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Encyclopedia > Gossip
Neighborly gossips in the Altstadt in Sindelfingen, Germany
Neighborly gossips in the Altstadt in Sindelfingen, Germany

Gossip consists of casual or idle talk of any sort, usually slanderous and/or devoted to discussing others. Compare backbiting. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (422x652, 89 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Gossip Sindelfingen ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (422x652, 89 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Gossip Sindelfingen ... Altstadt is the German word for old city. ... Sindelfingen is a town in the German state of Baden-Württemberg with about 60,000 residents and is about 15 km south west of Stuttgart, Germany. ... “Libel” redirects here. ...


While gossip forms one of the oldest and (still) the most common means of spreading and sharing facts and views, it also has a reputation for the introduction of errors and other variations into the information thus transmitted. The term also carries implications that the news so transmitted (usually) has a personal or trivial nature. Compare conversation. The ASCII codes for the word Wikipedia represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information. ... Lenin and Stalin in conversation Conversation is the verbalization of concepts involving abstractions and concrete objects which make up the reality in which we reside. ...


Some people commonly understand gossip as meaning the spreading of rumor and misinformation, as (for example) through excited discussion of scandals. Some newspapers carry "gossip columns" which retail the social and personal lives of celebrities or of élite members of certain communities. Look up rumour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Misinformation is information that is incorrect, but not because of a deliberate attempt to mislead. ... A scandal is a widely publicized incident involving allegations of wrong-doing, disgrace, or moral outrage. ... A gossip columnist is someone who writes a gossip column in a newspaper or magazine, especially a gossip magazine, that prints gossip stories, spreading news of a personal, private nature, and/or rumors and lies, usually about show business, the motion picture and television industries, celebrities, movie stars, superstars, people... “Megastar” redirects here. ... Elitism is the belief or attitude that the people who are considered to be the elite — a selected group of persons with outstanding personal abilities, wealth, specialised training or experience, or other distinctive attributes — are the people whose views on a matter are to be taken the most seriously, or... A community usually refers to a sociological group in a large place or collections of plant or animal organisms sharing an environment. ...


Gossip has recently come into the academy as a fruitful avenue of study, particularly in light of its relationship to both overt and implicit power structures. Compare discourse. Research is a human activity based on intellectual investigation and aimed at discovering, interpreting, and revising human knowledge on different aspects of the world. ... Much of the recent sociological debate on power revolves around the issue of constraining and/or enabling nature of power. ... Discourse is a term used in semantics as in discourse analysis, but it also refers to a social conception of discourse, often linked with the work of French philosopher Michel Foucault (1926-1984) and Jürgen Habermas The Theory of Communicative Action (1985). ...


Researchers studying computer networks and distributed computing have recently begun to develop software based on what they term gossip protocols. These mimic social networks as a way to carry out distributed computing tasks that can be hard to solve in other ways. (The term epidemic protocol is also used in this context.) A computer network is a system for communication among two or more computers. ... Distributed computing is a method of computer processing in which different parts of a program run simultaneously on two or more computers that are communicating with each other over a network. ... A gossip protocol is a style of computer-to-computer communication protocol inspired by the form of gossip seen in social networks. ... A gossip protocol is a style of computer-to-computer communication protocol inspired by the form of gossip seen in social networks. ...

Contents

Etymology

The word "gossip" originates from god-sib, the godparent of one's child or parent of one's godchildren ("god-sibling"; compare the possible cognate of sib: sabhā), referring to a relationship of close friendship. The Oxford English Dictionary traces the usage of godsib back as far as 1014. A godparent, in many denominations of Christianity, is someone who sponsors a childs baptism. ... A sabhā in Ancient India was an assembly, congregation, or council. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is generally regarded as the most comprehensive and scholarly dictionary of the English language. ...


The Oxford English Dictionary records the use of gossip in the meaning of "idle talk; trifling or groundless rumour; tittle-tattle ... [e]asy, unrestrained talk or writing, esp. about persons or social incidents" back as far as 1811. This became a primary meaning of the word, although literary as well as everyday English can continue to use gossip in the sense of "talkative woman" (apparently a near-synonym with "godparent" in Early Modern English, the first attestation of the extended meaning of "anyone engaging in familiar or idle talk" dating from 1566). The verb to gossip dates to the early 17th century.


Discredited folk-etymology

Despite the academic etymology, one popular etymology (or folk-etymology) connects the word "gossip" with "to sip": [1] the tale tells how politicians would send assistants to bars to sit and listen to general public conversations. The assistants had instructions to sip a beer and listen to opinions; they responded to the command to "go sip", which allegedly turned into "gossip". (Note the implied value (for power-brokers) that this story attributes to the uninhibited casual opinions and interests of "randomly"-encountered common people — compare opinion-polling and market research.) A fake etymology is an invented explanation (etymology) for the origin of a word. ... Folk etymology or popular etymology is a linguistic term for a category of false etymology which has grown up in popular lore, as opposed to one which arose in scholarly usage. ... Opinion polls are surveys of opinion using sampling. ... Market research is the process of systematic gathering, recording and analyzing of data about customers, competitors and the market. ...


Functions of gossip

This Soviet war poster conveys the message: "Don't chatter! Gossiping borders on treason" (1941).
This Soviet war poster conveys the message: "Don't chatter! Gossiping borders on treason" (1941).

Gossip can serve to: ImageMetadata File history File links No_chat. ... ImageMetadata File history File links No_chat. ...

  • normalise and re-inforce moral boundaries in a speech-community
  • foster and build a sense of community with shared interests and information
  • entertain and divert participants in gossip-sessions
  • retail and develop various types of story — anecdotes, narratives and even legends — see memetics
  • build structures of social accountability
  • further mutual social grooming (like many other uses of language, only more so)
  • provide a mating tool that allows (for example) women to mutually identify socially desirable men and compare notes on which men are better than others.

-1... A community usually refers to a sociological group in a large place or collections of plant or animal organisms sharing an environment. ... The ASCII codes for the word Wikipedia represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information. ... An anecdote is a short tale told about an interesting, amusing, or biographical incident. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Look up Legend in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Memetics is an approach to evolutionary models of information transfer based on the concept of the meme. ... Accountability is a concept in ethics with several meanings. ... In social animals and humans social grooming is a major social activity, and a means by which animals who live in proximity can bond and reinforce social structures, family links, and build relationships. ...

Various views on gossip

Some see gossip as trivial, hurtful and socially and/or intellectually unproductive. The Bahá'í Faith, for instance, refers to gossip as backbiting, and condemns and prohibits the practice, viewing it as a cause of disunity. Seat of the Universal House of Justice, governing body of the Baháís, in Haifa, Israel The Baháí Faith is the religion founded by Baháulláh in 19th century Persia. ...


In a more sinister interpretation, restrictions on gossip could potentially paralyse the free flow of information and enforce straight-jacketed thinking and censorship in a community. The term "gossip" typically labels discussion the speaker disapproves of ("I discuss, you speculate, he gossips"). Compare freedom of speech. A straitjacket is a garment shaped like a jacket with overlong sleeves. ... Personification of thought (Greek Εννοια) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Thought or thinking is a mental process which allows beings to model the world, and so to deal with it effectively according to their goals, plans, ends and desires. ... Censorship is defined as the removal and withholding of information from the public by a controlling group or body. ... Freedom of speech is the concept of being able to speak freely without censorship. ...


A feminist definition of gossip presents it as "a way of talking between women, intimate in style, personal and domestic in scope and setting, a female cultural event which springs from and perpetuates the restrictions of the female role, but also gives the comfort of validation." (Jones, 1990:243) Feminism is a number of social, cultural and political movements, theories and moral philosophies that are concerned with cultural, political and economic practices and inequalities that discriminate against women. ...


In Early Modern England

In Early Modern England the word "gossip" referred to companions in childbirth, not limited to the midwife. It also became a term for women-friends generally, with no necessary derogatory connotations. It commonly referred to an informal local sorority or social group, who could enforce socially-acceptable behaviour through private censure or through public rituals, such as "rough music" and the skimmington ride. The literature of the period has many references to this[citation needed], some of them doubtless fictional. In addition, legal records document actions taken by women themselves in the civil courts, and by the church in church courts. Early Modern Britain is a term used to define the period in the history of Great Britain roughly corresponding to the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. ... Childbirth (also called labour, birth, partus or parturition) is the culmination of a human pregnancy with the emergence of a newborn infant/s from the mothers uterus. ... Midwifery is a blanket term used to describe a number of different types of health practitioners, other than doctors, who provide prenatal care to expecting mothers, attend the birth of the infant and provide postnatal care to the mother and infant. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... This section may stray from the articles topic into the topic of another article: List of notable riots. ... In the common law, civil law refers to the area of law governing relations between private individuals. ... A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... An ecclesiastical court (also called Court Christian) is any of certain courts having jurisdiction mainly in spiritual or religious matters. ...


These include accounts of the rituals that shamed or celebrated women’s sexuality: women washing a neighbour’s private parts with soap and water, or ‘polling’ pubic hair. In Thomas Harman’s Caveat for Common Cursitors 1566 a ‘walking mort’ relates how she was forced to agree to meet a man in his barn, but informed his wife. The wife arrived with her “five furious, sturdy, muffled gossips” who catch the errant husband with “his hosen about his legs” and give him a sound beating. The story clearly functions as a morality tale in which the gossips uphold the social order. In politics, polling is the surveying of public opinion on an issue. ... Thomas Harman was an Elizabethan author who lived in Kent, England. ... Events January 7 - Pius V becomes Pope Selim II succeeds Suleiman I as Sultan of the Ottoman Empire Religious rioting in the Netherlands signifies the beginning of the Eighty Years War in the Netherlands. ... Thieves cant was a secret language (or cryptolect) formerly used by thieves, beggars and hustlers of various kinds in Great Britain and to a lesser extent in other English-speaking countries. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Social order is a concept used in sociology, history and other social sciences. ...

  • Bernard Capp, When Gossips Meet: Women, Family and Neighbourhood in Early Modern England, Oxford University Press, 2003. ISBN 0199255989

Gossip in Judaism

Main article: Lashon hara

Judaism considers gossip spoken without a constructive purpose (known in Hebrew as lashon hara) as a sin. Speaking negatively about people, even if retelling true facts, counts as sinful, as it demeans the dignity of man — both the speaker and the subject of the gossip. Lashon hara (Hebrew לשון חרא ×—×—×—; evil tongue, also transliterated as loshon hora) is the Jewish sin of gossip. ... Sin is a term used mainly in a religious context to describe an act that violates a moral rule, or the state of having committed such a violation. ...


According to Proverbs 18:8: "The words of a gossip are like choice morsels: they go down to a man's innermost parts." The Book of Proverbs is one of the books of the Ketuvim of the Tanakh and of the Writings of the Old Testament. ...


Gossip in Islam

Islam considers backbiting the equivalent of eating the flesh of one's dead brother. Backbiting about somebody harms that person without offering any chance of defence for the victim; just as a dead person cannot mount a defence if one were to eat his flesh. Since Islam has the concept of universal brotherhood, one should treat every other man like one's brother.


Gossip in Christianity

Christianity condemns all kinds of gossip. The Epistle to the Romans associates gossips ("backbiters") with a list of sins including sexual immorality and with murder: The Epistle to the Romans is one of the letters of the New Testament canon of the Christian Bible. ...

28 And even as they did not like to retain God in their knowledge, God gave them over to a reprobate mind, to do those things which are not convenient; 29 Being filled with all unrighteousness, fornication, wickedness, covetousness, maliciousness; full of envy, murder, debate, deceit, malignity; whisperers, 30 Backbiters, haters of God, despiteful, proud, boasters, inventors of evil things, disobedient to parents, 31 Without understanding, covenantbreakers, without natural affection, implacable, unmerciful: 32 Who knowing the judgment of God, that they which commit such things are worthy of death, not only do the same, but have pleasure in them that do them. (Romans 1:28-32)

Quotes

  • Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people. - Eleanor Roosevelt

See also

Confidential, July 1957 During the 1950s, magazines featuring scandalous gossip about the personal lives of celebrities became a popular genre in the United States. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... Look up rumour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A scandal is a widely publicized incident involving allegations of wrong-doing, disgrace, or moral outrage. ... Misinformation is information that is incorrect, but not because of a deliberate attempt to mislead. ... Word of mouth, is a reference to the passing of information by verbal means, especially recommendations, but also general information, in an informal, person-to-person manner. ... Yenta (YEN-tah) is a Yiddish word referring to a busybody or gossip. ... well you dont know what you are looking 4 so go 2 bed A label is any kind of tag attached with adhesive to something so as to identify the object or its contents. ...

Bibliography

  • Robert F. Goodman and Aaron Ben-Zeev, editors: Good Gossip. Lawrence, Kansas: University Press of Kansas, 1993. ISBN 0700606696
  • Deborah Jones, 1990: 'Gossip: notes on women's oral culture'. In: Cameron, Deborah. (editor) The Feminist Critique of Language: A Reader. London/New York: Routledge, 1990, pp. 242-250. ISBN 0415042593. Cited online in Rash, 1996.
  • Felicity Rash, 1996: "Rauhe Männer - Zarte Frauen: Linguistic and Stylistic Aspects of Gender Stereotyping in German Advertising Texts 1949-1959" in The Web Journal of Modern Language Linguistics, Issue 1, 1996. Retrieved from http://wjmll.ncl.ac.uk/issue01/rashb.rtf on 2006-08-11
  • Patricia Ann Meyer Spacks. Gossip. New York: Knopf, 1985. ISBN 0394540247
  • Robert C. Ellickson (1991). Order without law: how neighbors settle disputes. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. ISBN 978-0674641686. 

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Gossip

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robin Dunbar is an evolutionary biologist, specialising in primate behaviour. ...

References

  1. ^ See for example the popular-cultural account and discussion of the phenomenon as an Internet urban legend at http://www.word-detective.com/060704.html ; retrieved 2007-02-15.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gossip - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1027 words)
While gossip forms one of the oldest and (still) the most common means of spreading and sharing facts and views, it also has a reputation for the introduction of errors and other variations into the information thus transmitted.
Gossip has recently come into the academy as a fruitful avenue of study, particularly in light of its relationship to both overt and implicit power structures.
The word "gossip" originates from god-sib, the godparent of one's child or parent of one's godchildren ("god-sibling"; compare the possible cognate of sib: sabhā), referring to a relationship of close friendship.
What’s Wrong With Gossip? (1827 words)
Gossip is wicked and sinful -- a seething disease of corruption from the mouth.
Gossips use their mouth as a weapon -- a weapon which is always aimed at people to fulfill Satan’s desires to “steal, kill, and destroy” (John 10:10).
Gossip is an enemy to God and everything called holy -- a cancer which spreads a deadly infection to the body of Christ.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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