pipiens) is a species of Leopard frog from the true frog family native to parts of Canada and United States. ... In biology and ecology, extinction is the ceasing of existence of a species or group of species. ... For other uses, see Bullfrog (disambiguation). ... “Chiroptera” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Bald Eagle range  Resident, breeding Summer visitor, breeding Winter visitor On migration only Star: accidental records Subspecies (Linnaeus, 1766) Southern Bald Eagle (Audubon, 1827) Northern Bald Eagle Synonyms Falco leucocephalus Linnaeus, 1766 The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is a bird of prey found in North America... Binomial name Stellula calliope (Gould, 1847) The Calliope Hummingbird, Stellula calliope, is a very small hummingbird and the smallest bird found in Canada and the United States. ... For other uses, see Golden Eagle (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Osprey (disambiguation). ... Species Centrocercus urophasianus, (Bonaparte, 1827) Centrocercus minimus, (Young et. ... Binomial name Cygnus buccinator Richardson, 1832 The Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) is the largest native North American swan. ... Binomial name Piranga ludoviciana (Wilson, 1811) The Western Tanager, Piranga ludoviciana, is a medium-sized songbird of the Tanager family, Thraupidae. ... Carnivorism redirects here. ... Bears are big and have big ass, thats why bears are hot, and thats why cats are not. ... Binomial name Pallas, 1780 Synonyms Euarctos americanus The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) is the most common bear species native to North America. ... Binomial name Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) The puma (Puma concolor) is a type of large cat found in North, Central and South America. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Trinomial name Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri (Jordan & Gilbert, 1883) Main article: Cutthroat Trout The Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri) is a subspecies of the Cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) and is a freshwater fish in the salmon family (family Salmonidae) of order Salmoniformes. ... Download high resolution version (1757x1207, 601 KB)Picture from Grand Teton National Park, taken by me and scanned. ... Download high resolution version (1757x1207, 601 KB)Picture from Grand Teton National Park, taken by me and scanned. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Antilocapra americana Ord, 1815 Subspecies The Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is the only surviving member of the family Antilocapridae, and the fastest mammal in North America running at speeds of 58 mph (90 km/h). ... For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Rafinesque, 1817) The mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) is a deer whose habitat is in the western half of North America. ... Invertebrate is an English word that describes any animal without a spinal column. ... For other uses, see Spider (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hare (disambiguation). ... Reptilia redirects here. ... Binomial name Charina bottae tHIS PAGE IS DEDICATED TO TULLYS COFFEE AND ONLY TULLYS COFFEE!!!!!!! pEACE OUT:) The Southern Rubber Boa (Charina umbratica) is a closely related species found only in Southern California. ... Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... Binomial name (Audubon and Bachman, 1841) The Yellow-bellied Marmot (Marmota flaviventris), also known as the Rock Chuck, is a ground squirrel in the marmot genus. ... Binomial name Tamias minimus (Bachman, 1839) The Least Chipmunk, Tamias minimus, is a small squirrel-like rodent, the smallest North American member of the chipmunk genus, Tamias. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Muskrat range (native range in red, introduced range in green) The muskrat or musquash (Ondatra zibethicus), the only species in genus Ondatra, is a medium-sized semi-aquatic rodent native to North America, and introduced in parts of Europe, Asia, and South America. ... Binomial name (Erxleben, 1777) The North American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) is one of two species of tree squirrel currently classified in the genus Tamiasciurus and known as pine squirrels (the other is the Douglas squirrel, ). It is a medium sized (200–250g) diurnal mammal that defends a year-round... Binomial name Kennicott, 1863 The Uinta Ground Squirrel, Spermophilus armatus, is a native of the northern Rocky Mountains and surrounding foothills of the United States including Idaho, Montana, Utah, and Wyoming. ...

Panoramic view from Jackson Hole.
Panoramic view of the Grand Teton National Park as seen from the Signal Mountain Road.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 155 pixelsFull resolution (10143 × 1963 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (9546x1182, 2982 KB) Summary Taken by Wing-Chi Poon on 12th June 2004 along the Signal Mountain Road of the Grand Teton National Park. ...

References

This article contains material that originally came from a National Park Service website. According to their site disclaimer, "Information presented on this website, unless otherwise indicated, is considered in the public domain."

  • Geology of National Parks: Fifth Edition, Ann G. Harris, Esther Tuttle, Sherwood D., Tuttle (Iowa, Kendall/Hunt Publishing; 1997) ISBN 0-7872-5353-7
  • National Park Service: Grand Teton National Park (this article includes some public domain text from these NPS webpages) [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]
  • National Park Service Publication: Creation of Grand Teton National Park by Jackie Skaggs
  • Daugherty, John [1999] (2002-09-01). A Place Called Jackson Hole, Crockett, Stephanie; Goetzmann, William H.; Jackson Reynold G., Moose, Wyoming: Grand Teton Natural History Association. ISBN 0931895561. Retrieved on 2007-03-13. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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