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Encyclopedia > Grand Ole Opry

The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. It is the oldest continuous radio program in the United States, having been broadcast on WSM since November 28, 1925. Image File history File links Logo of the Grand Ole Opry from Opry. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Radio broadcasts have been a popular entertainment since the 1910s, though popularity has declined a little in some countries since television became widespread. ... WSM is the callsign of a 50,000 watt AM radio station located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Nickname: Music City Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area    - City 526. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Great American Country (or GAC), is a Nashville, Tennessee-based country music cable television network. ... WSM is the callsign of a 50,000 watt AM radio station located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Contents

History

The Grand Ole Opry started out as the WSM Barn Dance in the new fifth floor radio station studio of the National Life & Accident Insurance Company in downtown Nashville. The featured performer on the first show was Uncle Jimmy Thompson, a fiddler who was then 77 years old. The announcer was program director George D. Hay, known on the air as "The Solemn Old Judge." He was only 30 at the time and was not a judge, but was an enterprising pioneer who launched the Barn Dance as a spin-off of his National Barn Dance program at WLS Radio in Chicago. Some of the bands regularly featured on the show during its early days included the Possum Hunters, the Fruit Jar Drinkers, the Crook Brothers and the Gully Jumpers. They arrived in this order. However, Judge Hay liked the Fruit Jar Drinkers and asked them to appear last on each show because he wanted to always close each segment with "red hot fiddle playing." They were the second band accepted on the "Barn Dance." And, when the Opry began having square dancers on the show, the Fruit Jar Drinkers always played for them. A judge or justice is an official who presides over a court. ... The National Barn Dance was a former country music radio program broadcast in the early period of radio over the facilities of WLS in Chicago, Illinois. ... WLS is a pioneer Chicago radio station. ... This article is about Illinois largest city. ...


In 1926, Uncle Dave Macon, a Tennessee banjo player who had recorded several songs and toured the vaudeville circuit, became its first real star. The name Grand Ole Opry came about in December, 1927. The Barn Dance followed NBC Radio Network's Music Appreciation Hour, which consisted of classical music and selections from grand opera. Their final piece that night featured a musical interpretation of an onrushing railroad locomotive. In response to this Judge Hay quipped, "Friends, the program which just came to a close was devoted to the classics. Doctor Damrosch told us that there is no place in the classics for realism. However, from here on out for the next three hours, we will present nothing but realism. It will be down to earth for the 'earthy'." He then introduced the man he dubbed the Harmonica WizardDeFord Bailey who played his classic train song "The Pan American Blues". After Bailey's performance Hay commented, "For the past hour, we have been listening to music taken largely from Grand Opera. From now on we will present the 'Grand Ole Opry.'" The name stuck and has been used for the program since then. Uncle Dave Macon Uncle Dave Macon (October 7, 1870 - March 22, 1952) was an American farmer, banjo player, singer, songwriter and comedian. ... A four-string banjo For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument of African origin, early or original examples sometimes being called the gourd banjo. One predecessor to the banjo is called the Akonting. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan. ... DeFord Bailey (December 14, 1899 – July 2, 1982) was an early country music star and the first African American performer on the Grand Ole Opry. ...

The home of the Opry
The home of the Opry

As audiences to the live show increased, National Life & Accident Insurance's radio venue became too small to accommodate the hordes of fans. They built a larger studio, but it was still not large enough. The Opry then moved into then-suburban Hillsboro Theatre (now the Belcourt), then to the Dixie Tabernacle in East Nashville and then to the War Memorial Auditorium, a downtown venue adjacent to the State Capitol. A twenty-five cent admission began to be charged, in part an effort to curb the large crowds, but to no avail. In 1943, the Opry moved to the Ryman Auditorium. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1368x900, 992 KB)Grand Ole Opry House, in Nashville, TN. Taken early July, 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1368x900, 992 KB)Grand Ole Opry House, in Nashville, TN. Taken early July, 2005. ... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The Ryman Auditorium The Ryman Auditorium is a 2,362-seat live performance venue located at 116 Fifth Avenue North in Nashville, Tennessee, and is best-known as the one-time home of the Grand Ole Opry. ...


On October 2, 1954, a teenage Elvis Presley made his first (and only) performance there. Although the public reacted politely to his revolutionary brand of rockabilly music, after the show he was told by one of the organizers (Opry manager Jim Denny) that he ought to return to Memphis to resume his truck-driving career, prompting him to swear never to return. Years later, Garth Brooks commented in a television interview that one of the greatest thrills of playing the Opry was that he got to play on the same stage Elvis had. Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The Ryman was home to the Opry until 1974, when the show moved to the 4,400-seat Grand Ole Opry House, located several miles to the east of downtown Nashville on a former farm in the Pennington Bend of the Cumberland River. An adjacent theme park, called Opryland USA, preceded the new Opry House by two years. Due to sagging attendance, the park was shuttered and demolished after the 1997 season by the Opry's current owner, Gaylord Entertainment Company. The theme park was replaced by the Opry Mills Mall. An adjacent hotel, the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center, is the largest non-gambling hotel in North America and is the site of dozens of conventions annually. The Cumberland River is an important waterway in the southern United States. ... Germany Pavilion, part of the Epcot Center theme park in Orlando, Florida Amusement park (also called theme park) is the generic term for a collection of rides and other entertainment attractions assembled for the purpose of entertaining a fairly large group of people. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Gaylord Entertainment Company operates a number of hotel, resort, and media companies. ... One of the entrances to Opry Mills Opry Mills is a shopping mall owned by the Mills Corporation. ... The 4-star Manor House Hotel at Castle Combe, Wiltshire, England. ... Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center, formerly known as Opryland Hotel, is a large hotel and convention center owned by Gaylord Entertainment Company and located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Gambling has had many different meanings depending on the cultural and historical context in which it is used. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ...


Another controversy brewed in 2001 because of MTV. In 1997, CBS signed a five-year contract with the Opry to be the television broadcast home of the event, to air on The Nashville Network, as part of its acquisition of TNN and CMT from Gaylord Entertainment (which owns the Opry). The contract specifically carried a five-year requirement that TNN would be the broadcast home from October 1, 1997 until September 30, 2002.

Grand Ole Opry, December '06
Grand Ole Opry, December '06

Gaylord was very unhappy with MTV Networks after TNN was shut down and replaced with an adult-oriented (now known as Spike TV) channel in 2000, and MTV moved the Opry to CMT in 2001, technically breaking its contract. Gaylord eventually moved the Opry to a rival, GAC, in 2003. Image File history File links Grandoldopryhousewinter. ... Image File history File links Grandoldopryhousewinter. ... GAC may stand for: Generic Artificial Consciousness, the database and software of Mindpixel Global Assembly Cache This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Still, the Opry continues, with hundreds of thousands of fans traveling from around the world to Nashville to see the music and comedy on the Opry in person.


Impact and economics

In many ways, the artists and repertoire of the Opry defined American country music. Hundreds of performers have entertained as cast members through the years, including new stars, superstars and legends. Being made a member of the Grand Ole Opry is to be identified as a member of the elite of country music. Many linked the stripping of Hank Williams' Opry membership in 1952 to his death soon afterward. Hiram Hank King Williams (September 17, 1923 – January 1, 1953) was an American singer, guitarist, and songwriter, who has become an icon of country music and Rock n Roll, and one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. ...

June Carter Cash playing at the Grand Ole Opry. July, 1999.
June Carter Cash playing at the Grand Ole Opry. July, 1999.

The quality of the program has waxed and waned over the years. In the mid-1960s management decided to enforce strictly the requirement that members had to perform on at least twenty-six shows a year in order to keep their membership active. This imposed a tremendous financial hardship on members who made much of their income from touring and could not afford to be in or near Nashville every other weekend. This was aggravated by the fact that the Opry's appearance fee paid to the artist was essentially a token ($44 at the time). Image File history File links Grand_ole_opry_1999. ... Image File history File links Grand_ole_opry_1999. ...


The Opry management was so certain in its belief that only someone who could truthfully bill themselves as a "Member of the Grand Ole Opry" could be considered to be a major country music star that it felt this rule could be enforced; however, by this point many country music artists were so established that this was really no longer true. The quality of the Opry suffered in the years following, and by the late 1970s and early 1980s the Opry was regarded by many country music fans as sort of a musical equivalent of a sports "old-timers' game," where only former stars were to be seen. Over time, this problem was largely corrected by a reduced attendance requirement and special exceptions.


Another controversy that raged for years was over allowable instrumentation, especially the use of drums and electrically amplified instruments. Some purists were appalled at the prospect; traditionally a string bass provided the rhythm component in country music and percussion instruments were generally little used. Electric amplification was regarded as the province of rock and roll, anathema to many country fans, especially older ones. These restrictions chafed many artists, such as Waylon Jennings, who were popular with the newer and younger fans. These restrictions were largely eliminated over time, alienating many older and traditionalist fans, but probably saving the Opry long-term as a viable ongoing enterprise. Drum carried by John Unger, Company B, 40th Regiment New York Veteran Volunteer Infantry Mozart Regiment, December 20, 1863 Several American Indian-style drums for sale at the National Museum of the American Indian. ... Rock and Roll Music is a song written and originally recorded by Chuck Berry which became a hit single in 1957, and was later covered by many artists, notably The Beatles. ... Waylon Arnold Jennings (June 15, 1937 – February 13, 2002) was one of the most respected and influential American country music singers and guitarists of all time. ...


Management has been very conscious of the need to enforce its trademark on the term Grand Ole Opry and limit use to members of the Opry and products associated with or licensed by it. However, it lost a legal case against the owners of a small, now-defunct Nashville record label calling itself Opry Records. The record company's attorneys successfully argued that WSM's management indeed owned the rights to the words Grand Ole Opry, but only in that order and combination, and no more owned the word Opry in isolation than they owned Grand or Ole. A trademark, trade mark, ™ or ®[1] is a distinctive sign of some kind which is used by an organization to uniquely identify itself and its products and services to consumers, and to distinguish the organization and its products or services from those of other organizations. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ...


This has made the management wary about the issue of licensing and trademarks. It has also allowed a plethora of small-time country music shows to label themselves as Oprys of one sort or another, such as the Bell Witch Opry; Ozark Opry, etc. (Much the same thing happened when the Coca-Cola company failed to trademark the term "cola.")


In September 2004, it was announced that the Grand Ole Opry had contracted for the first time with a "presenting sponsor" and would henceforth be known as "the Grand Ole Opry presented by Cracker Barrel." Cracker Barrel, a long-time Opry sponsor headquartered in nearby Lebanon, Tennessee, is a chain of country-themed restaurants and gift shops whose market overlaps with that of the Opry to a great extent. Cracker Barrel Old Country Store, Inc. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ...


Grand Ole Opry Members

Current Members

Deceased Members Trace Adkins Tracy Darrell Trace Adkins (born January 13, 1962) is an American country music singer from Sarepta, Louisiana. ... James William Anderson III (born November 1, 1937 in Columbia, South Carolina) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ... Ernie Ashworth is an American county music singer and longtime star of the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Dierks Bentley (born November 20, 1975 in Phoenix, Arizona) is a country music singer. ... Clint Patrick Black (born February 4, 1962 in Long Branch, New Jersey, USA) is a neotraditional country music singer, songwriter and producer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Browns were an American family singing group from Sparkman, Arkansas made up of Jim Ed Brown (b. ... Roy Clark - March 2002 Roy Linwood Clark (born April 15, 1933 in Meherrin, Virginia) is one of the most versatile and well-known country music musicians and performers. ... Terri Clark (born on August 5, 1968 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian country singer whose career began in the mid-1990s. ... John Conlee (born August 11, 1946) is an American country music singer. ... Wilma Lee Cooper (February 7, 1921 - ) is a Bluegrass-based country music entertainer. ... Diamond Rio performing live This page is about the country band. ... James Cecil Dickens (born December 19, 1920 from Bolt, West Virginia), Hillbilly singers never will come any hillbilly-er than Little Jimmy Dickens. ... Joe Diffie was born Dec. ... Holly Dunn was a country music artist in the late 1980s and early 1990s, who first found fame with the release of her 1986 hit Daddys Hands from her self-titled début album. ... Larry Gatlin (born May 2, 1948 in Seminole, Texas) is an American singer, songwriter, stage actor and author. ... Vince Gill Vince Gill (born April 12, 1957) is an American country music musician, songwriter, and singer. ... Billy Grammer (born William Wayne Grammer on August 28, 1925 in Benton, Illinois) is an American country music singer and noted guitar player. ... Jack Greene Jack Greene (born January 7, 1930) is an American country musician nicknamed the Jolly Green Giant and well known for his 1967 hit There Goes My Everything. ... Tom T. Hall (born May 25, 1936 in Olive Hill, Kentucky) is an American country balladeer and songwriter. ... George Hamilton IV is an American country musician, known across the world for singles like Before This Day Ends and Abilene. He began performing in the late 1950s as a teen idol, only later switching to pop-country, then folk music. ... Emmylou Harris, ca. ... Jan Howard (born Lula Grace Johnson on March 13, 1930 in West Plains, Missouri) was one of the trail-blazing country music female vocalists of the 1960s. ... Alan Eugene Jackson (born October 17, 1958) is an American country music singer and songwriter, who became one of the best-selling country musicians of the 1990s. ... Stonewall Jackson (born November 6, 1932) was a Country musician. ... George Glenn Jones (born September 12, 1931), nicknamed The Possum, is an American country singer known for his distinctive voice and phrasing that frequently evoke the raw emotions caused by grief, unhappy love, and emotional hardship. ... Hal Ketchum (born April 9, 1953) is an American country musician. ... Alison Krauss (born July 23, 1971)[1] is an American bluegrass/country singer and fiddle player. ... Hank Locklin album Hank Locklin (born February 15, 1918 in McLellan, Florida) is a American country music singer and songwriter. ... Charles Elzer Loudermilk, born July 7, 1927 in Henegar, Alabama, is a American country music singer, songwriter best known by the stage name, Charlie Louvin. ... Patty Loveless signing a shirt Patty Loveless (born Patricia Lee Ramey on January 4, 1957 in Pikeville, Kentucky) is an American country music singer. ... Loretta Lynn (born April 14, 1935) is an American country singer who was the leading country female vocalist during much of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Barbara Ann Mandrell (born December 25, 1948 in Houston, Texas) is a Country Music singer, who became one of the most successful Pop-oriented Country music singers of the 1970s and 80s. ... Martina McBride (born Martina Mariea Schiff, July 29, 1966 in Sharon, Kansas) is an American Grammy nominated country music singer. ... Del McCoury Delano Floyd McCoury (born February 1, 1939 in Bakersville, North Carolina) is an American bluegrass musician. ... Mel McDaniel (born September 6, 1942) is an American country music singer. ... Reba Nell McEntire (b. ... Jesse Lester McReynolds, (Born July 9, 1929, in Coeburn, Virginia). ... Ronnie Lee Milsap (born January 16, 1943 in Robbinsville, North Carolina, USA) is an American country music singer and musician with 40 number one hit songs to his credit. ... Loretta Lynn Lorrie Morgan (born on June 27, 1959 in Nashville, Tennessee) is an American country music singer. ... JIMMY C. NEWMAN BIOGRAPHY Jimmy Cajun Newman Jimmy C. Newman, became the first Country singer to become a Grand Ole Opry member when he joined the world famous show in 1956. ... Brad Paisley (born October 28, 1972) is an American country music singer, virtuoso guitarist, and songwriter from Glen Dale, West Virginia. ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is an American Grammy-winning and Academy Award-nominated country singer, songwriter, composer, author, actress, and philanthropist. ... Charley Frank Pride (born March 18, 1938 in Sledge, Mississippi) is a former Negro League baseball player who became one of the very few African Americans to have a successful career in modern country music. ... Jeanne Pruett (born 1937) is an American country singer, probably best known for her 1973 hit Satin Sheets. ... Del Reeves (born July 14, 1933) is a country singer, best known for his girl-watching novelty-type songs of the 1960s. ... Riders in the Sky is a Western music and comedy group which began performing 1977. ... Marilyn Jeanne Seely (born July 6, 1940 in Titusville, Pennsylvania) is a country music singer. ... Ricky Van Shelton (January 12, 1952 in Grit, VA) is a well known country singer best known for his songs Crime of Passion and Ive Cried my Last Tear for You. Category: ... Jean Shepard (born November 21, 1933 in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma) or Ollie Imogene Shepard was one of the first female vocalists in the country music field to become a major star in the early 1950s. ... Ricky Skaggs, April 1988 Ricky Skaggs1st off Skaggs was known to hate everyone he met. ... Connie Smith (born August 14, 1941), born Constance Meador in Elkhart, Indiana, USA, is a country singer, best known for her 1964 hit song Once a Day, and often hailed by music critics as one of the finest voices in Country Music. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Ralph Stanley Ralph Stanley (born in 25 February 1927) is an American bluegrass musician. ... Marty Stuart is an American country musician, known for both his traditional style, and eclecting mergings of rockabilly, honky tonk, and traditional country music. ... Pam Tillis Pam Tillis (born July 24, 1957 in Plant City, Florida) is an American country music singer and actress. ... Randy Travis sings his chart-topping song Three Wooden Crosses, at the DoD-sponsored salute to Korean War veterans at the MCI Center in Washington, July 26, 2003. ... James Travis Tritt (born February 9, 1963) is a successful American country music singer. ... The Porter Wagoner Show, RCA, 1963 Porter Wagoner (born August 12, 1927, in Howell County, Missouri, in the Ozark Mountains) is an American country music singer. ... Steve Wariner Steve Wariner (born December 25, 1954 in Noblesville, Indiana) is a American country music singer, guitarist and songwriter. ... The Whites are an American country music vocal group consisting of Buck White and his daughters Sharon and Cheryl. ... Trisha Yearwood Trisha Yearwood (born September 19, 1964) is a country music singer. ...


The following is an incomplete list of individuals who were Opry members at the time of their death.

Former Members The following is an incomplete list of living and deceased performers who left or resigned from the Opry membership. Roy Acuff on the cover of The Great Roy Acuff (1964) Roy Claxton Acuff (15 September 1903 – 23 November 1992) was an American country musician. ... Boxcar Willie (September 1, 1931 – April 12, 1999; born Lecil Travis Martin) was an American country music singer who sang in the hobo music style. ... Rod Brasfield was an American comedian who was featured at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee, between 1947 and 1958. ... Archie Campbell (born November 7, 1914 in Bulls Gap, Tennessee, died August 29, 1987 in Knoxville, Tennessee) was a writer and star of Hee Haw, a popular long-running country-flavored television variety show. ... Patsy Cline (born Virginia Patterson Hensley September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963) was a Country Music/Pop Music singer, who enjoyed Pop Music cross-over success during the era of the Nashville Sound in the early 1960s. ... Howard Gerald Jerry Clower (born September 28, 1926 in Liberty, Mississippi, died August 24, 1998) was a popular country comedian best known for his stories of the rural South. ... Stoney Cooper (October 16, 1918 - March 22, 1977), was a country musician from Harmon, West Virginia. ... Lloyd Estel Copas (July 15, 1913 – March 5, 1963), better known by his stage name Cowboy Copas, was an American country singer. ... Skeeter Davis Skeeter Davis Skeeter Davis Mary Frances Skeeter Davis (December 30, 1931 – September 19, 2004) was an American country music singer and a member of the Grand Ole Opry radio show for more than 40 years. ... Roy Drusky (June 22, 1930 - September 23, 2004) was a leading country music singer from 1958 into the early 1970s. ... Lester Flatt (June 19, 1914 - May 11, 1979) was one of the pioneers of bluegrass music. ... Donald Eugene Gibson (April 3, 1928 – November 17, 2003) was an American country musician. ... Harold Franklin Hawkins (December 22, 1921 – March 5, 1963), better known by his stage name Hawkshaw Hawkins, was a country music singer and member of the Grand Ole Opry from Huntington, West Virginia. ... Charles David Houston (born December 9, 1938 in Bossier City, Louisiana; died November 30, 1993 in Bossier City) was an American country music singer. ... Grandpa Jones Grandpa Jones (October 20, 1913 – February 19, 1998) was an American banjo player and old time country and gospel music singer. ... Bob Luman (Robert Glynn Luman) (April 15, 1937 - December 27, 1978) was an american country and Rockabilly singer born in Blackjack, Texas. ... Uncle Dave Macon Uncle Dave Macon (October 7, 1870 - March 22, 1952) was an American farmer, banjo player, singer, songwriter and comedian. ... Bill Monroe Bill Monroe (September 13, 1911 - September 9, 1996) developed the style of country music known as bluegrass, which takes its name from his band, the Blue Grass Boys, named for his home state of Kentucky. ... George Morgan (1924 – 1975) was a mid-20th century country music singer. ... Johnny PayCheck 1938 - 2003 Johnny PayCheck (May 31, 1938 – February 18, 2003) was a country music singer. ... Minnie Pearl was the stage name of Sarah Ophelia Colley Cannon (October 25, 1912 - March 4, 1996). ... Jim Reeves is also the name of a competitive eater. ... Tex Ritter Tex Ritter (January 12, 1905 – January 2, 1974) was an American country singer and actor. ... Marty Robbins, (September 26, 1925, Glendale, Arizona - December 8, 1982), was an American Country & Western Hall of Fame musician. ... Johnny Russell (January 23, 1940 – July 3, 2001) was an American countrysinger, songwriter, and comedian famous for his song Act Naturally, which was made famous by Buck Owens and The Beatles. ... Clarence Eugene Snow (May 9, 1914 – December 20, 1999), better known as Hank Snow, was a Hall of Fame country music singer and songwriter. ... David Akeman (June 17, 1915 - November 11, 1973) was an American country music banjo player and comedy musician best known for his role on the hit television show, Hee Haw. ... Ernest Dale Tubb (February 9, 1914 - September 6, 1984), nicknamed the Texas Troubadour, was an American singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of country music. ... Justin Tubb (August 20, 1935 - January 24, 1998 was a Country Music singer and songwriter. ... Billy Walker (29 October 1897 - 28 November 1964) Was a prominent English footballer of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Dottie West, born Dorothy Marie Marsh (October 11, 1932 in McMinnville, Tennessee–September 4, 1991 in Nashville, Tennessee) was a United States country music singer. ... The Wilburn Brothers were a popular country music duet from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... Del Wood was the professional pseudonym used by pianist Polly Adelaide Hendricks Hazelwood (February 22, 1920 - October 3, 1989). ...

Eddy Arnold (May 15, 1918) is an American country music singer. ... DeFord Bailey (December 14, 1899 – July 2, 1982) was an early country music star and the first African American performer on the Grand Ole Opry. ... Bobby Bare Bobby Bare (born Robert Joseph Bare on April 7, 1935 in Ironton, Ohio) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ... Carl (1924-1992) and Pearl (1927-1989) Butler were American country music singers. ... June Carter Cash (born Valerie June Carter) (June 23, 1929 - May 15, 2003), middle daughter of Ezra (Eck) Carter and Maybelle Carter (Mother Maybelle), was a singer, songwriter, a member of the first country music recording stars, the Carter Family, and married to legendary singer Johnny Cash. ... Johnny Cash (born J.R. Cash, February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003) was an influential American country and rock and roll singer and songwriter. ... David L. Cook (b. ... The Original Cook Family Singers, David J Cook and his wife Martha Second Generation Cook Family Singers, L to R Marshall Cook, Clair Cook, Marvin Cook and Betty Cook // The Cook Family Singers, originally formed in 1885, by David J Cook and his wife, Martha. ... The Everly Brothers are a pair of brothers who were top-selling country-influenced rock and roll performers, best known for their acoustic guitar playing and close harmony singing, who had their greatest success in the 1950s. ... Clyde Julian Red Foley ( June 17, 1910 - September 19, 1968) was a country music singer. ... Lefty Frizzell (March 31, 1928 – July 19, 1975) was a country music singer and songwriter. ... Goldie Hill (January 11, 1933- February 24, 2005), born Angolda Voncile Hill in Karnes City, Texas was a country singer. ... Sonny James (born James Loden on May 1, 1929 in Hackleburg, Alabama) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ... The Jordanaires are an American singing group formed in 1948 in Springfield, Missouri. ... Pee Wee King, born Julius Frank Anthony Kuczynski (February 18, 1914 – March 7, 2000), was an American country music songwriter and recording artist. ... Bradley Kincaid (July 13, 1895 - September 23, 1989) was a folk singer. ... Lonzo and Oscar is a music group consisting of Lloyd George and Rollin Sullivan, best known for being the first to perform the song Im my Own Grandpa. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Rose Maddox (August 15, 1926 in Boaz, Alabama - April 16, 1998 in Ashland, Oregon) was an American country singer. ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American entertainer and songwriter, born and raised in Abbott, Texas. ... Norma Jean Beasler (Pretty Miss Norma Jean), born January 30, 1938 in Wellston, Oklahoma, recorded and sang professionally simply as Norma Jean. She had her own radio show in Oklahoma as a teenager and first attracted national attention on Red Foleys Ozark Jubilee television series in 1958. ... Webb Pierce (born August 8, 1921 - died February 24, 1991), was an American country music singer. ... Ray Price (born January 12, 1926) is an American country and western singer. ... Earl Scruggs Earl Eugene Scruggs (born January 6, 1924 in Shelby, North Carolina) created a banjo style (now called Scruggs style) that is one of the defining characteristics of bluegrass. ... Note: This article is about a musician. ... Texas Ruby, born Ruby Agnes Owens (June 4, 1910 (some sources say 1907 or 1908) - March 29, 1963) in Wise County, Texas was a pioneering country music female vocalist of the 1930s through the early 1960s. ... Billy Joe Thomas (born August 7, 1942) is an Oklahoma-born country singer. ... Hank Thompson can refer to different people: Hank Thompson was a baseball player in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Leroy Van Dyke (born October 4, 1929) is billed as The worlds most famous auctioneer. ... Kitty Wells Kitty Wells (born Muriel Deason on August 30, 1919) is an American country musician from Nashville, Tennessee, known from about 1955 as the Queen of Country Music. ... Slim Whitman (born January 20, 1924 in Tampa, Florida) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ... Don Williams Don Williams is a country music singer and songwriter born May 27, 1939, in Floydada, Texas. ... Hiram Hank King Williams (September 17, 1923 – January 1, 1953) was an American singer, guitarist, and songwriter, who has become an icon of country music and Rock n Roll, and one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. ... “Lady” Marion Worth was an American singer who appeared for many years on the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee, and was one of the first country singers to appear at New York’s Carnegie Hall. ... Singer/songwriter Johnnie Wright (born Johnnie Robert Wright, Jr. ... Tammy Wynette (May 5, 1942 – April 6, 1998) was a country singer and songwriter. ... Faron Young (born February 25, 1932 near Shreveport, Louisiana, died December 10, 1996) was an American country music singer. ...

See also

The Country Music Association (CMA) was founded in 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ...

References

  • Hay, George D. A Story of the Grand Ole Opry. 1945.
  • Wolfe, Charles K. A Good-Natured Riot: The Birth of the Grand Ole Opry. Nashville: Country Music Foundation Press, 1999. ISBN 0-8265-1331-X.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Grand Ole Opry (261 words)
Minnie Pearl and Roy Acuff onstage at the Grand Ole Opry, 1987
He joked that the audience had been listening to grand opera, but from then on the station would be presenting "the grand ole opry." The name stuck and has been used ever since.
The Grand Ole Opry is the longest-running live radio program in the world.
Grand Ole Opry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1307 words)
The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network.
The quality of the Opry suffered in the years following, and by the late 1970s and early 1980s the Opry was regarded by many country music fans as sort of a musical equivalent of a sports "old-timers' game," where only former stars were to be seen.
Wolfe, Charles K. A Good-Natured Riot: The Birth of the Grand Ole Opry.
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