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Encyclopedia > Gothic novel
Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the "Gothic revival" style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole
Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the "Gothic revival" style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole

The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. It depended for its effect on the pleasing terror it induced in the reader, a new extension of literary pleasures that was essentially Romantic. It is the predecessor of modern horror fiction and, above all, has led to the common definition of "gothic" as being connected to the dark and horrific. Horace Walpoles gothic mansion at Strawberry Hill (Contemporary engraving). ... Horace Walpoles gothic mansion at Strawberry Hill (Contemporary engraving). ... Neo-gothic architecture is an American branch of the Gothic revival style that was imported from England in the 1830s. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or subject matter (content). ... Romanticism was a secular and intellectual movement in the history of ideas that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle or horrify the reader. ...


Prominent features of gothic novels included terror (psychological as well as physical), mystery, the supernatural, ghosts, haunted buildings, castles, darkness, death, decay, madness, hereditary curses, and so on. The supernatural (Latin: super- exceeding + nature) refers to forces and phenomena which are beyond ordinary scientific measurement. ... A manufactured image of a ghostly woman ascending a staircase A ghost is an alleged non-corporeal manifestation of a dead person (or, rarely, an animal, vehicle). ... A haunted house is a building that supposedly is a centre for supernatural occurrences or paranormal phenomena. ...


Important ideas concerning and influencing the Gothic include: Anti-Catholicism, especially criticism of Catholic excesses such as the Inquisition (in southern European countries such as Italy and Spain); romanticism of an ancient Medieval past; melodrama; and parody (including self-parody).

Contents


Origins of the gothic novel

The term "gothic" was originally a disparaging term applied to a style of medieval architecture (Gothic architecture) and art (Gothic art). The opprobrious term "gothick" was embraced by the 18th century proponents of the gothic revival, a forerunner of the Romantic genres. Gothic revival architecture, which became popular in the nineteenth century, was a reaction to the classical architecture that was a hallmark of the Age of Reason. See also Gothic art. ... The Western (Royal) Portal at Chartres Cathedral ( 1145). ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Romanticism was a secular and intellectual movement in the history of ideas that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In a way similar to the gothic revivalists' rejection of the clarity and rationalism of the neoclassical style of the Enlightened Establishment, the term "gothic" became linked with an appreciation of the joys of extreme emotion, the thrill of fearfulness and awe inherent in the sublime, and a quest for atmosphere. The ruins of gothic buildings gave rise to multiple linked emotions by representing the inevitable decay and collapse of human creations— thus the urge to add fake ruins as eyecatchers in English landscape parks. English Protestants often associated medieval buildings with what they saw as a dark and terrifying period, characterized by harsh laws enforced by torture, and with mysterious, fantastic and superstitious rituals. Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture. ... The Age of Enlightenment refers to the 18th century in European philosophy, and is often thought of as part of a period which includes the Age of Reason. ... The Establishment is a slang term (chiefly in British and Commonwealth English) for a traditional conservative ruling class and its institutions. ... In aesthetics, the sublime (from the Latin sublimis (exalted)) is the quality of transcendent greatness, whether physical, moral, intellectual or artistic. ... Black cats are part of many superstitions. ...


The first gothic novels

The term "gothic" came to be applied to the literary genre precisely because the genre dealt with such emotional extremes and dark themes, and because it found its most natural settings in the buildings of this style - castles, mansions, and monasteries, often remote, crumbling, and ruined. It was a fascination with this architecture and its related art, poetry (see Graveyard Poets), and even landscape gardening that inspired the first wave of gothic novelists. For example, Horace Walpole, whose The Castle of Otranto is often regarded as the first true gothic novel, was obsessed with fake medieval gothic architecture, and built his own house, Strawberry Hill, in that form, sparking off a fashion for gothic revival. ... Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ... The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. ... Strawberry Hill is a place in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames near Twickenham. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


Walpole's novel arose out of this obsession with the medieval. He originally claimed that the book was a real medieval romance he had discovered and republished. Thus was born the gothic novel's association with fake documentation to increase its effect. Indeed, The Castle of Otranto was originally subtitled A Romance -- a literary form held by educated taste to be tawdry and unfit even for children, due to its superstitious elements -- but Walpole revived some of the elements of the medieval romance in a new form. The basic plot created many other gothic staples, including a threatening mystery and an ancestral curse, as well as countless trappings such as hidden passages and oft-fainting heroines. A false document is a form of verisimilitude that attempts to create in the reader (viewer, audience, etc. ... The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. ... As a literary genre, romance refers to a style of heroic prose and verse narrative current in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. ...


It was however Ann Radcliffe who created the gothic novel in its now-standard form. Among other elements, Radcliffe introduced the brooding figure of the gothic villain, which developed into the Byronic hero. Unlike Walpole's, her novels, beginning with The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794), were best-sellers, and virtually everyone in English society was reading them. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818) is undoubtedly one of the most important literary triumphs of this period. Ann Radcliffe (July 9, 1764 - February 7, 1823) was an English author, a pioneer of the gothic novel. ... A cartoon villain. ... A theme that pervades much of Byrons work is that of the Byronic hero, an idealized but flawed character whose attributes may include: having conflicting emotions, bipolar tendencies, or moodiness self-critical and introspective struggles with integrity having a distaste for social institutions and social norms being an exile... The Mysteries of Udolpho, by Ann Radcliffe, was first published in 1784 by G. G. and J. Robinson of London. ... Mary Shelley Mary Shelley (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English novelist, the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... Book covers for Frankenstein have taken many forms over the years which emphasize different themes of the novel such as gothic horror, science fiction and romanticism. ...


France and Germany

At about the same time, parallel Romantic literary movements developed in continental Europe: the roman noir ("black novel") in France and the Schauerroman ("shudder novel") in Germany.


Writers of the roman noir include François Guillaume Ducray-Duminil, Baculard d'Arnaud, and Madame de Genlis. Some writings of the Marquis de Sade have also been called "gothic". Sade provided a critique of the genre in his Reflections on the novel (1800), considering The Monk to be superior to the work of Ann Radcliffe. Stéphanie Félicité Ducrest de St-Aubin, comtesse de Genlis (January 25, 1746 - December 31, 1830), French writer and educator, was born of a noble but impoverished Burgundian family, at Champcéry, near Autun. ... Portrait of the Marquis de Sade by Charles-Amédée-Philippe van Loo (c. ...


The German Schauerroman was often more horrific and violent than the English gothic novel, and may have influenced Matthew Gregory Lewis's The Monk (1796) in this regard. One notable writer was E.T.A. Hoffman. Matthew Gregory Lewis (July 9, 1775 - May 14, 1818) was an English novelist and dramatist, often referred to as Monk Lewis, because of the success of his Gothic novel, The Monk. ... The Monk is a Gothic novel by Matthew Gregory Lewis that first appeared in 1796. ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ... ETA Hoffman Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann (January 24, 1776 - June 25, 1822), was a German romantic and fantasy author and composer. ...


Later developments

In the United Kingdom, the gothic novel as a genre largely played itself out by 1840. This was helped by the over-saturation of the genre by cheap "pulp" works—which would later morph into cheap horror fiction in the form of "penny dreadfuls"—as well as a decline in the genre's respectability since the turn of the century, caused by the publication of works such as Matthew Gregory Lewis' The Monk (1796), a shocking (particularly at the time) tale of sex, violence and debauchery that almost bordered on the pornographic. 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Penny Dreadful can refer to: The 19th century British penny dreadful publications. ... Matthew Gregory Lewis (July 9, 1775 - May 14, 1818) was an English novelist and dramatist, often referred to as Monk Lewis, because of the success of his Gothic novel, The Monk. ... The Monk is a Gothic novel by Matthew Gregory Lewis that first appeared in 1796. ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ...


However, the gothic novel had a lasting effect on the development of literary form in the Victorian period. It led to the Victorian craze for short ghost stories, as well as the short, shocking, macabre tales as mastered by the American author Edgar Allan Poe. It also was a heavy influence on Charles Dickens, who read gothic novels as a teenager and incorporated their gloomy atmosphere and melodrama into his own works, shifting them to a more modern period. The mood and themes of the gothic novel held a particular fascination for the Victorians, with their morbid obsession with mourning rituals, Mementos, and mortality in general. Ghost Stories (Japanese: 学校の怪談, Gakkō no Kaidan, School Ghost Stories) is a twenty-one-episode anime series created in 2000 by animation studio Aniplex for Fuji Television, based on a manga series by Yosuke Takahashi. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, editor, critic and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Mourning is in the simplest sense synonymous with grief over the death of someone. ... Momento mori is a Latin phrase that may be freely translated as Remember that you are mortal, Remember you will die, or Remember your death. It names a genre of artistic creations that vary widely from one another, but which all share the same purpose, which is to remind people...


Post-Victorian legacy

By the 1880s, it was time for a revival of the gothic novel as a semi-respectable literary form. This was the period of the gothic works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Machen, and Oscar Wilde, and the most famous gothic villain ever appeared in Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). Other notable writers included Algernon Blackwood, William Hope Hodgson, and H.P.Lovecraft. Lovecraft's protégé, Robert Bloch, penned the gothic horror classic, Psycho, which drew on the classic interests of the genre. From these, the gothic genre per se gave way to modern horror fiction, although many literary critics use the term to cover the entire genre, and many modern writers of horror (or indeed other types of fiction) exhibit considerable gothic sensibilities -- examples include the works of Anne Rice, as well as some of the less sensationalist works of Stephen King. 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850 – December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. ... Arthur Machen (March 3, 1863 – December 15th, 1947) was a leading Welsh-born author of the 1890s. ... Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Anglo-Irish playwright, novelist, poet, short story writer and Freemason. ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847–April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... Bela Lugosi as Dracula; U.S. postage stamp first issued in 1997 as part of a series celebrating Famous Movie Monsters Dracula (1897) is a novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, and the name of the worlds most famous vampire character. ... Algernon Henry Blackwood (March 14, 1869 – December 10, 1951) was a British writer of tales of the supernatural. ... William Hope Hodgson (1877–1918) was an English author of horror and fantastic fiction. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... Robert Albert Bloch (April 5, 1917, Chicago, Illinois-September 23, 1994, Los Angeles) was a prolific American writer. ... Psycho is a 1959 suspense novel by Robert Bloch, which describes the events surrounding the encounter of an embezzler and the profoundly disturbed motel proprietor Norman Bates. ... Horror fiction is, broadly, fiction in any medium intended to scare, unsettle or horrify the reader. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author best known for his enormously popular horror novels. ...


The genre also influenced American writing to create the genre of Southern Gothic literature, which combines some Gothic sensibilities (such as the Grotesque) with the setting and style of the Southern United States. Examples include William Faulkner, Harper Lee, and Flannery O'Connor. Also see Southern Ontario Gothic. Southern Gothic is a sub-genre of the Gothic writing style, unique to American literature. ... When commonly used, grotesque means strange, fantastic, ugly or bizarre, and thus is often used to describe shapes and distorted forms such as Halloween masks or gargoyles on churches. ... Southern United States. ... William Faulkner photographed 1954 by Carl Van Vechten William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was a Nobel Prize-winning novelist from Mississippi. ... Nelly Harper Lee (born April 28, 1926) is an American novelist, worst known for her Pulitzer Prize-winning 1960 novel To Kill a Mockingbird. ... Flannery OConnor Mary Flannery OConnor (March 25, 1925 – August 3, 1964) was an American author. ... Southern Ontario Gothic is a sub-genre of the Gothic novel genre and a feature of Canadian literature that comes from Southern Ontario. ...


The themes of the gothic novel have had innumerable children. It led to the modern horror film, one of the most popular of all genres seen in films. While few classical composers drew on gothic works, twentieth century popular music drew on it strongly, eventually resulting in gothic rock and the goth subculture surrounding it. Themes from gothic writers such as H.P. Lovecraft were also used amongst heavy metal bands, especially in black metal, death metal and gothic metal. More recently, the gothic tradition has been expanded to new media forms on the internet. Gothic rock (also called goth rock or simply goth) evolved out of post-punk during the late 1970s. ... NYC goth band The Naked and the Dead (1985). ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... Heavy metal is a genre of rock music that emerged as a defined musical style in the 1970s, having its roots in hard rock bands which, between 1967 and 1974, mixed blues and rock to create a hybrid with a thick, heavy, guitar-and-drums-centered sound, characterised by the... This page is about the musical genre black metal. ... It has been suggested that Death and Roll be merged into this article or section. ... Gothic metal is a genre of heavy metal music that originated in the early 1990s in Europe as an outgrowth of doom-death, a subgenre of doom metal. ...


Prominent examples

The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ... Vathek (alternatively titled Vathek, an Arabian Tale or The History of the Caliph Vathek) is a Gothic novel written by William Thomas Beckford. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Fonthill Abbey designed for William Beckford by the architect James Wyatt William Thomas Beckford (October 1, 1760 – May 2, 1844) was an English novelist, art critic, travel writer and politician. ... The Mysteries of Udolpho, by Ann Radcliffe, was first published in 1784 by G. G. and J. Robinson of London. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Ann Radcliffe (July 9, 1764 - February 7, 1823) was an English author, a pioneer of the gothic novel. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Godwin William Godwin (3 March 1756 – 7 April 1836) was an English political and miscellaneous writer, considered one of the important precursors of both utilitarian and liberal anarchist thought. ... The Monk is a Gothic novel by Matthew Gregory Lewis that first appeared in 1796. ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ... Matthew Gregory Lewis (July 9, 1775 - May 14, 1818) was an English novelist and dramatist, often referred to as Monk Lewis, because of the success of his Gothic novel, The Monk. ... The Italian (1800) is a novel belonging to the Gothic genre and written by the English author Ann Radcliffe. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Ann Radcliffe (July 9, 1764 - February 7, 1823) was an English author, a pioneer of the gothic novel. ... Book covers for Frankenstein have taken many forms over the years which emphasize different themes of the novel such as gothic horror, science fiction and romanticism. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Mary Shelley Mary Shelley (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English novelist, the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... Wikisource – The Free Library – is a Wikimedia project to build a free, wiki library of source texts, along with translations into any language and other supporting materials. ... The Vampyre is a short novel written by John William Polidori and generally regarded as the progenitor of the romantic vampire genre of fantasy fiction. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... John William Polidori (September 7, 1795 - August 24, 1821) is credited by some as the creator of the vampire genre of fantasy fiction. ... Melmoth the Wanderer is a gothic novel published in 1820, written by Charles Robert Maturin. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Robert Maturin, also known as Charles Maturin or C.R. Maturin, was an Irish Protestant clergyman (ordained by the Church of Ireland) and a writer of gothic plays and novels. ... Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1822) is an autobiographical novel by Thomas de Quincey first published in 1821 in the London Magazine, as a novel in 1822 and revised in 1856, about his laudanum (opium and alcohol) addiction and how it affected his life. ... The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas de Quincey from the frontispiece of Revolt of the Tartars, Thomas de Quincey (August 15, 1785 – December 8, 1859) was an English author and intellectual. ... The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner was published by James Hogg in 1824. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For the Texas Governor, see Jim Hogg James Hogg James Hogg (1770 - November 21, 1835) was a Scottish poet and novelist who wrote in both Scots and English. ... Naval Battle of Navarino by Carneray 1827 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Young Goodman Brown (1835) is a frequently taught and anthologized short story by American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Nathaniel Hawthorne illustrated in an 1870 publication. ... The Ministers Black Veil is a short story written by the nineteenth century author Nathaniel Hawthorne. ... Charles Darwin 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Nathaniel Hawthorne illustrated in an 1870 publication. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, editor, critic and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Wikisource – The Free Library – is a Wikimedia project to build a free, wiki library of source texts, along with translations into any language and other supporting materials. ... The Tell-Tale Heart is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, which was first published in James Russell Lowells The Pioneer in January 1843; Poe republished it in his periodical The Broadway Journal for August 23, 1845. ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, editor, critic and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Wikisource – The Free Library – is a Wikimedia project to build a free, wiki library of source texts, along with translations into any language and other supporting materials. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... George Lippard (1822-1854) was a brilliant but erratic 19th century American novelist, journalist, and playwright. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier (August 30, 1811 – October 23, 1872) was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist, and literary critic. ... Wikisource – The Free Library – is a Wikimedia project to build a free, wiki library of source texts, along with translations into any language and other supporting materials. ... Carmilla is a novella by Joseph Sheridan le Fanu. ... 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (August 28, 1814 – February 7, 1873) was an Irish writer of short stories and mystery novels. ... The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. ... 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850 – December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. ... VHS cover for the 1945 film version showing Hurd Hatfield (centre) as Gray, Donna Reed (left) as Gladys Hallward, Angela Lansbury (right) as Sibyl Vane and George Sanders (background) as Lord Henry Wotton The Picture of Dorian Gray, the only novel by Oscar Wilde, was first published in 1890 and... 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Anglo-Irish playwright, novelist, poet, short story writer and Freemason. ... Cordier and his lover, Odette Diary of a Madman is a 1963 horror film directed by Reginald Le Borg and starring Vincent Price as Simon Cordier, a French magistrate and amateur sculptor who comes into contact with a malevolent spirit. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Guy de Maupassant Henri René Albert Guy de Maupassant (IPA: ) (5 August 1850 – 6 July 1893) was a popular 19th-century French writer. ... Wikisource – The Free Library – is a Wikimedia project to build a free, wiki library of source texts, along with translations into any language and other supporting materials. ... The Yellow Wallpaper is a short story by feminist author Charlotte Perkins Gilman. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Charlotte Perkins Gilman in about 1900 Charlotte Anna Perkins Stetson Gilman (July 3, 1860 – August 17, 1935) was a prominent American short story and non-fiction writer, novelist, commercial artist, lecturer and feminist social reformer. ... Bela Lugosi as Dracula; U.S. postage stamp first issued in 1997 as part of a series celebrating Famous Movie Monsters Dracula (1897) is a novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, and the name of the worlds most famous vampire character. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847–April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... Wikisource – The Free Library – is a Wikimedia project to build a free, wiki library of source texts, along with translations into any language and other supporting materials. ... The Turn of the Screw is a novella written by Henry James. ... 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... Spoiler warning: The Monkeys Paw is a short story by W. W. Jacobs, written in 1902. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Wymark Jacobs (1863–1943) was an English author of macabre short stories. ... The title character as depicted by Lon Chaney (1883-1930) in the 1925 film depiction. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Gaston Leroux. ... Lair of the White Worm is a horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, who also wrote Dracula. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847–April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... Wikisource – The Free Library – is a Wikimedia project to build a free, wiki library of source texts, along with translations into any language and other supporting materials. ... Gormenghast Castle in the BBC miniseries Gormenghast is a fictional castle of titanic proportions that features prominently in a series of fantasy works penned by Mervyn Peake. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mervyn Laurence Peake (July 9, 1911 – November 17, 1968) was a British modernist writer, artist, poet and illustrator. ... The Name of the Rose, a 1980 novel by Umberto Eco, is a murder mystery set in an Italian monastery in the year 1327. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Photo of Umberto Eco by Robert Birnbaum Umberto Eco (born January 5, 1932) is an Italian medievalist, philosopher and novelist, best known for his novel The Name of the Rose and his many essays. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... MiloÅ¡ Urban (born on 1967) is a Czech novelist and horror writer. ...

Gothic satire

Northanger Abbey book cover Northanger Abbey was the first of Jane Austens novels to be completed for publication, though she had previously made a start on Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Jane Austen, in a portrait based on one drawn by her sister Cassandra Jane Austen (December 16, 1775 – July 18, 1817) was an English novelist whose work is considered part of the Western canon. ... Wikisource – The Free Library – is a Wikimedia project to build a free, wiki library of source texts, along with translations into any language and other supporting materials. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Thomas Love Peacock (October 18, 1785 - January 23, 1866) was an English satirist and author. ... The Ingoldsby Legends are a collection of myths, legends, ghost stories and poetry supposedly by Thomas Ingoldsby of Tappington manor, actually a pen-name of Richard Harris Barham. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Richard Harris Barham (December 6, 1788–June 17, 1845), English novelist and humorous poet, better known by his nom de plume of Thomas Ingoldsby, was born at Canterbury. ...

See also

Southern Gothic is a sub-genre of the Gothic writing style, unique to American literature. ... Southern Ontario Gothic is a sub-genre of the Gothic novel genre and a feature of Canadian literature that comes from Southern Ontario. ...

References

David Stevens "The Gothic Tradition" ISBN 0 521 777321 David Stevens is an Amercan Actor Filmography Mattress Man Commercial (2003) (V) - David Punch-Drunk Love (2002) - David No Dogs Allowed (2002) - Marko The Ballad of Lucy Whipple (2001) (TV) - Rusty Hawkins Twice Today (2001) - Chris Hunter Baby Bedlam (2000) - Motel Clerk Cage in Box Elder (2000) Kissed by an... The International Standard Book Number, or ISBN (sometimes pronounced is-ben), is a unique[1] identifier for books, intended to be used commercially. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Gothic Novel - MSN Encarta (189 words)
Gothic Novel, type of romantic fiction that predominated in English literature in the last third of the 18th century and the first two decades of the 19th century, the setting for which was usually a ruined Gothic castle or abbey (see Gothic Art and Architecture).
The Gothic novel, or Gothic romance, emphasized mystery and horror and was filled with ghost-haunted rooms, underground passages, and secret stairways.
The term Gothic is also used to designate narrative prose or poetry of which the principal elements are violence, horror, and the supernatural.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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