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Encyclopedia > Goth subculture
A German Goth, a so-called "Gruftie", with rosary beads and an alchemical symbol on forehead.
A German Goth, a so-called "Gruftie", with rosary beads and an alchemical symbol on forehead.

The goth subculture is a contemporary subculture found in many countries. It began in the United Kingdom during the early 1980s in the gothic rock scene, an offshoot of the post-punk genre. The goth subculture has survived much longer than others of the same era, and has continued to diversify. Its imagery and cultural proclivities indicate influences from nineteenth century Gothic literature along with horror movies and to a lesser extent, - according to César Fuentes Rodríguez and Carol Siegel - the BDSM culture.[1][2] This article is about the Germanic tribes. ... Look up Gothic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 401 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (435 × 650 pixel, file size: 67 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Goth subculture Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 401 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (435 × 650 pixel, file size: 67 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Goth subculture Metadata... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary Beads. ... Alchemical symbols, originally devised as part of the protoscience of alchemy, were used to denote some elements and some compounds until the 18th century. ... In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of rock music that originated during the late 1970s. ... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gothic novel. ... DVD cover showing horror characters as depicted by Universal Studios. ... Collars are a commonly used symbol of BDSM and can be ornamental or functional. ...


The goth subculture has associated tastes in music, aesthetics, and fashion, whether or not all individuals who share those tastes are in fact members of the goth subculture. Gothic music encompasses a number of different styles. Common to all is a tendency towards a lugubrious, mystical sound and outlook. Styles of dress within the subculture range from deathrock, punk, androgynous, medieval, some Renaissance and Victorian style clothes, or combinations of the above, most often with black attire, makeup and hair. Gothic fashion is a clothing style worn by members of the Goth subculture. ... Deathrock is a term used to identify a subgenre of punk rock and Goth which incorporates elements of horror and spooky atmospheres within a Goth-Punk style and first emerged most prominently in the West Coast of the United States and London during the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... Punk fashion is the styles of clothing, hairstyles, cosmetics, jewelry, and body modifications of the punk subculture. ... For other uses, see Androgyny (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Windsor Castle in Modern Times by Landseer depicts the Queen and the Prince Consort at home in the 1840s. ... This article is about the color. ...

Contents

Origins and development

Siouxsie and the Banshees were a major contributor to the style of "goth" early on.
Siouxsie and the Banshees were a major contributor to the style of "goth" early on.

By the late 1970s, there were a few post-punk bands in the United Kingdom labeled "gothic." However, it was not until the early 1980s that gothic rock became its own subgenre within post-punk, and that followers of these bands started to come together as a distinctly recognizable movement. The scene appears to have taken its name from an article published in UK rock weekly Sounds: ‘The face of Punk Gothique’, written by Steve Keaton and published on February 21 1981. The opening of the Batcave in London's Soho in July 1982 provided a prominent meeting point for the emerging scene, which had briefly been labeled positive punk by the New Musical Express.[3] The term "Batcaver" was later used to describe old-school goths. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (509x669, 64 KB) Summary Siouxsie Sioux on the cover of New Sounds New Styles magazine issue #8. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (509x669, 64 KB) Summary Siouxsie Sioux on the cover of New Sounds New Styles magazine issue #8. ... Siouxsie and the Banshees are a British gothic rock band. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of rock music that originated during the late 1970s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... The Batcave, which was held at Gossips in Dean Street (Soho), was an early goth nightclub in London, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Cast-iron architecture in Greene Street SoHo is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... Positive Punk is a term used to describe a branch of the punk subculture that emerged around Londons Batcave club in the early 1980s which was a precursor to the goth subculture. ... The New Musical Express (better known as the NME) is a weekly magazine about popular music published in the UK. It is unlike many other popular music magazines due to its intended focus on guitar-based music and indie rock bands, instead of mainstream pop acts. ...


Independent of the British scene, the late 1970s and early 1980s saw death rock branch off from American punk.[4] In 1980s and early 1990s, members of an emerging subculture in Germany were called Grufti[e]s (English "vault creatures" or "tomb creatures"); they generally followed a fusion of the gothic and new wave with an influence of new romantic, and formed the early stages of the "dark culture" (formerly called "dark wave culture"). Death Rock (also spelled Deathrock) is a term used to identify a playfully spooky offshoot of Punk Rock which first appeared in Los Angeles during the late 1970s and early 1980s, then later merged with the New Wave and Glam influenced Batcave musical scene to form Gothic Rock. ... The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The term dark culture (German Schwarze Szene, Portuguese cultura dark, Spanish cultura oscura), also called dark scene, is an umbrella term, used to describe a summary of parts of several subcultures. ... Darkwave, also written as dark wave, is an umbrella term which refers to a movement that began in the late 1970s, coinciding with the popularity of new wave. ...


After post-punk

After the waning in popularity of post-punk, the subculture diversified both musically and visually. This caused variations in style ("types" of goth). Usually, the appearance of each of the "types" of Goth reflects a certain mindset, although not necessarily. Local scenes also contributed to this variation. By the 1990s, Victorian fashion saw a renewed popularity in the goth scene, drawing on the mid-19th century gothic revival and the more morbid aspects of Victorian culture. Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


Current subcultural boundaries

By the 1990s, the term "goth" and the boundaries of the associated subculture had become more contentious. New subcultures emerged, or became more popular, some of them being conflated with the goth subculture by the general public and the popular media. This conflation was primarily owing to similarities of appearance, social customs, and the fashions of the subcultures, rather than the musical genres of the bands associated with them. As time went on, the term was extended further in popular usage, sometimes to define groups that had neither musical nor fashion similarities to the original gothic subculture.


This has led to the introduction of goth slang terms that some goths and others use to sort and label members of loosely related or at times unrelated subcultures. These include but are not limited to mallgoths in the US, dark in Latin America and Italy, hackians in New Zealand and spooky kids, moshers or mini moshers in the UK. More positive terms, such as mini-goths or baby bats, are also used by some older goths to refer to youths whom they see as exhibiting potential for growth into mature goths later on. The prevalence of internet-based information regarding goth has resulted in a distorted and overstated perception of varying slang terms as used in reality and offline, particularly with regard to those terms allegedly used outside of the UK and US. Goth slang is the slang of the goth subculture. ... Mansonite is a term originally used in reference to a particular type of Marilyn Manson fan, although its usage has now broadened to include fans of similar musical artists and genres, especially nu metal. ... Darkness is the absence of light. ... The Hack Circle as it appeared on October 23, 2006 The Hack Circle or Hack is a nickname given to an amphitheatre in central Christchurch, New Zealand. ... This article is about the type of dance. ...


The response of these newer groups to the older subculture varies. Some, being secure in a separate subcultural identity, express offense at being called "goth" in the first place, while others choose to join the existing subculture on its own terms. Still others have simply ignored its existence, and decided to appropriate the term "goth" themselves, and redefine the idea in their own image. Even within the original subculture, changing trends have added to the complexity of attempting to define precise boundaries.


The goth scene

The bands that began the gothic rock and death rock scene were limited in number, and included Bauhaus, Specimen, Siouxsie & the Banshees,The Damned, Southern Death Cult, Ausgang, Sex Gang Children, 45 Grave, UK Decay, The Virgin Prunes, Kommunity FK, Alien Sex Fiend and Christian Death. Gloria Mundi, Joy Division, The Cure, Dead Can Dance, early Adam and the Ants and Killing Joke have also been associated. Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of rock music that originated during the late 1970s. ... Death Rock (also spelled Deathrock) is a term used to identify a playfully spooky offshoot of Punk Rock which first appeared in Los Angeles during the late 1970s and early 1980s, then later merged with the New Wave and Glam influenced Batcave musical scene to form Gothic Rock. ... Bauhaus are an English rock band formed in Northampton in 1978 by Peter Murphy (vocals), Daniel Ash (guitar), Kevin Haskins (drums) and David J (bass). ... Johnny Slut Specimen was an 80s British band. ... Siouxsie and the Banshees were a British rock band that formed in 1976. ... This article is about the music group. ... Southern Death Cult was a gothic rock band in the early 1980s. ... Ausgang are a gothic rock group formed in Birmingham in 1982. ... Sex Gang Children was an early gothic rock group that formed in the early 1980s in Britain. ... During 1979-1990 in Los Angeles, 45 Grave was born in the chaos of the punk movement and churned out their own brand of death rock. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Virgin Prunes was an Irish gothic rock band. ... Kommunity FK a post punk, pioneer Death Rock band, initially formed in London in the early 1980s by American Anti-Art, Anti-Pop Singer/Guitarist Patrick Mata. ... // Alien Sex Fiend is a gothic rock/deathrock band from the UK. Getting their start at the Batcave club in London in 1982, they quickly became known in the gothic scene for their psychobilly, dark electronic, industrial sound, heavy samples and loops and manic vocals. ... Christian Death is a name that originally applied to the pioneering Los Angeles deathrock group formed in 1979. ... Gloria Mundi was an early gothic rock band. ... This article is about the band. ... This article is about the band. ... Dead Can Dance is a band comprised of Lisa Gerrard and Brendan Perry. ... Adam & the Ants were a rock and roll group during the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... This article is about the musical group. ...


By the mid-eighties, the number of bands began proliferating and became increasingly popular, including The Sisters of Mercy, The Mission (known as The Mission UK in the US), Xmal Deutschland, The Bolshoi and Fields of the Nephilim. The nineties saw the further growth of eighties bands and emergence of many new bands. Factory Records, 4AD Records, and Beggars Banquet Records released much of this music in Europe, while Cleopatra Records among others released much of this music in the United States, where the subculture grew especially in New York, Los Angeles, and Orange County, California, with many nightclubs featuring "gothic/industrial" nights. The popularity of 4AD bands resulted in the creation of a similar US label called Projekt Records. This produces what is colloquially termed ethereal wave, a subgenre of dark wave music. For the religious organisation of this name, see Sisters of Mercy. ... The Mission (known as The Mission UK in the United States due to a naming clash with a Philadelphia R&B band) is a gothic rock band formed in 1986 from the splinters of the freshly-dissolved rock band The Sisters of Mercy. ... Xmal Deutschland was a musical group from Hamburg, Germany. ... The Bolshoi were a London-based music group prominent mostly in the mid-late 1980s. ... Fields of the Nephilim is a gothic rock band formed in Stevenage, Hertfordshire in 1984. ... FAC 115: Factory Records Stationery (1984) Factory Records was a Manchester based British independent record label, started in 1978, which featured several prominent musical acts on its roster such as Joy Division, New Order, A Certain Ratio, The Durutti Column, Happy Mondays, and (briefly) James and Orchestral Manoeuvres in the... The British indie rock record label 4AD Records was started in 1979 by Ivo Watts-Russell and Peter Kent, funded by Beggars Banquet Records. ... Beggars Banquet is an English independent record label that began as a chain of record shops owned by Martin Mills and Nick Austin, and is part of the Beggars Group of labels. ... Cleopatra Records is a Los Angeles-based independent record label. ... Projekt is a Brooklyn, New York based independent record label specializing in gothic rock, ethereal, darkwave, ambient, shoegazer, dream-pop and dark cabaret created by Sam Rosenthal in 1983. ... Ethereal Wave, also called Ethereal Darkwave [1], Etheric Wave [2] or Heavenly Voices in Europe and is simply called Ethereal in the United States, is a term that describes a subgenre of Darkwave music. ... The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ...


By the mid-1990s, styles of music that were heard in venues that goths attended ranged from gothic rock, death rock, industrial music, EBM, ambient, experimental, synthpop, shoegazing, punk rock, 1970s glam rock, indie rock, to 1980s dance music. This variety was a result of the eclectic tastes of the members of the subculture. Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of rock music that originated during the late 1970s. ... Death Rock (also spelled Deathrock) is a term used to identify a playfully spooky offshoot of Punk Rock which first appeared in Los Angeles during the late 1970s and early 1980s, then later merged with the New Wave and Glam influenced Batcave musical scene to form Gothic Rock. ... It has been suggested that Chicago Industrial be merged into this article or section. ... Electronic body music (mainly known by its acronym EBM) is a music genre that combines elements of industrial music and electronic punk music. ... Ambient music refers to a kind of music that envelops the listener without drawing attention to itself [1] // The term ambient music was first coined by Brian Eno in the mid-1970s to refer to music that can be either actively listened to with attention or as easily ignored, depending... For experimental rock music, see experimental rock. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Shoegazing (also known as shoegaze or shoegazer; practitioners referred to as shoegazers) is a genre of alternative rock that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a style of rock music, which initially surfaced in the post-hippie early 1970s. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ...

Bauhaus - Live in concert, February 3, 2006
Bauhaus - Live in concert, February 3, 2006

Recent years have seen a resurgence in the early positive punk and death rock sound, in reaction to aggrotech, futurepop, and synthpop, which had taken over many goth clubs. Bands with an earlier goth sound like Cinema Strange, Bloody Dead And Sexy, Black Ice, and Antiworld are becoming very popular. Nights like Ghoul School and Release The Bats promote death rock heavily, and the Drop Dead Festival brings in death rock fans from all over the world. Goth and death rock magazines like Drop Dead Magazine (a companion to Drop Dead Festival) also help spread its popularity. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1603x1146, 455 KB) Other versions Originally from en. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1603x1146, 455 KB) Other versions Originally from en. ... Bauhaus are an English rock band formed in Northampton in 1978 by Peter Murphy (vocals), Daniel Ash (guitar), Kevin Haskins (drums) and David J (bass). ... Death Rock (also spelled Deathrock) is a term used to identify a playfully spooky offshoot of Punk Rock which first appeared in Los Angeles during the late 1970s and early 1980s, then later merged with the New Wave and Glam influenced Batcave musical scene to form Gothic Rock. ... Category: ... Futurepop is a recently-emerging electronic dance music genre, an outgrowth of electronic body music incorporating influences from synthpop (such as song structure and vocal style) and uplifting trance (grandiose and arpeggiated synthesizer melodies). ... The Drop Dead Festival is one of the largest horror music events in the world. ...


Today, the goth music scene thrives in Western Europe, especially Germany, with large festivals such as Wave-Gotik-Treffen, M'era Luna and others drawing tens of thousands of fans from all over the world. However, North America still sees large scale events, most recently, Chamber's Dark Art & Music Festival [1]. A current understanding of Western Europe. ... Wave-Gotik-Treffen (German das Treffen means meeting) is an annual festival for music and arts in Leipzig, Germany. ... The Mera Luna Festival is one of the most important events of the gothic or wave scene in Europe. ... North American redirects here. ...


Historical and cultural influences

Origins of the term

The original Goths were an Eastern Germanic tribe who played an important role in the fall of the western Roman Empire. In some circles, the name "goth" later became pejorative: synonymous with "barbarian" and the uncultured due to the then-contemporary view of the fall of Rome and depictions of the pagan Gothic tribes during and after the process of Christianization of Europe. During the Renaissance period in Europe, medieval architecture was retroactively labeled gothic architecture, and was considered unfashionable in contrast to the then-modern lines of classical architecture. This article is about the Germanic tribes. ... The Germanic tribes referred to as East Germanic constitute a wave of migrants who may have moved from Scandinavia into the area between the Oder and Vistula rivers between 600 - 300 BC. Later they went to the south. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Barbarian (disambiguation). ... ROSIE IS A GERMN LADYGermanic paganism refers to the religion of the Germanic nations preceding Christianization. ... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about building architecture. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... From the point of view of modern times, the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean sometimes seem to blend smoothly into one melange we call the Classical. ...


In the United Kingdom, by the late 1700s, however, nostalgia for the medieval period led people to become fascinated with medieval gothic ruins. This fascination was often combined with an interest in medieval romances, Roman Catholic religion and the supernatural. Enthusiasts for gothic revival architecture in the United Kingdom were led by Horace Walpole, and were sometimes nicknamed "goths", the first positive use of the term in the modern period.[citation needed] For the modern genre of romantic fiction, see Romance novel. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ... Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford, more commonly known as Horace Walpole, (September 24, 1717 – March 2, 1797), was a politician, writer and forerunner of the Gothic revival. ...


The gothic novel of the late eighteenth century, a genre founded by Horace Walpole with the 1764 publication of The Castle of Otranto, was accountable for the more modern connotations of the term gothic. He originally claimed that the book was a real medieval romance he had discovered and republished. Thus was born the gothic novel's association with fake documentation to increase its effect. Henceforth, the term was associated with a mood of horror, morbidity, darkness and the supernatural as well as camp and self-parody. The gothic novel established much of the iconography of later horror literature and cinema, such as graveyards, ruined castles or churches, ghosts, vampires, nightmares, cursed families, being buried alive and melodramatic plots. An additional notable element was the brooding figure of the gothic villain, which developed into the Byronic hero. The most famous gothic villain is the vampire, Dracula, originally depicted in a novel by Bram Stoker, then made more famous through the medium of horror movies. Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. ... A false document is a form of verisimilitude that attempts to create in the reader (viewer, audience, etc. ... Horror is the feeling of revulsion that usually occurs after something frightening is seen, heard, or otherwise experienced. ... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... Graves at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York A cemetery is a place (usually an enclosed area of land) in which dead bodies are buried. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... For other uses, see Ghost (disambiguation). ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ... The current usage of the term nightmare refers to a dream which causes the sleeper a strong unpleasant emotional response. ... Look up Curse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Poster for The Perils of Pauline (1914). ... Bad guy redirects here. ... The Byronic hero is an idealized, but flawed, character exemplified in the life and writings of Lord Byron, characterized by his ex-lover Lady Caroline Lamb as being mad, bad and dangerous to know.[1] The Byronic hero first appears in Byrons semi-autobiographical epic narrative poem Childe Harold... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ... This article is about the novel. ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847 – April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ...


The powerful imagery of horror movies began in German expressionist cinema in the twenties then passed onto the Universal Studios films of the thirties, then to camp horror B films such as Plan 9 From Outer Space and then to Hammer Horror films. By the 1960s, TV series, such as The Addams Family and The Munsters, used these stereotypes for camp comedy. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... This article is about 1959 film. ... New company logo as introduced in May 2007 A poster for Dracula: Prince of Darkness (1966). ... TV redirects here. ... The Addams Family is an American television series based on the characters in Charles Addams New Yorker cartoons. ... The Munsters was a 1960s American television comedy depicting the home life of a family of monsters. ...


Certain elements in the dark, atmospheric music and dress of the post punk scene were clearly gothic in this sense. The use of gothic as an adjective in describing this music and its followers led to the term goth. Post-punk was a popular musical movement beginning at the end of the 1970s, following on the heels of the initial punk rock explosion of the mid 1970s. ...


20th century influences

The influence of the gothic novel on the goth subculture can be seen in numerous examples of the subculture's poetry and music, though this influence sometimes came second hand, through the popular imagery of horror films and television. The Byronic hero, in particular, was a key precursor to the male goth image, while Dracula's iconic portrayal by Bela Lugosi appealed powerfully to early goths. They were attracted by Lugosi's aura of camp menace, elegance and mystique. Some people even credit the band Bauhaus' first single "Bela Lugosi's Dead", released August 1979, with the start of the goth subculture, though many prior art house movements also influenced gothic fashion and style. Notable early examples include Siouxsie Sioux of the musical group Siouxsie and the Banshees, and Dave Vanian of the band The Damned. Some members of Bauhaus were, themselves, fine art students and/or active artists. DVD cover showing horror characters as depicted by Universal Studios. ... The Byronic hero is an idealized, but flawed, character exemplified in the life and writings of Lord Byron, characterized by his ex-lover Lady Caroline Lamb as being mad, bad and dangerous to know.[1] The Byronic hero first appears in Byrons semi-autobiographical epic narrative poem Childe Harold... Bela Lugosi as Dracula United States stamp. ... Bauhaus are an English rock band formed in Northampton in 1978 by Peter Murphy (vocals), Daniel Ash (guitar), Kevin Haskins (drums) and David J (bass). ... Bela Lugosis Dead is an influential gothic rock song (often considered to be the first) written by the band Bauhaus. ... Susan Janet Ballion (born May 27, 1957 in Bromley, London), better known by her stage name, Siouxsie Sioux (IPA: , pronounced the same way as Susie Sue), is the lead singer of both the influential rock band Siouxsie & the Banshees and of its splinter group The Creatures. ... Siouxsie and the Banshees are a British gothic rock band. ... David Vanian is and has always been the core of the seminal alternative punk band; The Damned. ... This article is about the music group. ...

Film poster for The Hunger, a key influence in the early days of the goth subculture.
Film poster for The Hunger, a key influence in the early days of the goth subculture.

Some of the early gothic rock and death rock artists adopted traditional horror movie images, and also drew on horror movie soundtracks for inspiration. Their audiences responded in kind by further adopting appropriate dress and props. Use of standard horror film props like swirling smoke, rubber bats, and cobwebs were used as gothic club décor from the beginning in The Batcave. Such references in their music and image were originally tongue-in-cheek, but as time went on, bands and members of the subculture took the connection more seriously. As a result, morbid, supernatural, and occult themes became a more noticeably serious element in the subculture. The interconnection between horror and goth was highlighted in its early days by The Hunger, a 1983 vampire film, which starred David Bowie, Catherine Deneuve, and Susan Sarandon. The movie featured gothic rock group Bauhaus performing "Bela Lugosi's Dead" in a nightclub. In 1993, Whitby became the location for what became the UK's biggest goth festival as a direct result of being featured in Bram Stoker's Dracula. Image File history File links The_Hunger_film_poster. ... Image File history File links The_Hunger_film_poster. ... The Hunger is a 1983 English language horror film. ... Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of rock music that originated during the late 1970s. ... Death Rock (also spelled Deathrock) is a term used to identify a playfully spooky offshoot of Punk Rock which first appeared in Los Angeles during the late 1970s and early 1980s, then later merged with the New Wave and Glam influenced Batcave musical scene to form Gothic Rock. ... Sarcasm is the making of remarks intended to mock the person referred to (who is normally the person addressed), a situation or thing. ... For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Occult (disambiguation). ... The Hunger is a 1983 English language horror film. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 1947 January 8) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... Catherine Deneuve (French IPA: ), (October 22, 1943, in Paris, France), is an Academy Award-nominated French actress. ... Susan Sarandon (born October 4, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Bela Lugosis Dead is an influential gothic rock song (often considered to be the first) written by the band Bauhaus. ... , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ...


The Revolutionary War-era "American Gothic" story of the Headless Horseman, immortalized in Washington Irving's story "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" (published in book form in 1820 along with Irving's equally fantastic "Rip Van Winkle" marked the arrival in the New World of dark, romantic story-telling. The tale was composed by Irving while he was living in England, and was based (as was its companion piece) on popular tales told by colonial Dutch settlers of New York's Hudson River valley. Although the first film adaptation was made in 1922, with Will Rogers as a silent and monochromatic Ichabod Crane, the tale solidly entered 20th century pop culture when Disney included it in the 1949 animated omnibus movie The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad. Nine years later it was separated from its Wind in the Willows partner, and as The Legend of Sleepy Hollow became a favorite on Disney's Sunday-night show on NBC, usually as a Halloween-week special. The Hessian Horseman in the Western Woods as seen in Sleepy Hollow. ... Washington Irving (April 3, 1783 – November 28, 1859) was an American author of the early 19th century. ... The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is a short story by Washington Irving contained in his collection The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. ... For the operetta of the same name, see Rip Van Winkle (operetta). ... William Penn Adair Rogers (November 4, 1879 – August 15, 1935) was a Cherokee-American cowboy, comedian, humorist, social commentator, vaudeville performer, and actor. ... by William J. Wilgus, artist chromolithograph, c. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. ... The Wind in the Willows is a classic of childrens literature by Kenneth Grahame. ... The first incarnation of the Disney anthology television series, commonly called The Wonderful World of Disney, premiered on ABC on October 27, 1954 under the name Disneyland. ...


Although another live-action film was shot in 1980 (starring Jeff Goldblum), the story found its richest treatment yet in Tim Burton's 1999 film Sleepy Hollow. Burton, already famous through his films Edward Scissorhands, Beetlejuice and Batman as producing a unique blend of myth, magic and the macabre, brought his full powers to bear on the story, creating a storybook atmosphere that nevertheless was filled with darkness and shadow. Burton's biggest departure from the admittedly dumbed-down Disney version was in giving equal weight to the stories of both Crane and the Horseman. As in Irving's original tale, the headless rider (Christopher Walken) is an undead Hessian mercenary, but Burton uses a whole raft of traditionally gothic, horrific, medieval and Inquisitional imagery in bringing his version alive. Jeffrey Lynn Goldblum (born October 22, 1952) is an Academy-Award nominated American actor. ... Sleepy Hollow (1999) is a horror film directed by Tim Burton, interpreting the legend of The Headless Horseman and based loosely around the Washington Irving story The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. ... Edward Scissorhands is a 1990 fantasy film, directed and co-written by Tim Burton and written by Caroline Thompson. ... This article is about the film. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... In fantasy fiction, the term revenant usually means a sentient creature whose desire to complete a goal (usually to avenge its death) allows it to return from the grave as a creature vaguely resembling an intelligent zombie. ... The term Hessian refers to the inhabitants of the German state of Hesse. ... This article is about the Inquisition by the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Throughout the evolution of goth subculture, classic romantic, gothic and horror literature has played a significant role. Keats, Poe, Baudelaire and other tragic and romantic writers have become as emblematic of the subculture as has using dark eyeliner or dressing in black. Baudelaire, in fact, in his preface to Les Fleurs du Mal (Flowers of Evil) penned lines that as much as anything can serve as a sort of goth malediction: Keats redirects here. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... “Baudelaire” redirects here. ... Les Fleurs du Mal (literal trans. ...

C'est l'Ennui! —l'œil chargé d'un pleur involontaire,
Il rêve d'échafauds en fumant son houka.
Tu le connais, lecteur, ce monstre délicat,
—Hypocrite lecteur,—mon semblable,—mon frère!
It is ennui! — an eye brimming with an involuntary tear,
he dreams of the gallows in the fumes of his water-pipe.
You apprehend, reader, this fragile monster,
—hypocrite reader,—my mirror,—my brother![5]

A newer literary influence on the gothic scene was Anne Rice's re-imagining of the idea of the vampire. Rice's characters were depicted as struggling with eternity and loneliness, this with their ambivalent or tragic sexuality had deep attractions for many goth readers, making her works very popular in the eighties through the nineties. Movies based on her books have been filmed in recent years — notably Interview with the Vampire, in which goths appear directly and indirectly. Anne Rice (born on October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ... Interview with the Vampire is a vampire novel by Anne Rice written in 1973 and published in 1976. ...


Later media influences

As the subculture became well-established, the connection between goth and horror fiction became almost a cliché, with Goths quite likely to appear as characters in horror novels and film. For example, The Crow drew directly on goth music and style. Neil Gaiman's acclaimed graphic novel series The Sandman influenced Goths with characters like the dark, brooding Dream and his sister Death. Anne Rice's book series The Vampire Chronicles and the popular World of Darkness roleplaying games, especially Vampire: The Masquerade, also referred directly to gothic music and culture and encouraged an interest in the scene. Influences from anime, cyberpunk fiction such as The Matrix and Shadowrun have increased interest in the goth scene although unrelated, adding to Cyber subculture, or Industrial/goth fusion; and the popularity of Industrial music. For other uses, see The Crow (disambiguation). ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... The Sandman is a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman. ... Dream is one of the Endless, fictional characters from Neil Gaimans comic book series, The Sandman. ... Death is a fictional character from the DC comic book series, The Sandman (1988 - 1996). ... Anne Rice (born on October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. ... The World of Darkness (or WoD) is the name given to three related but distinct fictional universes. ... Vampire: The Masquerade (Revised Edition) cover. ... Animé redirects here. ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... The Matrix series consists primarily of three films, The Matrix, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions. ... This article is about the pen & paper RPG. For other uses, see Shadowrun (disambiguation). ... The Cyber subculture, also known as cyberculture, is used both to refer to a branch of the goth and rivethead subcultures that has arguably become a subculture in its own right. ... It has been suggested that Chicago Industrial be merged into this article or section. ...


A regular goth character is portrayed positively on the American television series NCIS. Abby Sciuto, played by Pauley Perrette, is uniquely goth, but works firmly on the side of the protagonists as a highly skilled forensic scientist. NCIS is a CBS network show about a team of special agents from the Naval Criminal Investigative Service of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps. ... Abigail Abby Sciuto (shoe-toe) is a fictional forensic scientist in the NCIS television series by CBS Television, portrayed by Pauley Perrette. ... Pauley Perrette (born March 27, 1969) is an American actress. ...


Visual art influences

The Belgian photographer Viona Ielegems at Wave-Gotik-Treffen in 2005
The Belgian photographer Viona Ielegems at Wave-Gotik-Treffen in 2005

The Goth subculture has influenced different artists - not only musicians - but also painters and photographers. In particular their work is based on mystic, morbid and romantic motifs. In photography and painting the spectrum varies from erotic artwork to romantic images of vampires or ghosts. To be present is a marked preference for dark colours and sentiments, similar to Gothic fiction, Pre-Raphaelites or Art Nouveau. In the Fine Art field, Anne Sudworth is a well known goth artist with her dark, nocturnal works and strong Gothic imagery. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (480x640, 61 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Goth subculture Viona Ielegems ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (480x640, 61 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Goth subculture Viona Ielegems ... Wave-Gotik-Treffen (German das Treffen means meeting) is an annual festival for music and arts in Leipzig, Germany. ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole Gothic fiction is an important genre of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. ... Persephone, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. ... Vitebsk Railway Station one of the finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture. ... Anne Sudworth is a British artist known for her paintings of magical earth light trees and haunting moonlit landscapes. ...


Some of the graphic artists close to Goth are Gerald Brom, Nene Thomas, Luis Royo, Dave McKean, Jhonen Vasquez, Trevor Brown as well as the American comic artist James O'Barr. H R Giger of Switzerland is one of the first graphic artists to make serious contributions to the Gothic/Industrial look of much of modern cinema with his work on the film "Alien" by Ridley Scott. Gerald Brom (born March 9, 1965) is a gothic fantasy artist and illustrator. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... David Tench McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, England) is an illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, graphic designer, filmmaker and musician. ... Jhonen Vasquez (born September 1, 1974), also known by his pseudonyms Mr. ... Though presently living in Japan, Trevor Brown is a British artist whose work explores paraphilias, such as pedophilia, BDSM, and other fetish themes. ... James OBarr (born 1960, Detroit, Michigan) is the creator of the comic book series, The Crow. ... Birth machine Hans Ruedi Giger (IPA: ) (born at Chur, Grisons canton, February 5, 1940) is an Academy Award-winning Swiss painter, sculptor, and set designer best known for his design work on the film Alien. ...


Ideology

Defining an explicit ideology for the gothic subculture is difficult for several reasons. First is the overwhelming importance of mood and aesthetic for those involved. This is, in part, inspired by romanticism and neoromanticism. The allure for goths of dark, mysterious, and morbid imagery and mood lies in the same tradition of Romanticism's gothic novel. During the late 18th and 19th century, feelings of horror, and supernatural dread were widespread motifs in popular literature; The process continues in the modern horror film. Balancing this emphasis on mood and aesthetics, another central element of the gothic is a deliberate sense of camp theatricality and self-dramatization; present both in gothic literature as well as in the gothic subculture itself. This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Romantics redirects here. ... (Disambiguation: you may be looking for Neoromanticism (music) or New Romantic (British pop music)) The term neo-romanticism is synonymous with post-Romanticism or late Romanticism. ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ...


Goths, in terms of their membership in the subculture, are usually not supportive of violence, but rather with tolerance. Many in the media have incorrectly associated the Goth subculture with violence, hatred of minorities, white supremacy, and other acts of hate. However, violence and hate do not form elements of goth ideology; rather, the ideology is formed in part by recognition, identification, and grief over societal and personal evils that the mainstream culture wishes to ignore or forget. These are the prevalent themes in goth music.[6]


The second impediment to explicitly defining a gothic ideology is goth's generally apolitical nature. While individual defiance of social norms was a very risky business in the nineteenth century, today it is far less socially radical. Thus, the significance of goth's subcultural rebellion is limited, and it draws on imagery at the heart of Western culture. Unlike the hippie or punk movements, the goth subculture has no pronounced political messages or cries for social activism. The subculture is marked by its emphasis on individualism, tolerance for diversity, a strong emphasis on creativity, tendency toward intellectualism, a dislike of social conservatism, and a mild tendency towards cynicism, but even these ideas are not universal to all goths. Goth ideology is based far more on aesthetics than ethics or politics. For the British TV show, see Hippies (TV series). ... Punks at a music festival The punk subculture is a subculture that is based around punk rock music. ... Aesthetics is commonly perceived as the study of sensory or sensori-emotional values, sometimes called judgments of sentiment and taste. ... For other uses, see Ethics (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ...


Goths may, indeed, have political leanings ranging from left-liberal to anarchist, but they do not express them specifically as part of a cultural identity. Instead, political affiliation, like religion, is seen as a matter of personal conscience. Unlike punk, there are few clashes between political affiliation and being "goth". In politics, the term liberal refers to: an adherent of the ideology of liberalism or a state or quality of this ideology. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ...


For the individual goth, involvement with the subculture can be extremely valuable and personally fulfilling, especially in creative terms. However, it also can be risky, especially for the young, partly because of the negative attention it can attract due to public misconceptions of goth subculture. The value that young people find in the movement is evidenced by its continuing existence after other subcultures of the eighties (such as the New Romantics) have long since died out. New Romantic was a New Wave music subgenre and fashion movement that occurred primarily in the United Kingdom during the early 1980s. ...


Individualism and consumerism

Paul Hodkinson's book, Goth: Identity, Style and Subculture, explores how the Western cult of individualism, usually expressed via consumerism, is drawn on by goths and other subcultural groups. Many who are drawn to the culture have already failed to conform to the norms of existing society, and for its participants the gothic subculture provides an important way of experiencing a sense of community and validation not found in the outside world. Hodkinson shows how inside the gothic subculture status can be gained via enthusiastic participation and creativity, in creating a band, DJ-ing, making clothes, designing, creating art, or writing a fanzine. He suggests that the self-conscious artificiality of a subculture is a valid alternative choice in a post-modern world, compared to submitting to the invisible manipulations of popular consumerism and the mass media. Individualism is a term used to describe a moral, political, or social outlook that stresses human independence and the importance of individual self-reliance and liberty. ... Consumerist redirects here. ... In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ... In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ... Postmodernism (sometimes abbreviated pomo) is a term applied to a wide-ranging set of developments in critical theory, philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and culture, which are generally characterized as either emerging from, in reaction to, or superseding, modernism. ...


Religious Imagery

While there is no one common religious tie that binds together the goth movement, spiritual, supernatural, and religious imagery has frequently played an important part in gothic fashion, song lyrics, and visual art. In particular, aesthetic elements from Catholicism play a major role in goth culture. Reasons for donning such imagery vary between individuals, and range from expression of religious affiliation, satire, or simply decorative effect.[6] Catholic Church redirects here. ...


Fashion

Main article: Gothic fashion

Goth fashion is stereotyped as a dark, sometimes morbid, eroticized fashion and style of dress. Typical gothic fashion includes dyed black hair, dark eyeliner, black fingernails, black period-styled clothing; goths may or may not have piercings. Styles are often borrowed from the Elizabethan, Victorian or medieval period and often express Catholic or other religious imagery such as crucifixes or ankhs.[7][6] The extent to which goths hold to this style varies amongst individuals as well as geographical locality, though virtually all Goths wear some of these elements. Gothic fashion is a clothing style worn by members of the Goth subculture. ... A baby wearing many items of winter clothing: headband, cap, fur-lined coat, shawl and sweater. ... The Elizabethan Era is the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603) and is often considered to be a golden age in English history. ... Victorian can refer to: people from or attributes of places called Victoria (disambiguation page), including Victoria, Australia, people who lived during the British Victorian era of the 19th century, and aspects of the Victorian era, for example: Victorian architecture Victorian fashion Victorian morality Victorian literature This is a disambiguation page... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ...


Confusion with heavy metal fashion

Goth fashion is often confused with heavy metal fashion: outsiders often mistake fans of heavy metal for goth, particularily those who wear black trenchcoats or wear "corpse paint" (a term associated with the black metal music scene). Judas Priest, in typical heavy metal attire, performing at the VH1 Rock Honors on May 25, 2006. ... Abbath and Horgh of Immortal Corpse paint (sometimes a single word, corpsepaint) is a style of black-and-white makeup used extensively by black metal bands during live concerts and photo shoots. ... This article is about the musical genre. ...


Controversy

The gothic fascination with the macabre has raised public concerns regarding the well-being of goths. The mass media has made reports that have influenced the public view that goths or people associated with the subculture, are malicious; however this is disputed and the Goth subculture is often described as non-violent.[8] Some individuals who have either identified themselves or been identified by others as goth, whether correctly or incorrectly, have committed high profile violent crimes, including several school shootings. These incidents and their attribution to the goth scene have helped to propagate a wary perception of Goth in the public eye.[9][7] For other uses, see Macabre (disambiguation). ... Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... A violent crime or crime of violence is a crime in which the offender uses or threatens violent force upon the victim. ... School shooting is a term popularized in American and Canadian media to describe gun violence at educational institutions, especially the mass murder or spree killing of people connected with an institution. ...


The Dawson College shooting, in Canada, also raised public concern with the goth scene. Kimveer Gill, who killed one and injured nineteen, maintained an online journal at a web site, VampireFreaks.com, in which he "portrayed himself as a gun-loving Goth."[10] The day after the shooting it was reported that "it are rough times for industrial / goth music fans these days as a result of yet another trench coat killing", implying that Gill was involved in the goth subculture.[10] During a search of Gill's home, police found a letter praising the actions of Columbine shooters Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold and a CD titled "Shooting sprees ain't no fun without Ozzy and friends LOL".[11] Although the shooter claimed an obsession for "Goth", his favorite music list was described, by the media, as a "who's who of heavy metal".[12] The Dawson College shooting occurred on September 13, 2006 at Dawson College, a CEGEP in Westmount near downtown Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Kimveer Gill (July 9, 1981 – September 13, 2006) was the gunman involved in a school shooting referred to as the Dawson College shooting at Dawson College in Montreal, Quebec, Canada on September 13, 2006. ... The Columbine High School massacre occurred on Tuesday, April 20, 1999, at Columbine High School in unincorporated Jefferson County, Colorado (the CDP of Columbine) near Denver and Littleton. ... Eric Harris (left) and Dylan Klebold (right) Eric David Harris (April 9, 1981 – April 20, 1999) and Dylan Bennet Klebold (September 11, 1981 – April 20, 1999) were the high school seniors who committed the Columbine High School massacre. ...


Mick Mercer, author, noted music journalist, and world's leading historian of Goth music[13][14][15] stated, of Kimveer Gill, that he was "not a Goth. Never a Goth. The bands he listed as his chosen form of ear-bashing were relentlessly Metal and standard Grunge, Rock and Goth Metal, with some Industrial presence.", "Kimveer Gill listened to metal", "He had nothing whatsoever to do with Goth" and further commented "I realise that like many Neos this idiot may even have believed he somehow was a Goth, because they're only really noted for spectacularly missing the point." Mercer emphasized that he was not blaming heavy metal music for Gill's actions and added "It doesn’t matter actually what music he liked.".[16]. Mick Mercer is an author who best known for his reviews of goth and punk music. ... This article is about notable bands within the goth scene. ... Kimveer Gill (July 9, 1981 – September 13, 2006) was the gunman involved in a school shooting referred to as the Dawson College shooting at Dawson College in Montreal, Quebec, Canada on September 13, 2006. ... This article is about metallic materials. ... Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is an independent-rooted music genre that became a commercially successful offshoot of hardcore punk, thrash metal, and alternative rock in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Goth metal (also called Gothic metal) is a crossover between heavy metal music and goth music itself; although the term metal is debated by those who say it is mainly goth music. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ...


Another school shooting that was wrongly attributed to the goth subculture is the Red Lake High School massacre[17]. Jeff Weise killed 7 people, and was believed by a fellow student to be into the goth culture: wearing "a big old black trench coat," and listening to heavy metal music. Weise was also found to participate in neo-nazi online forums.[18] Wikinews has related news: Ten dead on Minnesota Indian reservation after school shooting The Red Lake High School massacre was a school massacre that took place on Monday, March 21, 2005 in which Jeffrey Weise, a student at Red Lake High School in Red Lake, Beltrami County, Minnesota, killed seven... Jeff Weise as a sophomore in a 2005 class photo. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... The terms Neo-Nazism and Neo-Fascism refer to any social or political movement to revive Nazism or Fascism, respectively, and postdates the Second World War. ...


Other murders which are attributed to people suspected of being part of the goth culture include the Scott Dyleski killing,[19] and the Richardson family murders,[20][21] although neither of these cases raised the same amount of media attention as the school shootings. A compilation of three photos of Scott Dyleski, run on the cover of the San Francisco Chronicle. ... This image of Jasmine Richardson was originally released to the media on April 23 when the police were looking for her, but she was not an official suspect, but was suppressed on April 24 when she became a suspect (and was arrested). ...


In part because of public misunderstanding and ignorance surrounding gothic aesthetics, goths sometimes suffer prejudice, discrimination, and intolerance. As is the case with members of various other controversial subcultures and alternative lifestyles, outsiders sometimes marginalize goths, either by intention or by accident.[22] Goths, like any other alternative sub-culture sometimes suffer intimidation, humiliation, and, in extreme cases, physical violence for their involvement with the subculture.[23] This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Intolerance is the lack of ability or willingness to tolerate something. ... An alternative lifestyle is a lifestyle (a mode or style of conducting ones life) which carries the implication that it is not within the generally perceived cultural norm. ... Intimidation is generally used in the meaning of criminal threatening. ... Etymology: Late Latin humiliatus, past participle of humiliare, from Latin humilis low. ...


In 2006 four goths were attacked in San Diego California by a Navy man and his brother resulting in one goth, Jim Howard, having to be rushed to the hospital to undergo surgery in order to repair the damage that was done. The perpetrators of this attack were found guilty in August of 2007 on four related accounts, two of which were felonies. It was made clear that the goths were assaulted due to their subculture affiliation. This can be otherwise known as a "hate crime" though the San Diego courts do not recognize this attack as such at this time.[24][25][26] Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Naval redirects here. ...


On August 11, 2007, two goths, walking through Stubbylee Park in Bacup, Lancashire, England were attacked by a group of teenagers because they were goths. Sophie Lancaster subsequently died from her injuries. [27][28] Sophie Lancaster ( 1987 – August 24, 2007) was a British woman who was brutally attacked with her boyfriend, Robert Maltby while walking through Stubby Lee Park in Bacup, Rossendale in Lancashire. ...


Criticism

In contrast to postcolonialist literary and cultural critics who see goth as eurocentric and laden with racist connotations, film historian David J. Skal argues that horror cinema has always served as a socially acceptable outlet for subversive social criticism,[29] and thus neither horror imagery nor (by extension) the Gothic subculture adhere to the description suggested by these critics. This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Eurocentrism is the practice, conscious or otherwise, of placing emphasis on European (and, generally, Western) concerns, culture and values at the expense of those of other cultures. ...


Cartoonist Jhonen Vasquez has satirized the goth subculture in his comics Johnny the Homicidal Maniac, I Feel Sick, and Fillerbunny. Vasquez depicts it as showing tendencies towards backbiting, unoriginality, and conceit. At the same time, his work is also self-mocking, particularly when it touches on issues such as murder and depression (common in Johnny the Homicidal Maniac), which are topics of interest in Goth subculture.[citation needed] Jhonen Vasquez (born September 1, 1974), also known by his pseudonyms Mr. ... Johnny the Homicidal Maniac. ... Main character Devi (Top), Tenna & Spooky (Bottom) I Feel Sick is a doubleshot, full-color comic book written and drawn by the popular comic artist Jhonen Vasquez and colored by Rosearik Rikki Simons (who would later go on to do the voice of GIR in Invader Zim). ... Fillerbunny is a character created by comic book artist and writer Jhonen Vasquez. ... Johnny the Homicidal Maniac. ...


References

Books
  • Baddeley, Gavin: Goth Chic: A Connoisseur's Guide to Dark Culture (Plexus, US, August 2002, ISBN 0-85965-308-0)
  • Davenport-Hines, Richard: Gothic: Four Hundred Years of Excess, Horror, Evil and Ruin (1999: North Port Press. ISBN 0-86547-590-3 (trade paperback) - A voluminous, if somewhat patchy, chronological/aesthetic history of Gothic covering the spectrum from Gothic architecture to The Cure.
  • Fuentes Rodríguez, César: Mundo Gótico. (Quarentena Ediciones, 2007, ISBN 8493389161)-In Spanish. Covering Literature, Music, Cinema, BDSM, Fashion and Subculture topics-
  • Hodkinson, Paul: Goth: Identity, Style and Subculture (Dress, Body, Culture Series) 2002: Berg. ISBN 1-85973-600-9 (hardcover); ISBN 1-85973-605-X (softcover)
  • Kilpatrick, Nancy: The Goth Bible : A Compendium for the Darkly Inclined. 2004: St. Martin's Griffin. ISBN 0-312-30696-2
  • Voltaire: What is Goth? (WeiserBooks, US, 2004; ISBN 1-57863-322-2) — a view of the goth subculture
  • Andrew C. Zinn: The Truth Behind The Eyes (IUniverse, US, 2005; ISBN 0-595-37103-5) — Dark Poetry
Notes
  1. ^ César Fuentes Rodríguez "Mundo Gótico", pages 18 & ss./pages 206 & ss.
  2. ^ Carol Siegel "Goth's Dark Empire", pages 8-13 and ss.
  3. ^ Batcave club history Scathe.demon.co.uk. URL Accessed April 23, 2006.
  4. ^ Archived Interview with Ms. Dinah Cancer Alicebag.com. URL Accessed April 23, 2006.
  5. ^ translated from the French by wiki user starfarmer
  6. ^ a b c ReligiousTolerance.org's article on "Goth"
  7. ^ a b Eric Lipton Disturbed Shooters Weren't True Goth from the Chicago Tribune, April 27, 1999
  8. ^ Goth subculture may protect vulnerable children - health - 14 April 2006 - New Scientist
  9. ^ Marcia Montenegro The World According to Goth Christian Answers for the New Age
  10. ^ a b September 14, 2006. Shooting by Canadian trench coat killer affects industrial / goth scene Side-line.com. Retrieved on March 13, 2007.
  11. ^ CTV News. "Details of Kimveer Gill's apology note revealed", March 20, 2007. 
  12. ^ Singh, Raman [http://www.nriinternet.com/NRI_Murdered/CANADA/Montreal/Kimveer_Gill/index.htm NRI Kimveer Gill, Montreal native gunman called himself 'angel of death', kills One and injuring 20] NRI Retrieved on March 22, 2007.
  13. ^ Blu Interview with Mick Mercer Starvox.net
  14. ^ Kyshah Hell Interview with Mick Mercer Morbidoutlook.com
  15. ^ Mick Mercer Broken Ankle Books
  16. ^ Mick Mercer Mick Mercer talks about Kimveer Gill mickmercer.livejournal.com
  17. ^ "Shooter is described as 'Goth kid'", Star-Telegram (subscription required)
  18. ^ NBC, MSNBC and news services Teen who killed 9 claimed Nazi leanings MSNBC
  19. ^ CNN.com. October 22, 2005. Vitale slaying suspect charged with murder. Retrieved on March 13, 2007.
  20. ^ Reynolds, Richard, "Accused killer, 12, linked to goth site", The Sydney Morning Herald, April 28, 2006.
  21. ^ Johnsrude, Larry, "Goths say Medicine Hat killings give them bad name", Edmonton Journal, April 26, 2006.
  22. ^ Carey Goldberg " TERROR IN LITTLETON: THE SHUNNED; For Those Who Dress Differently, an Increase in Being Viewed as Abnormal" New York Times - May 1, 1999
  23. ^ Marcia Montenegro The World According to Goth Christian Answers for the New Age
  24. ^ Goths and Violent Crime Gothic Angst Webzine Sept 8, 2007
  25. ^ Goth Help Us, San DiegoGothic Angst Webzine May 1, 2007
  26. ^ Vindication Jim Howard sept 1, 2007
  27. ^ Goth couple badly hurt in attack BBC News-UK
  28. ^ Bonnie Malkin and agencies Woman 'attacked for being a Goth' dies Telegraph.co.uk News
  29. ^ David J. Skal: "The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror" Faber and Faber, Inc., 1993 ISBN 0-571-19996-8

Voltaire (real name Aurelio Voltaire Hernández) (born January 25, 1967, in Havana, Cuba[2]), is a musician popular in the goth scene. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Fort Worth Star-Telegram is a major U.S. daily newspaper serving Fort Worth and the western half of the North Texas area known as the Metroplex. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Goth subculture
Gothic rock - Gothic fashion - Goth slang - Gothic aesthetics - Post-Punk

Gothic fashion is a clothing style worn by members of the Goth subculture. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole Gothic fiction is an important genre of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. ... Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of rock music that originated during the late 1970s. ... // Subcultures The 20th century, particularly the latter half, was a time of increasing social diversity and individualism. ... The following is a list of Gothic rock bands which have articles on the English Wikipedia, in alphabetical order. ... Goth slang is the slang of the goth subculture. ... St. ... Gothic rock (sometimes called goth rock or simply goth) is a genre of rock music that originated during the late 1970s. ... Gothic fashion is a clothing style worn by members of the Goth subculture. ... Goth slang is the slang of the goth subculture. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Gothic people
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Gothic subculture
  • Article from the New Scientist on benefits of the Goth subculture.
  • Encyclopedia Gothica Encyclopedia of the Goth subculture.
Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... New Scientist is a weekly international science magazine covering recent developments in science and technology for a general English-speaking audience. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Goth. Who is Goth? What is Goth? Where is Goth? Definition of Goth. Meaning of Goth. (1456 words)
The word goth, as it relates to the modern subculture, is a neologism laid claim to by a number of famous figures associated with the goth movement [1].
In referring to goth as a whole it is easier to think of it as a movement, driven by gothic fashion and gothic rock, its members generally exhibiting some degree of taste for a dark, supernatural aesthetic.
Goth, as a concept, continues to evolve and develop in the 21st century, recently embracing influences from rave culture and anime.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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