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Encyclopedia > Grand Prince

The title Grand Prince (Latin, Magnus Princeps; German, Großfürst, Finnish Suuriruhtinas, Swedish Storfurste, Lithuanian Didysis kunigaikštis, Russian Великий князь Velikii kniaz) ranks in honour below Emperor and Tsar but higher than a sovereign Prince (Fürst) or Royal Prince. A title is a prefix or suffix added to a persons name to signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. ... Latin is the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ... A monarch is a type of ruler or head of state, whos titles and ascention are inherited, not earned, and represents a larger monarchical system which has established rules and customs regarding succession, duties, and powers. ... The term prince (from the Latin princeps), for a member of the highest aristocracy, has fundamentally different meanings - one generic, and several types of titles the female form is princess // Abstract notion The original but least common use is as a GENERIC (descriptive, not formal) term -originating in the application... For Fürst, the German title of nobility that is best translated as Prince, see below. ...


The usual and established translation, in languages which do not have separate words meaning prince for (1) children of a monarch, and (2) monarch (sovereign or like) princes, is Grand Duke. English and French use Grand Duke also in this meaning. (The titles Grand Prince and Grand Duke have however some clearly different meanings.) The title of sovereign Grand Duke and it as translation of Grand Prince thus have clearly different meanings. The term prince (from the Latin princeps), for a member of the highest aristocracy, has fundamentally different meanings - one generic, and several types of titles the female form is princess // Abstract notion The original but least common use is as a GENERIC (descriptive, not formal) term -originating in the application... A monarch is a type of ruler or head of state, whos titles and ascention are inherited, not earned, and represents a larger monarchical system which has established rules and customs regarding succession, duties, and powers. ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ...


Velikiy knjaz (Grand Prince, Grossfurst) is also the Russian courtesy title Velikiy Knjaz (grand prince) of Russia, which from 17th century belonged to members of the family of the Russian tsar, although those Grand Princes were not sovereigns.

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Medieval use

Grand Prince, used in the Slavic and Baltic languages, was the title of a medieval monarch who headed more or less loose confederation whose constituent parts were ruled by lesser princes, and which was at the time usually translated as king. In fact, the Slavic "knjaz" and the Baltic "kunigaitis" (nowadays usually translated as Prince) are cognates of king. However, a grand prince was usually only primus inter pares within a dynasty, other princes of the dynasty were approximately as much entitled to succession as the current ruler (for example, succession was through agnatic seniority or rotation), and often other members of the dynasty ruled the constituent parts. An established use of the title was in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (since 14th century) and the Kievan Rus'. Thus, "Veliki Knjaz" has been more like high king than "grand duke" - at least, originally. As these countries expanded territorially and moved towards primogeniture and centralization, their rulers acquired more elevated titles. The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup of Indo-European languages, have speakers in most of Eastern Europe, in much of the Balkans, in parts of Central Europe, and in the northern part of Asia. ... The Baltic languages are a group of genetically-related languages spoken in the Northern Europe and belonging to the Indo-European language family. ... For other meanings, see Prince (disambiguation). ... A monarch is a type of ruler or head of state, whos titles and ascention are inherited, not earned, and represents a larger monarchical system which has established rules and customs regarding succession, duties, and powers. ... First among equals is a phrase which indicates that a person is the most senior of a group of people sharing the same rank or office. ... In hereditary monarchies, particularly in more ancient or in more underdeveloped times, seniority was a much used principle of order of succession. ... Rotation is the movement of a body in such a way that the distance between a certain fixed point and any given point of that body remains constant. ... The presumable banner of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania with the coat of arms, called Пагоня in Belarusian, Vytis in Lithuanian and Pogoń in Polish Another version of the Lithuanian banner The Grand Duchy of Lithuania (Lithuanian: Lietuvos Didžioji Kunigaikštystė, Belarusian: Вялі́кае Кня́ства Літо́ўскае (ВКЛ), Ukrainian: Велике Князівство Литовське (ВКЛ), Polish: Wielkie Księstwo Litewskie) was an... Kievan Rus′ (Russian: , Kievskaya Rus; Ukrainian: , Kyivs’ka Rus’) was the early, mostly East Slavic¹ state dominated by the city of Kiev (Russian: Ки́ев, Kiev; Ukrainian: Ки́їв, Kyiv), from about 880 to the middle of the 12th century. ... Primogeniture is inheritance by the first-born of the entirety of a parents wealth, estate or office, or in the absence of children, by collateral relatives in order of seniority of the collateral line. ... Centralization is the process by which the activities of an organization, particularly those regarding decision-making, become concentrated within a particular location and/or group. ...


Some of the first rulers of Hungary in the 10th century were grand princes: Geza, and, until his royal coronation, his son and heir Stephen of Hungary. ( 9th century - 10th century - 11th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Géza of Hungary (born around 940-945, died in 997) (possibly Gyécsa in Old Hungarian, Gejza in Slovak), was the fejedelem (ruling prince) of the Magyars from c. ... A statue of Stephen the Great King Stephen the Great or St. ...


Великий князь (Velikiy Kniaz; literally, grand prince) was, starting in the 10th century, the title of the leading Prince of the Kievan Rus', head of the Rurikid House: first the prince of Kiev, and then that of Vladimir starting in the 13th century. Later, several princes of nationally important cities, which comprised vassal appanage principalities, held this title (Grand Princes of Moscow, Tver', Yaroslavl', Ryazan', Smolensk, etc.). From 1328 the Grand Prince of Muscovy appeared as the titular head of all of Russia and slowly centralized power until Ivan IV was crowned as Tsar in 1547. Kniaz’ or knyaz (князь in Russian and Ukrainian; cneaz in Romanian fem. ... ( 9th century - 10th century - 11th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... The term prince (from the Latin princeps), for a member of the highest aristocracy, has fundamentally different meanings - one generic, and several types of titles the female form is princess // Abstract notion The original but least common use is as a GENERIC (descriptive, not formal) term -originating in the application... Kievan Rus′ (Russian: , Kievskaya Rus; Ukrainian: , Kyivs’ka Rus’) was the early, mostly East Slavic¹ state dominated by the city of Kiev (Russian: Ки́ев, Kiev; Ukrainian: Ки́їв, Kyiv), from about 880 to the middle of the 12th century. ... Rurik Dynasty ... Motto: Oblast Municipality Municipal government City council (Київська Міська рада) Mayor Oleksandr Omelchenko Area 800 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 2,642,486 100% 3,299/km² Founded City rights around 5th century 1487 Latitude Longitude 50°27′ N 30°30′ E Area code +380 44 Car plates  ? Twin towns Athens, Brussels, Budapest... Vladimir (Влади́мир) is a city in Russia, administrative center of Vladimir Oblast. ... A vassal or liege, in the terminology that both preceded and accompanied the feudalism of medieval Europe, is one who enters into mutual obligations with a lord, usually of military support and mutual protection, in exchange for certain guarantees, which came to include the terrain held as a fief. ... The system of appanage has greatly influenced the territorial construction of France and explains the flag of many provinces of France. ... Saint Basils Cathedral Moscow (Russian/Cyrillic: Москва́, IPA:   listen?) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva, and encompassing 1097. ... Tver (Russian: Тверь), formerly (1931_1990) Kalinin (Калинин) after Mikhail Kalinin, is a city in Russia, center of Tver Oblast (region). ... Yaroslavl (Russian: ) is a city in Russia, an administrative center of Yaroslavl Oblast, located 250 km NE of Moscow at 57°37′ N 39°51′ E The historical part of the city is located at confluence of Volga and Kotorosl. ... Ryazan (Ряза́нь) is a city in Central Russia federal district, an administrative center of the Ryazan Oblast. ... The view of Smolensk in 1912 Smolensk (Russian: Смоленск;, Belarusian: Смаленск) is a city in western Russia, located on the Dniepr river at 54. ... Events May 1 - Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton - England recognises Scotland as an independent nation after the Wars of Scottish Independence May 12 - Nicholas V is consecrated at St Peters Basilica in Rome by the bishop of Venice. ... This article is about Muscovite Russia. ... Ivan IV (Ivan Vasilyevich) (August 25, 1530–March 18, 1584) was the first ruler of Russia to assume the title of tsar. ... Crowning (Koronatsiya, or the last of the Romanovs), the historical novel by internationally acclaimed Russian detective story writer Boris Akunin. ... Tsar (Bulgarian цар, Russian царь,   listen?; often spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English), was the title used for the autocratic rulers of the First and Second Bulgarian Empires since 913, in Serbia in the middle of the 14th century, and in Russia from 1547 to 1917 (although... Events January 16 - Grand Duke Ivan IV of Muscovy becomes the first Tsar of Russia. ...


The title Didysis kunigaikštis (in Lithuanian) was used by the rulers of Lithuania, and after 1569, it was found among the titles used by the kings of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The Polish kings of the Swedish Vasa dynasty also used this title for their non-Polish territories. However, this Lithuanian title was sometimes latinized as Magnus Dux or Grand Duke. Events January 11 - First recorded lottery in England. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Vasa Coat of Arms The House of Vasa was the Royal House of Sweden (1523-1654) and of Poland (1587-1668). ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ...


In 1582 king John III of Sweden added Grand Prince of Finland to the subsidiary titles of the Swedish kings, however without any factual consequences, Finland already being a part of the Swedish realm. Events January 15 - Russia cedes Livonia and Estonia to Poland February 24 - Pope Gregory XIII implements the Gregorian Calendar. ... John III (Johan III) (December 23, 1537 - November 27, 1592) was King of Sweden from 1568 until his death. ... Grand Duke of Finland, more correctly Grand Prince of Finland, (Finnish: Suomen suuriruhtinas, Swedish: Storfurste av Finland) was a title in use, sometimes sporadically, between 1584 and 1808. ...


After the Russian conquests, the title continued to be used by the Russian Emperor in his role as ruler of Lithuania (1793-1918) and of autonomous Finland (1809-1917) as well. His titulary included also, among other titles, the following: "Grand Duke of Smolensk, Volynia, Podolia", "Lord and Grand Duke of Nizhni Novgorod, Chernigov". 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Grand Duchy of Finland was a state that existed 1809–1917. ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1917 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The view of Smolensk in 1912 Smolensk (Russian: Смоленск;, Belarusian: Смаленск) is a city in western Russia, located on the Dniepr river at 54. ... Volhynia (Wołyń in Polish; Волинь, Volyn’ in Ukrainian; also called Volynia, Volyň in Czech) comprises the historic region in western Ukraine located between the rivers Pripyat and Western Bug. ... Historical arms of Podolia The region of Podolia (Polish: Podole, Ukrainian: Podillya) lies in the west-central and south-west portions of present-day Ukraine that correspond to Khmelnytskyi Oblast and Vinnytsia Oblast. ... Area  - Total 260,000 mi² Population  - City (2003)  - Metropolitan 1,334,249 2 million approx. ... Chernihiv (Чернігів in Ukrainian) is an ancient city in northern Ukraine, the central city of Chernihivska oblast. Some common historical spellings of the name are Polish: Czernichów, and Russian: Чернигов, Chernigov. ...


The Holy Roman Empire ruling house of Habsburg instituted a similar Grand Principality in Transylvania (Siebenburgen) in 1765. This page is about the Germanic empire. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... Transylvania (Romanian: Transilvania or Ardeal, Hungarian: Erdély, German: Siebenbürgen, Serbian: Transilvanija, Turkish: Erdel, Slovak: Sedmohradsko or Transylvánia, Polish: Siedmiogród) forms the western and central parts of Romania. ... 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Modern use

The title Grand Prince (which in many of those lands already was in later grand princely epochs awarded simultaneously to several rulers in the more expanded dynasty) continued as a courtesy title for all or several members of the dynasty, such as the Grand Duke of Russia in Russia's imperial era. The title Velikiy Kniaz, finally formalized by Alexander III, then belonged to sons and grandsons (through male lines) of the Tsars and Emperors of Russia. The daughters and paternal granddaughters of Russian Emperors, as well as the consorts of Russian Grand Dukes, were also accorded the title, in female form ((Velikie knjagin)). Kniaz’ or knyaz (князь in Russian and Ukrainian; cneaz in Romanian fem. ...


A more accurate translation of the Russian title than Grand Duke would be Great Prince—especially in the pre-Petrine era — but the term is neither standard nor widely used in English. In German, however, a Russian Grand Duke was known as a Großfürst, and in Latin as Magnus Princeps. Latin is the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...


In 1800's, that courtesy title use of Russia, expanded because of births of several male dynasts, instead of the earlier precarious situations when Russia barely had only one or two to succeed. A courtesy title is a form of address in the British peerage system used for wives, children, and other close relatives of a peer. ...


The German language (which has separate words for royal prince, "Prinz", and for sovereign prince, "Fürst"), calls the Grand Princes of Lithuania, Russian states and other Eastern European higher princes, as well as the later Russian dynasts, with the term "Großfürst", not with "Großherzog".


Styles and forms of address

A Russian Grand Duke or Grand Duchess in modern times is an Imperial Highness.


Related topics


  Results from FactBites:
 
Grand Prince - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (980 words)
Grand Prince, used in the Slavic and Baltic languages, was the title of a medieval monarch who headed more or less loose confederation whose constituent parts were ruled by lesser princes.
However, a grand prince was usually only primus inter pares within a dynasty, other princes of the dynasty were approximately as much entitled to succession as the current ruler (for example, succession was through agnatic seniority or rotation), and often other members of the dynasty ruled some constituent parts of the monarchy/ country.
From 1328 the Grand Prince of Muscovy appeared as the titular head of all of Russia and slowly centralized power until Ivan IV was crowned as Tsar in 1547.
Grand duchy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1419 words)
Grand Duchy is the appellation of the territory of a sovereign Grand Duke's territory.
Grand Duke is also the usual and established translation of sovereign Grand Prince in languages which do not have separate words meaning prince for (1) the non-ruling relatives of a monarch, and (2) monarch (sovereign or like) princes.
However, a grand prince was usually only primus inter pares within a dynasty, other princes of the dynasty were approximately as entitled to succession as the then ruler (succession was for example through agnatic seniority or rotation), and often other members of the dynasty ruled parts of the same realm as some sort of "sub-princes".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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