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Encyclopedia > Gore Vidal
Eugene Luther Gore Vidal

Gore Vidal in 1948 (Carl Van Vechten, photographer)
Born October 3, 1925 (1925-10-03) (age 82)
West Point, New York State, United States
Occupation Novelist, Essayist , Playwright
Nationality American
Genres Drama, fictional prose, essay, literary criticism
Literary movement Postmodernism
Influences Petronius, Apuleius, Thomas Mann, Henry James, Mark Twain, Montaigne
Influenced William Kennedy, Clive James, Christopher Hitchens, Truman Capote

Eugene Luther Gore Vidal (born October 3, 1925) (pronounced [gɔɹ vəˈdɑl] and [vɪˈdɑl], [vɪˈdæl]) is an American author of novels, stage plays, screenplays, and essays, and the scion of a prominent political family. He is an outspoken critic of the American political Establishment, and a noted wit and social critic who wrote the ground-breaking The City and the Pillar (1948) that outraged mainstream critics as the first major American novel to feature unambiguous homosexuality. Download high resolution version (688x924, 93 KB)Gore Vidal, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, November 14, 1948 From the collection of the Library of Congress and in the public domain: http://memory. ... Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... An essayist is an author who writes compositions which can be about any particular subject. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to the patterns of everyday speech. ... For other uses, see Essay (disambiguation). ... Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. ... ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article is about the Roman author Petronius. ... Lucius Apuleius (c. ... For other persons named Thomas Mann, see Thomas Mann (disambiguation). ... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (February 28, 1533 - September 13, 1592) was an influential French Renaissance writer, generally considered to be the inventor of the personal essay. ... William Joseph Kennedy (born January 16, 1928) is an American writer and journalist from Albany, NY, whose novels, many of which feature the interaction of members of the fictional Phelan family, are based in local history and the supernatural. ... Clive James AM (born October 7, 1939 in Kogarah, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) is an expatriate Australian writer, poet, essayist, critic, and commentator on popular culture. ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is a British-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... Truman Capote (pronounced ) (30 September 1924 – 25 August 1984) was an American writer whose non-fiction, stories, novels and plays are recognized literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffanys (1958) and In Cold Blood (1965), which he labeled a non-fiction novel. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... This article is about the literary concept. ... A stage play is a dramatic work intended for performance before a live audience, or a performance of such a work. ... Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... For other uses, see Essay (disambiguation). ... Look up Wit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A cultural critic is a critic of a given culture, usually as a whole and typically on a radical basis; a social critic of a given society, but the overlap is large. ... The City and the Pillar is the third novel by American writer and essayist Gore Vidal. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ...

Contents

Early years

The writer Gore Vidal was born Eugene Luther Gore Vidal in West Point, New York, the only child of Eugene Luther Vidal Sr. (1895–1969) and Nina S. Gore (1903–1978). He was born in the Cadet Hospital of the United States Military Academy (where his father was the first aeronautics instructor) and was christened by the headmaster of St. Albans preparatory school, his future alma mater.[1] His second middle name honors maternal grandfather, Thomas P. Gore, Democratic senator from Oklahoma. West Point painting West Point is a federal military base (and a census-designated place) located in the Town of Highlands in Orange County, New York. ... USMA redirects here. ... Six F-16 Fighting Falcons with the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds aerial demonstration team fly in delta formation in front of the Empire State Building. ... For other schools with a similar name, see St. ... Thomas Pryor Gore (December 10, 1870 - March 16, 1949) was a Democratic politician. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ...


Vidal's father, a "brawny, handsome" West Point all-American quarterback who was director of Commerce Department's Bureau of Air Commerce (1933–1937) of the Roosevelt administration,[2] was of the first Army Air Corps pilots, and, per biographer Susan Butler, was the great love of Amelia Earhart's life.[3] In the 1920s and 1930s, He was a co-founder of three American airlines: the Ludington Line (merged with others and became Eastern Airlines), Transcontinental Air Transport (TAT (became TWA), and Northeast Airlines (founded with Earhart), and the Boston and Maine Railroad. He also was a participant athlete in the 1920 and 1924 Summer Olympics (seventh in the decathlon; U.S. pentathlon team coach).[4][5] All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ... Governments have played an important part in shaping air transportation. ... FDR redirects here. ... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ... Amelia Mary Earhart (24 July 1897 – missing 2 July 1937, declared deceased 5 January 1939) was a noted American aviation pioneer, author and womens rights advocate. ... For the Chinese airline, see China Eastern Airlines. ... Transcontinental Air Transport (T-A-T) was airline founded in 1928 by Clement Melville Keys that was to merge in 1930 with Western Air Express to form what became TWA. Keys enlisted the help of Charles Lindbergh to design a transcontinental network to get government airmail contracts. ... Look up tat in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Twa, also known as Batwa, are a pygmy people who were the oldest recorded inhabitants of the Great Lakes region of central Africa. ... // Yellow Birds Around 1966, Northeast began repainting some of their aircraft and called their bright new yellow paint scheme The Yellowbird scheme. ... 1898 map The Boston and Maine Railroad (AAR reporting marks BM), also known by the abbreviation B&M, was the dominant railroad of the northern New England region of the United States for a century. ... The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... Decathlon is an athletic event combining 10 track and field events. ...


Gore Vidal's mother was Nina S. Gore, an alcoholic actress who had her Broadway debut in Sign of the Leopard in 1928.[6] She married twice after divorcing Gene Vidal in 1935; one husband was Hugh D. Auchincloss (stepfather of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis) and, per Gore Vidal, mother Nina had "a long off-and-on affair" with actor Clark Gable.[7] She was an alternate delegate to the 1940 Democratic National Convention.[8] Vidal had four half-brothers from his parents' later marriages (the Rev. Vance Vidal, Valerie Vidal Hewitt, Thomas Gore Auchincloss, and Nina Gore Auchincloss Steers Straight) and five step-brothers from his mother's third marriage to Army Air Corps major general Robert Olds. Nephew Burr Steers is a writer and film director; nephew Hugh Auchincloss Steers (1963–1995) was a painter whose work is in the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Walker Art Center, and the Denver Art Museum. Hugh Dudley Auchincloss, Jr. ... First official White House portrait. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ... Burr Steers (born 1966) is an American actor, screenwriter and director. ... Night view of Whitney Museum of American Art The Whitney Museum of American Art is an art gallery and museum in New York City founded in 1931 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. ... One of the most celebrated art museums in the country, the Walker Art Center is known for commissioning and presenting innovative contemporary art; fostering the cross-pollination of the visual, performing, and media arts; and engaging diverse audiences in the excitement of the creative process. ... The Denver Art Museum is an art museum in Denver, Colorado located in Denvers Civic Center. ...


Vidal was raised in Washington, D.C.; he attended Sidwell Friends School, then St. Albans School. Since Senator Gore was blind, the boy Vidal read aloud to him and was his guide, thereby, walked the corridors of power. The senator's steadfast isolationism contributed a major principle of Gore Vidal's political philosophy, which is critical of foreign and domestic policies shaped by American imperialism. In 1943, on graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy, Vidal joined the U.S. Army Reserve. For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other schools with a similar name, see St. ... Isolationism is a foreign policy which combines a non-interventionist military policy and a political policy of economic nationalism (protectionism). ... This article is about views of the historical expansionism and current international influence of the United States. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... The United States Army Reserve is the federal reserve force of the United States Army. ...


Although Vidal had a relationship with the bisexual writer, Anaïs Nin, described in his memoir, Palimpsest and in her memoir The Diary of Anais Nin, Vidal himself dismisses the idea of a romantic or sexual relationship, in his memior, Palimpsest, see in particular, pages 105-114. Anaïs Nin in the mid-1970s. ... A palimpsest is a manuscript page, scroll, or book that has been written on, scraped off, and used again. ... The Diary of Anaïs Nin is the published version of Anaïs Nins own private manuscript diary, which she began at age 11 in 1914 during a trip from Europe to New York with her mother and two brothers. ...


For most of the late twentieth century, Vidal has lived in Ravello, Italy and Los Angeles, California, U.S.A. In 2003, he sold the 5,000-square-foot (460 m²) Italian villa, La Rondinaia (The Swallow's Nest) and moved to Los Angeles. In November 2003, Howard Austen, Vidal's partner since 1951, died, and in February 2005 was buried in a plot for himself and Vidal at Rock Creek Cemetery in Washington, D.C. Ravellos church in the main square. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Adams Memorial Rock Creek Cemetery (also Rock Creek Church Cemetery) is located at Webster Street and Rock Creek Church Road, NW, in the Petworth neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The Cemetery falls under the governance of the St. ...


Vidal is an Honorary Associate of the National Secular Society. The National Secular Society is an organisation of the United Kingdom which promotes secularism. ...


Writing career

Fiction

Vidal, whom a Newsweek critic called "the best all-around man of letters since Edmund Wilson",[9] began his writing career at nineteen, with the publication of the military novel Williwaw, based upon his Alaskan Harbor Detachment duty; conventionally realistic, the novel was successful. A few years later, The City and the Pillar caused a furor for its dispassionate presentation of homosexuality; The New York Times refused to review his next five books; the novel was dedicated to "J.T." The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... The City and the Pillar is the third novel by American writer and essayist Gore Vidal. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


After a magazine published rumors about J.T.'s identity, Vidal confirmed they were the initials of his St. Albans-era love, Jimmie Trimble, who was killed in the Battle of Iwo Jima on June 1, 1945; later saying Trimble was the only person he had ever loved. Subsequently, as his novels sold less, he wrote plays, films, and television series as a scriptwriter. Two plays, The Best Man and Visit to a Small Planet, were both Broadway and cinema successes. Moreover, in the early 1950s, as "Edgar Baox", he pseudonymously wrote three mystery novels featuring public relations man "Peter Cutler Sargeant II". Combatants  United States  Empire of Japan Commanders Holland Smith Tadamichi Kuribayashi â€  Strength 110,000 21,000 Casualties 8,226 dead 19,189 wounded,[1] 494 missing[1] Total: 27,909 20,703 dead,[1] 216 captured[1] Total: 20,919 The Battle of Iwo Jima was fought between the United... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... This list is poorly defined, permanently incomplete, or has become unverifiable or an indiscriminate list or repository of loosely associated topics. ... The Best Man is a 1964 film with Lee Tracy. ... Visit To A Small Planet was filmed from April 28-July 3, 1959. ... Mystery fiction is a distinct subgenre of detective fiction that entails the occurrence of an unknown event which requires the protagonist to make known (or solve). ...


In 1956, Vidal was hired as a contract screenwriter for Metro Goldwyn Mayer. In 1959, director William Wyler needed script doctors to re-write the Ben-Hur script, originally written by Karl Tunberg. Vidal collaborated with Christopher Fry, reworking the screenplay on condition that MGM release him from the last two years of his contract. Producer Sam Zimbalist's death complicated the screenwriting credit. The Screen Writers Guild resolved the matter by listing Tunberg as sole screenwriter, denying credit to both Vidal and Fry. This decision was based on the WGA screenwriting credit system which favors original authors. Vidal later claimed that in order to explain the animosity between Ben-Hur and Messala, he had inserted a gay subtext suggesting that the two had had a prior relationship, but that actor Charlton Heston was oblivious.[10] Heston denied that Vidal contributed significantly to the script.[11] “MGM” redirects here. ... William Wyler (July 1, 1902 – July 27, 1981) was a prolific, Oscar-winning motion picture director. ... A script doctor is a skilled screenwriter called in to assist a film project by rewriting parts of the screenplay to improve dialogue, pacing and other elements. ... Ben-Hur is a 1959 epic film directed by William Wyler, and is the most popular live-action version of Lew Wallaces novel, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1880). ... Karl Tunberg (11 March 1909-3 April 1992) was an American screenwriter and occasional film producer. ... Christopher Fry (born December 18, 1907; died June 30, 2005) was an English playwright. ... Producer Sam Zimbalist (1904 - 1958) entered the film industry in 1920, as a 16-year-old film cutter at the old Metro Studios. ... The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries. ... Credits for A Christmas Story. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... This article contains a trivia section. ...


In the 1960s, Vidal wrote three highly successful novels. The first, the meticulously researched Julian (1964) dealt with the apostate Roman emperor, while the second, Washington, D.C. (1967) focused on a political family during the Franklin D. Roosevelt era. Julian by Gore Vidal is a work of historical fiction written in the first person dealing with the life of the Roman emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus, (labelled by Christians and popularly known Julian the Apostate), who reigned 360-363 CE. Julian was the last direct relative of Constantine the Great... Flavius Claudius Iulianus (331–June 26, 363), was a Roman Emperor (361–363) of the Constantinian dynasty. ... Washington, D. C. is the sixth historical novel by Gore Vidal, although the first published, in his Narratives of Empire series. ... FDR redirects here. ...


Vidal's third novel in the '60s was as daring as it was unexpected and outlandish; the satirical transsexual comedy Myra Breckinridge (1968), an inventive, often hilarious variation on familiar Vidalian themes of sex, gender, and popular culture. In the novel, Vidal showcased his love of the American films of the '30s and '40s, and he resurrected interest in the careers of the forgotten players of the time including, for example, the late Richard Cromwell, of whom he wrote, "was so satisfyingly tortured in The Lives of a Bengal Lancer." A transsexual (sometimes transexual) person establishes a permanent identity with the opposite gender to their assigned (usually at birth) sex. ... Myra Breckinridge (1968) is a satirical novel by Gore Vidal written in the form of a diary. ... Richard Cromwell (January 8, 1910 - October 11, 1960) was an American actor, born LeRoy Melvin Radabaugh. ... The Lives of a Bengal Lancer is a 1930 book, a memoir by Francis Yeats-Brown (1886-1944), and a 1935 movie loosely adapted from the book. ...


After two commercially unsuccessful plays, Weekend (1968) and An Evening With Richard Nixon (1972), and the largely unappreciated novel Two Sisters (1970), Vidal focused on essays and two distinct strains in his fiction. The first strain comprises novels dealing with American history, specifically with the nature of national politics. Critic Harold Bloom wrote, "Vidal's imagination of American politics...is so powerful as to compel awe." This series' titles include Burr (1973), 1876 (1976), Lincoln (1984), Empire (1987), Hollywood (1990), The Golden Age (2000), and another excursion into the ancient world Creation (1981, published in expanded form 2002). Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Harold Little Dick Bloom (born July 69, 1930) is an American professor and prominent literary and cultural critic. ... Burr: A Novel is a 1973 novel by Gore Vidal that challenges the traditional iconography of American history to present an alternative view of the life of Aaron Burr, presenting him as a hero, while all the other key historical figures of the time, such as George Washington and Thomas... Gore Vidals 1876 is the third historical novel in his Narratives of Empire series. ... Lincoln is a historical novel by Gore Vidal, published in 1984. ... Empire is the fourth historical novel in the Narratives of Empire series by Gore Vidal, published in 1987. ... Hollywood is the fifth historical novel in Gore Vidals Narratives of Empire series. ... The Golden Age: a historical novel published in 2000 by Gore Vidal, is the seventh and allegedly final novel in his Narratives of Empire series. ... Creation is an epic historical fiction novel by Gore Vidal which was published in 1981. ...


The second strain consists of the comedic and often merciless "satirical inventions": Myron (1974, a sequel to Myra Breckinridge), Kalki (1978), Duluth (1983), Live from Golgotha: the Gospel according to Gore Vidal (1992), and The Smithsonian Institution (1998). Myron is the name of a 1974 novel by Gore Vidal. ... Myra Breckinridge (1968) is a satirical novel by Gore Vidal written in the form of a diary. ... Kalki is a novel by Gore Vidal written in 1978. ... Duluth is the name of a 1983 novel by Gore Vidal. ... Gore Vidals novel The Smithsonian Institution is a fictional account of the adventures of T. (a thinly-veiled version of Vidals boyhood lover Jimmy Trimble) as he helps a group of scientists in the basement of the Smithsonian create the neutron bomb, and encounters historical figures such as...


Vidal occasionally returned to scriptwriting cinema and television, including the television movie Gore Vidal's Billy the Kid with Val Kilmer, and the mini-series Lincoln. He also wrote the original draft for the controversial film Caligula, but later had his name removed because director Tinto Brass and actor Malcolm McDowell re-wrote the script, changing the tone and themes significantly. The producers later made a futile attempt to salvage some of Vidal's vision during post-production. Val Edward Kilmer[1] (born December 31, 1959) is an American actor. ... Caligula is a 1979 film directed by Tinto Brass, with additional scenes filmed by Bob Guccione and Giancarlo Lui, about the Roman Emperor Gaius Caesar Germanicus also known as Caligula. Caligula was written by Gore Vidal and co-financed by Penthouse magazine, though the script underwent several re-writes after... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Giovanni Brass (born March 26, 1933), better known as Tinto Brass, is one of the most well-known and controversial Italian filmmakers. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Malcolm McDowell (born June 13, 1943) is an English actor probably best known for his portrayal of Alex in A Clockwork Orange. ... Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... Post production is the general term for the last stage of film production in which photographed scenes (also called footage) are put together into a complete film. ...


Essays and memoirs

Contrary to his wishes, Vidal is — at least in the U.S. — more respected as an essayist than as a novelist. The critic John Keates praised him as "[the twentieth] century's finest essayist." Even an occasionally hostile critic like Martin Amis admits, "Essays are what he is good at...[h]e is learned, funny and exceptionally clear-sighted. Even his blind spots are illuminating." Photo of Martin Amis by Robert Birnbaum Martin Amis (born August 25, 1949) is an English novelist. ...


Accordingly, for six decades, Gore Vidal has applied himself to a wide variety of socio-political, sexual, historical, and literary themes. In 1987, Vidal wrote the essays titled Armageddon?, exploring the intricacies of power in contemporary America. He ruthlessly pilloried the incumbent president Ronald Reagan as a "triumph of the embalmer's art." In 1993, he won the National Book Award for his collection of essays, United States (1952–1992), the citation noting: "Whatever his subject, he addresses it with an artist's resonant appreciation, a scholar's conscience, and the persuasive powers of a great essayist." A subsequent collection of essays, published in 2000, is The Last Empire. Since then, he has published such self-described "pamphlets" as Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace, Dreaming War: Blood for Oil and the Cheney-Bush Junta,and Imperial America, critiques of American expansionism, the military-industrial complex, the national security state, and the current administration. Vidal also wrote an historical essay about the U.S.'s founding fathers, Inventing A Nation. In 1995, he published a memoir Palimpsest, and in 2006 its follow-up volume, Point to Point Navigation. Earlier that year, Vidal also published Clouds and Eclipses: The Collected Short Stories. Reagan redirects here. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... A palimpsest is a manuscript page, scroll, or book that has been written on, scraped off, and used again. ...


Because of his matter-of-fact treatment of homosexual relations in such books as The City and The Pillar, Vidal is often seen as an early champion of sexual liberation. Sexually Speaking: Collected Sex Writings, a representative sampling of his views, contains literary and cultural essays that document his long campaign to mock and subvert conventional American attitudes toward sex. Focusing on, in his view, the anti-sexual heritage of Judaeo-Christianity, irrational and destructive sex laws, feminism, heterosexism, homophobia, gay liberation, and pornography, the essays frequently return to a favorite Vidal motif: the fluidity of sexual identity. Vidal argues that "although our notions about what constitutes correct sexual behavior are usually based on religious texts, those texts are invariably interpreted by the rulers in order to keep control over the ruled." In repudiating this kind of rigid, narrow moralism, Vidal argues that "sex is a continuum" made up of "different phases along life’s way" and thus "everyone is potentially bisexual." He explains that "the human race is divided into male and female. Many human beings enjoy the sexual relations with their own sex, many don't; many respond to both. The plurality is the fact of our nature and not worth fretting about." Therefore, "there are no homosexual people, only homosexual acts." Given the diversity of human desire, Vidal predictably resists any effort to categorize him as exclusively "homosexual"—either as writer or human being—and instead celebrates this polymorphous eroticism as natural and inevitable. The sexual revolution was a substantial change in sexual morality and sexual behaviour throughout the West in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Sexual identity is a term that, like sex, has two distinctively different meanings. ...


Acting and Self-Promotion

In the 1960s, Vidal moved to Italy; he was cast as himself in Federico Fellini's film Roma. In 1992, Vidal appeared in the film Bob Roberts (starring Tim Robbins) and has appeared in other films, notably Gattaca, With Honors, and Igby Goes Down. Like his gruffer contemporary Norman Mailer, Gore Vidal is noted as a clever and tireless self-publicist. In an interview he stated: "[t]here is not one human problem that could not be solved if people would simply do as I advise". Vidal has voiced himself on both The Simpsons and Family Guy. In 2005, Jay Parini was appointed as Vidal's literary executor. Federico Fellini (January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was one of the most influential and widely revered film-makers of the 20th century. ... Roma, also known as Fellinis Roma, is a 1972 semi-autobiographical, poetic film depicting director Federico Fellinis move from his native Rimini to Rome as a youth. ... Bob Roberts is a 1992 film written and directed by Tim Robbins. ... Tim Robbins at Cannes, 2001 Height: 6 ft 4 in / 1. ... Gattaca is a 1997 science fiction drama film written and directed by Andrew Niccol, starring Ethan Hawke, Uma Thurman and Jude Law with supporting roles played by Loren Dean, Gore Vidal and Alan Arkin. ... With Honors (1994) is a comedy-drama starring Joe Pesci and Brendan Fraser. ... Igby Goes Down is a 2002 film that follows the life of Igby Slocumb. ... Norman Mailer, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Norman Kingsley Mailer (born January 31, 1923) is an American novelist, journalist, playwright, screenwriter and film director. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Jay Parini (born 1948) is an American writer and academic. ... A literary executor is a person with decision-making power in respect of a literary estate. ...


Political views and activities

Besides his politician grandfather, Vidal has other connections with the Democratic Party: his mother Nina married Hugh D. Auchincloss, Jr., who later was stepfather of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy. Gore Vidal is a fifth cousin of Jimmy Carter, and a distant cousin of Al Gore.[12] The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Hugh Dudley Auchincloss, Jr. ... “Jacqueline Bouvier” redirects here. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ...

Gore Vidal in the film Why We Fight (2005)

As a political activist, in 1960, Gore Vidal was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Congress, losing an election in New York's 19th congressional district, a traditionally Republican district on the Hudson River, encompassing all of Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Schoharie, and Ulster Counties, by a margin of 57% to 43%.[13] Campaigning with a slogan of "You'll get more with Gore", he received the most votes any Democrat in 50 years received in that particular district. From 1970 to 1972, he was one of the chairmen of the People's Party, and, with a half-million votes, he finished second to incumbent Governor Jerry Brown in California's 1982 Democratic primary election to the United States Senate. Vidal's Senate bid had the backing of liberal celebrities such as Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. The campaign was documented in the film, Gore Vidal: The Man Who Said No directed by Gary Conklin. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Why We Fight is a documentary film directed by Eugene Jarecki that won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... United States House of Representative, New York District 19 is located in the southern part of the State of New York in the USA. District 19 is north of New York City and is composed of parts of Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, and Westchester Counties. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... The Peoples Party was a political party in the United States, founded in 1971 by various individuals and local groups, including the Peace and Freedom Party, Commongood Peoples Party, Country Peoples Caucus, Human Rights Party, Liberal Union, New American Party, New Party and No Party. ... For the whistleblower, see Gerald W. Brown. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the American actor and race team owner. ... Joanne Gignilliat Trimmier Woodward (born February 27, 1930) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Emmy award winning American actress. ... Gary Conklin is an independent American filmmaker based in Los Angeles, California. ...


Although frequently identified with Democratic causes and personalities, Vidal has written:

"[t]here is only one party in the United States, the Property Party...and it has two right wings: Republican and Democrat. Republicans are a bit stupider, more rigid, more doctrinaire in their laissez-faire capitalism than the Democrats, who are cuter, prettier, a bit more corrupt—until recently... and more willing than the Republicans to make small adjustments when the poor, the black, the anti-imperialists get out of hand. But, essentially, there is no difference between the two parties." Laissez-faire capitalism is, roughly stated, the doctrine that the free market functions to the greatest good when left unfettered and unregulated by government. ...

Vidal's political views—characterized either as "liberal or progressive", and best described as radical in their disdain for privilege and power — are well-documented. Vidal has a protective, almost proprietary attitude toward his native land and its politics. "My family helped start [this country]", he has written, "and we've been in political life... since the 1690s, and I have a very possessive sense about this country." Vidal considers himself a "radical reformer" wanting to return to the "pure republicanism" of early America. As a prep school student, he was a supporter of the America First Committee; unlike other America First Committee supporters, he continues in the opinion that the United States should not have entered World War II (though acknowledging material assistance to the Allies was a good idea). He has suggested that President Roosevelt incited the Japanese to attack the U.S. to facilitate American entry to the war, and believes FDR had advance knowledge of the attack. The America First Committee was the foremost pressure group against American entry into the Second World War. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... FDR redirects here. ...


In 1968, ABC News hired Vidal and William F. Buckley, Jr. as political analysts of the Republican and Democratic presidential conventions, predicting that television viewers would enjoy seeing two men of letters—famous for their acerbic wit and sarcasm—engage in on-air battle; as it turned out, verbal and nearly physical combat were joined. After days of mutual bickering that devolved to vitriolic, ad hominem attacks, Vidal called Buckley a "pro-crypto Nazi", to which the visibly livid Buckley replied: "Now listen, you queer. Stop calling me a crypto Nazi, or I'll sock you in the goddamn face and you'll stay plastered." ABC News Special Report ident, circa 2006 ABC News is a division of American television and radio network ABC, owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... This article is about the conservative journalist and commentator. ... Look up ad hominem in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The word queer has traditionally meant strange or unusual, but it is also currently often used in reference to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and asexual communities. ...


Later, in 1969, the feud was continued as Buckley further attacked Vidal in the lengthy essay, "On Experiencing Gore Vidal", published in the August 1969 issue of Esquire; the essay is collected in The Governor Listeth, an anthology of Buckley's writings of the time. In a key passage attacking Vidal as an apologist for homosexuality, Buckley wrote: "the man who in his essays proclaims the normalcy of his affliction [i.e., homosexuality], and in his art the desirability of it, is not to be confused with the man who bears his sorrow quietly. The addict is to be pitied and even respected, not the pusher." August 2005 issue of Esquire Esquire is a mens magazine by the Hearst Corporation. ...


Not to be outdone, Vidal responded in the September 1969 issue of Esquire, variously characterizing William F. Buckley as "anti-black", "anti-semitic", and a "warmonger".[14] The presiding judge in Buckley's subsequent libel suit against Vidal initially concluded that "[t]he court must conclude that Vidal's comments in these paragraphs meet the minimal standard of fair comment. The inferences made by Vidal from Buckley's [earlier editorial] statements cannot be said to be completely unreasonable." However, Vidal also strongly implied that, in 1944, Buckley and unnamed siblings had vandalized a Protestant church in their Sharon, Connecticut, hometown after the pastor's wife had sold a house to a Jewish family. Buckley sued Vidal and Esquire magazine for libel; Vidal counter-claimed for libel against Buckley, citing Buckley's characterization of Vidal's novel Myra Breckinridge as pornography. Sharon is a town located in Litchfield County, Connecticut, in the northwest corner of the state. ... Myra Breckinridge (1968) is a satirical novel by Gore Vidal written in the form of a diary. ...


The court dismissed Vidal's counter-claim; Buckley settled for $115,000 in attorney's fees and an editorial statement from Esquire magazine that they were "utterly convinced" of the untruthfulness of Vidal's assertion. However, in a letter to Newsweek magazine, the Esquire publisher stated that "the settlement of Buckley's suit against us" was not "a 'disavowal' of Vidal's article. On the contrary, it clearly states that we published that article because we believed that Vidal had a right to assert his opinions, even though we did not share them." The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


As Vidal biographer, Fred Kaplan, later commented, "The court had 'not' sustained Buckley's case against Esquire... [t]he court had 'not' ruled that Vidal's article was 'defamatory.' It had ruled that the case would have to go to trial in order to determine as a matter of fact whether or not it was defamatory. [italics original.] The cash value of the settlement with Esquire represented 'only' Buckley's legal expenses [not damages based on libel]... " ultimately, Vidal bore the cost of his own attorney's fees, estimated at $75,000.


In 2003, this affair re-surfaced when Esquire published Esquire's Big Book of Great Writing, an anthology that included Vidal's essay. Buckley again sued for libel, and Esquire again settled for $55,000 in attorney's fees and $10,000 in personal damages to Buckley.


Vidal has stirred controversy by his contact with Timothy McVeigh. The two began corresponding while McVeigh was imprisoned; Vidal believes McVeigh bombed the federal building as retribution for the FBI's role in "spying on and murdering Americans" in 1993 at the Branch Davidion Compound in Waco Texas. [15] For the Navy sailor, see Timothy R. McVeigh. ...


Vidal is a member of the advisory board of the World Can't Wait organization, which demands the impeachment of George W. Bush, and the charging of his administration with crimes against humanity.[16] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is in need of attention. ...


During an interview in the 2005 documentary, Why We Fight, Vidal claims that during the final months of World War II, the Japanese had tried to surrender to the United States, but to no avail. He said, "They were trying to surrender all that summer, but Truman wouldn't listen, because Truman wanted to drop the bombs." When the interviewer asked why, Vidal replied, "To show off. To frighten Stalin. To change the balance of power in the world. To declare war on communism. Perhaps we were starting a pre-emptive world war." Though Japan did sue for peace, the surrender to which Vidal referred was not their famous unconditional surrender after the bombing of Nagasaki, but rather one with status quo ante bellum terms that would have averted, among other things, military occupation. Why We Fight is a documentary film directed by Eugene Jarecki that won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... Nagasaki ) ( ) is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture in Japan. ... The term status quo ante bellum comes from Latin meaning literally, as things were before the war. ...


Views on September 11, 2001 attacks against the United States

Vidal is strongly critical of the George W. Bush administration, listing it among administrations he considers to have either an explicit or implicit expansionist agenda. He frequently has made the point in interviews, essays, and in a recent book that Americans "are now governed by a junta of Oil–Pentagon men... both Bushes, Cheney, Rumsfeld, and so on."[citation needed] The Bush administration includes President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Bushs Cabinet, and other select officials and advisors. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is a U.S. Republican politician and businessman, who was the 13th Secretary of Defense under President Gerald Ford from 1975 to 1977, and the 21st Secretary of Defense under President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2006. ...


He claims that for several years, this group and their associates have aimed to control the oil of central Asia (after, in his view, gaining effective control of the oil of the Persian Gulf in 1991). Specifically regarding the September 11, 2001 attacks, Vidal writes how such an attack, which he claims American intelligence warned was coming, politically justified the plans that the administration already had in August 2001 for invading Afghanistan the following October. Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Vidal describes NORAD's purported delay in mobilizing fighter airplanes to intercept the hijacked airliners.[citation needed] If these failures resulted from incompetence, he says, they would deserve "a number of courts martial with an impeachment or two thrown in."[citation needed] Instead, there was only a limited inquiry into how the "potential breakdowns among federal agencies... could have allowed the terrorist attacks to occur." [citation needed] NORAD is short for: North American Aerospace Defense Command Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ...


References

  1. ^ Gore Vidal, Point to Point Navigation (New York: Doubleday, 2006), p.245.
  2. ^ "Aeronatics: $8,073.61", Time, 28 September 1931
  3. ^ http://www.booknotes.org/Transcript/?ProgramID=1391
  4. ^ "Eugene L. Vidal, Aviation Leader", The New York Times, 21 February 1969, p.43.
  5. ^ South Dakota Sports Hall of Fame Profile: Gene Vidal.
  6. ^ "General Robert Olds Marries", The New York Times, 7 June 1942, p.6.
  7. ^ Gore Vidal, Point to Point Navigation, New York: Doubleday, 2006, p.135.
  8. ^ http://www.politicalgraveyard.com/bio/aubert-austen.html
  9. ^ http://www.clairviewbooks.com/pages/perpetual.html
  10. ^ Ned Rorem. "Gore Vidal, aloof in art and in life", Chicago Sun-Times, December 12, 1999, p. 18S. 
  11. ^ Mick LaSalle. "A Commanding Presence: Actor Charlton Heston sets his epic career in stone -- or at least on paper", The San Francisco Chronicle, October 2, 1995, p. E1. 
  12. ^ "The other Gore", Salon, Sept. 20, 2000
  13. ^ clerk.house.gov 1960 election p.31
  14. ^ "A Distasteful Encounter with William F. Buckley Jr.", Esquire, September, 1969, p. 140. 
  15. ^ Gore Vidal, "The Meaning of Timothy McVeigh." Vanity Fair, September 2001.
  16. ^ World Can't Wait Advisory Board. Retrieved on 2002-07-29.

“TIME” redirects here. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

Essays and non-fiction

  • Rocking the Boat (1963)
  • Reflections Upon a Sinking Ship (1969)
  • Sex, Death and Money (1969) (paperback compilation)
  • Homage to Daniel Shays (1972)
  • Matters of Fact and of Fiction (1977)
  • The Second American Revolution (1982)
  • Armageddon? (1987) (UK only)
  • At Home (1988)
  • A View From The Diner's Club (1991) (UK only)
  • Screening History (1992) ISBN 0-233-98803-3
  • Decline and Fall of the American Empire (1992) ISBN 1-878825-00-3
  • United States: essays 1952–1992 (1993) ISBN 0-7679-0806-6
  • Palimpsest: a memoir (1995) ISBN 0-679-44038-0
  • Virgin Islands (1997) (UK only)
  • The American Presidency (1998) ISBN 1-878825-15-1
  • Sexually Speaking: Collected Sex Writings (1999)
  • The Last Empire: essays 1992–2000 (2001) ISBN 0-375-72639-X (there is also a much shorter UK edition)
  • Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace or How We Came To Be So Hated, Thunder's Mouth Press, 2002, (2002) ISBN 1-56025-405-X
  • Dreaming War: Blood for Oil and the Cheney-Bush Junta, Thunder's Mouth Press, (2002) ISBN 1-56025-502-1
  • Inventing a Nation: Washington, Adams, Jefferson (2003) ISBN 0-300-10171-6
  • Imperial America: Reflections on the United States of Amnesia (2004) ISBN 1-56025-744-X
  • Point to Point Navigation : A Memoir (2006) ISBN 0-385-51721-1

See also: 1962 in literature, other events of 1963, 1964 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1968 in literature, other events of 1969, 1970 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1968 in literature, other events of 1969, 1970 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1971 in literature, other events of 1972, 1973 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1976 in literature, other events of 1977, 1978 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1981 in literature, other events of 1982, 1983 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1986 in literature, other events of 1987, 1988 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1987 in literature, other events of 1988, 1989 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1990 in literature, other events of 1991, 1992 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1991 in literature, other events of 1992, 1993 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1991 in literature, other events of 1992, 1993 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1992 in literature, other events of 1993, 1994 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The year 1995 in literature involved some significant events and new books. ... See also: 1996 in literature, other events of 1997, 1998 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1997 in literature, other events of 1998, 1999 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1998 in literature, other events of 1999, 2000 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 2000 in literature, other events of 2001, 2002 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 2001 in literature, other events of 2002, 2003 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 2001 in literature, other events of 2002, 2003 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 2002 in literature, other events of 2003, 2004 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The year 2004 in literature involved some significant events and new books. ... // Events June 26, 2006: J.K. Rowling reaveals that two characters will die in the seventh book of the Harry Potter series. ...

Plays

  • Visit to a Small Planet (1957) ISBN 0-8222-1211-0
  • The Best Man (1960)
  • On the March to the Sea (1960–1961, 2004)
  • Romulus (adapted from Friedrich Duerrenmatt's play) (1962)
  • Weekend (1968)
  • Drawing Room Comedy (1970)
  • An evening with Richard Nixon (1970) ISBN 0-394-71869-0
  • On the March to the Sea (2005)

Visit To A Small Planet was filmed from April 28-July 3, 1959. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Novels

See also: 1945 in literature, other events of 1946, 1947 in literature, list of years in literature. ... -1... The City and the Pillar is the third novel by American writer and essayist Gore Vidal. ... See also: 1947 in literature, other events of 1948, 1949 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1948 in literature, other events of 1949, 1950 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1949 in literature, other events of 1950, 1951 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1949 in literature, other events of 1950, 1951 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Judgment of Paris or Judgement of Paris may refer to Judgement of Paris - The story in Greek mythology that has its roots in the Trojan War and is the subject of numerous works of arts. ... See also: 1951 in literature, other events of 1952, 1953 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1953 in literature, other events of 1954, 1955 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1955 in literature, other events of 1956, 1957 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Julian by Gore Vidal is a historical novel in the first person dealing with the life of the Roman emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus, known as Julian the Apostate, who reigned 360-363 CE. He was the last direct relative of Constantine the Great to assume the purple, his father being... See also: 1963 in literature, other events of 1964, 1965 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Washington, D. C. is the sixth historical novel by Gore Vidal, although the first published, in his Narratives of Empire series. ... See also: 1966 in literature, other events of 1967, 1968 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Myra Breckinridge (1968) is a satirical novel by Gore Vidal written in the form of a diary. ... See also: 1967 in literature, other events of 1968, 1969 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Two Sisters is a song by Fiction Plane, the lead single from their 2007 album, Left Side of the Brain. ... See also: 1969 in literature, other events of 1970, 1971 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Burr: A Novel is a 1973 novel by Gore Vidal that challenges the traditional iconography of American history to present an alternative view of the life of Aaron Burr, presenting him as a hero, while all the other key historical figures of the time, such as George Washington and Thomas... See also: 1972 in literature, other events of 1973, 1974 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Myron is the name of a 1974 novel by Gore Vidal. ... See also: 1973 in literature, other events of 1974, 1975 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Gore Vidals 1876 is the third historical novel in his Narratives of Empire series. ... See also: 1975 in literature, other events of 1976, 1977 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Kalki is a novel by Gore Vidal written in 1978. ... See also: 1977 in literature, other events of 1978, 1979 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Creation is an epic historical fiction novel by Gore Vidal which was published in 1981. ... See also: 1980 in literature, other events of 1981, 1982 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Duluth is the name of a 1983 novel by Gore Vidal. ... See also: 1982 in literature, other events of 1983, 1984 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Lincoln is a historical novel by Gore Vidal, published in 1984. ... See also: 1983 in literature, other events of 1984, 1985 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Empire is the fourth historical novel in the Narratives of Empire series by Gore Vidal, published in 1987. ... See also: 1986 in literature, other events of 1987, 1988 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Hollywood is the fifth historical novel in Gore Vidals Narratives of Empire series. ... See also: 1989 in literature, other events of 1990, 1991 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1991 in literature, other events of 1992, 1993 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Gore Vidals novel The Smithsonian Institution is a fictional account of the adventures of T. (a thinly-veiled version of Vidals boyhood lover Jimmy Trimble) as he helps a group of scientists in the basement of the Smithsonian create the neutron bomb, and encounters historical figures such as... See also: 1997 in literature, other events of 1998, 1999 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Golden Age is a novel published in 2000 by Gore Vidal, the final book in his American Chronicle series. ... See also: 1999 in literature, other events of 2000, 2001 in literature, list of years in literature. ... // Events June 26, 2006: J.K. Rowling reaveals that two characters will die in the seventh book of the Harry Potter series. ...

Screenplays

The Catered Affair, also known as Wedding Breakfast, is a 1956 family drama film made by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. ... Suddenly, Last Summer is a 1959 drama film made by Columbia Pictures Corporation, based on the play of the same title by Tennessee Williams. ... The Best Man is a 1964 film with Lee Tracy. ... Is Paris Burning? (French: Paris brûle-t-il ?) is a 1966 French-American film dealing with the 1944 liberation of Paris by Allied forces. ... Last of the Mobile Hot Shots is a 1970 American drama film released by Warner Brothers. ... Caligula is a 1979 film directed by Tinto Brass, with additional scenes filmed by Bob Guccione and Giancarlo Lui, about the Roman Emperor Gaius Caesar Germanicus also known as Caligula. Caligula was written by Gore Vidal and co-financed by Penthouse magazine, though the script underwent several re-writes after... Dimenticare Palermo is a 1989 Italian political thriller starring James Belushi and Mimi Rogers. ...

Under pseudonyms

  • A Star's Progress (aka Cry Shame!) (1950) as Katherine Everard
  • Thieves Fall Out (1953) as Cameron Kay
  • Death Before Bedtime (1953) as Edgar Box
  • Death in the Fifth Position (1952) as Edgar Box
  • Death Likes It Hot (1954) as Edgar Box

See also: 1949 in literature, other events of 1950, 1951 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1952 in literature, other events of 1953, 1954 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1952 in literature, other events of 1953, 1954 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1951 in literature, other events of 1952, 1953 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1953 in literature, other events of 1954, 1955 in literature, list of years in literature. ...

Appearances and interviews

Igby Goes Down is a 2002 film that follows the life of Igby Slocumb. ... Burr Steers (born 1966) is an American actor, screenwriter and director. ... Thinking XXX is a 2004 documentary about the process photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders went through to create his book XXX: 30 Porn Star Photographs. ... Why We Fight is a documentary film directed by Eugene Jarecki that won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. ... Promotional poster for Inside Deep Throat Inside Deep Throat is a 2005 documentary about the 1972 pornographic film Deep Throat and its effects on American society. ... One Bright Shining Moment: The Forgotten Summer of George McGovern is a 2005 documentary directed by Stephen Vittori. ... Foreign Correspondent is a weekly news-documentary programme screned on ABC TV. External links Official Website Categories: | | ... For other persons named Bob Carr, see Bob Carr (disambiguation). ... The U.S. Versus John Lennon is a film that is coming out in the United States, September 2006. ... Hollywood Bowl in 2005. ... The Los Angeles Philharmonic is an orchestra based in Los Angeles, California, USA. From 1964-2003, the orchestra played its concerts in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion of the Los Angeles Music Center. ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of concert and film music, as well as an accomplished pianist. ... Lincoln Portrait is an orchestral work written by the American composer Aaron Copland. ... Michael Tilson Thomas (born December 21, 1944), nicknamed MTT, is an American conductor, pianist and composer. ... The Henry Rollins Show is a weekly talk show hosted by Henry Rollins on the Independent Film Channel (IFC). ...

See also

This is a list of fictional stories in which politics features as an important plot element. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Persondata
NAME Vidal, Gore
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Vidal, Eugene Luther Gore
SHORT DESCRIPTION American author
DATE OF BIRTH October 3, 1925
PLACE OF BIRTH West Point, New York
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
American Masters . Gore Vidal | PBS (1870 words)
Gore Vidal is a novelist, essayist, playwright, and provocateur whose career has spanned six decades, beginning in the years immediately following World War II and continuing into the early years of the twenty-first century.
Vidal's lineage in American literature may be traced back to Henry James, the sophisticated American from the upper echelons of society who mingles with European sophisticates, and Mark Twain, the raw humorist and critic of American empire.
Vidal was born in 1925 with high political and social connections.
Gore Vidal: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (5583 words)
Eugene Luther Gore Vidal (born October 3 1925), known as Gore Vidal, is a prolific and versatile American writer of novels, stage plays, screenplays, and essays and has been a public and often controversial figure on both the American literary and political scenes for nearly sixty years.
Gore Vidal was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Congress in 1960, losing a very close election in a traditionally Republican district on the Hudson River.
Vidal is a member of the advisory board of the World Can't Wait organization, which demands the impeachment of George W. Bush, and the charging of his administration with crimes against humanity ([3]).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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