FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Gordon Smith
Gordon Smith
Gordon Smith

Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 7, 1997
Serving with Ron Wyden
Preceded by Mark Hatfield

Born May 25, 1952 (1952-05-25) (age 55)
Pendleton, Oregon
Political party Republican
Spouse Sharon Smith
Alma mater Brigham Young University
Religion The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Gordon Harold Smith (born May 25, 1952) is Oregon's junior United States Senator, currently serving his second term. He is a member of the Republican Party. Image File history File links Ballot_box_current. ... This article is about the political process. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1154x1292, 135 KB) http://gsmith. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Ronald Lee Wyden (born May 3, 1949) to German American parents, is Oregons senior United States Senator. ... Mark Odom Hatfield (born July 12, 1922) is a former United States Senator and Governor of Oregon. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pendleton is a city located in Umatilla County, Oregon. ... GOP redirects here. ... , Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is a private coeducational school completely owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church) and run under the auspices of its Church Educational System. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... GOP redirects here. ...

Contents

Personal background

Smith was born in Pendleton, Oregon to Jessica Udall Smith and Milan Dale Smith.[1] Smith's family moved to Bethesda, Maryland during his childhood, when his father became an Assistant United States Secretary of Agriculture. After graduating high school, Smith went on a two-year mission for his church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, to New Zealand. Pendleton is a city located in Umatilla County, Oregon. ... Bethesda is an urbanized, but unincorporated, area in southern Montgomery County, Maryland, near Washington, D.C. It takes its name from a church located there, the Bethesda Presbyterian Church, built in 1820 and rebuilt in 1850, which in turn took its name from Jerusalems Pool of Bethesda. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Smith then went to college at Brigham Young University, received his Juris Doctor from Southwestern University School of Law, and became an attorney in New Mexico and Arizona. He moved back to Oregon in the 1980s to become director of Smith Frozen Foods company in Weston, Oregon.[2] , Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is a private coeducational school completely owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church) and run under the auspices of its Church Educational System. ... “J.D.” redirects here. ... The Southwestern University School of Law (also known as Southwestern Law School) is a private ABA-accredited law school located in Los Angeles, California, with about 1000 students at a campus that includes the Bullocks Wilshire building, an admired art-deco landmark. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Weston is a city located in Umatilla County, Oregon. ...


Smith and his wife Sharon adopted several children in the 1980s, including sons Morgan and Garrett and daughter Brittany. Adoption is the legal act of permanently placing a child with a parent or parents other than the birth parents. ...


On September 8, 2003, Garrett, then a 21 year old college student majoring in culinary arts, committed suicide. Smith wrote a book entitled Remembering Garrett, One Family’s Battle with a Child’s Depression.[3] In 2004, President George W. Bush signed the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Act, authorizing $82 million for suicide-prevention and awareness programs at colleges.[4] is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Smith is also a member of the Udall political family. His mother was a cousin of the late Congressmen Mo Udall (D-AZ) and Stewart Udall (D-AZ), and Smith is a second cousin of current Congressmen Mark Udall (D-CO) and Tom Udall (D-NM). They are double cousins, as their grandparents were a pair of brother and a pair of sisters who intermarried. Smith is the only Republican in the group. For other meanings see Udall (disambiguation). ... This is a partial listing of prominent political families around the world. ... Morris Udall Morris King Udall (June 15, 1922 – December 12, 1998), better known as Mo, was an American politician who served as a U.S. Representative from Arizona from May 2, 1961 to May 4, 1991. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Stewart Udall Stewart Lee Udall (born January 31, 1920) was an American politician. ... Udall poses with an eagle, which was brought to his office to highlight his efforts at protecting the species. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Thomas Stewart Tom Udall (born May 18, 1948) is an American politician who has represented New Mexicos third Congressional district (map) as a member of the United States House of Representatives since 1999. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Double first cousins arise when two siblings reproduce with another set of siblings and the resulting children are related to each other through both parents families. ...


Smith's brother, Milan Dale Smith, Jr., is a federal judge appointed by President George W. Bush in 2006. Milan Dale Smith, Jr. ...


Smith is an Eagle Scout.[5] Eagle Scout rank (Boy Scouts of America) Eagle Scout rank (Boy Scouts of the Philippines) List of Eagle Scouts (BSA) Category: ...


Early political career

Smith entered politics with his election to the Oregon State Senate in 1992, and became president of that body in 1995. Later in 1995, he ran in a special election primary for a Senate seat vacated by the resignation of Bob Packwood, but was narrowly defeated in the January 1996 special election by then-Congressman Ron Wyden. The Oregon State Senate chamber in the State Capitol. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Robert William Bob Packwood (born September 11, 1932) is an American politician from Oregon and a member of the Republican Party. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Ronald Lee Wyden (born May 3, 1949) to German American parents, is Oregons senior United States Senator. ...


Senate career

United States Senator Mark Hatfield, a fellow Republican, announced his retirement later that year. Smith became the first person to run for the Senate twice in one year. This time he won, defeating Lon Mabon (whose organization, the Oregon Citizens Alliance, had previously endorsed Smith over Wyden) in the Republican primary[6] and Democrat Tom Bruggere in the general election. Mark Odom Hatfield (born July 12, 1922) is a former United States Senator and Governor of Oregon. ... The Oregon Citizens Alliance (OCA) is a conservative Christian political activist organization, founded by Lon Mabon in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tom Bruggere is a businessman and politician in the U.S. state of Oregon. ...


Smith was re-elected by a strong margin in 2002, defeating Oregon Secretary of State Bill Bradbury.  Republican hold  Republican pickup  Democratic holdhttp://en. ... The Secretary of State of Oregon, an elected constitutional officer within the executive branch of government, is second in line of succession to the Governor. ... Bill Bradbury (born 1949) is the Secretary of State for the U.S. state of Oregon. ...


As of August 2007, Smith's approval rating was 46%, with 44% disapproving.[7]


Political positions

Smith has not conformed to either liberal or conservative positions in his views on social policy. Independent thinking, political pandering and his affiliation with the Mormon church — which is relatively tolerant on many social issues — have all been cited as possible reasons for his unusual positions.[citation needed]


Smith became a strong supporter[citation needed] of expanding hate crime laws to encompass crimes against gays. On June 15, 2004, he successfully passed an amendment doing just that (65-33) with every Democrat in the Senate voting for his amendment. As a result, he was one of a few Republican senators supported by gay rights groups in the United States, including the Human Rights Campaign. Since then, gay rights groups have expressed disappointment at his support for the Federal Marriage Amendment, which would define marriage as between a man and a woman.[8] A Jewish cemetery in France after being defaced by Neo-Nazis. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... HRC logo The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is one of the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) equal rights organization in the United States. ... The United States Federal Marriage Amendment (FMA) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution which would define marriage in the United States as a union of one man and one woman. ... Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


Leading up to the 2006 midterm elections, Smith joined Senate Democrats to introduce legislation that would guarantee gay employees of the federal government domestic partnership benefits.[9] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... International recognition Civil unions and Domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      A domestic partnership is a legal or personal relationship between individuals who live...


Smith has described himself as pro-life,[10] and in 2003 he voted along party lines to pass the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act, legislation that prohibits the controversial intact dilation and extraction procedure. In 2006, he voted to pass another controversial bill, this time crossing party lines to vote for the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act. The measure, which would have expanded federal funding of stem cell research to cell lines extracted from embyros discarded during fertility treatment, became the first bill to be vetoed by President George W. Bush. Smith is one of 19 Senate Republicans who voted for the measure. This article is about the social movement. ... It has been suggested that Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 1995 be merged into this article or section. ... Intact dilation and extraction (IDX or intact D&X), also known as intact dilation and evacuation (intact D&E), dilation and extraction (D&X), intrauterine cranial decompression and in the United States as partial birth abortion, is a surgical abortion wherein an intact and usually viable fetus is removed from... The Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act was the first bill ever vetoed by United States President George W. Bush, more than five years after his inauguration. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells with fluorescent marker. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


In January 2006, Smith began circulating a draft of the Digital Content Protection Act of 2006.[11][12] The legislation would grant the Federal Communications Commission the authority to authorize a technology known as the "broadcast flag." This technology would enable the producers of television programming to ensure the programs cannot be recorded by viewers in their homes, for instance using a digital video recorder like TiVo or onto recordable DVDs. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... FCC redirects here. ... A broadcast flag is a set of status bits (or flags) sent in the data stream of a digital television program that indicates whether or not it can be recorded, or if there are any restrictions on recorded content. ... Foxtel IQ, a digital video recorder and a satellite cable set-top box. ...


Conservative or moderate?

Smith is the only Republican currently holding statewide office in the largely Democratic state of Oregon. Along with representative Greg Walden, he is one of two Republican members of Oregon's congressional delegation. Smith is often described as politically moderate, but has strong conservative credentials as well. In a 2007 web video, Smith refers to "the values that make us Republicans, that make us conservatives."[13] Gregory Greg Walden (born January 10, 1957, in The Dalles, Oregon) is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Oregon and represents its Second District, which covers more than two-thirds of the state (generally, east of the Cascades. ...


Smith is a member of the moderate Republican Main Street Partnership, and a February 2006 National Journal congressional rating placed Smith in the exact ideological center of the Senate.[14] The Republican Main Street Partnership is a group of social liberals and moderates in the United States Republican Party. ... National Journal is a weekly magazine that provides Insight for Insiders through nonpartisan reporting on the current political environment as well as emerging political and policy trends. ...


However, Smith is described as a rank-and-file Republican by GovTrack.us[15], and throughout 2006 Smith voted with Republican leader Bill Frist (TN) on 82% of contentious bills, in contrast to predecessor Mark Hatfield's 55% record of agreement with party leader Trent Lott (MS) in 1996.[16] Based on five senate votes in 2006, the abortion rights advocacy group NARAL gave Smith a score of 15% on abortion rights (100% being a complete pro-choice score.)[17] For votes cast in 2006, Smith received a 14% rating from the League of Conservation Voters (out of a possible 100%).[18] Smith's votes have run contrary to widespread public sentiment on several issues, notably minimum wage[19][20][21][22] and the Oregon Death with Dignity Act.[23] William Harrison Bill Frist, Sr. ... Mark Odom Hatfield (born July 12, 1922) is a former United States Senator and Governor of Oregon. ... Chester Trent Lott Sr. ... NARAL Pro-Choice America (pronounced Nay-ral) is a United States group that favors the right to legal abortions and engages in political action to oppose restrictions on what it portrays as womens right to abort. ... Issues of discussion Pro-choice describes the political and ethical view that a woman should have complete control over her fertility and pregnancy. ... The League of Conservation Voters is an American environmentalist lobby. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... Measure 16 of 1994 established Oregons Death with Dignity Act, which legalizes physician-assisted suicide with certain restrictions, making Oregon the first U.S. state and one of the first jurisdictions in the world to officially do so. ...


Sen. Smith was also a key advocate for embattled conservative Sen. Lott's return to a leadership post within the Republican Party in 2006. Lott had resigned his position as Senate Republican Leader in 2002, following controversy surrounding his perceived support of conservative Sen. Strom Thurmond's (R-SC) segregationist politics. After the party lost control of the Senate in November 2006, Republicans elected Lott to the post of Minority Whip (the second-highest Republican position in the Senate.) During the closed-door election, Sen. Judd Gregg (R-NH) nominated Lott for the position. Sen. Smith then seconded the nomination and delivered a supportive address before casting his vote.[24] Lott defeated Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) in a 25-24 vote.[25] James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Segregation means separation. ... Judd Gregg (born February 14, 1947) is a former Governor of New Hampshire and current United States Senator serving as ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee. ... Andrew Lamar Alexander (born July 3, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Tennessee and a member of the Republican Party. ...


War in Iraq

Smith is one of several Republican Senators for whom political concerns have clashed with party loyalty, on the subject of the war in Iraq.[26]


In December 2006, Gordon Smith spoke out against the Iraq war for the first time, after having voted in support of it four years prior.[27] Smith said that to continue the current policy in Iraq "may even be criminal".[28] For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


Several weeks after stating his opposition to the occupation of Iraq, however, Smith declined to sign onto a bipartisan resolution to oppose the President's plan to escalate troop levels in Iraq by 21,500,[29] prompting questions about the sincerity of his opposition to the continued US military presence in Iraq.[30] Smith cited the controversial nature of the word "escalate" in defending his choice. The bill's sponsors have since changed the word to "increase." Smith expressed support for the bill, but subsequently voted to prevent it from being debated by the full Senate.


In March 2007, Smith was one of only two Republicans to vote for a resolution aimed at withdrawing most American combat troops from Iraq in 2008, the other being Chuck Hagel. The vote was 50 for to 48 against.[31] Smith said in July 2007 that he would vote for a bill authorizing a timeline in which to leave Iraq. He was one of three Republican senators, the other two being Chuck Hagel of Nebraska and Olympia Snowe of Maine, to support the Levin Amendment (S.AMDT.2085) to the 2008 Defense Authorization bill (H.R.1585) that would begin a withdrawal of US forces from Iraq.[32] For other uses, see March (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Charles Timothy Chuck Hagel (born October 4, 1946) is the senior United States Senator from Nebraska. ...


2008 election

Smith's Senate seat is up for election in 2008, and Smith has indicated that he intends to run again. As of January 2006, Smith has been identified as one of the six most vulnerable Republican Senators in the 2008 election by CQ Politics.[33] He could face both Republican and Democratic opponents.[34] Republican Bill Sizemore has speculated about a run, and Democrats Jeff Merkley[35] and Steve Novick[36] have announced their candidacy. The Oregon Senate Election of 2008 will be held on November 4, 2008. ... Bill Sizemore (Born June 2, 1951 in Aberdeen Washington) is a political activist in Clackamas, Oregon. ... Jeff Merkley (b. ... Steve Novick (born February 8, 1963) is an environmental lawyer, political activist, and candidate for the United States Senate. ...


Committee assignments

Smith chaired the Special Committee on Aging until Democrats took control of the Senate in 2007; he is now the committee's Ranking Minority Member. (Oregon’s senior Senator, Ron Wyden, sits on this committee as well.) The United States Senate Special Committee on Aging was initially established in 1961 as a temporary committee; it became a permanent committee in 1977. ... Ronald Lee Wyden (born May 3, 1949) to German American parents, is Oregons senior United States Senator. ...


Smith also serves on the following Senate committees: Commerce, Science and Transportation, Energy and Natural Resources, Finance, and Indian Affairs. The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation is a standing committee of the United States Senate in charge of all senate matters related to the following subjects: Coast Guard Coastal zone management Communications Highway safety Inland waterways, except construction Interstate commerce Marine and ocean navigation, safety, and transportation Marine... The United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources has jurisdiction over matters related to energy and nuclear waste policy, territorial policy, native Hawaiian matters, and public lands. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance (or, less formally, Senate Finance Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs is responsible for dealing with matters related to the American Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native peoples. ...


He is the Ranking Minority Member of the Senate Finance Subcommittee on International Trade and Global Competitiveness. Ranking member, in American politics, is a term used to refer to the member of a committee in Congress who is the longest-serving member of the party not in the majority (the longest-serving member of the majority is the chairman). ... The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance (or, less formally, Senate Finance Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ...


Electoral history

Oregon U.S. Senate election, 1996 (January special election)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Ron Wyden 571,739 49
Republican Gordon Smith 553,519 48
Oregon U.S. Senate election, 1996
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Gordon Smith 677,336 49
Democratic Tom Bruggere 624,370 47
Oregon U.S. Senate election, 2002
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Gordon Smith (incumbent) 712,287 56
Democratic Bill Bradbury 501,898 40

 Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1996 was an election for United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of Bill Clinton as president. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Ronald Lee Wyden (born May 3, 1949) to German American parents, is Oregons senior United States Senator. ... GOP redirects here. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1996 was an election for United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of Bill Clinton as president. ... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Tom Bruggere is a businessman and politician in the U.S. state of Oregon. ...  Republican hold  Republican pickup  Democratic hold  Democratic pickup The U.S. Senate election, 2002 was a fiercely-contested race that resulted in a victory for the Republican Party, which gained two seats and thus a narrow majority from the Democratic Party in the United States Senate. ... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Bill Bradbury (born 1949) is the Secretary of State for the U.S. state of Oregon. ...

References

  1. ^ Smith's genealogy
  2. ^ Oregon's United States Senators. Oregon Blue Book (online edition). Salem, Oregon: Oregon Secretary of State (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-18.
  3. ^ George, Christy. "Senator Gordon Smith on his Son’s Suicide", Oregon Territory, Oregon Public Broadcasting, April 21, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-04-18. 
  4. ^ Text of Senate Bill 2634, July 9, 2004
  5. ^ The Congress and Scouting. Fact sheet. Boy Scouts of America. Retrieved on 2006-09-06.
  6. ^ Kinsey-Hill, Gail. "After earlier defeat, Smith successfully moves toward center", The Oregonian, November 7, 1996. 
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ Barnett, Jim. "Smith will support same-sex marriage ban", The Oregonian, July 10, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-05-22. 
  9. ^ "Partner benefits proposed for federal workers", The Advocate, September 27, 2006. 
  10. ^ CNN Crossfire transcript July 19, 2001. CNN.com (2001-07-19). Retrieved on 2007-02-13.
  11. ^ Electronic Frontier Foundation (January 20, 2006). New Senate Broadcast Flag Bill Would Freeze Fair Use. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-04-19.
  12. ^ http://eff.org/broadcastflag/dcp_act_2006.pdf
  13. ^ Gordon Smith: I'm a conservative. Loaded Orygun. Retrieved on 2007-09-12.
  14. ^ The Centrists (PDF). The Oregonian (February 25, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-02-09.
  15. ^ GovTrack: Gordon Smith. GovTrack.us. Retrieved on 2007-02-12.
  16. ^ Kosseff, Jeff. "Oregonians in Congress: not so independent", The Oregonian, January 9, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-02-11. 
  17. ^ Congressional Record on Choice by State: Oregon. NARAL Pro-Choice America Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-02-13.
  18. ^ Gordon Smith: Environmentalist?.
  19. ^ http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=109&session=1&vote=00027
  20. ^ http://projects.washingtonpost.com/congress/109/senate/2/votes/179/
  21. ^ Bunster, Mark. "Gordon Smith's voting record", The Oregonian, July 10, 2006. 
  22. ^ Palmer, Susan. "Smith hears of challenges facing area's poor", The Register-Guard, July 1, 2004. 
  23. ^ Christie, Tim. "Assisted suicide upheld", The Register-Guard, January 18, 2006. 
  24. ^ Eve Fairbanks. "Whip it Good", The New Republic, December 18, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-18. 
  25. ^ Kosseff, Jeff (November 17, 2006). Smith supported Lott's leadership bid. The Oregonian. Retrieved on 2007-02-09.
  26. ^ Shailagh Murray and Jonathan Weisman. "Resolution will test GOP senators' mettle", The Concord Monitor, February 5, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-02-08. 
  27. ^ Editorial. "Gordon Smith changes his mind", The Oregonian, December 9, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-15. 
  28. ^ Judd (December 9, 2006). Sen. Gordon Smith (R-OR): Bush’s Iraq Policy ‘May Even Be Criminal’. thinkprogress.org. Retrieved on 2007-01-15.
  29. ^ "GOP senator drafting alternative war resolution", CNN, January 18, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-18. 
  30. ^ http://www.blueoregon.com/2007/01/smith_senate_re.html
  31. ^ Toner, Robin (March 15, 2007). Senate Rejects Measure for Iraq Pullout. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-03-15.
  32. ^ Dems plan Senate all-nighter. CNN. Retrieved on 2007-07-16.
  33. ^ http://www.cqpolitics.com/2007/01/ratings_chart_2008_senate_race.html
  34. ^ Cain, Brad. "Ore. senator faces tricky path to re-election", The Register-Guard, Associated Press, April 8, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-20. 
  35. ^ http://www.oregonlive.com/newsflash/regional/index.ssf?/base/news-20/1185323381185390.xml&storylist=orlocal
  36. ^ http://www.blueoregon.com/2007/04/hes_in_steve_no.html

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... EFF Logo The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is an international non-profit advocacy and legal organization based in the United States with the stated purpose of being dedicated to preserving free speech rights such as those protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution in the context of... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... October 2, 2004 edition. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Gordon Smith
Political offices
Preceded by
Bill Bradbury
President of the Oregon State Senate
1995 – 1997
Succeeded by
Brady Adams
Preceded by
Larry Craig
Chairman of the Senate Aging Committee
2005 – 2007
Succeeded by
Herb Kohl
United States Senate
Preceded by
Mark Hatfield
Senator from Oregon (Class 2)
1997 – present
Served alongside: Ron Wyden
Incumbent

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gordon Smith - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (663 words)
Smith is also a member of the Udall political family, being a double cousin of Democratic Congressmen Mo and Stewart Udall, and a double second cousin of current Congressmen Mark Udall and Tom Udall (Smith is the only Republican in the group).
Smith entered politics and was elected to the Oregon State Senate in 1992, becoming president of that body in 1995.
Smith is a member of The Republican Main Street Partnership and supports stem cell research, even as he largely opposes abortion.
Attorney Gordon Smith, Hume, Smith, Geddes, Green & Simmons, LLP, Indianapolis, Indiana (431 words)
Gordon is admitted to practice in all courts in the State of Indiana.
Gordon was a founder and president of the IAC Arts Foundation, Inc. and the IAC Sports Foundation, Inc., the latter which sponsors the St. Patrick's Day Parade, the largest annual parade in Indianapolis next to the 500 Festival Parade.
A former scoutmaster, Gordon is proud to have a son and grandson attain the rank of Eagle Scout.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m