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Encyclopedia > Gothic Fiction
Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the "Gothic revival" style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole

Gothic fiction is an important genre of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. As a genre, it is generally believed to have been invented by the English author Horace Walpole, with his 1764 novel The Castle of Otranto. The effect of Gothic fiction depends on a pleasing sort of terror, an extension of essentially Romantic literary pleasures that were relatively new at the time of Walpole's novel. Horace Walpoles gothic mansion at Strawberry Hill (Contemporary engraving). ... Horace Walpoles gothic mansion at Strawberry Hill (Contemporary engraving). ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... A romance novel is a literary genre developed in Western culture, mainly in English-speaking countries. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. ... Horror is the feeling of revulsion that usually occurs after something frightening is seen, heard, or otherwise experienced. ... Romantics redirects here. ...


Prominent features of Gothic fiction include terror (both psychological and physical), mystery, the supernatural, ghosts, haunted houses and Gothic architecture, castles, darkness, death, decay, doubles, madness, secrets and hereditary curses. Look up Supernatural in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Ghost (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Interior of San Zanipolo, Venice, photo Giovanni dallOrto. ... This article describes the fortified buildings. ... Darkness is the absence of light. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Secrets can mean several things: Secrets (album), an 1996 album by Toni Braxton Secrets (2004 album), a 2004 album by Allison Crowe Secrets (film), a 1933 film starring Mary Pickford Secrets (1992 film), a 1992 film starring Noah Taylor Secrets (band), a Virginia, United States fusion jazz band Secrets (novel... For the scientific journal Heredity see Heredity (journal) Heredity (the adjective is hereditary) is the transfer of characters from parent to offspring, either through their genes or through the social institution called inheritance (for example, a title of nobility is passed from individual to individual according to relevant customs and... Look up Curse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The stock characters of Gothic fiction include tyrants, villains, bandits, maniacs, Byronic heroes, persecuted maidens, femmes fatales, madwomen, magicians, vampires, werewolves, monsters, demons, revenants, ghosts, perambulating skeletons, the Wandering Jew and the Devil himself. A stock character is a fictional character that relies heavily on cultural types or stereotypes for its personality, manner of speech, and other characteristics. ... A tyrant (from Greek τυραννος) is a usurper of rightful power, possessing absolute power and ruling by tyranny. ... A stereotypical villain, common in early 20th century silent films, wears formal black clothes, exquisitely neat facial hair, and a maniacal demeanour. ... Butch Cassidy, a famous outlaw An outlaw, a person living the lifestyle of outlawry, is most familiar to contemporary readers as a stock character in Western movies. ... The term maniac can mean more than one thing: (archaic) A maniac is a person who exhibits the behaviour known as mania. ... The Byronic hero is an idealized, but flawed, character exemplified in the life and writings of Lord Byron, characterized by his ex-lover Lady Caroline Lamb as being mad, bad and dangerous to know.[1] The Byronic hero first appears in Byrons semi-autobiographical epic narrative poem Childe Harold... A poster for The Perils of Pauline (1914). ... Convicted spy Mata Hari made her name synonymous with femme fatale during WWI. A femme fatale (plural: femmes fatales) is an alluring and seductive woman whose charms ensnare her lovers in bonds of irresistible desire, often leading them into compromising, dangerous, and deadly situations. ... The Madwoman in the Attic : The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination, published in 1979, examines Victorian literature from a feminist perspective. ... otheruses|Magician}} The Enchanted Garden of Messer Ansaldo by Marie Spartali Stillman: a magician makes his garden bear fruit and flowers in winter. ... Further reading Christopher Frayling - Vampyres: Lord Byron to Count Dracula 1992. ... A werewolf in folklore and mythology is a person who changes into a wolf, either by purposefully using magic in some manner or by being placed under a curse. ... This article is about monsters as a kind of legendary creature. ... The demon Satan In folklore, mythology, and religion, a demon is a supernatural being that is generally described as an evil spirit, but is also depicted to be good in some instances. ... In the Middle Ages, revenants were legendary animated corpses which rose from the grave to haunt the living. ... For other uses, see Ghost (disambiguation). ... Animated skeletons in a woodcut from La Danse Macabre by Hans Holbein the Younger (1538). ... The Wandering Jew by Gustave Doré. For other uses, see Wandering Jew (disambiguation). ... This page is about the concept of the Devil. ...


Important ideas concerning and regarding the Gothic include: Anti-Catholicism, especially criticism of Roman Catholic excesses such as the Inquisition (in southern European countries such as Italy and Spain); romanticism of an ancient Medieval past; melodrama; and parody (including self-parody). Anti-Catholicism is discrimination, hostility or prejudice directed at Catholics or the Catholic Church. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... This article is about the Inquisition by the Roman Catholic Church. ... Romantics redirects here. ... Poster for The Perils of Pauline (1914). ...

Contents

Origins

The term "Gothic" was originally a disparaging term applied to a style of medieval architecture (Gothic architecture) and art (Gothic art). The opprobrious term "gothick" was embraced by the 18th century proponents of the gothic revival, a forerunner of the Romantic genres. Gothic revival architecture, which became popular in the nineteenth century, was a reaction to the classical architecture that was a hallmark of the Age of Reason. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... This article is about building architecture. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Interior of San Zanipolo, Venice, photo Giovanni dallOrto. ... The Western (Royal) Portal at Chartres Cathedral ( 1145). ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Romantics redirects here. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In a way similar to the gothic revivalists' rejection of the clarity and rationalism of the neoclassical style of the Enlightened Establishment, the term "gothic" became linked with an appreciation of the joys of extreme emotion, the thrill of fearfulness and awe inherent in the sublime, and a quest for atmosphere. The ruins of gothic buildings gave rise to multiple linked emotions by representing the inevitable decay and collapse of human creations— thus the urge to add fake ruins as eyecatchers in English landscape parks. English Protestants often associated medieval buildings with what they saw as a dark and terrifying period, characterized by harsh laws enforced by torture, and with mysterious, fantastic and superstitious rituals. Late Baroque classicizing: G. P. Pannini assembles the canon of Roman ruins and Roman sculpture into one vast imaginary gallery (1756) Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that... 18th century philosophy redirects here. ... In aesthetics, the sublime (from the Latin sublimis (exalted)) is the quality of transcendent greatness, whether physical, moral, intellectual or artistic. ... The Palladian bridge in Prior Park in Bath The English Grounds of Wörlitz were one of the largest English parks in 18th-century Europe. ... For other uses, see Superstition (disambiguation). ...


The first gothic romances

The term "Gothic" came to be applied to the literary genre precisely because the genre dealt with such emotional extremes and very dark themes, and because it found its most natural settings in the buildings of this style — castles, mansions, and monasteries, often remote, crumbling, and ruined. It was a fascination with this architecture and its related art, poetry (see Graveyard Poets), and even landscape gardening that inspired the first wave of gothic novelists. For example, Horace Walpole, whose The Castle of Otranto (1764) is often regarded as the first true gothic romance, was obsessed with medieval gothic architecture, and built his own house, Strawberry Hill, in that form, sparking a fashion for gothic revival. Indeed Margaret Drabble suggests in the The Oxford Companion to English Literature (ed.; 5th & 6th edns) (1985, 2000), that the term 'Gothic' originally meant medieval, as in Castle of Otranto, a Gothic Tale. Graveyard Poets or Churchyard Poetsis a critical term applied in retrospect to a number of pre-Romantic English poets of the 18th century characterised by their gloomy meditations on mortality in the context of the graveyard. ... Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ... The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. ... Strawberry Hill is an affluent area of the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames near Twickenham. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Margaret Drabble (born June 5, 1939) is an English novelist. ...


Walpole's novel arose out of this obsession with the medieval. He originally claimed that the book was a real medieval romance he had discovered and republished. Thus was born the gothic novel's association with fake documentation to increase its effect. Indeed, The Castle of Otranto was originally subtitled "A Romance" — a literary form held by educated taste to be tawdry and unfit even for children, due to its superstitious elements — but Walpole revived some of the elements of the medieval romance in a new form. The basic plot created many other gothic staples, including a threatening mystery and an ancestral curse, as well as countless trappings such as hidden passages and oft-fainting heroines. A false document is a form of verisimilitude that attempts to create in the reader (viewer, audience, etc. ... As a literary genre, romance or chivalric romance refers to a style of heroic prose and verse narrative current in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. ...


It was however Ann Radcliffe who created the gothic novel in its now-standard form. Among other elements, Radcliffe introduced the brooding figure of the gothic villain, which developed into the Byronic hero. Unlike Walpole's, her novels, beginning with The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794), were best-sellers, although along with all novels they were looked down upon by well-educated people as sensationalist women's entertainment (despite some men's enjoyment of them). This article is about the 19th-century author. ... “Bad guy” redirects here. ... The Byronic hero is an idealized, but flawed, character exemplified in the life and writings of Lord Byron, characterized by his ex-lover Lady Caroline Lamb as being mad, bad and dangerous to know.[1] The Byronic hero first appears in Byrons semi-autobiographical epic narrative poem Childe Harold... The Mysteries of Udolpho, by Ann Radcliffe, was published in the summer of 1794 by G. G. and J. Robinson of London in 4 volumes. ...

"The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid. I have read all Mrs. Radcliffe's works, and most of them with great pleasure. The Mysteries of Udolpho, when I had once begun it, I could not lay down again; I remember finishing it in two days – my hair standing on end the whole time." [said Henry]
...
"I am very glad to hear it indeed, and now I shall never be ashamed of liking Udolpho myself. " [replied Catharine]
— Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey (written 1798) For films named Northanger Abbey, see Northanger Abbey (1986 film) or Northanger Abbey (2007 TV drama). ...

Radcliffe also provided an aesthetic for the burgeoning genre courtesy of her influential article "On the Supernatural in Poetry" in The New Monthly Magazine 7, 1826, pp 145-52, examining the distinction and correlation between Horror and Terror in Gothic fiction. Horror is the feeling of revulsion that usually occurs after something frightening is seen, heard, or otherwise experienced. ...


Developments in continental Europe, and The Monk

Contemporaneously to English Gothic, parallel Romantic literary movements developed in continental Europe: the roman noir ("black novel") in France (including such writers as François Guillaume Ducray-Duminil, Baculard d'Arnaud, and Madame de Genlis) and the Schauerroman ("shudder novel") in Germany (e.g. Christian Heinrich Spieß's Das Petermännchen, 1791/92) - which were often more horrific and violent than the English gothic novel. Stéphanie Félicité Ducrest de St-Aubin, comtesse de Genlis (January 25, 1746 - December 31, 1830), French writer and educator, was born of a noble but impoverished Burgundian family, at Champcéry, near Autun. ...


The fruit of this harvest of continental horrors was Matthew Gregory Lewis's lurid tale of monastic debauchery, black magic and diabolism The Monk (1796). Though Lewis' novel could be read as a sly, tongue-in-cheek spoof of the emerging genre, self-parody was a constituent part of the Gothic from the time of the genre's inception with Walpole's Otranto. Lewis' tale appalled some contemporary readers; however his portrayal of depraved monks, sadistic inquisitors and spectral nuns, and his scurrilous view of the Catholic church was an important development in the genre and influenced established terror-writer Ann Radcliffe in her last novel The Italian (1797). In this book the hapless protagonists are ensnared in a web of deceit by a malignant monk called Schedoni and eventually dragged before the tribunals of the Inquisition in Rome, leading one contemporary to remark that if Radcliffe wished to transcend the horror of these scenes she would have to visit hell itself (Birkhead 1921). Matthew Gregory Lewis (July 9, 1775 - May 14, 1818) was an English novelist and dramatist, often referred to as Monk Lewis, because of the success of his Gothic novel, The Monk. ... The Monk is a Gothic novel by Matthew Gregory Lewis that first appeared in 1796. ... The Italian (1800) is a novel belonging to the Gothic genre and written by the English author Ann Radcliffe. ... This article is about the Inquisition by the Roman Catholic Church. ...


The Marquis de Sade used a gothic framework for some of his fiction, notably The Misfortunes of Virtue and Eugenie de Franval, though the marquis himself never thought of his work as such. Sade critiqued the genre in the preface of his Reflections on the novel (1800) which is widely accepted today, stating that the gothic is "the inevitable product of the revolutionary shock with which the whole of Europe resounded". This correlation between the French revolutionary Terror and the "terrorist school" of writing represented by Radcliffe and Lewis was noted by contemporary critics of the genre. Sade considered The Monk to be superior to the work of Ann Radcliffe. Portrait of the Marquis de Sade by Charles-Amédée-Philippe van Loo (c. ... Justine (or The Misfortunes of Virtue, or several other titles: see below) is a classical erotic novel by Donatien Alphonse François de Sade, better known as the Marquis de Sade. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... For the Doctor Who British TV serial, see The Reign of Terror (Doctor Who). ...


Other notable writers in the continental tradition include Jan Potocki and E.T.A. Hoffmann. Noble Family Potocki Coat of Arms Piława Parents Stanisław Potocki Anna Teresa Ossolińska Consorts Julia Lubomirska Konstancja Potocka Children with Julia Lubomirska Alfred Wojciech Potocki Artur Potocki with Konstancja Potocka Bernard Potocki Irena Potocka Teresa Potocka Date of Birth March 3, 1761 Place of Birth Leżajsk... ETA Hoffman Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann (January 24, 1776 - June 25, 1822), was a German romantic and fantasy author and composer. ...


Parody

The excesses and frequent absurdities of the traditional Gothic made it rich territory for satire. The most famous parody of the Gothic is Jane Austen's novel Northanger Abbey (1818) in which the naive protagonist, after reading too much Gothic fiction, conceives herself a heroine of a Radcliffian romance and imagines murder and villainy on every side, though the truth turns out to be somewhat more prosaic. Jane Austen's novel is valuable for including a list of early Gothic works since known as the Northanger Horrid Novels: 1873 engraving of Jane Austen, based on a portrait drawn by her sister Cassandra. ... For films named Northanger Abbey, see Northanger Abbey (1986 film) or Northanger Abbey (2007 TV drama). ... The Northanger Horrid Novels are the seven early works of Gothic fiction recommended by the character Isabella Thorpe in Jane Austens novel Northanger Abbey (1818). ...

  • The Necromancer: or, The Tale of the Black Forest (1794) by 'Ludwig Flammenberg' (pseudonym for Carl Friedrich Kahlert; translated by Peter Teuthold)
  • Horrid Mysteries (1796) by the Marquis de Grosse (translated by P. Will)
  • Castle of Wolfenbach (1793) by Eliza Parsons
  • The Mysterious Warning, a German Tale (1796) by Eliza Parsons
  • Clermont (1798) by Regina Maria Roche
  • Orphan of the Rhine (1798) by Eleanor Sleath
  • The Midnight Bell (1798) by Francis Lathom

These books, with their lurid titles, were once thought to be the creations of Jane Austen's imagination, though later research confirmed that they did actually exist and stimulated renewed interest in the Gothic. Clermont is the name of several places in the United States of America: Clermont, Florida Clermont, Georgia Clermont, Indiana Clermont, Iowa Clermont, New York Clermont County, Ohio Clermont is the name of several communes in France: Clermont, in the Ariège département Clermont, in the Haute-Savoie département... Regina Maria Roche (1764-1845) is considered today to be a minor Gothic novelist who wrote very much in the shadow of Ann Radcliffe. ... Francis Lathom (1774 - 1832), was a British gothic novelist and playwright. ...


The Romantics

Further contributions to the Gothic genre were provided in the work of the Romantic poets. Prominent examples include Coleridge's Christabel and Keats's La Belle Dame Sans Merci which feature mysteriously fey ladies. Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Keats grave in Rome (left). ... Categories: Stub | Poems | British poems ...


The poetry, romantic adventures and character of Lord Byron, characterised by his spurned lover Lady Caroline Lamb as 'mad, bad and dangerous to know' was another inspiration for the Gothic, providing the archetype of the Byronic hero. Byron features, under the codename of 'Lord Ruthven', in Lady Caroline's own Gothic novel: Glenarvon (1816). Byron was also the host of the celebrated ghost-story competition involving himself, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley and John William Polidori at the Villa Diodati on the banks of Lake Geneva in the summer of 1816. This occasion was productive of both Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818) and Polidori's The Vampyre (1819). This latter story revives Lamb's Byronic 'Lord Ruthven', but this time as a vampire. The Vampyre has been accounted by cultural critic Christopher Frayling as one of the most influential works of fiction ever written and spawned a craze for vampire fiction and theatre (and latterly film) which has not ceased to this day. Mary Shelley's novel, though clearly influenced by the gothic tradition, is often considered the first science fiction novel, despite the omission in the novel of any scientific explanation of the monster's animation and the focus instead on the moral issues and consequences of such a creation. Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... Lady Caroline Lamb The Lady Caroline Lamb (13 November 1785–26 January 1828) was a British aristocrat, the only daughter of the 3rd Earl of Bessborough. ... The Byronic hero is an idealized, but flawed, character exemplified in the life and writings of Lord Byron, characterized by his ex-lover Lady Caroline Lamb as being mad, bad and dangerous to know.[1] The Byronic hero first appears in Byrons semi-autobiographical epic narrative poem Childe Harold... The title of Lord Ruthven was created on January 29, 1488 for Sir William Ruthven. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... John William Polidori (September 7, 1795 - August 24, 1821) is credited by some as the creator of the vampire genre of fantasy fiction. ... Lake Geneva or Lake Léman (French Lac Léman, le Léman, or Lac de Genève) is the second largest freshwater lake in Central Europe (after Lake Balaton). ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... The Vampyre is a short novel written by John William Polidori and is a progenitor of the romantic vampire genre of fantasy fiction. ... ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


A late example of traditional Gothic is Melmoth the Wanderer (1820) by Charles Robert Maturin which combines themes of Anti-Catholicism with an outcast Byronic hero. Melmoth the Wanderer is a gothic novel published in 1820, written by Charles Robert Maturin. ... Charles Robert Maturin, also known as Charles Maturin or C.R. Maturin, was an Irish Protestant clergyman (ordained by the Church of Ireland) and a writer of gothic plays and novels. ... Anti-Catholicism is discrimination, hostility or prejudice directed at Catholics or the Catholic Church. ... The Byronic hero is an idealized, but flawed, character exemplified in the life and writings of Lord Byron, characterized by his ex-lover Lady Caroline Lamb as being mad, bad and dangerous to know.[1] The Byronic hero first appears in Byrons semi-autobiographical epic narrative poem Childe Harold...


Victorian Gothic

Though it is sometimes asserted that the Gothic had played itself out by the Victorian era and had declined into the cheap horror fiction of the "penny dreadful" type, exemplified by the serial novel Varney the Vampire, in many ways Gothic was now entering its most creative phase - even if it was no longer the dominant literary genre. The greatest re-interpreter of the Gothic in this period was Edgar Allan Poe who opined 'that terror is not of Germany, but of the soul’. His story "The Fall of the House of Usher" (1839) explores these 'terrors of the soul' whilst revisiting classic Gothic tropes of aristocratic decay, death and madness. The legendary villainy of the Spanish Inquisition, previously explored by Gothicists Radcliffe, Lewis and Maturin, is revisited in "The Pit and the Pendulum" (1842). The influence of Ann Radcliffe is also detectable in Poe's "The Oval Portrait" (1842), including an honorary mention of her name in the text of the story. Penny Dreadful can refer to: The 19th century British penny dreadful publications. ... Varney the Vampire or The Feast of Blood was a mid-Victorian gothic horror story by James Malcolm Rymer, first published in 1845. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... The Fall of the House of Usher is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article is about one of the historical Inquisitions. ... This article is about the short story by Edgar Allan Poe. ... The Oval Portrait is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe involving the disturbing tale of a portrait in a chateau. ...


The influence of Byronic Romanticism evident in Poe is also apparent in the work of the Bronte sisters. Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights (1847) transports the Gothic to the forbidding Yorkshire Moors and features ghostly apparitions and a Byronic anti-hero in the person of the demonic Heathcliff whilst Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre (1847) adds the madwoman in the attic (Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar 1979) to the cast of gothic fiction. The Brontë's fiction is seen by some feminist critics as prime examples of Female Gothic, exploring woman's entrapment within domestic space and subjection to patriarchal authority and the transgressive and dangerous attempts to subvert and escape such restriction. Charlotte's Jane Eyre and Emily's Cathy are both examples of female protagonists in such a role (Jackson 1981: 123-29). Louisa May Alcott's gothic potboiler, A Long Fatal Love Chase (written in 1866, but published in 1995) is also an interesting specimen of this subgenre. Emily Jane Brontë (July 30, 1818 – December 19, 1848) was a British novelist and poet, now best remembered for her only novel Wuthering Heights, a classic of English literature. ... For other uses, see Wuthering Heights (disambiguation). ... Charlotte Brontë (IPA: ) (April 21, 1816 – March 31, 1855) was an English novelist and the eldest of the three Brontë sisters whose novels have become timeless pieces of English literature. ... This article is about the Victorian novel. ... The Madwoman in the Attic : The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination, published in 1979, examines Victorian literature from a feminist perspective. ... Dr. Sandra M. Gilbert (born 1936), Professor of English at the University of California, Davis, is an influential Literary critic and Poet who has published widely in the fields of Feminist literary criticism, Feminist theory, and Psychoanlytic Criticism. ... Dr. Susan Gubar is a Distinguished Professor of English and Womens Studies. ... Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. ... A Long Fatal Love Chase is a suspense novel by Louisa May Alcott, who wrote the manuscript in 1866, two years before finally establishing her literary reputation with the publication of Little Women (1868). ...


Elizabeth Gaskell's tales "The Doom of the Griffiths" (1858) "Lois the Witch" and "The Grey Woman" all employ one of the most common themes of Gothic fiction, the power of ancestral sins to curse future generations, or the fear that they will. Elizabeth Gaskell, in the 1832 miniature by William John Thomson Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell (née Stevenson; 29 September 1810–12 November 1865), often referred to simply as Mrs. ...


The gloomy villain, forbidding mansion and persecuted heroine of Sheridan Le Fanu's Uncle Silas (1864) shows the direct influence of both Walpole's Otranto and Radcliffe's Udolpho. Le Fanu's short story collection In a Glass Darkly (1872) includes the superlative vampire tale Carmilla, which provided fresh blood for that particular strand of the Gothic and influenced Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897). According to Terry Eagleton, Le Fanu, together with his predecessor Maturin and his successor Stoker, form a sub-genre of Irish Gothic, whose stories, featuring castles set in a barren landscape, with a cast of remote aristocrats dominating an atavistic peasantry, represent in allegorical form the political plight of colonial Ireland subjected to the Protestant Ascendancy (Eagleton 1995). Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (August 28, 1814 – February 7, 1873) was an Irish writer of short stories and mystery novels. ... for the rural reprobate of stories by H.E. Bates, see My Uncle Silas Uncle Silas is a Victorian Gothic mystery/thriller novel by the Anglo-Irish writer J. Sheridan Le Fanu. ... In a Glass Darkly is a collection of five short stories by Sheridan Le Fanu, first published in 1872, the year before his death. ... Carmilla is a Gothic novella by Joseph Sheridan le Fanu. ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847 – April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. ... Terry Eagleton (born in Salford, Lancashire (now Greater Manchester), England, on February 22, 1943) is a British literary critic and philosopher. ... The Protestant Ascendancy refers to the political, economic, and social domination of Ireland by Anglican landowners, Church of Ireland clergy, and professionals during the 17th, 18th, and 19th century. ...


The genre was also a heavy influence on more mainstream writers, such as Charles Dickens, who read gothic novels as a teenager and incorporated their gloomy atmosphere and melodrama into his own works, shifting them to a more modern period and an urban setting. His most explicitly Gothic work is his last novel The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1870). The mood and themes of the gothic novel held a particular fascination for the Victorians, with their morbid obsession with mourning rituals, Mementos, and mortality in general. “Dickens” redirects here. ... The Mystery of Edwin Drood is the final novel by Charles Dickens. ... Mourning is in the simplest sense synonymous with grief over the death of someone. ... Earthly Vanity and Divine Salvation by Hans Memling. ...


The 1880s, saw the revival of the Gothic as a powerful literary form allied to fin de siecle decadence. Classic works of this period include Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) , Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), George du Maurier's Trilby (1894), Henry James' The Turn of the Screw (1898) and the stories of Arthur Machen. The most famous gothic villain ever, Count Dracula was created by Bram Stoker in 1897. Stoker's book also established Transylvania and Eastern Europe as the locus classicus of the Gothic. Fin de siècle is French for End of the Century. The term turn-of-the-century is sometimes used as a synonym, but is more neutral (lacking some or most of the connotations described below), and can include the first years of a new century. ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. ... For other uses, see Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (disambiguation). ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... The Picture of Dorian Gray is the only published novel written by Oscar Wilde, and first came out as the lead story in Lippincotts Monthly Magazine on 20 June 1890. ... Self portrait of George du Maurier George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier (6 March 1834 – 8 October 1896) was a British author who was born in Paris, France. ... Trilby is a gothic horror novel by George du Maurier published in 1894. ... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... The Turn of the Screw may also refer to the opera by Benjamin Britten or an album by the band 1208. ... Arthur Machen (March 3, 1863 – December 15th, 1947) was a leading Welsh-born author of the 1890s. ... This article is about the novel. ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847 – April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Largely as a result of the success of Dracula, Transylvania has become a popular setting for horror fiction (particularly that involving vampires). ...


In America, two notable writers of the end of the 19th century, in the Gothic tradition, were Ambrose Bierce and Robert W. Chambers. Bierce's short stories were in the horrific and pessimistic tradition of Poe. Chambers, though, indulged in the decadent style of Wilde and Machen (even to the extent of having a character named 'Wilde' in his The King in Yellow ). Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (June 24, 1842 – 1914?) was an American editorialist, journalist, short-story writer and satirist, today best known for his Devils Dictionary. ... Robert William Chambers (May 26, 1865 – December 16, 1933) was an American artist and writer. ... The King in Yellow is a collection of short stories published by Robert W. Chambers in 1895. ...


The Victorian Gothic fictionalized contemporary fears like ethical degeneration and questioned the social structures of the time.


Post-Victorian legacy

Notable English twentieth century writers in the Gothic tradition include Algernon Blackwood, William Hope Hodgson, M. R. James and Hugh Walpole. In America pulp fiction magazines such as Weird Tales reprinted classic Gothic horror tales from the previous century, by such authors as Poe, Arthur Conan-Doyle, Edward Bulwer-Lytton and printed new stories by modern authors featuring both traditional and new horrors. The most significant of these was H. P. Lovecraft who also wrote an excellent conspectus of the Gothic and supernatural horror tradition in his Supernatural Horror in Literature (1936). Lovecraft's protégé, Robert Bloch, penned Psycho, which drew on the classic interests of the genre. From these, the gothic genre per se gave way to modern horror fiction, although many literary critics use the term to cover the entire genre, and many modern writers of horror (or indeed other types of fiction) exhibit considerable gothic sensibilities -- examples include the works of Anne Rice, as well as some of the sensationalist works of Stephen King. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ... Algernon Henry Blackwood (March 14, 1869 – December 10, 1951) was an English writer of tales of the supernatural. ... William Hope Hodgson (1877–1918) was an English author. ... Montague Rhodes James, OM (August 1, 1862 – June 12, 1936), who published under the byline M. R. James, was a noted British mediaeval scholar and provost of Kings College, Cambridge (1905–1918) and of Eton College (1918–1936). ... Sir Hugh Walpole, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 Sir Hugh Seymour Walpole (March 13, 1884 - June 1, 1941) was an English novelist. ... This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... This page is about the fantasy and horror fiction pulp magazine and its heirs. ... This article is about the author. ... Supernatural Horror in Literature is a collection of essays written in 1927 and added to between 1933 and 1935 by the famed fantasy and horror author H. P. Lovecraft (1890-1937). ... Robert Albert Bloch (April 5, 1917, Chicago-September 23, 1994, Los Angeles) was a prolific American writer. ... Psycho is a 1959 pulp thriller by Robert Bloch. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... Anne Rice (born on October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of over 200 stories including over 50 bestselling horror novels. ...


In the twentieth century the Romantic strand of Gothic was taken up in Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca (1938) which is in many ways a reworking of Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre. Others of her books, such as Jamaica Inn (1936), also display Gothic tendencies. Du Maurier's work inspired a substantial body of 'Female Gothics,' concerning heroines alternately swooning over or being terrified by scowling Byronic men in possession of acres of prime real estate and the appertaining droit de seigneur [1]. Dame Daphne du Maurier DBE (13 May 1907–19 April 1989) was a famous British novelist best known for her short story The Birds and her classic novel Rebecca, published in 1938. ... Rebecca is a novel by British author Daphne du Maurier. ... Charlotte Brontë (IPA: ) (April 21, 1816 – March 31, 1855) was an English novelist and the eldest of the three Brontë sisters whose novels have become timeless pieces of English literature. ... This article is about the Victorian novel. ... Jamaica Inn is a novel by the Cornish writer Daphne du Maurier, first published in 1936. ...


Gothic Romances of this description became popular during the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, with authors such as Joan Aiken, Dorothy Eden, Dorothy Fletcher, Victoria Holt, Barbara Michaels, Mary Stewart and Jill Tattersall. Many featured covers depicting a terror-stricken woman in diaphanous attire in front of a gloomy castle. A lot were published under the Paperback Library Gothic imprint and were marketed to a female audience. Though the authors were mostly women, some men wrote gothic romances under female pseudonyms. For instance the prolific Clarissa Ross and Marilyn Ross were pseudonyms for the male writer Dan Ross. Outside of companies like Lovespell, who carry Colleen Shannon, very few books seem to be published using the term today. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Joan Delano Aiken (September 4, 1924–January 4, 2004) was an English novelist. ... Dorothy Enid Eden (1912 – 1982) was a novelist and short story writer. ... Eleanor Alice Burford (September 1, 1906 - January 8, 1993), Mrs. ... Elizabeth Peters (a pen-name of Barbara Mertz) has written many books in the mystery genre, featuring strong female protagonists and many archaeological connections. ... For the Canadian freestyle swimmer, see Mary Stewart (swimmer). ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... Paperback Library was a paperback book publisher established in 1961. ... Dan Ross was a bestselling Canadian novelist who wrote over 300 books in a variety of genres and under a variety of mostly female pseudonyms such as Clarissa Ross, Ann Gilmer, Dan Roberts, and W.E.D. Ross. ... Dan Ross was a bestselling Canadian novelist who wrote over 300 books in a variety of genres and under a variety of mostly female pseudonyms such as Clarissa Ross, Ann Gilmer, Dan Roberts, and W.E.D. Ross. ... Daniel R. Ross (February 9, 1957 – May 16, 2006) was a former professional American Football tight end who played for the Cincinnati Bengals (1979-1985), the Seattle Seahawks (1985), and the Green Bay Packers (1986). ... Colleen Shannon was born in the U.S. state of Alaska, on April 14 1978, and was Playboys Playmate of the Month in January, 2004 and also was the magazines 50th anniversary Playmate. ...


The genre also influenced American writing to create the Southern Gothic genre, which combines some Gothic sensibilities (such as the Grotesque) with the setting and style of the Southern United States. Examples include William Faulkner, Harper Lee, and Flannery O'Connor. A contemporary American writer in this tradition is Joyce Carol Oates, in such novels as Bellefleur, A Bloodsmoor Romance and short story collections such as Night-Side. The Southern Ontario Gothic applies a similar sensibility to a Canadian cultural context. Another writer in this tradition was Henry Farrell whose best-known work was the Hollywood horror novel What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1960). Farrel's novels spawned a sub-genre of 'Grande Dame Guignol' in the cinema, dubbed on the wikipedia as the Psycho-biddy genre. American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... Southern Gothic is a subgenre of the Gothic writing style, unique to American literature. ... This article is about the word itself. ... Historic Southern United States. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American novelist and poet whose works feature his native state of Mississippi. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Harper Lee Nelle Harper Lee (born April 28, 1926) is an American novelist known for her Pulitzer Prize – winning 1960 novel To Kill a Mockingbird, her only major work to date. ... Mary Flannery OConnor (March 25, 1925–August 3, 1964) was an American author. ... Joyce Carol Oates (born June 16, 1938) is an American author and the Roger S. Berlind 52 Professor in the Humanities with the Program in Creative Writing at Princeton University, where she has taught since 1978 ([1]). She serves as associate editor for the Ontario Review, a literary magazine, and... Bellefleur is a novel by Joyce Carol Oates about the generations of an upstate New York family. ... Southern Ontario Gothic is a sub-genre of the Gothic novel genre and a feature of Canadian literature that comes from Southern Ontario. ... Henry Farrell (born ca. ... What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? is a novel by author Henry Farrell published in 1960. ... Wikipedia (IPA: , or ( ) is a multilingual, web-based, free content encyclopedia project, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization. ... Psycho-biddy is a colloquial term for a sub-genre of the horror/thriller movie also known by the name Older women in peril, which was most prevalent from the early 1960s through the mid-1970s. ...


A notable contemporary British writer in the Gothic tradition is Patrick McGrath. Patrick McGrath (born February 7, 1950, London) is a British novelist whose work has been categorized as gothic fiction. ...


The themes of the literary Gothic have been translated into other media such as the theatre and had a notable revival in twentieth century gothic horror films such the classic Universal horror films of the 1930s, Hammer Horror and Roger Corman's Poe cycle. Twentieth century Rock and Roll music also had its gothic side. Black Sabbath created a dark sound different at the time. Themes from gothic writers such as H.P. Lovecraft were also used among Gothic Rock and Heavy Metal bands, especially in Black Metal, Thrash Metal (Metallica's The Call of Ktulu), Death Metal and Gothic Metal. For example, gothic heavy metal musician King Diamond delights in telling stories full of horror, theatricality, satanism and Anti-Catholicism in his compositions. A gallery of classic Universal monsters Universal Horror is the name given to the distinctive series of horror films made by Universal Studios in California from the 1920s through to the 1950s. ... Hammer horror refers to a series of gothic horror films produced from the late 1950s until the 1970s by the British film production company Hammer Film Productions Ltd. ... Roger Corman Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appelation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of rock music that originated during the late 1970s. ... “Heavy metal” redirects here. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Thrash metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music, one of the extreme metal subgenres that is characterised by its signature high speed and aggression. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... This article is about the song by Metallica. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Gothic metal is a genre of heavy metal music that originated during the mid 1990s in Europe as an outgrowth of doom-death, a fusion genre of doom metal and death metal. ... King Diamond (born Kim Bendix Petersen, June 14, 1956, Copenhagen, Denmark) is a heavy metal musician known for his shock rock image. ... Satanism can refer to a number of belief systems depending on the user and contexts. ... Anti-Catholicism is discrimination, hostility or prejudice directed at Catholics or the Catholic Church. ...


More recently, the gothic tradition has been expanded to new media forms on the internet. As example, with the rise of internet literature, G.E. Graven's: Grotesque, A Gothic Epic (Online Novel) is freely available as hypertext gothic fiction. Grotesque, A Gothic Epic is a 1998 online novel by gothic author G.E. Graven. ... In computing, hypertext is a user interface paradigm for displaying documents which, according to an early definition (Nelson 1970), branch or perform on request. ...


Prominent examples

The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ... Vathek (alternatively titled Vathek, an Arabian Tale or The History of the Caliph Vathek) is a Gothic novel written by William Thomas Beckford. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... William Beckford William Thomas Beckford (October 1, 1760 – May 2, 1844) was an English novelist, art critic, travel writer and politician. ... The Mysteries of Udolpho, by Ann Radcliffe, was published in the summer of 1794 by G. G. and J. Robinson of London in 4 volumes. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the 19th-century author. ... Caleb Thomas Williams is a well-known American gonzo journalist based out of San Antonio. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Godwin William Godwin (3 March 1756 – 7 April 1836) was an English political and miscellaneous writer, considered one of the important precursors of both utilitarian and liberal anarchist thought. ... The Monk is a Gothic novel by Matthew Gregory Lewis that first appeared in 1796. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Matthew Gregory Lewis (July 9, 1775 - May 14, 1818) was an English novelist and dramatist, often referred to as Monk Lewis, because of the success of his Gothic novel, The Monk. ... The Italian (1800) is a novel belonging to the Gothic genre and written by the English author Ann Radcliffe. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the 19th-century author. ... Clermont is the name of several places in the United States of America: Clermont, Florida Clermont, Georgia Clermont, Indiana Clermont, Iowa Clermont, New York Clermont County, Ohio Clermont is the name of several communes in France: Clermont, in the Ariège département Clermont, in the Haute-Savoie département... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Regina Maria Roche (1764-1845) is considered today to be a minor Gothic novelist who wrote very much in the shadow of Ann Radcliffe. ... Wieland or The Transformation: An American Tale is a Gothic novel by Charles Brockden Brown, first published in 1798. ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Charles Brockden Brown (January 17, 1771 - February 22, 1810), an American novelist, historian, and magazine editor of the Early National period, is generally regarded by scholars as the most ambitious and accomplished US novelist before James Fenimore Cooper. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Regina Maria Roche (1764-1845) is considered today to be a minor Gothic novelist who wrote very much in the shadow of Ann Radcliffe. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... The Vampyre is a short novel written by John William Polidori and is a progenitor of the romantic vampire genre of fantasy fiction. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... John William Polidori (September 7, 1795 - August 24, 1821) is credited by some as the creator of the vampire genre of fantasy fiction. ... Melmoth the Wanderer is a gothic novel published in 1820, written by Charles Robert Maturin. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Robert Maturin, also known as Charles Maturin or C.R. Maturin, was an Irish Protestant clergyman (ordained by the Church of Ireland) and a writer of gothic plays and novels. ... Confessions of an English Opium Eater (1821). ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas de Quincey from the frontispiece of Revolt of the Tartars, Thomas de Quincey (August 15, 1785 – December 8, 1859) was an English author and intellectual. ... The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner was published by the Scottish author James Hogg in 1824. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For the Texas Governor, see Jim Hogg James Hogg James Hogg (1770 - November 21, 1835) was a Scottish poet and novelist who wrote in both Scots and English. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Young Goodman Brown (1835) is a frequently taught and anthologized short story by American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... The Ministers Black Veil is a short story written by the nineteenth century author Nathaniel Hawthorne. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... The Phantom Ship (1839) is a Gothic novel by Frederick Marryat which explores the legend of The Flying Dutchman and, in one chapter, features a Werewolf. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Captain Frederick Marryat (July 10, 1792 – August 9, 1848) was an English novelist, a contemporary and acquaintance of Charles Dickens, noted today as an early pioneer of the sea story. ... The Fall of the House of Usher is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... The Tell-Tale Heart is an 1843 short story by Edgar Allan Poe. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Jan. ... George Lippard George Lippard (1822-1854) was a brilliant but erratic 19th century American novelist, journalist, and playwright. ... For other uses, see Wuthering Heights (disambiguation). ... Emily Jane Brontë (July 30, 1818 – December 19, 1848) was a British novelist and poet, now best remembered for her only novel Wuthering Heights, a classic of English literature. ... The House of the Seven Gables (1668) is a Colonial mansion in Salem, Massachusetts, as well as the title of a novel written in 1851 by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Elizabeth Gaskell, in the 1832 miniature by William John Thomson Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell (née Stevenson; 29 September 1810–12 November 1865), often referred to simply as Mrs. ... It has been suggested that Penguin Modern Poets, Penguin Great Ideas be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier (August 30, 1811 – October 23, 1872) was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist, and literary critic. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Carmilla is a Gothic novella by Joseph Sheridan le Fanu. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (August 28, 1814 – February 7, 1873) was an Irish writer of short stories and mystery novels. ... The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. ... The Picture of Dorian Gray is the only published novel written by Oscar Wilde, and first came out as the lead story in Lippincotts Monthly Magazine on 20 June 1890. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... Cordier and his lover, Odette Diary of a Madman is a 1963 horror film directed by Reginald Le Borg and starring Vincent Price as Simon Cordier, a French magistrate and amateur sculptor who comes into contact with a malevolent spirit. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Guy de Maupassant. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... The Yellow Wallpaper is a short story by author Charlotte Perkins Gilman. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Charlotte Perkins Gilman (July 3, 1860 – August 17, 1935) was a prominent American poet, non-fiction writer, short story writer, novelist, lecturer, and social reformer. ... Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847 – April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... The Turn of the Screw may also refer to the opera by Benjamin Britten or an album by the band 1208. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... The Monkeys Paw is a horror short story by author W. W. Jacobs. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Wymark Jacobs (1863–1943) was an English author of macabre short stories. ... This article is about the Gaston Leroux novel. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Gaston Leroux. ... Lair of the White Worm is a horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, who also wrote Dracula. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847 – April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Gormenghast Castle in the BBC miniseries The Gormenghast series is a series of books written by Mervyn Peake that is centered around the castle Gormenghast and the character Titus Groan. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mervyn Laurence Peake (July 9, 1911 – November 17, 1968) was an English modernist writer, artist, poet and illustrator. ...

Gothic satire

For films named Northanger Abbey, see Northanger Abbey (1986 film) or Northanger Abbey (2007 TV drama). ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1873 engraving of Jane Austen, based on a portrait drawn by her sister Cassandra. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Thomas Love Peacock (October 18, 1785 - January 23, 1866) was an English satirist and author. ... The Ingoldsby Legends are a collection of myths, legends, ghost stories and poetry supposedly by Thomas Ingoldsby of Tappington manor, actually a pen-name of Richard Harris Barham. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Richard Harris Barham (December 6, 1788–June 17, 1845), English novelist and humorous poet, better known by his nom de plume of Thomas Ingoldsby, was born at Canterbury. ...

See also

Southern Gothic is a subgenre of the Gothic writing style, unique to American literature. ... Southern Ontario Gothic is a sub-genre of the Gothic novel genre and a feature of Canadian literature that comes from Southern Ontario. ... Dark romanticism, also referred to as anti-transcendentalism is a label applied to some gothic fiction. ... Suburban Gothic is a subgenre of Gothic Literature. ...

References

Edith Birkhead was a lecturer in English Literature at the University of Bristol and a Noble Fellow at the University of Liverpool. ... Terry Eagleton (born in Salford, Lancashire (now Greater Manchester), England, on February 22, 1943) is a British literary critic and philosopher. ... Dr. Sandra M. Gilbert (born 1936), Professor of English at the University of California, Davis, is an influential Literary critic and Poet who has published widely in the fields of Feminist literary criticism, Feminist theory, and Psychoanlytic Criticism. ... Dr. Susan Gubar is a Distinguished Professor of English and Womens Studies. ... The Madwoman in the Attic : The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination, published in 1979, examines Victorian literature from a feminist perspective. ... Jack Sullivan (born 1946) is an American literary scholar, essayist, author, editor, musicologist, and short story writer. ... The Penguin Encyclopedia of Horror and the Supernatural is a reference work on horror fiction in the arts, edited by Jack Sullivan. ... Augustus Montague Summers (10 April 1880 - 10 August 1948) was an eccentric British author and clergyman. ...

External links


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BITBOOKS: Fiction_Zines e-Stories and e-Books (377 words)
Join us for free Romance novel fiction, interviews, articles, and inspiration.
showcases emerging and established writers in a variety of genres, including short fiction, poetry, creative essays, humor, interviews and anything else of interest to a literary audience.
An award winning digital journal of speculative fiction, poetry and artwork.
Gothic fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2372 words)
Gothic fiction began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole.
The opprobrious term "gothick" was embraced by the 18th century proponents of the gothic revival, a forerunner of the Romantic genres.
Gothic revival architecture, which became popular in the nineteenth century, was a reaction to the classical architecture that was a hallmark of the Age of Reason.
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