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Encyclopedia > Grand Bahama
Grand Bahama from space, June 1998
Grand Bahama from space, June 1998
Map of Bahamas

Grand Bahama is one of the northernmost of the islands of the Bahamas, and the closest major island to the United States, lying just 55 mi (90 km) off the coast of the state of Florida. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (639x639, 125 KB)Grand Bahama Island, Bahamas - June 1998 image description here File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (639x639, 125 KB)Grand Bahama Island, Bahamas - June 1998 image description here File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Map of the Bahamas. ... Official language(s) English Capital Largest city Tallahassee Jacksonville Area  - Total   - Width   - Length    - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 22nd 65,794 sq mi  170,451 km² 162 miles  260 km 497 miles  800 km 17. ...


The island's earliest known inhabitants were the Stone Age hunter-gatherer Siboney Indians, of whom little evidence remains apart from artifacts such as ornamentative shells or jewellery. These primitive people eventually disappeared to be replaced by the Taino Arawaks from South America, who travelling in dugout canoes eventually colonized most of the Caribbean. The Arawak communities on Grand Bahama, who became known as Lucayans (a name that lives on in the popular tourist town of Port Lucaya) were believed to have advanced and well-organized social and political structures, and there were estimated to be approximately 4,000 on Grand Bahama at the time of the arrival of the Spanish Conquistadors in 1492. This arrival, and the subsequent claim of the island by Spain shortly after, eventually caused the Lucayans to disappear from Grand Bahama entirely, whether dying through the spreading of European diseases, through the frequent European genocides, or being captured as slaves (usually to mine for gold in the larger Caribbean islands of Hispaniola or Cuba, or to dive for pearls in Trinidad). The disappearance of the Lucayans was rapid, and it is probably for this reason little is known beyond rough estimates about their society. However, in sites such as the Lucayan National Park and Dead Man's Reef there have been numerous artifacts discovered including animal bones, pottery shards, shell beads and evidence of a complex burial system. Stone Age fishing hook. ... In anthropology, the hunter-gatherer way of life is that led by certain societies of the Neolithic Era based on the exploitation of wild plants and animals. ... The Taíno are the pre-Hispanic Amerindian inhabitants of the Greater Antilles, which includes Cuba, Hispaniola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic), Puerto Rico, Jamaica and the Bahamas. ... The Arawakan languages are an indigenous language family of South America and the Caribbean. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Canoe at El Nido, Philippines A canoe is a relatively small human-powered boat. ... Central America and the Caribbean (detailed pdf map) The Caribbean, (Spanish: Caribe; French: Caraïbe or more commonly Antilles; Dutch: Cariben or Caraïben, or more commonly Antillen) or the West Indies, is a group of islands and countries which are in or border the Caribbean Sea which lies on... Conquistador (Spanish: kōn-kÄ“-stŏ-dōr) (meaning Conqueror in the Spanish language) is the term used to refer to the soldiers, explorers, and adventurers who brought much of the Americas and Asia Pacific under Spanish colonial rule between the 15th and 17th centuries, starting with the 1492 settlement... 1492 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A disease is any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. ... Genocide has been defined as the deliberate killing of people based on their ethnicity, nationality, race, religion, or (sometimes) politics, as well as other deliberate actions leading to the physical elimination of any of the above categories. ... General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Atomic mass 196. ... Early map of Hispaniola The island of Hispaniola (from Spanish, La Española) is the second-largest island of the Antilles, lying east of Cuba. ... Trinidad (Spanish, Trinity) is the largest and most populous of the 23 islands which make up the country of Trinidad and Tobago. ...


The Spanish gave the island the name Gran Bajamar, meaning "Great Shallows", and what the eventual name of the Bahamas islands as a whole is derived from. Grand Bahama's existence for almost two centuries was largely governed by the nature of these "great shallows" - the coral reefs surrounding the island were treacherous, and repelled its Spanish owners (who largely left it alone apart from for infrequent en-route stops by ships for provisions) while attracting pirates, who would lure ships onto the reefs where they would run aground and be plundered. The Spaniards took little interest in the island after enslaving the native Lucayan inhabitants, and the islands were claimed by Great Britain in 1670. Piracy continued to thrive for at least half a century after the British takeover, though the problem was eventually brought under control. Grand Bahama was to remain relatively quiet until the mid-nineteenth century, with only around 200-400 regular inhabitants in the capital, West End. Part of a coral reef. ... The Lucayan were those Arawak which inhabited the Bahamas at the time of Christopher Columbus landing. ... 1670 was a common year beginning on a Saturday in countries using the Julian calendar and a Wednesday in countries using the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1834, the towns of Pinder’s Point, Russell Town and Williams Town were established by former Bahamian slaves after the abolition of slavery in the British empire. The island was still little developed until a brief boom in economic activity during the American Civil War, when it was a center for blockade runners smuggling goods (mostly weaponry, sugar and cotton) to the Confederacy. A second brief smuggling boom occurred during the years of prohibition in the USA. 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... About five miles from Freeport/Lucaya is Williams Town, a sleepy community nestled in pine trees and resting on what Bahamians call generation land -- land that is settled by a single family then passed on to its descendants. ... It has been suggested that Chattel slavery be merged into this article or section. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Combatants Union (remaining U.S. states) Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln† Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 94,000 Total dead: 258,000 Wounded: 137,000+  The... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861–May 1... Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ...


By the middle of the 20th century, Grand Bahama's population numbered around 500 and the island was one of the least developed of the Bahamas islands. However the island finally gained a stable source of income when in 1955 a Virginian financier named Wallace Groves arranged terms with the Bahamian government to build the city of Freeport. Seeing the success of Cuba as a tourist destination for wealthy Americans, Groves was eager to develop Grand Bahama in a similar vein. The city grew rapidly, with Groves adding a harbour soon after the city was founded, and adding the tourist center of Port Lucaya in 1962. Freeport became the second most populous city in the Bahamas (over 50,000 in 2004), and the tourists that it attracts are now the mainstay of the island's economy. Grand Bahama's tourism sector is complemented by an oil bunkering facility owned by the Venezuelan Government and a transhipment port owned by Hong Kong conglomerate Hutchison Whampoa. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 320 km 690 km 7. ... Freeport is a city and free trade zone on the island of Grand Bahama, located approximately 100 mi (160 km) east-northeast of Fort Lauderdale, South Florida and gives its name to a district of the Bahamas. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... More than 3 million tourists visited the Taj Mahal (India) in 2004. ... Hutchison Whampoa Limited (HWL, 和記黃埔有限公司), SEHK: 0013, of Hong Kong, is one of the largest companies listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. ...


West End, which was until the rise of Freeport the capital of Grand Bahama, is the oldest city and Western most settlement on the island. McLeans Town is the eastern most settlement and a 30 minute ferry ride from the northernmost settlement of the Island of Abaco. The Abaco islands lie in the northern Bahamas and comprise the main islands of Great Abaco and Little Abaco, together with the smaller Wood Cay, Green Turtle Cay, Great Guana Cay, Gorda Cay, Elbow Cay, Man-o-War Cay, Strangers Cay, Umbrella Cay, Walkers Cay and Mores Island. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Grand Bahama - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (559 words)
Grand Bahama is one of the northernmost of the islands of the Bahamas, and the closest major island to the United States, lying just 55 mi (90 km) off the coast of the state of Florida.
By the middle of the 20th century, Grand Bahama's population numbered around 500 and the island was one of the least developed of the Bahamas islands.
Grand Bahama's tourism sector is complemented by an oil bunkering facility owned by the Venezuelan Government and a transhipment port owned by Hong Kong conglomerate Hutchison Whampoa.
Historical Sources for Grand Bahama (452 words)
Grand Bahama in 1887 from L. Powles The Land of the Pink Pearl or Recollections of Life in the Bahamas.
Grand Bahama in 1926 from Mary Mosley The Bahamas Handbook.
Grand Bahama in 1931 from Nassau and the Treasure Islands of the Bahamas
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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