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Encyclopedia > Graceland Cemetery
Graceland Cemetery
(U.S. National Register of Historic Places)
Location: 4001 N. Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois
Coordinates: 41°57′16.2″N, 87°39′44.2″W
Area: 48 ha (119 acres)
Built/Founded: 1860
Added to NRHP: January 18, 2001

Graceland Cemetery is a large Victorian-era cemetery located in the north side community area of Uptown, in the city of Chicago, Illinois, USA. Established in 1860, its main entrance is at Clark and Irving Park. The Sheridan stop on the Red Line is the nearest CTA "L" station. Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 683 pixel, file size: 536 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Graceland Cemetery Metadata... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in Chicagoland and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Skyline of Uptown, looking northeast Uptown is a diverse neighborhood located north of Chicagos downtown. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Chicagos Clark Street is occasionally a diagonal, and occasionally a north-south street running near the shore of Lake Michigan from the city limits with Evanston (where it is called Chicago Avenue, and further north, Green Bay Road) south to Cermak Road. ... Sheridan is a station on the Chicago Transit Authoritys L system, located in the neighborhood of Buena Park at 3940 North Sheridan Road in Chicago, Illinois (directional coordinates 4000 north, 1000 west). ... The Red Line (Howard-Dan Ryan Service) is a heavy rail line in Chicago, run by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) as part of the Chicago L system. ... Chicago Transit Authority, also known as CTA, is the operator of mass transit within the City of Chicago, Illinois. ...


In the 19th century a train to the north suburbs occupied the eastern edge of the cemetery where the "L" now rides. The line was also used to carry mourners to funerals, in specially rented funeral cars, requiring an entry on the east wall, now closed. At that point the cemetery would have been well outside the city limits of Chicago. After the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, Lincoln Park which had been the city's cemetery, was deconsecrated and the bodies moved here. The edge of the pond around Daniel Burnham's burial island is lined with broken headstones transported from Lincoln Park. Lincoln Park then became a recreational area, with a single mausoleum remaining, the "Couch tomb". Artists rendering of the fire, by John R Chapin, originally printed in Harpers Weekly The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday October 8 to early Tuesday October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. ... A concert in Lincoln Park circa 1907. ... Daniel H. Burnham. ...


The cemetery is typical of those that reflect Queen Victoria's reconception of the early 19th century "graveyard". Instead of poorly-maintained headstones, and bodies buried on top of each other, on an ungenerous parcel of land; the cemetery became a pastoral landscaped park dotted with memorial markers, with room left over for picnics, a common usage of the cemetery. Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ...


Many of the cemetery's tombs are of great architectural or artistic interest, including the Getty Tomb, the Martin Ryerson mausoleum (both designed by architect Louis Sullivan, who is also buried here), and the Schoenhofen Pyramid Mausoleum. The industrialist George Pullman was buried at night, in a lead-lined coffin within an elaborately reinforced steel-and-concrete vault, to prevent his body from being exhumed and desecrated by labor activists. Front entrance The Carrie Eliza Getty Tomb, located in Graceland Cemetery in Chicago, Illinois, was commissioned in 1890 by the lumber magnate, Henry Harrison Getty, for his wife, Carrie Eliza. ... Louis Sullivan Louis Henry (Henri) Sullivan (September 3, 1856–April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. He is considered by many as the creator of the modern skyscraper, was an influential architect and critic of the Chicago School, and was a mentor to Frank Lloyd... George Mortimer Pullman (March 3, 1831 – October 19, 1897) was an American inventor and industrialist. ...


Along with its other famous burials the cemetery is notable for two statues by sculptor Lorado Taft, Eternal Silence for the Graves family plot and the Crusader that marks Victor Lawson's final resting place. Self-portrait from the Fountain of Time, Chicago, IL Columbus Fountain, Washington D.C. Lorado Zadoc Taft (April 29, 1860–October 30, 1936) was an American sculptor, writer and educator, was born in Elmwood, Illinois in 1860. ...


Graceland is one of three notable 19th century cemeteries which were previously well outside the city limits; the other two being Rosehill (further north), and Oak Woods (South of Hyde Park) which includes a major monument to Confederate civil war dead. Main entrance of Rosehill Cemetery Rosehill Cemetery is a 350 acre (1. ... Oak Woods Cemetery was established in 1854 at 1035 E. 67th Street in Chicago, Illinois. ...


The cemetery's walls are topped off with barbed wire, as well as razor wire in some locations.

Contents

Notable burials

Getty Tomb for Cary Eliza Getty, designed by Louis Sullivan, 1890
Getty Tomb for Cary Eliza Getty, designed by Louis Sullivan, 1890

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 574 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Potter Palmer and Bertha Honoré Palmer mausoleum Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, IL. © Jeremy Atherton, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 574 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Potter Palmer and Bertha Honoré Palmer mausoleum Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, IL. © Jeremy Atherton, 2006. ... Potter Palmer (1826 - 1902) was a Chicago businessman who was responsible for much of the development of State Street. ... Bertha Palmer (born May 22, 1849 - died May 5, 1918) was an American musician, linguist, and writer. ... David Adler (born 1882 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, died September 27, 1949 in Libertyville, Illinois) was a prolific architect, designing over 200 buildings. ... John Peter Altgeld (December 30, 1847 - March 12, 1902) was the governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1893 until 1897. ... Philip Danforth Armour (1832-1901) was born in Stockbridge, New York, of Scotch-Irish descent. ... Fred Busse (born: March 3, 1886; died: July 9, 1914; buried in Graceland Cemetery) served as mayor of Chicago, Illinois (1907-1911) for the Republican Party. ... Masonic Temple Building Daniel Hudson Burnham (September 4, 1846 - June 1, 1912) was born in Henderson, New York and raised in Chicago, Illinois. ... William Deering (born April 25, 1826, South Paris, Maine; died December 9, 1913, Coconut Grove) was a U.S. business man and philanthropist. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Marshall Field (1834 -1906) was founder of Marshall Field and Company, the Chicago based chain of department stores. ... Lincoln Memorial Henry Bacon (November 28, 1866 – February 17, 1924) an American Beaux-Arts architect, is best remembered for his severe Greek Doric Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. (built 1915–1922), which was his final project. ... Daniel Chester French Signature, Daniel Chester French (April 20, 1850 – October 7, 1931) was an American sculptor. ... Robert James Bob Fitzsimmons (May 26, 1863 - October 22, 1917) was a Cornish native and moved to New Zealand in his childhood. ... Melville Weston Fuller (February 11, 1833 – July 4, 1910) was the Chief Justice of the United States between 1888 and 1910. ... Elbert Henry Gary (October 8, 1846–August 15, 1927) was an American lawyer and corporate officer. ... Bruce Alonzo Goff (1904-1982) was an American architect. ... Carter Henry Harrison, Sr. ... Carter Henry Harrison, Jr. ... Born: September 11th, 1854 in Amenia Union, New York Died: July 19th, 1923 in Evanston, Illinois Partnered with: Martin Roche Holabird studied at the Military Academy at West Point but resigned and moved to Chicago. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... William Hulbert William Ambrose Hulbert (October 23, 1832 - April 10, 1882) was one of the founders of the National League, recognized as baseballs first major league, and was also the president of the Chicago White Stockings franchise. ... John Arthur Johnson(March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946), better known as Jack Johnson and nicknamed the Galveston Giant, was an American boxer and arguably the best heavyweight of his generation. ... Image:Fazlur Khan. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (482x640, 59 KB)Louis Sullivans Getty Tomb, Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois This image is from HABS/HAER, the Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record collection at the Library of Congress. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (482x640, 59 KB)Louis Sullivans Getty Tomb, Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, Illinois This image is from HABS/HAER, the Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record collection at the Library of Congress. ... Front entrance The Carrie Eliza Getty Tomb, located in Graceland Cemetery in Chicago, Illinois, was commissioned in 1890 by the lumber magnate, Henry Harrison Getty, for his wife, Carrie Eliza. ... Louis Sullivan Louis Henry (Henri) Sullivan (September 3, 1856–April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. He is considered by many as the creator of the modern skyscraper, was an influential architect and critic of the Chicago School, and was a mentor to Frank Lloyd... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John Kinzie (December 3, 1763 - January 6, 1828) is known as Chicago’s first permanent white settler. ... Cornelius Krieghoff (June 19, 1815 - March 8, 1872) is probably the most popular Canadian painter of the 19th century. ... Frank Orren Lowden (1861 - 1943) was a U.S. political figure. ... Watercolour from the Canberra Design Artists Studio (Section). ... Cyrus McCormick Cyrus McCormick (February 15, 1809 - May 13, 1884) of Virginia was an Irish American farmer, inventor, businessman, marketer and newspaper editor. ... Joseph Medill (April 6, 1823–March 16, 1899) is better known as the business manager and managing editor of the Chicago Tribune than as mayor of Chicago, Illinois, although his term in office occurred during two of the most important years of the citys history as Chicago tried to... László Moholy-Nagy (probably July 28, 1895 – November 24, 1946) was a Hungarian painter and photographer as well as professor in the Bauhaus school. ... New Bauhaus is a school formed by László Moholy-Nagy in Chicago after the demise of the Bauhaus in Germany. ... IIT Institute of Design logo Institute of Design (ID) at Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), previously known for the New Bauhaus, is a college teaching systemic, human-centered design. ... Richard Nickel (1928-1972) was a photographer and historian who, during the 1960s and 1970s, attempted to preserve the work of Louis Sullivan as well as other 19th Century American architects (most from the Prairie School) by photographing their buildings, protesting their demolition, and (if the latter didnt work... Ruth Page (22nd March 1899 - 7th April 1991) was an American dancer and choreographer born in Indianapolis, the daughter of a brain surgeon (father) and a pianist. ... Bertha Palmer (born May 22, 1849 - died May 5, 1918) was an American musician, linguist, and writer. ... Potter Palmer (1826 - 1902) was a Chicago businessman who was responsible for much of the development of State Street. ... This article does not adequately cite its references. ... George Mortimer Pullman (March 3, 1831 – October 19, 1897) was an American inventor and industrialist. ... John Wellborn Root (January 10, 1850 - January 15, 1891) was a significant U.S. architect who worked out of Chicago with Daniel Burnham. ... Louis Sullivan Louis Henry (Henri) Sullivan (September 3, 1856–April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. He is considered by many as the creator of the modern skyscraper, was an influential architect and critic of the Chicago School, and was a mentor to Frank Lloyd... The reconstructed German Pavilion in Barcelona Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (born Maria Ludwig Michael Mies) (March 27, 1886 – August 17, 1969) was a German- American architect. ... Howard Van Doren Shaw (b. ... Kate Warne made history as the first female hired in 1856 to be a detective by Mr. ... This article does not adequately cite its references. ... Daniel Hale Williams, c. ...

Sources & resources

  • Hucke, Matt and Ursela bielski, Graveyards of Chicago: the People, History, Art, and Lore of Cook County Cemeteries, Lake Claremont Press, Chicago, 1999
  • Lanctot, Barbara, A Walk Through Graceland Cemetery, Chicago Architectural Foundation, Chicago, Illinois, 1988

See also

Gettysburg National Cemetery, Pennsylvania Golden Gate National Cemetery, California Arlington National Cemetery, Virgnia National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Hawaii National Cemetery is a designation for nationally important cemeteries in the United States. ... This is a list of famous cemeteries, mausoleums and other places people are buried, world-wide. ... This is a list of mausoleums around the world. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Graceland Cemetery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (251 words)
Graceland Cemetery is a large Victorian-era cemetery located in the North Side neighborhood of Lakeview, in the city of Chicago, Illinois.
Many of the cemetery's tombs are of great architectural or artistic interest, including the mausoleums of Henry Harrison Getty, the Ryerson family (both designed by architect Louis Sullivan, who is also buried here), and the Schoenhofen Pyramid Mausoleum.
The industrialist George Pullman was buried at night, in a lead-lined coffin within an elaborately reinforced steel-and-concrete vault, to prevent his body from being exumed and desecrated by labor activists.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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