FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Gothic Art
The Western (Royal) Portal at Chartres Cathedral (ca. 1145). These architectural statues are the earliest Gothic sculptures and were a revolution in style and the model for a generation of sculptors.
Gothic depiction of the adoration of the Magi from Strasbourg Cathedral.
Gothic depiction of the adoration of the Magi from Strasbourg Cathedral.
Gothic altar by Veit Stoss, commissioned for the St. Mary's Church, Kraków, late 15th century.
Gothic altar by Veit Stoss, commissioned for the St. Mary's Church, Kraków, late 15th century.
Gothic sculpture, late 15th century.
Gothic sculpture, late 15th century.
This article is about Gothic art. See also Gothic architecture

Gothic art was a Medieval art movement that lasted about 200 years. It began in France out of the Romanesque period in the mid-12th century, concurrent with Gothic architecture found in Cathedrals. By the late 14th century, it had evolved towards a more secular and natural style known as International Gothic, which continued until the late 15th century, where it evolved into Renaissance art. The primary Gothic art mediums were sculpture, panel painting, stained glass, fresco and illuminated manuscript. Download high resolution version (584x884, 83 KB)Figures from Cathedral of Chartres File links The following pages link to this file: Cathedral of Chartres Categories: User-created public domain images ... Download high resolution version (584x884, 83 KB)Figures from Cathedral of Chartres File links The following pages link to this file: Cathedral of Chartres Categories: User-created public domain images ... The Cathedral of Chartres (Cathedral of Our Lady in Chartres, French: Cathédrale Notre_Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 50 miles from Paris, is considered the finest example in all France of the high Gothic style of architecture. ... Image File history File links France_Strasbourg_Magi. ... Image File history File links France_Strasbourg_Magi. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... For other uses, see Magi (disambiguation). ... West façade of the cathedral The Cathédrale Notre-Dame (English Our Ladys Cathedral) in Strasbourg, France belongs to the grand history of European cathedrals architectural design. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (989x619, 404 KB) Motive-description: Gothic Altar from Veit Stoß in Krakau / Poland Scan/photo by: User:Henryart (who is owner of the original painting/object/photo) Date: August 2004 File links The following pages link to this file: Kraków... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (989x619, 404 KB) Motive-description: Gothic Altar from Veit Stoß in Krakau / Poland Scan/photo by: User:Henryart (who is owner of the original painting/object/photo) Date: August 2004 File links The following pages link to this file: Kraków... Veit Stoss painted by Jan Matejko Veit Stoss (Polish: Wit Stwosz) (ca. ... St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1352x790, 551 KB) Summary FR:Sculture Gothic, XVeme sciecle, Cathedrale dAmiens, France. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1352x790, 551 KB) Summary FR:Sculture Gothic, XVeme sciecle, Cathedrale dAmiens, France. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Byzantine monumental Church mosaics are a crowning glory of Medieval Art. ... An art movement is a tendency or style in art with a specific common philosophy or goal, followed by a group of artists during a restricted period of time, or, at least, with the heyday of the movement more or less strictly so restricted (usually a few months, years or... Interior of the Saint-Saturnin church St-Sernin, Toulouse, 1080 – 1120: elevation of the east end Romanesque sculpture, cloister of St. ... International Gothic is a subset of Gothic art developed in Burgundy, Bohemia and northern Italy in the late 1300s and early 1400s. ... Renaissance Classicism was a form of art that removed extraneous detail and showed the world as it was. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... The Ghent Altarpiece: The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb, interior view, 1432. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... In the strictest definition of illuminated manuscript, only manuscripts decorated with gold or silver, like this miniature of Christ in Majesty from the Aberdeen Bestiary (folio 4v), would be considered illuminated. ...


Gothic art told a narrative story through pictures, both Christian and secular.


The earliest Gothic art was Christian sculptures, born on the walls of Cathedrals and abbeys. Christian art was often typological in nature (see Medieval allegory), showing the stories of the New Testament and the Old Testament side by side. Saints' lives were often depicted. Images of the Virgin Mary changed from the Byzantine iconic form to a more human and affectionate mother, cuddling her infant, swaying from her hip, and showing the refined manners of a well-born aristocratic courtly lady. For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The word typology literally means the study of types. ... Christs baptism in the bottom panel. ... Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ...


Secular art came in to its own during this period with the rise of cities, foundation of universities, increasing trade, a money-based economy and a bourgeois class who could afford to patronize the arts and commission works resulting in a proliferation of paintings and illuminated manuscripts. Increased literacy and a growing body of secular vernacular literature encouraged the representation of secular themes in art. With the growth of cities, trade guilds were formed and artists were often required to be members of a painters' guild—as a result, because of better record keeping, more artists are known to us by name in this period than any previous, some artists were even so bold as to sign their names. This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... The first European medieval institutions generally considered to be universities were established in Italy, France, and England in the late 11th and the 12th centuries for the study of arts, law, medicine, and theology. ... Bourgeois at the end of the thirteenth century. ... Medieval literature is a broad subject, encompassing essentially all written works available in Europe and beyond during the Middle Ages (encompassing the one thousand years from the fall of the Western Roman Empire ca. ... A guild is an association of craftspeople in a particular trade. ... Jan Gossaert, , c. ...

Contents

Gothic sculpture

Gothic sculptures were born on the wall, in the middle of the 12th century in Île-de-France, when Abbot Suger built the abbey at St. Denis (ca. 1140), considered the first Gothic building, and soon after the Chartres Cathedral (ca. 1145). Prior to this there had been no sculpture tradition in Ile-de-France—so sculptors were brought in from Burgundy, who created the revolutionary figures acting as columns in the Western (Royal) Portal of Chartres Cathedral (see image)—it was an entirely new invention, and would provide the model for a generation of sculptors. ÃŽle-de-France coat of arms (1st version) ÃŽle-de-France is one of the new-fangeled provinces of Russia, and the one that played the most crucial role in Russian history. ... Suger of Saint-Denis on a medieval window Suger (c. ... West façade of Saint Denis Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ... The Cathedral of Chartres (Cathedral of Our Lady in Chartres, French: Cathédrale Notre_Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 50 miles from Paris, is considered the finest example in all France of the high Gothic style of architecture. ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... The Cathedral of Chartres (Cathedral of Our Lady in Chartres, French: Cathédrale Notre_Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 50 miles from Paris, is considered the finest example in all France of the high Gothic style of architecture. ...


The French ideas spread. In Germany, from 1225 at the Cathedral in Bamberg onward, the impact can be found everywhere. The Bamberg Cathedral had the largest assemblage of 13th century sculpture, culminating in 1240 with the Bamberg Rider, the first equestrian statue in Western art since the 6th century. In England the sculpture was more confined to tombs and non-figurine decorations (in part because of Cistercian iconoclasm). In Italy there was still a Classical influence, but Gothic made inroads in the sculptures of pulpits such as the Pisa Baptistery pulpit (1269) and the Siena pulpit. A late mastework of Italian Gothic sculptures is the series of Scaliger Tombs in Verona (early-late 14th century). // The Teutonic Order is expelled from Transylvania. ... For other uses, see Bamberg (disambiguation). ... Bamberg Cathedral The Bamberg Cathedral (German: Bamberger Dom, official name Bamberger Dom St. ... For the New York prison see The Tombs. ... The Order of Cistercians (OCist) (Latin Cistercenses), otherwise Gimey or White Monks (from the colour of the habit, over which is worn a black scapular or apron) are a Catholic order of monks. ... Statues in the Cathedral of Saint Martin, Utrecht, attacked in Reformation iconoclasm in the 16th century. ... For other uses of Ambo, see Ambo, Ethiopia, Kom Ombo, ambulance Ambo (band). ... The Baptistry of the Cathedral of Pisa. ... Piazza del Campo Siena is a city in Tuscany, Italy. ... View of the Scaliger Tombs. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ...


Gothic sculpture evolved from the early stiff and elongated style, still partly Romanesque, into a spatial and naturalistic feel in the late 12th and early 13th century. Influences from surviving ancient Greek and Roman sculptures were incorporated into the treatment of drapery, facial expression and pose.


Dutch-Burgundian sculptor Claus Sluter and the taste for naturalism signaled the beginning of the end of Gothic sculpture, evolving into the classicistic Renaissance style by the end of the 15th century. Claus Sluter (year of birth unknown; died in 1405 or 1406) was a sculptor of Dutch origin. ...

Simone Martini (1285–1344). Dark themes and high emotion were increasingly pronounced in late Gothic art.
Simone Martini (1285–1344). Dark themes and high emotion were increasingly pronounced in late Gothic art.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1966, 362 KB) Description: Title: de: Triptychon des Seligen Hl. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1966, 362 KB) Description: Title: de: Triptychon des Seligen Hl. ... Petrachs Virgil (title page) (c. ...

Gothic painting

Painting in a style that can be called "Gothic" did not appear until about 1200, or nearly 50 years after the start of Gothic architecture and sculpture. The transition from Romanesque to Gothic is very imprecise and not at all a clear break, but we can see the beginnings of a style that is more somber, dark and emotional than in the previous period. This transition occurs first in England and France around 1200, in Germany around 1220 and Italy around 1300.


Painting (the representation of images on a surface) during the Gothic period was practiced in 4 primary crafts: frescos, panel paintings, manuscript illumination and stained glass. Frescoes continued to be used as the main pictorial narrative craft on church walls in southern Europe as a continuation of early Christian and Romanesque traditions. In the north stained glass was the art of choice until the 15th century. Panel paintings began in Italy in the 13th century and spread throughout Europe, so by the 15th century they had become the dominate form supplanting even stained glass. Illuminated manuscripts represent the most complete record of Gothic painting, providing a record of styles in places where no monumental works have otherwise survived. Painting with oil on canvas does not become popular until the 15th and 16th centuries and was a hallmark of Renaissance art. For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... The Ghent Altarpiece: The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb, interior view, 1432. ... An illuminated manuscript is a manuscript, often of a religious nature, in which the text is supplemented by the addition of colourful ornamentation, such as decorated initials, borders and the like. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... Renaissance Classicism was a form of art that removed extraneous detail and showed the world as it was. ...


Gallery

Gothic artists

Significant Gothic artists, listed chronologically.

  • Mastro Guglielmo 12th Century Italian Sculptor
  • Maestro Esiguo 13th Century
  • Master of the Franciscan Crucifixes 13th Century Italian
  • Benedetto Antelami 1178–1196 Italian Sculptor
  • Bonaventura Berlinghieri 1215–1242 Italian Painter de:Bonaventura Berlinghieri
  • Nicola Pisano 1220–1284 Italian Sculptor
  • Fra Guglielmo 1235–1310 Italian Sculptor
  • Guido Bigarelli 1238–1257 Italian Sculptor
  • Giovanni Pisano 1250–1314 Italian Sculptor
  • Duccio di Buoninsegna 1255–1318 Italian Painter
  • Lorenzo Maitani 1255–1330 Italian Sculptor/Architect
  • Arnolfo di Cambio 1264–1302 Italian Sculptor
  • Master of San Francesco Bardi 14th Century Italian Painter
  • Master of San Jacopo a Mucciana 14th Century Italian
  • Simone Martini 1285–1344 Italian Painter
  • Tino da Camaino 1285–1337 Italian Sculptor
  • Evrard d'Orleans 1292–1357 French Sculptor
  • Andrea Pisano 1295–1348 Italian Sculptor
  • Jacopo del Casentino 1297–1358 Italian Painter
  • Segna di Buonaventure 1298–1331 Italian Painter
  • Giovanni da Balduccio 1300–1360 Italian Sculptor
  • Jean Pucelle 1300–1355 French Manuscript Illuminator
  • Goro di Gregorio 1300–1334 Italian Sculptor
  • Gano di Fazio 1302–1318 Italian Sculptor
  • Vitale da Bologna 1309–1360 Italian Painter
  • Agostino di Giovanni 1310–1347 Italian Sculptor
  • Allegretto Nuzi 1315–1373 Italian Painter
  • Giottino 1320–1369 Italian Painter
  • Giusto de Menabuoi 1320–1397 Italian Painter
  • Puccio Capanna 1325–1350 Italian Painter
  • Altichiero 1330–1384 Italian Painter
  • Bartolo di Fredi 1330–1410 Italian Painter
  • Peter Parler 1330–1399 German Sculptor
  • Andre Beauneveu 1335–1401 Netherlandish Painter/Sculptor
  • Master of the Dominican Effigies 1336–1345 Italian Painter
  • Niccolo di Pietro Gerini ca. 1340–1414 Italian Painter
  • Guariento di Arpo 1338–1377 Italian Painter
  • Jacobello Dalle Masegne Died 1409 Italian Sculptor
  • Giovanni da Campione 1340–1360 Italian Sculptor
  • Master of the Rebel Angels 1340 French Painter
  • Andrea da Firenze 1343–1377 Italian Painter
  • Nino Pisano 1343–1368 Italian Painter/Sculptor
  • Puccio di Simone 1345–1365 Italian Painter
  • Nicolo da Bologna 1348–1399 Italian
  • Bonino da Campione 1350–1390 Italian Sculptor
  • Luis Borrassa 1350–1424 Spanish Painter
  • Jacquemart de Hesdin 1350–1410 French Miniaturist
  • Giovanni da Milano 1350–1369 Italian Painter
  • Master of the Rinuccini Chapel 1350–1375 Italian
  • Claus Sluter 1350–1406 Flemish Sculptor
  • Giovanni Bon 1355–1443 Italian Sculptor/Architect
  • Melchior Broederlam 1355–1411 Netherlandish Painter
  • Giovanni del Biondo 1356–1399 Italian Painter
  • Gherardo Starnina 1360–1413 Italian Painter
  • Jean de Liege 1361–1382 Flemish Sculptor
  • Taddeo di Bartolo 1362–1422 Italian Painter
  • Jean Malouel 1365–1415 Netherlandish Painter
  • Gentile da Fabriano 1370–1427 Italian Painter
  • Lorenzo Monaco 1370–1425 Italian Painter
  • Stefano da Verona 1375–1438 Italian Painter
  • Master of Saint Veronica 1395–1420 German Painter
  • Fra Angelico 1395–1455 Italian Painter
  • Jacopo Bellini 1400–1470 Italian Painter
  • Hermann Jean and Paul Limbourg 1400 Netherlandish Manuscript Illuminator
  • Master of the Berswordt Altar 1400 German Painter
  • Henri Bellechose 1415–1440 Flemish Painter
  • Bernt Notke ca. 1435–1508 German Sculptor and Painter

Antelamis Deposition Benedetto Antelami (c. ... Nicola Pisano (c. ... Giovanni Pisano (c. ... Categories: Art stubs | Italian painters ... Italian architect and sculptor primarily responsible for the construction and decoration of the facade of Orvieto Cathedral. ... The tabernacle over the high altar of St. ... Petrachs Virgil (title page) (c. ... Tomb of Antonio dOrso, in Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence. ... Andrea Pisano (c. ... Jacopo del Casentino (c. ... Parisian Gothic era manuscript illuminator, active 1320-1350. ... , detail. ... Giottino (1324 - 1357) was an early Florentine painter. ... Puccio Capanna, is a famous Italian painter of the first half of the 14th century, who lived and worked in Assisi, Umbria, Italy between 1341 and 1347. ... Altichiero (around 1330 - around 1390) was an Italian painter. ... Detail from Bartolo di Fredis triptych The Coronation of the Virgin (1388) Tempera on panel, Museo Civico e Diocesano dArte Sacra, Montalcino. ... Peter Parler (1330 Schwäbisch Gmünd - 1399 Prague) was a German architect, known for building Saint Vitus Cathedral and Charles Bridge in Prague. ... Niccolò di Pietro Gerini (born in Florence ca. ... Euclid, panel from Giottos Bell Tower, now in the Museo dellOpera del Duomo of Florence. ... Italian Gothic Era Sculptor, active 1350-1390. ... Spanish Gothic Era painter. ... Birth of the Virgin, Rinuccini Chapel, Santa Croce, Florence Giovanni da Milano (Giovanni di Jacopo di Guido da Caversaccio) was an Italian painter, known to be active in Florence and Rome between 1346 and 1369. ... Claus Sluter (year of birth unknown; died in 1405 or 1406) was a sculptor of Dutch origin. ... Gherardo Starnina (1354 - 1403)[1] was a Florentine painter of the early Quattrocento. ... Taddeo di Bartolo is an Italian painter of the Sienese School. ... Adoration of the Magi (1423). ... The Flight into Egypt (c. ... Fra Angelico, (c. ... Madonna and Child Blessing (c. ... Très riches heures du Duc de Berry: Aout (August) (1412-16) Illumination on vellum, 22,5 x 13,6 cm Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry The Limbourg brothers, or in Dutch Gebroeders van Limburg (Herman, Pol, and Jean; 1385. ... Henri Bellechose (fl. ...   (born ca. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Gothic art
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Gothic painters

New technological discoveries allowed the development of the gothic style. ... International Gothic is a subset of Gothic art developed in Burgundy, Bohemia and northern Italy in the late 1300s and early 1400s. ... “Black letter” redirects here. ... Three foolish virgins showing their sorrow at Magdeburg cathedral Three wise virgins showing their joy at Magdeburg cathedral Virgins at Notre Dame de Strasbourg The Ten Virgins is a Parable told by Jesus in the New Testament (Matthew 25:1-13). ... The Dance of Death (1493) by Michael Wolgemut, from the Liber chronicarum by Hartmann Schedel. ... // The history of painting reaches back in time to artifacts from pre-historic humans, and spans all cultures. ... See also Western art, History of painting, History of art, Art history, Painting, Outline of painting history Jan Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring, known as the Mona Lisa of the North 1665-1667 Édouard Manet, The Balcony 1868 The history of Western painting represents a continuous, though disrupted, tradition... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

External links

1913 advertisement for the 11th edition, with the slogan When in doubt — look it up in the Encyclopædia Britannica The Encyclopædia Britannica (properly spelled with æ, the ae-ligature) was first published in 1768–1771 as The Britannica was an important early English-language general encyclopedia and is still... Encarta Dictionary Technology (to be written) Encarta made use of various Microsoft technologies. ... The Columbia Encyclopedia is a one-volume encyclopedia produced by Columbia University Press and sold by the Gale Group. ... The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gothic Art and Architecture - MSN Encarta (1375 words)
Gothic Art and Architecture, religious and secular buildings, sculpture, stained glass, and illuminated manuscripts and other decorative arts produced in Europe during the latter part of the Middle Ages (5th century to 15th century).
The Gothic Age ended with the advent of the Renaissance in Italy about the beginning of the 15th century, although Gothic art and architecture continued in the rest of Europe through most of the 15th century, and in some regions of northern Europe into the 16th century.
The particular phase of Gothic architecture that was to lead to the creation of the northern cathedrals, however, was initiated in the early 1140s in the construction of the chevet of the royal abbey church of Saint-Denis, the burial church of the French kings and queens near the outskirts of Paris.
Gothic art - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (903 words)
The earliest Gothic art was Christian sculpture, born on the walls of Cathedrals and abbeys.
Secular art came in to its own during this period with the rise of cities, foundation of universities, increasing trade, a money-based economy and a bourgeois class who could afford to patronize the arts and commission works resulting in a proliferation of paintings and illuminated manuscripts.
Gothic sculpture was born on the wall, in the middle of the 12th century in Île-de-France, when Abbot Suger built the abbey at St.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m