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Encyclopedia > Government of New York City

New York City has been a metropolitan municipality with a "strong" mayor-council form of government since its consolidation in 1898. The mayor is elected to a four year term while councilors are elected to two year terms. The New York City Council is a unicameral body consisting of 51 Council members whose districts are defined by geographic population boundaries. Each councilor represents approximately 157,000 people. The mayor and councilors are subject to eight year term limits. The most recent election was held in 2005. Flag Seal Nickname: Big Apple Location Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,214. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Consolidated city-county. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger,greater) is in modern times the title of the highest ranking municipal officer, who discharges certain judicial and administrative functions, in many systems an elected politician, who serves as chief executive and/or ceremonial official of many types of municipalities. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... A councillor is a member of a council (such as a city council), particularly in the U.K. and its former colonies. ... New York City Hall The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ...

The city has historically elected Democratic mayoral candidates. The current and previous mayor, however, are pro-choice Republicans considerably to the left of their national counterparts. Councilors are elected under specific issues and are usually well-known. Labor politics are important. Housing and economic development are the most controversial topics, with an ongoing debate over the proposed Brooklyn Nets Arena. Download high resolution version (500x710, 44 KB)Source: http://www. ... Download high resolution version (500x710, 44 KB)Source: http://www. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... Michael Bloomberg Michael Rubens Mike Bloomberg (born February 14, 1942), a Republican, is a prominent Jewish American businessman, the founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of the City of New York. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Brooklyn Nets Arena is a proposed US$3. ...


The Working Families Party, affiliated with the labor movement and progressive community activists, is an important force in city politics. The Democratic Party holds the majority of public offices. Party platforms are centered on affordable housing, education and economic development. The city's political demographics are liberal and Democratic. 87% of registered voters in the city are Democrats. This is in contrast to New York state, which is less liberal. The Working Families Party (WFP) is a left-wing-progressive minor political party in the US state of New York, which has now expanded efforts into a number of other states, including the creation of the Connecticut Working Families Party and organizing projects in a number of other states. ...


The city has a strong imbalance of payments with the Federal and state governments. New York City receives 83 cents in services for every $1 it sends to Washington in taxes (or annually sends $11.4 billion more to Washington than it receives back). The city also sends an additional $11 billion more each year to the state of New York than it receives back.


The current mayor is Michael Bloomberg, a former Democrat who switched his party affiliation to Republican for his first mayoral campaign and was re-elected in 2005 with 59% of the vote. He is known for taking control of the city's education system from the state, rezoning and economic development, fiscal management, and banning smoking in bars and restaurants. He is also known for his strong support of strict gun control laws, abortion rights, and aggressive public health policy. Michael Bloomberg Michael Rubens Mike Bloomberg (born February 14, 1942), a Republican, is a prominent Jewish American businessman, the founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of the City of New York. ...


New York has what is widely regarded as one of the most effective municipal campaign finance systems in the United States. The New York City Campaign Finance Board was created in 1988 in the wake of several political corruption scandals. It gives public matching funds to qualifying candidates, who in exchange submit to strict contribution and spending limits and a full audit of their finances. Citywide candidates in the program are required to take part in debates. Corporate contributions are banned and political action committees must register with the city.


New York City's political geography is unusual. It is made up of five individual counties, each coterminous with a borough: Manhattan is New York County, Queens is Queens County, Brooklyn is Kings County, The Bronx is Bronx County and Staten Island is Richmond County. In 1898, when New York City was consolidated into its present form, all previous town and county governments within it were abolished in favor of the present five boroughs and unified, centralized city government. However, there are separate criminal court systems and district attorneys in the counties. Political geography is a field of human geography that is concerned with politics. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ... For other uses, see Staten Island (disambiguation) Staten Island, shown in an enhanced satellite image Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, located on an island of the same name on the west side of the Narrows at the entrance of New York Harbor. ...


The executive branch of New York City is headed by the Mayor, who is elected by direct popular vote. The Mayor of New York City appoints several Deputy Mayors to head major offices within the executive branch of the city government. Deputy Mayors report directly to the Mayor. They are: First Deputy Mayor, Deputy Mayor for Economic Development and Rebuilding, Deputy Mayor for Health & Human Services, Deputy Mayor for Legal Affairs, Deputy Mayor for Governmental Affairs, Deputy Mayor for Administration, Deputy Mayor for Education & Development. For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ...


Legislative power in New York City is vested in the City Council, which is divided into committees which have oversight of various functions of the city government. Bills passed by a simple majority are sent to the mayor, who may sign it into law. If the mayor vetoes the bill, the Council has 30 days to override the veto by a two-thirds majority vote.


Unlike the rest of New York State, New York City does not have typical county courts. Instead, there is a single Civil Court, with a presence in each borough and city-wide jurisdiction, and a Criminal Court for each New York City county which handles lesser criminal offenses and domestic violence cases, a responsibility shared with the Family Court. Unlike other counties in New York, judges for Family Courts in New York City are appointed for ten year terms by the mayor, instead of being elected. Domestic violence occurs when a family member, partner or ex-partner attempts to physically or psychologically dominate or harm the other. ...

Contents


Executive Branch

The executive branch of New York City is responsible for all city services, police and fire protection, enforcement of all city and state laws within the city, prosecution of crimes, and administration of public property and all public agencies.


The Mayor

The executive branch is headed by the Mayor of New York City, who is elected by direct popular vote by the people. The current mayor is Michael Bloomberg, a Republican. Though he was a lifelong Democrat, it's said he chose to run on the Republican ticket to avoid the contentious Democratic primary. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2214x1689, 2226 KB) Summary New York City Hall Photo by Kmf164. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2214x1689, 2226 KB) Summary New York City Hall Photo by Kmf164. ... ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... Michael Bloomberg Michael Rubens Mike Bloomberg (born February 14, 1942), a Republican, is a prominent Jewish American businessman, the founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of the City of New York. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ...


Deputy Mayors

The Mayor of New York City appoints several Deputy Mayors to head major offices within the executive branch of the city government. Deputy Mayors report directly to the Mayor. They are:

  • First Deputy Mayor Patricia E. Harris
The First Deputy Mayor advises the Mayor on Citywide administrative, operational and policy matters. The First Deputy Mayor oversees and coordinates the operations of the Department of Consumer Affairs, Department of Cultural Affairs, Department of Design and Construction, Department of Parks and Recreation, and the Commission for the United Nations, Consular Corps and Protocol, as well as all aspects of the Mayor’s Office, including the Offices of Appointments, Correspondence, Citywide Services, and Fiscal and Administrative Management. The First Deputy Mayor also organizes and monitors City-sponsored events, and serves as liaison with the Art Commission, Gracie Mansion Conservancy, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City, Mayor’s Volunteer Center, Commission on Women’s Issues, libraries, museums, performing arts organizations, gardens and zoos. In the Mayor’s absence, the First Deputy Mayor is delegated the authority to act on the Mayor’s behalf.
  • Deputy Mayor for Economic Development and Rebuilding Daniel L. Doctoroff
The Deputy Mayor for Economic Development and Rebuilding oversees and coordinates the operations of the Department of Buildings, Department of City Planning, the Economic Development Corporation, Department of Environmental Protection, Office of Film, Theater and Broadcasting, Department of Finance, Department of Housing Preservation and Development, Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications, Office of Operations, Department of Small Business Services, and the Department of Transportation. The Deputy Mayor also serves as a liaison with city, state and federal agencies responsible for the City’s economic development and infrastructure including the Governors Island Preservation and Education Corporation, Lower Manhattan Development Corporation and Metropolitan Transportation Authority. The Deputy Mayor also serves as Co-Chair of the Mayor’s Commission on Construction Opportunity.
  • Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services Linda I. Gibbs
The Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services oversees and coordinates the operations of the Department for the Aging, Administration for Children’s Services, Commission for Economic Opportunity, Family Services Coordinator, Health Insurance Access Program, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Department of Homeless Services, Human Resources Administration/ Department of Social Services, Department of Juvenile Justice, and the Department of Correction and Department of Probation. The Deputy Mayor maintains liaison with the Health and Hospitals Corporations and the HIV Health and Human Services Planning Council.
  • Deputy Mayor for Legal Affairs Carol A. Robles-Roman
The Deputy Mayor for Legal Affairs oversees and coordinates the operations of the Coordinator of Administrative Justice, Office to Combat Domestic Violence, Commission on Human Rights, Office of Immigrant Affairs, Office for People with Disabilities, and the Office of Veterans Affairs. The Deputy Mayor serves as the liaison with the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings, Civilian Complaint Review Board, Commission to Combat Police Corruption, Conflicts of Interest Board, Equal Employment Practices Commission, and Voter Assistance Commission. The Counsel to the Mayor serves as the Mayor’s legal advisor on matters involving the City of New York. The Counsel advises on legal and policy issues affecting the implementation of Mayoral initiatives, programs and operations and serves as the liaison with the Mayor’s Advisory Committee on the Judiciary. (Serves as Records Access Appeals Officer.)
  • Deputy Mayor for Governmental Affairs Kevin Sheekey
The Deputy Mayor for Government Affairs directs the City’s relations with federal, state and local governing entities and serves as the Mayor’s chief liaison with elected officials. The Deputy Mayor oversees and coordinates the operations of the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs, Office of City Legislative Affairs, Office of Federal Affairs, Office of State Legislative Affairs, and the Department of Records and Information Services. The Deputy Mayor is also the liaison to the Board of Elections, Campaign Finance Board, and Election Modernization Task Force.
  • Deputy Mayor for Administration Edward Skyler
The Deputy Mayor for Administration assists the Mayor in managing the Police Department, Fire Department, Office of Emergency Management, Office of Management and Budget, Office of Labor Relations and the Law Department. The Deputy Mayor oversees and coordinates the operations of the Department of Sanitation, Department of Citywide Administrative Services, Business Integrity Commission, Office of Contract Services, Criminal Justice Coordinator, Office of Midtown Enforcement, the Communications Director and Press Office, including the Speechwriting, Photography and Research Units. The Deputy Mayor serves as the liaison with the City’s five pension systems and governmental bodies dealing with public finance, procurement, and franchises and concessions.
  • Deputy Mayor for Education and Community Development Dennis M. Walcott
The Deputy Mayor for Education and Community Development oversees and coordinates the operations of the Department of Education and the Department of Youth and Community Development, as well as maintains liaison with and reviews the activities of the New York City School Construction Authority, City University of New York, City University Construction Fund and the New York City Housing Authority. The Deputy Mayor is also responsible for maintaining liaison with community-based organizations citywide and coordinating policies concerning youth programs and adult education. The Deputy Mayor serves as Co-Chair of the Mayor’s Commission for Construction Opportunity.

The New York City Police Department (NYPD) , the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... The Fire Department, City of New York (FDNY) has the responsibility of protecting the New York Citys five boroughs from fires and fire hazards, as well as preventing disasters like The Station nightclub fire in nearby Rhode Island, and the trampling deaths at an overcrowded building in Chicago. ... Originally formed in 1996 as part of the Mayors Office under Rudy Giuliani, the New York City Office of Emergency Management (OEM) became an independent agency, headed by a Commissioner who reports to the Mayor, by a vote of City residents in 2001. ...

Legislative

New York City's legislative power is vested in the New York City Council, a unicameral body consisting of 51 Council members, each representing a district of approximately 157,000 people. Council members are elected every four years, except for two consecutive two year terms every twenty years (starting in 2001 and 2003 and again in 2021 and 2023). The head of the City Council is called the Speaker, and is currently Christine Quinn, a Democrat. New York City Hall The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... Christine C. Quinn (b. ...


Like most legislative bodies, the City Council has several committees with legislative oversight over various categories of legislation. Each council member sits on at least three standing, select or subcommittees. The standing committees, listed below, meet at least once per month. The Speaker of the Council, the Majority Leader, and the Minority Leader are all ex officio members of every committee. This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ...


City Council Standing Committees

  • Aging
  • Civil Rights
  • Civil Service & Labor
  • Community Development (Select Committee)
  • Consumer Affairs
  • Contracts
  • Cultural Affairs, Libraries & International Intergroup Relations
  • Economic Development
  • Education
  • Environmental Protection
  • Finance
  • Fire & Criminal Justice Services
  • General Welfare
  • Governmental Operations
  • Health
  • Higher Education
  • Housing & Buildings
  • Immigration
  • Juvenile Justice
  • Land Use
  • Mental Health, Mental Retardation, Alcoholism, Drug Abuse & Disability Services
  • Oversight and Investigations
  • Parks & Recreation
  • Public Safety
  • Rules, Privileges & Elections
  • Sanitation & Solid Waste Management
  • Small Business
  • Standards & Ethics
  • State & Federal Legislation
  • Technology in Government
  • Transportation
  • Veterans
  • Waterfronts
  • Women's Issues
  • Youth Services

City Council Subcommittees

  • Drug Abuse
  • Landmarks, Public Siting and Maritime Uses
  • Libraries
  • Planning, Dispositions and Concessions
  • Public Housing
  • Senior Centers
  • Zoning and Franchises

City Council Partisan Makeup

Affiliation Members
  Democrat 48
  Republican 3
 Total
51

Borough Members The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...

A map of New York City, highlighting Brooklyn. ... Queens Borough in New York City, in yellow Queens is the largest in area and second most populous of the five boroughs of New York City. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ... Staten Island, in yellow, lies to the southwest of the rest of New York City. ...

Members of the City Council

District Representative Party Borough
1 Alan Gerson Democrat Manhattan
2 Rosie Mendez Democrat Manhattan
3 Christine Quinn Democrat Manhattan
4 Daniel Garodnick Democrat Manhattan
5 Jessica Lappin Democrat Manhattan
6 Gale Brewer Democrat Manhattan
7 Robert Jackson Democrat Manhattan
8 Melissa Viverito Democrat Manhattan
9 Inez Dickens Democrat Manhattan
10 Miguel Martinez Democrat Manhattan
11 G. Oliver Koppell Democrat Bronx
12 Larry Seabrook Democrat Bronx
13 James Vacca Democrat Bronx
14 Maria Baez Democrat Bronx
15 Joel Rivera Democrat Bronx
16 Helen Foster Democrat Bronx
17 Maria del Carmen Arroyo Democrat Bronx
18 Annabel Palma Democrat Bronx
19 Tony Avella Democrat Queens
20 John Liu Democrat Queens
21 Hiram Monserrate Democrat Queens
22 Peter Vallone, Jr. Democrat Queens
23 David Weprin Democrat Queens
24 James Gennaro Democrat Queens
25 Helen Sears Democrat Queens
26 Eric Gioia Democrat Queens
27 Leroy Comrie Democrat Queens
28 Thomas White, Jr. Democrat Queens
29 Melinda Katz Democrat Queens
30 Dennis P. Gallagher Republican Queens
31 James Sanders, Jr. Democrat Queens
32 Joseph Addabbo, Jr. Democrat Queens
33 David Yassky Democrat Brooklyn
34 Diana Reyna Democrat Brooklyn
35 Letitia James Democrat Brooklyn
36 Albert Vann Democrat Brooklyn
37 Erik Martin Dilan Democrat Brooklyn
38 Sara M. Gonzalez Democrat Brooklyn
39 Bill DeBlasio Democrat Brooklyn
40 Yvette Clarke Democrat Brooklyn
41 Darlene Mealy Democrat Brooklyn
42 Charles Barron Democrat Brooklyn
43 Vincent J. Gentile Democrat Brooklyn
44 Simcha Felder Democrat Brooklyn
45 Kendall Stewart Democrat Brooklyn
46 Lewis Fidler Democrat Brooklyn
47 Domenic M. Recchia, Jr. Democrat Brooklyn
48 Michael C. Nelson, Jr. Democrat Brooklyn
49 Michael McMahon Democrat Staten Island
50 James Oddo Republican Staten Island
51 Andrew Lanza Republican Staten Island

Alan Gerson is a Democratic member of the New York City Council, elected in 2001 to represent the 1st council district in Manhattan. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Rosie Mendez is an American Democratic Party politician in New York, and a member of the New York City Council from Manhattan. ... Christine C. Quinn (b. ... Daniel R. (Dan) Garodnick is a New York City Councilman representing the 4th district, which comprises Midtown East, Murray Hill, Stuyvesant Town, and much of the Upper East Side. ... Jessica Lappin is a Democratic New York City Councilwoman representing the Upper East Side, a Manhattan neighborhood. ... Gale Brewer is a member of the New York City Council. ... Robert Jackson is a member of the New York City Council, representing the 7th District in Manhattan. ... Inez Dickens is a member of the New York City Council. ... Miguel Martinez is a member of the New York City Council representing the 10th Council district in Manhattan. ... G. Oliver Koppell (born 1940) is a member of the New York City Council from District 11 in the Borough of The Bronx, covering the neighborhoods of Riverdale, Norwood, and Bedford Park. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ... Tony Avella is a member of the New York City Council from the borough of Queens. ... Queens Borough in New York City, in yellow Queens is the largest in area and second most populous of the five boroughs of New York City. ... Council Member John Liu is the Chairperson of the Councils Transportation Committee. ... Peter Vallone, Jr. ... David Weprin (born May 2, 1956) is a council member in the New York City Council. ... Eric Gioia is a member of the New York City Council and a Democratic politician in New York. ... Thomas White, Jr. ... Melinda Katz is an American Democratic Party politician in New York, and a member of the New York City Council from Queens. ... Dennis P. Gallagher is a current New York City Council member representing 30th District in Queens, including the neighborhoods of Middle Village, Glendale, Ridgewood, Richmond Hill, Woodhaven, and Forest Hills. ... Joseph Addabbo Jr. ... David Yassky is a member of the New York City Council. ... A map of New York City, highlighting Brooklyn. ... New York City Council Member Letitia James. ... Albert Vann is a member of the New York City Council from Brooklyn representing the 36th Council District, which includes Bedford-Stuyvesant. ... Yvette Clarke is a member of the New York City Council from Brooklyn. ... A former Black Panther, Charles Barron is a Democratic New York City Councilmember who contemplated running for mayor of New York City in the 2005 election. ... Simcha Felder is a member of the New York City Council from Brooklyn. ... Kendall Stewart is a member of the New York City Council from Brooklyn. ... Domenic M. Recchia, Jr. ... Michael McMahon is a City Council member representing the North Shore of Staten Island. ... Staten Island, in yellow, lies to the southwest of the rest of New York City. ... James S. Oddo is a Socialist politician from Staten Island, currently serving as Minority Leader in the New York City Council. ... Andrew Lanza is a member of the New York City Council, representing the 51st Council District which encompases the South Shore of Staten Island. ...

Council Leadership Information

Position Name Party Borough District
Speaker Christine Quinn Democratic Manhattan 3
Majority Leader Joel Rivera Democratic Bronx 15
Minority Leader James Oddo Republican Staten Island 50

The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress. ... Christine C. Quinn (b. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... The majority leader is a term used in congressional systems for the chamber leader of the party in control of a legislature. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ... In U.S. politics, the minority leader is the Floor Leader of the second-largest caucus in a legislative body. ... James S. Oddo is a Socialist politician from Staten Island, currently serving as Minority Leader in the New York City Council. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Staten Island, in yellow, lies to the southwest of the rest of New York City. ...

Judicial

The court system of New York City differs from that of the courts of other counties in New York State. Rather than County Courts, New York City has a special New York City Civil Court, which functions much like the civil jurisdiction of the County Court in other counties of New York State. The difference is the reach of the New York City Civil Court in each county; the court's jurisdiction is extended to the other counties of New York City so that a resident of one county does not have to use the Civil Court of another county. The New York City Civil Court generally has jurisdiction of controversies up to $25,000 and also supervise small claims and housing cases. The New York City Civil Court is the civil branch of the New York City courts system. ... In law, jurisdiction from the Latin jus, juris meaning law and dicere meaning to speak, is the practical authority granted to a formally constituted body or to a person to deal with and make pronouncements on legal matters and, by implication, to administer justice within a defined area of responsibility. ... Small claims courts are courts of limited jurisdiction that hear civil cases between private litigants. ...


Each county in New York City also has a Criminal Court that handles lesser criminal cases and family related domestic violence offenses (a shared jurisdiction with Family Court). Unlike other New York State counties, Family Court judges in New York City are not elected, but appointed for terms of ten years by the Mayor. The New York City Criminal Court is the begining level trial court of criminal cases in the City of New York. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of common law that punishes criminals for committing offences against the state. ... Domestic violence occurs when a family member, partner or ex-partner attempts to physically or psychologically dominate or harm the other. ... In law, an offense is a violation of the penal law. ...


Like all other counties, each New York City county has a sitting Supreme Court. In New York City, Supreme Court handles criminal cases on indictment, which in other counties of the state are handled by the County Court. As in the rest of the state, Supreme Court also handles larger civil cases. Grand juries sit in each of the counties as well. New York County Supreme Court building at 60 Centre Street, from across Foley Square The Supreme Court of the State of New York is the basic New York State trial court of general jurisidiction. ... In the common law legal system, an indictment is a formal charge of having committed a serious criminal offence. ... A grand jury is a type of common law jury responsible for investigating alleged crimes, examining evidence, and issuing indictments if they believe that there is enough evidence for a trial to proceed. ...


Manhattan and the Bronx are in the first appellate department of the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court. The First Department sits at the Court House on Madison Avenue and 25th Street. Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island (as well as the rest of Long Island and Westchester, Putnam, Dutchess, Rockland and Orange County) being in the second appellate department. The Second Department sits in Brooklyn at the Court House on Pierrepont Street and Morgan Place. Appellate department is the term used to distinguish the four appellate jurisdictions in New York state. ... Appellate Department is the informal term used to distinguish the four appellate jurisdictions in New York State. ... Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City which carries northbound one-way traffic. ... Mercator projection of Long Island Long Island is an island in New York, USA. At 1,377 square miles (3567 km²) and is home to 7. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Putnam County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Dutchess County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Rockland County is a county located in the state of New York. ... The Orange County Government Center in Goshen, N.Y., designed by Paul Rudolph. ...


The borough of Brooklyn is also home to the Red Hook Community Justice Center, which opened in 2000 as the nation's first multi-jurisdictional community court which was built with city, state, and federal assistance in an attempt to alleviate the chronic lack of access to justice services in the isolated Red Hook area in Brooklyn. The court combines family court, civil and housing court and minor criminal court functions and takes a community development approach to justice through such programs as the Youth Court where teenagers are trained and act as mediators to help their peers resolve disputes. This article is about the year 2000. ... A Holland-Style Factory Building in Red Hook Red Hook circa 1875 Red Hook is a neighborhood of the Borough of Brooklyn, New York, USA. Before annexation into Brooklyn, Red Hook was a separate village. ...


Other Elected Officials

In addition to the mayor, residents elect two other officials by city-wide vote:


The Public Advocate

The Public Advocate is a directly elected executive official and heads the Office of the Public Advocate. The Public Advocate's primary responsibility is to ease public relations with the government, investigate complaints regarding city agencies, mediate disputes between city agencies and citizens, serve as the city's ombudsman and advise the mayor on community relations. The Public Advocate serves as the presiding officer of the New York City Council and is an ex-officio member of all Council committees. The Public Advocate is permitted to introduce legislation in the Council. The current Public Advocate is Betsy Gotbaum, a Democrat. She was elected in 2001 and reelected in 2005. Term limits prevent her from seeking a third term in 2009 Look up Ombudsman in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... New York City Hall The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. ... Betsy Gotbaum is the Public Advocate of New York City. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Comptroller

The Comptroller is the city's chief financial officer. In addition to managing the city's $80 billion pension fund, the Comptroller advises the mayor and the City Council on all financial matters, fiscal policy and financial transactions. The Office of the Comptroller is empowered with limited investigational power over all city expenditures and finance, and is responsible for auditing the finances of all city agencies. The Comptroller is a member of the Board of all city pension funds, and is responsible for managing the assets of the pension funds. The Comptroller also has responsibility for issuing and marketing all city bonds. The current Comptroller, elected in 2001 and reelected in 2005, is William C. Thompson, Jr., a Democrat. Term limits prevent him from seeking reelection in 2009. A pension (also known as superannuation) is a retirement plan intended to provide a person with a secure income for life. ... A financial audit, or more accurately, an audit of financial statements, is the examination by an independent third party of the financial statements of a company or other organisation, resulting in the publication of an independent opinion on whether or not those financial statements are relevant, accurate and complete. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William C. Thomspson, Jr. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Boroughs

The five boroughs are coterminous with their respective counties, but the counties do not have actual county governments. Each borough elects a Borough President, but under the current city charter, the Borough President's powers are limited—he or she has a small discretionary budget to spend on projects within the borough. (The last significant power of the borough presidents—to appoint a member of the Board of Education —was abolished, with the board, on June 30, 2002.) Currently, borough presidents serve as ex officio members of various boards and committees. Administrative divisions of New York State differ from those in certain other countries and most U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... Administrative divisions of New York State differ from those in certain other countries and most U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... A board of education or a school board or school committee is the title of the board of directors of a local school district. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ...


Borough Presidents

The Borough Presidents are elected by direct popular vote from each of New York City's five boroughs (see below). Though they were powerful in the past, today, borough presidents have little influence. The borough presidents are seen mainly as ceremonial leaders of their boroughs and borough cheerleaders. The last major responsibility of the borough presidents was their power to appoint a member of the Board of Education, which was abolished in 2002. The two major remaining appointments of the Borough President, is one member of the city Planning Commission and one member of the Panel for Educational Policy. Currently, their responsibility is to advise the mayor on issues relating to each borough, to comment on all land use items in their borough, to advocate borough needs in the annual municipal budget process, to administer a small discretionary budget for projects within each borough, to make certain political appointments for intra-borough offices, to appoint Community Boards (see below), chair the Borough Boards (see below) and to sit as ex officio members on various other boards and committees. Each of the borough presidents has certain pet projects they push while in office. The current Borough Presidents are: For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ...

The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ... Adolfo Carrión, Jr. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Marty Markowitz is the Borough President of Brooklyn, New York City. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Scott Stringer (born 1960) is a New York politician and the current Borough President of Manhattan. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ... Helen Marshall is the Borough President of Queens in New York City and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... For other uses, see Staten Island (disambiguation) Staten Island, shown in an enhanced satellite image Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, located on an island of the same name on the west side of the Narrows at the entrance of New York Harbor. ... James Molinaro, is the 14th and current Borough President of Staten Island, New York. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ...

Borough Boards

Each Borough has a Borough Board consisting of the Borough President, the City Council members from the borough, and the chair of each of the borough's Community Boards. The Borough Boards meet monthly to serve the needs of the local communities. They may hold public hearings, make inquiries into the performance of public services, and make recommendations about city owned land use and sales within the borough.


Community Boards

New York City is divided into 59 administrative districts, each served by a Community Board. Community Boards are local representative bodies that serve as advocates for New York City residents and communities. Each Board has up to 50 voting members, with one half of the membership appointed each year for two-year terms; there are no term limits. Additionally, all city council members whose council districts cover part of a community district are ex-officio Board members and may participate in all Board activities. However, council members may not vote on Board issues. Borough Presidents appoint the voting Community Board members, with half of the appointees nominated by council members representing the district. Broadly assigned by the city charter to "Consider the needs of the district which it serves," the Boards have been limited in their ability by ineffective local communication channels, minuscule budgets and archaic technology. As a result, many residents have concluded that they have little impact on the operation of their communities or their lives. The BeyondVoting Wiki and the Community-Based Planning Task Force have begun to address the limitations. See Community Board 3, Queens' website and Livable Neighborhoods Report to learn more about a typical Board's operation and how these efforts hope to make improvements in the future.


The Seal of New York City

The seal of the City of New York, adopted in an earlier form in 1686, bears the legend SIGILLVM CIVITATIS NOVI EBORACI which means simply "The Seal of the City of New York": Eboracum was the Roman name for York, the titular seat of James II as Duke of York. The two supporters represent the unity between Native American and colonist, the four windmill sails recall the city's Dutch history as New Amsterdam, and the beavers and flour barrels the city's earliest trade goods (see History of New York City). The crest over the seal is the American eagle added after the Revolution and at the bottom 1625, the date of the founding of the city. New York City Seal, image made by Dov Gutterman, and posted at http://fotw. ... This article is about the English city. ... James II of England and VII of Scotland (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685. ... New Amsterdam (Dutch: Nieuw Amsterdam) was the name of the 17th century fortified settlement on Manhattan Island in the New Netherland territory (1614-1674) situated originally between 38 and 42 degrees latitude. ... // Lenape and New Netherland: Prehistory:1613-1664 Main article: History of New York City (prehistory-1664) Prehistory in the area began with the geological formation of the peculiar territory of what is today New York City. ...


See also

  New York City  v·d·e 
Flag of New York City

History · Government · Geography · Demographics · Economy · Transportation
Culture · Media · Music · Sports · Buildings & Architecture · Museums · Education
New York City Lists · New York City Portal · New York State Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... // Lenape and New Netherland: Prehistory:1613-1664 Main article: History of New York City (prehistory-1664) Prehistory in the area began with the geological formation of the peculiar territory of what is today New York City. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... New York City Hall The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. ... The New York City Civil Court is the civil branch of the New York City courts system. ... The New York City Criminal Court is the begining level trial court of criminal cases in the City of New York. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Big Apple Location Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,214. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_York_City. ... // Lenape and New Netherland: Prehistory:1613-1664 Main article: History of New York City (prehistory-1664) Prehistory in the area began with the geological formation of the peculiar territory of what is today New York City. ... New York City is the largest city in North America and one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the world, and has a long history of absorbing immigrants from nations all over the globe. ... A busker plays in the New York City subway. ... Carnegie Hall, a major music venue in New York The music of New York City is a diverse and important field in the world of music; no American city has as central a place in music history as New York City. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005. ... New York City is home to hundreds of cultural institutions and historic sites, many of which are internationally known. ... // Culture and Education List of famous New Yorkers List of colleges and universities in New York City List of New York City newspapers and magazines List of New York City Television and Film studios List of television shows set in New York City List of movies set in New York... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ...

The Five Boroughs: The Bronx · Brooklyn · Manhattan · Queens · Staten Island
New York City Governmental Institutions
Flag of New York City

Government · Brooklyn Public Library · City University of New York · Department of Education · Department of Parks and Recreation · Fire Department (FDNY) · New York Public Library · Police Department (NYPD) · Queens Borough Public Library The Five Boroughs of New York City: 1: Manhattan 2: Brooklyn 3: Queens 4: Bronx 5: Staten Island In New York City, a borough is a unique form of government used to administer the five constituent counties that make up the city; it differs significantly from other borough forms of... The Bronx is one of the five Boroughs of New York City in the United States. ... A map of New York City, highlighting Brooklyn. ... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Queens Borough in New York City, in yellow Queens is the largest in area and second most populous of the five boroughs of New York City. ... Staten Island, in yellow, lies to the southwest of the rest of New York City. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Big Apple Location Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,214. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_York_City. ... The Main Branch, Brooklyn Public Library, Grand Army Plaza, 2003 The Brooklyn Public Library (BPL), is the public library system of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym pronounced kyoo-nee), is the public university system of New York City. ... The New York City Department of Education is a department of the city of New York which runs almost all of the citys public schools. ... The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation is the branch of government of the City of New York responsible for maintaining the citys parks system, preserving and maintaining the ecological diversity of the citys natural areas, and furnishing recreational opportunities for citys residents. ... The New York City Fire Department or the Fire Department of New York (FDNY) has the responsibility of protecting citizens and property in New York Citys five boroughs from fires and fire hazards, as well as first response to biological, chemical and radioactive hazards. ... New York Public Library, central block, built 1897–1911, Carrère and Hastings, architects (June 2003) The New York Public Library (NYPL), one of three public library systems serving New York City, is one of the leading libraries in the United States. ... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) , the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... The Queens Borough Public Library, or QBPL is the public library for the Borough of Queens and one of three library systems serving New York City. ...

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The Five Boroughs: The Bronx · Brooklyn · Manhattan · Queens · Staten Island

  Results from FactBites:
 
New York City - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8365 words)
New York City is a center for international finance, fashion, entertainment, and culture, and is widely considered to be one of the world's major global cities with an extraordinary collection of museums, galleries, performance venues, media outlets, international corporations, and financial markets.
New York City emerged from World War II as the unquestioned leading city of the world, with Wall Street leading America's emergence as the world's dominant economic power, the United Nations headquarters (built in Manhattan in 1952) emphasizing its political influence, and the rise of Abstract Expressionism displacing Paris as center of the art world.
New York City is located at the center of the BosWash megalopolis, 218 miles (350 km) driving distance from Boston and 220 miles (353 km) from Washington, D.C. The city's total area is 468.9 square miles (1,214.4 km²), of which 35.31% is water.
Government of New York City - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2922 words)
The New York City Council is a unicameral body consisting of 51 Council members whose districts are defined by geographic population boundaries.
New York City's legislative power is vested in the New York City Council, a unicameral body consisting of 51 Council members, each representing a district of approximately 157,000 people.
The Public Advocate's primary responsibility is to ease public relations with the government, investigate complaints regarding city agencies, mediate disputes between city agencies and citizens, serve as the city's ombudsman and advise the mayor on community relations.
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