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Encyclopedia > Gram Parsons
Gram Parsons
Birth name Ingram Cecil Connor III
Born November 5, 1946(1946-11-05)
Winter Haven, Florida, U.S.
Origin Waycross, Georgia, U.S.
Died September 19, 1973 (aged 26)
Yucca Valley, California
Genre(s) Country rock
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter, Guitarist, Pianist
Instrument(s) Vocals, Guitar, Piano
Years active 1963 - 1973
Label(s) Reprise, A&M
Associated acts International Submarine Band
The Byrds
The Flying Burrito Brothers

Gram Parsons (November 5, 1946September 19, 1973) was an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and pianist. A solo artist as well as a member of the International Submarine Band, The Byrds and The Flying Burrito Brothers, he is best known for a series of recordings that anticipated the so-called country rock of the 1970s and the alt-country movement that began around 1990. Parsons described his records as "Cosmic American Music". He died of a drug overdose at the age of 26. In 2004, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked him #87 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[1] is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Winter Haven is a city in Polk County, Florida, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Waycross is a city in Ware County, Georgia, United States. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Joshua Tree is a census-designated place located in San Bernardino County, California. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the geological term, see Country rock (geology). ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... For the UK magazine, see Guitarist (magazine). ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Pianoforte redirects here. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Reprise Records is an American record label, owned by Warner Music Group, operated through Warner Bros. ... A&M redirects here. ... The International Submarine Band was formed by country-rock music groundbreaker Gram Parsons. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... Cover of The Gilded Palace of Sin (1969) The Flying Burrito Brothers was an early country rock band, best known for its influential debut album, 1969s The Gilded Palace of Sin. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... For the UK magazine, see Guitarist (magazine). ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... The International Submarine Band was formed by country-rock music groundbreaker Gram Parsons. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... Cover of The Gilded Palace of Sin (1969) The Flying Burrito Brothers was an early country rock band, best known for its influential debut album, 1969s The Gilded Palace of Sin. ... For the geological term, see Country rock (geology). ... Alternative country can refer to several ideas. ... The term drug overdose (or simply overdose) describes the ingestion or application of a drug or other substance in quantities greater than are recommended or generally practiced. ... This article is about the music magazine. ...

Contents

Biography

1946–1968

Parsons was born Ingram Cecil Connor III in Winter Haven, Florida, the grandson of citrus fruit magnate John A. Snively, with extensive properties both there and in Waycross, Georgia, where Parsons was raised. A sister, "Little" Avis, soon followed. His father, "Coon Dog" Connor, suffered mood swings and abruptly committed suicide two days before Christmas Day 1958. Parsons' mother, Avis, subsequently married Bob Parsons, whose surname was adopted by young Ingram, the elder Parsons going as far to have new birth certificates drawn up for his stepson and stepdaughter. Henceforth he would be known as Gram Parsons. Parsons attended the prestigious Bolles School in Jacksonville, Florida. For a time, the family found a stability of sorts until Avis rapidly descended into alcoholism, leading to her death from cirrhosis. Winter Haven is a city in Polk County, Florida, United States. ... For other uses, see Citrus (disambiguation). ... Waycross is a city in Ware County, Georgia, United States. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... The Bolles School of Jacksonville, Florida, United States, was founded as an all-boys military academy in 1933 by Agnes Cain Painter, a friend of philanthropist Richard J. Bolles. ... Jacksonville redirects here. ... Cirrhosis is a consequence of chronic liver disease characterized by replacement of liver tissue by fibrotic scar tissue as well as regenerative nodules, leading to progressive loss of liver function. ...


As his family disintegrated around him, Parsons developed strong musical interests, particularly after seeing Elvis Presley perform in concert in 1957. Five years later, while barely in his teens, he played in rock and roll cover bands such as the Pacers and the Legends, headlining in clubs owned by his stepfather in the Winter Haven/Polk County area. By the age of 16 he graduated to folk music, and in 1963 he teamed with his first professional outfit, the Shilos. Heavily influenced by the Kingston Trio and the Journeymen,[1] the band played hootenannies, coffee houses and high school auditoriums. Forays into New York City's Greenwich Village included appearances at The Bitter End. Elvis redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Folk song redirects here. ... The Kingston Trio is an American folk group, perhaps the single most prominent one. ... Hootenanny was originally an old country word for party. The concept of a hootenanny as a gathering for folk singing was created by Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie as a way to raise rent for their Greenwich Village, New York apartment. ... A Street Cafe, Jerusalem, Henry Fenn (1838- ): steel engraving in Picturesque Palestine, ca 1875 A coffeehouse, coffee shop, or caf shares some of the characteristics of a bar, and some of the characteristics of a restaurant. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... The Bitter End is arguably the most famous nightclub in New York Citys Greenwich Village. ...


After the band folded he attended Harvard University, studying theology but departing after a semester. Despite being from the South, he became serious about country music during his time in Boston, Massachusetts after hearing Merle Haggard for the first time. In 1966, he and others from the Boston folk scene formed the International Submarine Band. The band relocated to Los Angeles the following year, and in 1968 released the album Safe at Home, which contains one of his best-known songs, "Luxury Liner", as well as an early version of "Do You Know How It Feels", which he would reprise on the first Flying Burrito Brothers album. But Parsons had already moved on to bigger things by the time of the album's release. Harvard redirects here. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Merle Ronald Haggard (born April 6, 1937) is an American country music singer, guitarist and songwriter. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... The International Submarine Band was a country-rock group led by a 21-year old Gram Parsons. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... // January 4 - Guitarist Jimi Hendrix is jailed by Stockholm police, after trashing a hotel room during a drunken fist fight with bassist Noel Redding. ... Safe At Home was the 1968 album by The International Submarine Band, led by the 21-year-old Gram Parsons. ...


1968–1970

By 1968 Parsons had come to the attention of Chris Hillman of The Byrds, who, depleted by the firing of David Crosby and the departure of Gene Clark, were seeking new members. Originally conceived by band leader Roger McGuinn as a history of twentieth-century music, beginning with traditional country, taking in jazz, R&B, and rock, and ending with the most advanced (for the time) form of electronic wizardry, Sweetheart of the Rodeo was their only album with Parsons. Contrary to what is often claimed, Parsons was never an official member of The Byrds. As Chris Hillman recalls, "Gram was hired. He was not a member of The Byrds, ever — he was on salary" [2]. Nonetheless, as recording plans were made, Parsons (originally hired as a jazz pianist) began to exert a tremendous influence over the group, persuading the other members to leave Los Angeles and record the album in Nashville. Along the way McGuinn's original album concept was jettisoned in favor of a fully fledged country and western project, and included Parsons' songs such as "One Hundred Years from Now" and "Hickory Wind", along with compositions by Bob Dylan and Merle Haggard. However, owing to contractual issues, most of Parsons' vocals were removed from the final product. While touring with The Byrds in the summer of 1968, Parsons dropped out of a planned concert in South Africa, citing opposition to that country's apartheid policies, upon the persuasion of Keith Richards. McGuinn and Hillman subsequently fired him from the tour. Chris Hillman on the cover of his album The Other Side (2005) Chris Hillman (born Christopher Hillman December 4, 1944, in Los Angeles, California), was one of the original members of The Byrds (1965) with Roger McGuinn, Gene Clark, David Crosby, and Michael Clarke. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... David Van Cortlandt Crosby (born August 14, 1941) is an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. ... For other uses, see Gene Clark (disambiguation). ... James Roger McGuinn (known professionally as Roger McGuinn and born James Joseph McGuinn III on July 13, 1942) is a popular rock American singer-songwriter and guitarist of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... R&B redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Sweetheart of the Rodeo is an album by American country rock band The Byrds, released on July 29, 1968 (see 1968 in music). ... Chris Hillman on the cover of his album The Other Side (2005) Chris Hillman (born Christopher Hillman December 4, 1944, in Los Angeles, California), was one of the original members of The Byrds (1965) with Roger McGuinn, Gene Clark, David Crosby, and Michael Clarke. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Nashville redirects here. ... Hickory Wind is a song credited to country rock pioneer, Gram Parsons, and former International Submarine Band mate Bob Buchanan. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Merle Ronald Haggard (born April 6, 1937) is an American country music singer, guitarist and songwriter. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer, producer and founding member of The Rolling Stones. ...


During this period Parsons became friendly with Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones. It has been suggested that Parsons was mostly apolitical and merely took advantage of an opportunity to hang out with his idols, although he did refer to one of the younger African-American butlers in the Connor household as being "like a brother" to him in an interview and did not seem to exhibit racist behavior. While in England, Parsons developed a close kinship with Richards and reintroduced him to country music. Sitting around for hours, the twosome would play obscure records and trade off on various songs with their guitars. They even traveled together on a few occasions to Stonehenge (with Chris Hillman and Roger McGuinn) in the English countryside of Wiltshire, where Richards had a house quite near to the ancient site. Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer, producer and founding member of The Rolling Stones. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... For other uses, see Stonehenge (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Wilshire. ...


Parsons was widely rumored to have been the author of "Honky Tonk Women" and added credence to this in interviews and in discussions with friends by claiming to have developed the acoustic guitar and fiddle dominated arrangement of the song included on Let It Bleed as "Country Honk". Nevertheless, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards have always claimed that they conceived the traditional country arrangement while on holiday in Brazil in late 1968. As this vacation came on the heels of Parsons' initial visits with the Stones, it could be assumed that he was at least an indirect influence upon this new musical direction. Incidentally, partial authorship for the song has also been attributed to the likes of Ry Cooder (who introduced Richards to the trademark open five string tunings that would become nearly synonymous with his style) and the disintegrating Brian Jones. Honky Tonk Women was a 1969 hit song by the Rolling Stones. ... A steel string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar descended from the classical guitar, but strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. ... “Fiddler” redirects here. ... This article is about the 1969 album by The Rolling Stones. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Honky Tonk Women. ... Ryland Ry Peter Cooder (born 15 March 1947, in Los Angeles, California) is an American guitarist, singer and composer, known for his slide guitar work, his interest in the American roots music and, more recently, for his collaborations with traditional musicians from many countries. ... For other persons named Brian Jones, see Brian Jones (disambiguation). ...


After becoming good friends with Dewey Cox through a road trip he had gone on with a few friends, Dewey and Gram Became lovers. Parsons divorced his wife for Cox. By this time Dewey was heavily into drugs aswell as Parsons leaving their relationship in the dust. Cox and Dewey split up in 69.


Returning to Los Angeles, Parsons was soon joined by Hillman (both as rhythm guitarists), and the two formed the Flying Burrito Brothers with bassist Chris Ethridge and pedal steel player Sneaky Pete Kleinow. Their 1969 album The Gilded Palace Of Sin was a modernized version of the Bakersfield style of country music made popular by Buck Owens, and the band appeared on the album cover wearing Nudie suits emblazoned with all sorts of hippie accoutrements. Along with the Parsons-Hillman originals "Christine's Tune" and "Hot Burrito #2" were versions of the soul music classics "The Dark End of the Street" and "Do Right Woman", the latter featuring David Crosby on high harmony. Most of the songs on the album were composed by Hillman and Parsons in a creatively fertile period when the latter's drug intake noticeably decreased; the atypically pronounced (for Parsons) gospel soul influence likely comes from his frequent jamming with Delaney and Bonnie and Richards. Cover of The Gilded Palace of Sin (1969) The Flying Burrito Brothers were an early country rock band, best known for their massively influential debut album, 1969s The Gilded Palace of Sin. ... Pedal steel guitar (also called Steel Guitar) is a type of guitar, and a method of playing the instrument. ... Sneaky Pete Kleinow Sneaky Pete Kleinow (born August 20, 1934 in South Bend, Indiana, died January 6, 2007 in California) was an American country-rock musician, songwriter, and a motion picture special effects artist. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The Gilded Palace of Sin is an album by the country rock group The Flying Burrito Brothers, released in 1969. ... The Bakersfield sound was a genre of country music developed in the mid- to late 1950s in and around Bakersfield, California, at bars such as The Blackboard. ... Alvis Edgar Buck Owens, Jr. ... Gram Parsons wearing a Nudie Suit Nudie Cohn (December 15, 1902 – May 9, 1984) was a Ukrainian-American tailor, known for designing rhinestone-covered, and other elaborate outfits, to be worn by celebrities. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... The Dark End of the Street is a 1967 soul song written by Dan Penn and Chips Moman and first performed by James Carr. ... Delaney and Bonnie & Friends was a group started by Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett, which featured the elite session artists of the day, such as Carl Radle, Jim Price, Bobby Keys, Rita Coolidge, Bobby Whitlock, Jim Gordon, Leon Russell, Dave Mason and revolving guest lead guitarists which would include Eric Clapton...


Though not a commercial success, Gilded was acclaimed by rock critic Robert Christgau as "an ominous, obsessive, tongue-in-cheek country-rock synthesis, absorbing rural and urban, traditional and contemporary, at point of impact." The album was recorded without a permanent drummer, but the group soon added original Byrd Michael Clarke on drums. Embarking on a cross-country tour via train, as Parsons suffered from periodic bouts of fear of flying, the group squandered most of their money in a perpetual poker game and received bewildered reactions in most cities. Parsons was frequently indulging in massive quantities of psilocybin and cocaine, so his performances were erratic at best, while much of the band's repertoire consisted of vintage honky tonk and soul standards with few originals. Perhaps the most successful appearance occurred in Philadelphia, where the group opened for the reconstituted Byrds. Midway through their set, Parsons joined the headline act and fronted his former group on renditions "Hickory Wind" and "You Don't Miss Your Water". The other Burritos surfaced with the exception of Clarke, and the joint aggregation played several songs. including "Long Black Veil" and "Goin' Back". Music journalism is a specialized branch of entertainment journalism--especially criticism and reportage about music, usually rock, but also hip hop, classical, and electronica, among other forms. ... Robert Christgau (born April 18, 1942), is an American essayist, music journalist, and the self-declared Dean of American Rock Critics.[1] In print, his name is sometimes abbreviated as Xgau. ... Michael Clarke may refer to: Michael Clarke (cricketer) Michael Clarke (musician) Michael Clarke Duncan, U.S. actor This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Fear of flying (disambiguation). ... Psilocybin (also known as psilocybine) is a psychedelic alkaloid of the tryptamine family, found in psilocybin mushrooms. ... For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... Honky tonk was originally the name of a type of bar common throughout the southern United States, also Honkatonk or Honkey-tonk. ...


After returning to Los Angeles the group recorded "The Train Song", written during an increasingly infrequent songwriting session on the train and produced by 1950s R&B legends Larry Williams and Johnny "Guitar" Watson. Despite a request from the Burritos that the remnants of their publicity budget be diverted to promotion of the single, it also flopped. Ethridge, who lacked total commitment to Parsons' musical vision and often indulged in drugs and drink on a level surpassing the guitarist, departed shortly thereafter. He was replaced by lead guitarist Bernie Leadon, while Hillman reverted to bass. // [] // ... Johnny Guitar Watson (February 3, 1935 - May 17, 1996) was an American musician whose long career influenced the development of blues, soul music, rhythm & blues, funk, rock music, and rap music. ... Bernard Leadon (born July 19, 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American musician, best known as a founding member of the Eagles, an American rock band. ...


By this time, Parsons's own use of drugs had increased to the extent that new songs were rare and much of his time was diverted to partying with the Stones, who briefly relocated to America in the summer of 1969 to finish their forthcoming Let It Bleed and prepare for an autumn cross country tour, their first series of regular live engagements since 1967. As they prepared to play the nation's largest sports arenas, the Burritos played to dwindling nightclub audiences; one night Jagger had to literally order Parsons to fulfill an obligation with his group. Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational purposes rather than for work, medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ...


The singer's dedication to the Rolling Stones was rewarded when the Burrito Brothers were booked as the opening act of the infamous Altamont Music Festival. Playing a short set including "Six Days on the Road" and "Bony Moronie", Parsons left on one of the final helicopters and attempted to pick up Michelle Phillips. "Six Days..." was included in Gimme Shelter, a documentary of the event. DVD cover of Gimme Shelter, the documentary film of the Altamont Music Festival The Altamont Free Concert was a famous rock music festival held on December 6, 1969. ... Michelle Phillips, far right, with her fellow band members when with The Mamas & the Papas in the late 1960s. ... Gimme Shelter is a 1970 documentary film directed by Albert and David Maysles and Charlotte Zwerin, chronicling the Rolling Stones 1969 US tour, which culminated in the disastrous Altamont Free Concert. ...


With mounting debt incurred, A&M hoped to recoup some of their losses by marketing the Burritos as a straight country group. To this end, manager Jim Dickinson instigated a loose session where the band recorded several honky tonk staples from their live act, contemporary pop covers in a countrified vein ("To Love Somebody", "Lodi", "I Shall Be Released", "Honky Tonk Women"), and Larry William's "Bony Moronie". This was soon scrapped in favor of a second album of originals on an extremely reduced budget. Faced with a dearth of new material, most of the material was hastily written in the studio by Leadon, Hillman, and Parsons, with two Gilded Palace of Sin outtakes thrown into the mix. The resulting album, entitled Burrito Deluxe, was released in April 1970. Burrito Deluxe is the second album by the country rock group The Flying Burrito Brothers, released in 1970. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The album is considered less inspired than its predecessor, but it is notable for the Parsons-Hillman-Leadon song "Older Guys" and for its take on Jagger and Richards' "Wild Horses"—the first recording released of this famous song. Parsons was inspired to cover the song after hearing an advance tape of the Sticky Fingers sent to Kleinow, who was scheduled to overdub a part on the song. Jagger consented to the cover version, so long as the Flying Burrito Brothers did not issue it as a single. // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ...


Burrito Deluxe, like its predecessor, underperformed commercially but faced the double whammy of being lambasted by critics. Disenchanted with the band, he left the Burritos in mutual agreement with Hillman, at his wits' end after two years of babysitting Parsons. Under his direction, the group recorded two more LPs.


1970–1972

Parsons immediately signed a solo deal with A&M Records and partnered with producer/scenester Terry Melcher, who had produced The Byrds' Mr. Tambourine Man and worked with The Beach Boys. With a mutual penchant for alcohol, cocaine, and (by this juncture) heroin, the sessions were unproductive and found the singer in a holding pattern of covering country hits and himself ("Hot Burrito #1"). Eventually losing interest altogether, he checked the master tapes out in 1971. He accompanied the Stones on their 1971 tour in the hope of being signed to the newly formed Rolling Stones Records, intending to record a duo album with Richards. Moving into Villa Nellcôte with the guitarist during the sessions for Exile on Main Street, Parsons remained in a consistently incapacitated state and frequently quarreled with his much younger girlfriend, aspiring actress Gretchen Burrell. Eventually, Parsons was asked to leave by Anita Pallenberg, Richards' longtime domestic partner. Rumors have persisted that he appears somewhere on the legendary album, and while Richards concedes that it is very likely he is among the chorus of singers on "Sweet Virginia", nothing has been substantiated to this day. Parsons attempted to rekindle his relationship with the band on their 1972 tour to no avail. A&M redirects here. ... Album cover for Melchers eponymous album (1974) Terry Melcher (February 8, 1942 – November 19, 2004) was an American musician and record producer. ... Mr. ... The Beach Boys is an American rock and roll band. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... Rolling Stones Records is the record label formed by The Rolling Stones in 1970, after their recording contract with Decca Records expired. ... Exile on Main St. ... Anita Pallenberg (born January 25, 1944 in Rome, Italy) is a model, actress and fashion designer. ...


After leaving the Stones' camp, Parsons married in 1971, for the first and only time, to Burrell at his stepfather's New Orleans estate. Allegedly, the relationship was far from stable, with Burrell cutting a needy and jealous figure while Parsons castrated her burgeoning film career. Many of the singer's closest associates and friends claim that Parsons was preparing to commence divorce proceedings at the time of his death; the couple had already separated by this point.


1972–1973

Parsons and Burrell enjoyed the most idyllic time of their relationship, visiting old cohorts like Ian Dunlop and Family/Blind Faith/Traffic member Ric Grech in England. With the assistance of Grech and one of the bassist's friends, Hank Wangford a doctor friend who dabbled in country music, Parsons managed to kick his heroin habit once and for all (a treatment suggested by William Burroughs proved unsuccessful). This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Blind Faith (disambiguation). ... Traffic was a rock band from Birmingham, England, formed in late 1966 by Steve Winwood with Jim Capaldi, Chris Wood and Dave Mason. ... Richard Roman Grech, November 1, 1946 – March 17, 1990. ... Hank Wangford is the stage name for an English country and western musician and songwriter (real name: Samuel Hutt, 1940). ... William S. Burroughs. ...


He returned to the US for a one-off concert with the Burritos, and at Hillman's instigation went to hear Emmylou Harris sing in a small club in Washington, D.C. They became friends and, within a year, he asked her to join him in Los Angeles for another attempt to record his first solo album. Emmylou Harris (born April 2, 1947, Birmingham, Alabama) is a country, folk, alternative rock, and alternative country musician. ... ...


Having gained thirty pounds since his Burrito days from Southern food and excessive alcohol consumption, it came as a surprise to many when Parsons was enthusiastically signed to Reprise Records by Mo Ostin in mid-1972. GP, released in 1973, utilized the guitar-playing of James Burton (sideman to Elvis Presley and Ricky Nelson), and featured new songs from a creatively revitalized Parsons such as "Big Mouth Blues" and "Kiss the Children," as well as a superb cover of Tompall Glaser's "Streets of Baltimore." Reprise Records is an American record label, owned by Warner Music Group, operated through Warner Bros. ... Mo Ostin is a famous record executive, who has worked for several companies, including Verve, Reprise, Warner Brothers, and DreamWorks. ... G.P. was the first solo album by Gram Parsons, released in 1972. ... James Burton (born August 21, 1939 in Minden, Louisiana) is an American guitarist. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Tompall Glaser is an American country music singer in the Outlaw genre. ...


Parsons, by now featuring Harris as his duet partner, played dates across the United States as Gram Parsons and the Fallen Angels. Unable to afford the services of the Elvis band for a month, the band featured the talents of obscure Colorado-based rock guitarist Jock Bartley (soon to skyrocket to fame with Firefall), veteran Nashville sideman Neil Flanz on pedal steel, Kyle Tullis on bass and former Mountain drummer N.D. Smart (once described by Canadian folksinger Ian Tyson as "a psychotic redneck"). The touring party also included Gretchen Parsons—by this point extremely envious of Harris—and Harris' young daughter. Coordinating the spectacle as road manager was Phil Kaufman, who had served time with Charles Manson on Terminal Island in the mid-sixties and first met Parsons while working for the Stones in 1968. Kaufman ensured that the performer stayed away from substance abuse, limiting his alcohol intake during shows and throwing out any drugs smuggled into hotel rooms. At first, the band was under-rehearsed and played poorly, but improved markedly with steady gigging and received rapturous responses at the Armadillo World Headquarters in Austin, Texas and at a filmed concert at Liberty Hall in Houston (with Neil Young and Linda Ronstadt sitting in) and Max's Kansas City in New York City. According to a number of sources, it was Emmylou who forced the band to practice and work up an actual set list. Nevertheless, the tour did absolutely nothing for record sales. While he had been in the vanguard with The Byrds and the Burrito Brothers, Parsons was now perceived as being too authentic and traditional in an era dominated by the stylings of The Eagles, whose sound Parsons disdained (although he did maintain cordial relations with Leadon, now an Eagle). Jock Bartley is an American Musician. ... This article needs cleanup. ... For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... This article is about a stereotypical description. ... Charles Milles Manson (b. ... Reservation Point at the very southwest tip of Teminal Island. ... The Armadillo World Headquarters (usually called simply The Armadillo) was the premiere music hall and entertainment center in Austin, Texas between 1970 and 1980. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musician. ... Linda Marie Ronstadt (born July 15, 1946 in Tucson, Arizona) is an American popular vocalist and entertainer who has earned multiple Grammy Awards, an Emmy Award, numerous certified gold, platinum and multiplatinum albums, and Tony Award and Golden Globe nominations. ... Maxs Kansas City was a nightclub (upstairs) and restaurant (downstairs) between 17th and 18th Streets, on Park Avenue South in New York City. ... The Eagles are an American rock music group that originally came together in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. ...


For his next and final album, 1974's Grievous Angel, he again used Harris and Burton. The record, which was released after his death, received even more enthusiastic reviews than had GP, and has since attained classic status. Among its most celebrated songs is "$1000 Wedding", a holdover from the Burrito Brothers era which was covered by one of the many groups influenced by Parsons, the Mekons, and "Brass Buttons", a 1965 opus which addresses his mother's alcoholism. Also included was a new version of "Hickory Wind" and "Ooh Las Vegas", co-written with Grech and dating from the G.P. sessions. Despite the fact that Parsons only contributed two new songs to the album ("In My Hour of Darkness", "Return of the Grievous Angel"), Parsons was highly enthused with his new sound and seemed to have finally adopted a serious, diligent mindset to his musical career, eschewing most drugs and alcohol during the sessions. Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Grievous Angel was the second solo album by Gram Parsons, compiled from 1973 sessions and posthumously released four months after his death. ... The Mekons are a British rock band. ...


Before recording, Parsons and Harris played a preliminary three show mini tour as the headline act in a Warner Brothers country-rock package. The backing band included Clarence White, Pete Kleinow, and Chris Etheridge. On July 14, 1973, the legendary White was killed by a drunk driver while loading equipment in his car for a concert with the New Kentucky Colonels. At White's funeral, Parsons and Bernie Leadon launched into an impromptu touching rendition of "Farther Along"; that night, the distraught and drunken musician reportedly informed Phil Kaufman of his final wish: to be cremated in Joshua Tree. Despite the almost insurmountable setback, Parsons, Harris, and the other musicians decided to continue with plans for a fall tour. Cremation is the practice of disposing of a corpse by burning. ...


In the summer of 1973 Parsons' Topanga Canyon home burned to the ground, the result of a stray cigarette. Nearly all of his possessions were destroyed with the exception of a guitar and a prized Jaguar automobile. The fire proved to be the last straw in the relationship between Burrell and Parsons, who moved into a spare room in Kaufman's house. While not recording, he frequently hung out and jammed with members of New Jersey-based country rockers Quacky Duck and His Barnyard Friends (whose members included Tony Bennett's sons, Danny and Dae Bennett as well as future Dylan sideman and member of the Alpha Band, multi-instrumentalist David Mansfield) and the proto-punk Jonathan Richman & the Modern Lovers, who were being managed by Kaufman. Richman credits Parsons with introducing him to acoustic-based music[citation needed]. Parsons is credited as producer on Quacky Duck's only album, Media Push, released by Warner Bros. in 1974. According to the road manager of Quacky Duck, Parsons was, despite being frequently drunk, a kind soul who provided business and musical guidance to the younger band. Quacky Duck and His Barnyard Friends was an American country rock band of the early 1970s. ... For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ... This article is about the recording artist. ... The Alpha Band was a rock band formed in July of 1976 from the remnants of Bob Dylans Rolling Thunder Revue. ... David Mansfield (born c. ... Protopunk is a term used to describe a number of performers who were important precursors of punk rock, or who have been cited by early punk rockers as influential. ... Jonathan Richman (born 16 May 1951) is an American proto-punk musician. ...


Before formally breaking up with Burrell, Parsons already had a woman waiting in the wings. While recording, he saw a photo of a beautiful woman at a friend's home and was instantly smitten. The woman turned out to be Margaret Fisher, a high school sweetheart of the singer from his Waycross, Georgia days. Like Parsons, Fisher had drifted west and became established in the Bay Area rock scene. A meeting was arranged and the two instantly rekindled their relationship, with Fisher dividing her weeks between Los Angeles and San Francisco at Parsons' expense.


Death

In the late 1960s, Parsons became enamored with Joshua Tree National Monument. Alone or with friends, he would disappear in the desert for days, searching for UFOs while under the influence of psilocybin or LSD. After splitting from Burrell, Parsons would frequently spend his weekends in the area with Margaret Fisher and Phil Kaufman. Before his tour was scheduled to commence in October 1973, Parsons decided to go on one more excursion. Accompanying him were Fisher, personal assistant Michael Martin, and Dale McElory, Martin's girlfriend. Less than two days after arriving, Parsons died September 19, 1973 in Joshua Tree, California at the age of 26 from a lethal combination, purportedly of morphine and alcohol.[3] According to Fisher in the 2005 biography Grievous Angel: An Intimate Biography of Gram Parsons, the amount of morphine consumed by Parsons would not be lethal to an addict and thus he had likely overestimated his tolerance considering his past experience with opiates. Fisher and McElroy were returned to Los Angeles by Kaufman, who dispersed the remnants of Parsons' stash in the desert. Double Cross on The Old Woman Rock Joshua Tree National Park is located in south-eastern California. ... UFO redirects here. ... Psilocybin (also known as psilocybine) is a psychedelic alkaloid of the tryptamine family, found in psilocybin mushrooms. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Joshua Tree is a census-designated place located in San Bernardino County, California. ... The term drug overdose (or simply overdose) describes the ingestion or application of a drug or other substance in quantities greater than are recommended or generally practiced. ... This article is about the drug. ... Booze redirects here. ...


In a story that has taken on legendary stature, Parsons' body disappeared from the Los Angeles International Airport, where it was being readied to be shipped to Louisiana for burial. Prior to his death, Parson stated that he wanted his body cremated at Joshua Tree and his ashes spread over Cap Rock, a prominent natural feature there. However, Parson's stepfather arranged for a private ceremony back in New Orleans and neglected to invite any of his friends from the music industry.[3] Maintaining his alleged promise, Kaufman and a friend managed to steal Parsons' body from the airport and, in a borrowed hearse, drove Parsons' body to Joshua Tree where they attempted to cremate it, by pouring five gallons of gasoline into the open coffin, and throwing a lit match inside. What resulted was an enormous fireball. Police chased them, but, according to one account, "were encumbered by sobriety".[3] The two were arrested several days later, but since there was no law against stealing a dead body, were only fined $750 (or $700) for stealing the coffin.[3][4] The burned remains were eventually returned to Parsons' stepfather and interred in New Orleans. LAX and KLAX redirect here. ... The crematorium at Haycombe Cemetery, Bath, England. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ...


The site of the cremation was marked by a small concrete slab and is presided over by a large rock flake known to rock climbers as 'The Gram Parsons memorial hand traverse'.[5] The slab has since been removed by the U.S. National Park Service and was relocated to the Joshua Tree Inn which was where he was staying at the time of his death. At the site of the original memorial now are simple rock structures and writings on the rock which the park service sand blasts to remove from time to time. Climbers on Valkyrie at the Roaches. ...


The song "My Man" which appeared on the Eagles album "On The Border" was written by fellow Flying Burrito band member Bernie Leadon as a posthumous tribute to Gram Parsons. Eagles redirects here. ... Bernard Leadon (born July 19, 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American musician, best known as a founding member of the Eagles, an American rock band. ...


In the 2004 documentary film Gram Parsons: Fallen Angel (released commercially in 2006), Parsons' family alleged that Kaufman's cremation attempt was little more than a drunken hatchet job, which succeeded only in mutilating roughly 60% of the corpse.


The 2003 film Grand Theft Parsons stars Johnny Knoxville as Phil Kaufman and chronicles a fictionalized version of the theft of Parsons' corpse. Grand Theft Parsons is a 2003 movie based on the true story of the legendary country musician Gram Parsons, who died of an overdose in 1973. ...


The soundtrack of the 2007 film Cthulhu features the song "Return of the Grievous Angel", performed by Parsons and Emmylou Harris. Cthulhu is a 2007 American thriller/horror movie, directed by Dan Gildark and co-written by Grant Cogswell and Daniel Gildark. ... Emmylou Harris (born April 2, 1947, Birmingham, Alabama) is a country, folk, alternative rock, and alternative country musician. ...


A petition was begun in May 2007 in an attempt to induct Gram Parsons into the Country Music Hall of Fame, based on his contribution to the evolution of country music.[6] Backed by many friends and admirers who have signed and left comments from around the world, it is targeting the Country Music Association (CMA) and the Country Music Hall of Fame. Within four months to the day, it had hit its target of 1,000 signers, with more signing every day, the total nearing 2,000. The petition is intended to be presented to the CMA on the 35th anniversary of Parsons' death in September 2008, although it will continue to be available to signers until his actual induction into the Hall occurs. (Note: in February 2008, Gram's protégée, Emmylou Harris, was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame.) This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... The Country Music Association (CMA) was founded in 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee. ...


Discography

  • Safe at Home : International Submarine Band (1968)
  • Sweetheart of the Rodeo : The Byrds (1968)
  • The Gilded Palace of Sin : Flying Burrito Brothers (1969)
  • Burrito Deluxe : Flying Burrito Brothers (1970)
  • GP : Gram Parsons (1973)
  • Grievous Angel : Gram Parsons (1974)
  • Sleepless Nights: Gram Parsons & the Flying Burrito Brothers (1976)
  • Early Years (1963–1965) : Gram Parsons (1979)
  • Live 1973 : Gram Parsons and the Fallen Angels (1982)
  • Sacred Hearts & Fallen Angels: The Gram Parsons Anthology : Gram Parsons/Various (2001)
  • Another Side of This Life: The Lost Recordings of Gram Parsons : Sundazed Music (2001)
  • The Complete Reprise Sessions : Gram Parsons (2006)
  • Gram Parsons Archives Vol.1: Live at the Avalon Ballroom 1969 : Gram Parsons with the Flying Burrito Brothers (Amoeba Records, 2007).

Safe At Home was the 1968 album by The International Submarine Band, led by the 21-year-old Gram Parsons. ... Sweetheart of the Rodeo is an album by American country rock band The Byrds, released on July 29, 1968 (see 1968 in music). ... The Gilded Palace of Sin is an album by the country rock group The Flying Burrito Brothers, released in 1969. ... Burrito Deluxe is the second album by the country rock group The Flying Burrito Brothers, released in 1970. ... G.P. was the first solo album by Gram Parsons, released in 1972. ... Grievous Angel was the second solo album by Gram Parsons, compiled from 1973 sessions and posthumously released four months after his death. ... Sleepless Nights is a posthumous compilation album by Gram Parsons. ... Live 1973 is a recording by Gram Parsons and the Fallen Angels. ... The Complete Reprise Sessions is a box set released in 2006 featuring both of Gram Parsonss early 1970s solo albums, GP and Grievous Angel. ...

Tributes

  • Return of the Grievous Angel: A Tribute to Gram Parsons (1999)

References

  1. ^ The Immortals. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone.
  2. ^ Bud Scoppa, "Track-by-Track," in Sacred Hearts Fallen Angels (Rhino: 2001, p. 26)
  3. ^ a b c d "What's up with the strange end of country-rock pioneer Gram Parsons?" from The Straight Dope
  4. ^ Gram Parsons FAQ from GramParsons.com
  5. ^ Gram Parsons from Find A Grave
  6. ^ Gram Parsons: Induct into Country Music Hall of Fame from Care2
  • Christgau, Robert. 1990. Rock Albums of the '70s: A Critical Guide. (New York: Da Capo Press). ISBN 0-306-80409-3.
  • Fong-Torres, Ben. (1998). "Gram Parson". In The Encyclopedia of Country Music. Paul Kingsbury, Editor. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 405-6.

Cecil Adams is the pen name of the author of The Straight Dope since 1973, a popular question and answer column published in The Chicago Reader, syndicated in thirty newspapers in the United States and Canada, and available online. ... Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ... Care2 is a social network website that was founded by Randy Paynter in 1998 to help connect activists from around the world. ...

Further reading

  • Twenty Thousand Roads: The Ballad of Gram Parsons and His Cosmic American Music, David N. Meyer, Villard Books, 2007. ISBN 978-0-375-50570-9
  • Road Mangler Deluxe, Phil Kaufman with Colin White, White-Boucke Publishing, 2005 (3rd edition). ISBN 1-888580-31-3
  • Are You Ready for the Country: Elvis, Dylan, Parsons and the Roots of Country Rock, Peter Dogget, Penguin Books, 2001. ISBN 0-14-026108-7
  • Dreaming Out Loud: Garth Brooks, Wynonna Judd, Wade Hayes and the Changing Face of Nashville, Bruce Feiler, Avon Books, 1998. ISBN 0-380-97578-5
  • In the Country of Country: A Journey to the Roots of American Music, Nicholas Dawidoff, Vintage Books, 1998. ISBN 0-375-70082-X
  • Hickory Wind: The Life and Times of Gram Parsons, Ben Fong-Torres, Pocket Books, 1991. ISBN 0-671-70513-X
  • Grievous Angel: An Intimate Biography of Gram Parsons, Jessica Hundley and Polly Parsons, Thunder's Mouth Press, 2005. ISBN 978-1560256731
  • Proud to Be an Okie: Cultural Politics, Country Music, and Migration to Southern California, Peter La Chapelle. University of California Press, Berkeley, 2007. ISBN 978-0-520-24889-2
  • Gram Parsons: God's Own Singer, Jason Walker, Helter Skelter Books, London, 2002. ISBN 1-900924-27-7
  • Moody Food, Ray Robertson, SFWP, 2006. ISBN 0-9776799-0-X

External links

For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer, producer and founding member of The Rolling Stones. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... James Roger McGuinn (known professionally as Roger McGuinn and born James Joseph McGuinn III on July 13, 1942) is a popular rock American singer-songwriter and guitarist of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Chris Hillman on the cover of his album The Other Side (2005) Chris Hillman (born Christopher Hillman December 4, 1944, in Los Angeles, California), was one of the original members of The Byrds (1965) with Roger McGuinn, Gene Clark, David Crosby, and Michael Clarke. ... David Van Cortlandt Crosby (born August 14, 1941) is an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. ... For other uses, see Gene Clark (disambiguation). ... Michael Clarke (born Michael James Dick) (June 3, 1933 – December 19, 1993), was an American musician, best known as the drummer for the 1960s rock music group The Byrds from 1964 to 1968. ... Clarence White (born Clarence LeBlanc) (June 7, 1944 – July 14, 1973) was a guitar player for Nashville West, The Byrds, Muleskinner, and the Kentucky Colonels. ... Gene Parsons is an american drummer, best known for his work with The Byrds from 1968 to 1972, although officially still a member until the groups dissolution in 1973, he had not performed with them after 1972, as Roger McGuinn was on a reunion tour with the other original members. ... Skip Clyde Skip Battin (Born 2/18/34 in Gallipolis, Ohio) was a successful singer-songwriter, musician, performer and recording artist. ... John Guerin (Born October 31, 1939 in Hawaii, U.S.A, Died January 5, 2004, West Hills, California, U.S.A) worked as a Drummer, Percussionist, and Recording Artist Worldwide. ... Joe Lala is an actor and voice actor, notable for a his dubbing of Kun Lan of the computer-game Killer7. ... Jimmi Seiter (born James Duke Seiter) (May 2, 1945 in St. ... Mr. ... Turn! Turn! Turn! (album) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Fifth Dimension is the third album by The Byrds, released in the summer of 1966. ... Younger Than Yesterday is the fourth album from folk-rock group The Byrds. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject to understand later content. ... Sweetheart of the Rodeo is an album by American country rock band The Byrds, released on July 29, 1968 (see 1968 in music). ... Dr. Byrds & Mr. ... The Ballad of Easy Rider was an album by the rock band The Byrds in October 1969 on Columbia Records. ... -1... Byrdmaniax is an album by American band The Byrds, released in 1971 (see 1971 in music). ... Farther Along is an album by American band The Byrds, released in 1971 (see 1971 in music). ... Byrds is a rock music album by American band The Byrds from 1973. ... Live at the Fillmore - February 1969 is a live album released by American band The Byrds in 2000 on Columbia Records. ... The Byrds Greatest Hits is the first compilation release by The Byrds. ... Super Hits is a budget hits compilation released by Columbia/Legacy in 1998. ... The Byrds Play Dylan is unique album released by American band The Byrds in 2002 on Columbia Records featuring twenty interpretations of Bob Dylan songs from their entire career, regardless of line-up. ... The Essential Byrds is a comprehensive two-CD compilation album released by American band The Byrds in 2003 on Columbia Records. ... The Byrds is a boxed set released by American band The Byrds in 1990 on Columbia Records. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Gram Parsons (1946-1973) (1234 words)
Gram Parsons is widely acknowledged to be one of the most important pioneers of the country-rock genre.
Parsons often referred to his childhood as the happiest years of his life, even though his parents' drinking habits cast a shadow over the family.
Parsons wrote much of the material on the record, and many critics called it one of the best records of the year and one of the Byrds' best efforts to date.
Gram Parsons - Music Downloads - Online (1221 words)
Bio: Gram Parsons is the father of country-rock.
Gram Parsons was born Cecil Ingram Connor on November 5, 1946.
Gram Parsons only spent a few months with the Byrds, leaving the band in the fall of 1968 because he refused to accompany them on a tour of South Africa, allegedly because he opposed apartheid.
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