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Goy (Hebrew: גוי, plural goyim גוים) is a transliterated Hebrew word which translates as "nation" or "people". Image File history File links Circle-question-red. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... One of the most influential doctrines in history is that all humans are divided into groups called nations. ...

Contents

Etymology

A page from Elia Levita's Yiddish-Hebrew-Latin-German dictionary (16th century) contains a list of nations, including word "גוי", translated to Latin as "Ethnicus"
A page from Elia Levita's Yiddish-Hebrew-Latin-German dictionary (16th century) contains a list of nations, including word "גוי", translated to Latin as "Ethnicus"

In the Hebrew Bible, goy and its variants appear over 550 times in reference to Israelites and to Gentile peoples. The first recorded usage of goy occurs in Genesis 10:5 and applies to non-Israelite nations. The first mention in relation to the Israelites comes in Genesis 12:2, when God promises Abraham that his descendants will form a goy gadol ("great nation"). While the earlier books of the Hebrew Bible often use goy to describe the Israelites, the later ones tend to apply the term to other nations. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (432x622, 132 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Yiddish language Elia Levita ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (432x622, 132 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Yiddish language Elia Levita ... Elia Levita (1469–1549), also known as Eliahu Bakhur (Eliahu the Bachelor) was the author of the Bovo-Bukh (written in 1507–1508), the most popular chivalric romance in the Yiddish language, which, according to Sol Liptzin, is generally regarded as the most outstanding poetic work in Old... Yiddish (Yid. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Hebrew Bible itself, see Tanakh (Jewish term) or Old Testament (Christian term). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ... It has been suggested that Abraham (Hebrew Bible) be merged into this article or section. ...


Some Bible translations leave the word Goyim untranslated and treat it as the proper name of a country in Genesis 14:1. Bible commentaries suggest that the term may refer to Gutium.[1] The "King of Goyim" was Tidal. Genesis (Hebrew: ‎, Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah, the first book of the Tanakh and also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ... Tidal king of Goyim is a monarch mentioned in Genesis 14:1. ...


Modern usage

In modern Hebrew and Yiddish, the word goy is a standard term that refers to members of Gentile nations. In Yiddish it is the only proper term used to say 'Gentile' and many bilingual English and Yiddish speakers do use it dispassionately. In English however, the use of the word goy can be controversial. Like other common (and otherwise innocent) terms, it may be assigned pejoratively to non-Jews[2][3][4] (as well as to Jews who are perceived by other Jews to lack religious commitment to Judaism[citation needed]). To avoid any perceived offensive connotations, writers may use the English terms "Gentile" or "non-Jew". The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people. ...


References

  1. ^ Goiim in the International Standard Bible Encyclopedia [1]
  2. ^ The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
  3. ^ "There is nothing inherently insulting about the word 'goy.' In fact, the Torah occasionally refers to the Jewish people using the term 'goy.' Most notably, in Exodus 19:6, G-d says that the Children of Israel will be 'a kingdom of priests and a holy nation,' that is, a goy kadosh. Because Jews have had so many bad experiences with anti-Semitic non-Jews over the centuries, the term 'goy' has taken on some negative connotations, but in general the term is no more insulting than the word 'gentile.' Jewish Attitudes Toward Non-Jews, Jewfaq.org. Retrieved January 30, 2007.
  4. ^ "The word goy means literally "nation", but has come to mean "Gentile", sometimes with a derogatory connotation." Diane Wolfthal. Picturing Yiddish: gender, identity, and memory in the illustrated Yiddish books of Renaissance, Brill Academic Publishers, 2004, ISBN 9004117423, p. 59 footnote 60.

The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (AHD) is a dictionary of American English published by Boston publisher Houghton-Mifflin, the first edition of which appeared in 1969. ...

External links

Look up Goy in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Italic text Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... The Jewish Encyclopedia was an encyclopedia originally published between 1901 and 1906 by Funk and Wagnalls. ... Leo Calvin Rosten (April 11, 1908–February 19, 1997) was born on 11 April 1908 in Lodz, Russian Empire (now Poland) and died on 19 February 1997 in New York. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Term "Goy" (336 words)
It is frequently claimed that the term "Goy" (pl. goyim or goyyim) means "animal" and is therefore a derogatory term.
The word used here for nation, referring to the children of Israel, is "goy".
It is important to note that the idea of respect for others, and the values of a pluralistic society, form an old, integral part of Judaism and Jewish tradition.
JewishEncyclopedia.com - SHABBAT GOY: (235 words)
The Shabbat goy's duty is to extinguish the lighted candles or lamps on Friday night, and make a fire in the oven or stove on Sabbath mornings during the cold weather.
The latest story in which the Shabbat goy plays a rôle is that of K. Silman Franco, in Hebrew, in "Aḥiasaf," 5665 (1904-5).
Maxim Gorki, the Russian novelist, was once employed as a Shabbat goy by the Jewish colonists in the governments of Kherson and Yekaterinoslav.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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