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Encyclopedia > Gordon Jenkins
Gordon Jenkins
Gordon Jenkins

Gordon Hill Jenkins (12 May 1910-1 May 1984) was an American arranger who was an influential figure in popular music in the 1940s and 1950s, renowned for his lush string arrangements. Jenkins worked with the Andrews Sisters, Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong, Judy Garland, and Nat King Cole, among other singers. Jenkins was married to singer Loulie Jean Norman, who sings on a few of his albums. American arranger Source: http://www. ... American arranger Source: http://www. ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... -1... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In popular music an arrangement is a setting of a piece of music, which may have been composed by the arranger or by someone else. ... // Events and trends World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrination, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atomic bomb. ... // Events and trends This map shows two essential global spheres during the Cold War in 1959. ... The Andrews Sisters on the cover of the reissue collection The Best of the Andrew Sisters: The Millennium Collection. ... Francis Albert Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer who is considered by many to have been the finest male popular song vocalist of all time. ... Louis Daniel Armstrong (usually pronounced Louee in the French pronunciation with a silent s) (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nicknames Satchmo and Pops) was an American jazz musician. ... Judy Garland, circa 1943. ... For other uses, see King Cole (disambiguation). ... Loulie Jean Norman, (born in Birmingham, Alabama, on March 12, 1913; died August 2, 2005 in Los Angeles) is a famous soprano who worked with famed arranger Gordon Jenkins. ...


Jenkins was born in Webster Groves, Missouri. He started his career doing arrangements for a St Louis radio station. He was then hired by Isham Jones, the director of a dance band known for its ensemble playing, and this gave Jenkins the opportunity to develop his skills in melodic scoring. He also conducted The Show Is On on Broadway. Webster Groves is a city located in St. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... Isham Jones (31 January 1894 – 19 October 1956) was a United States bandleader, violinist, saxophonist and songwriter. ... Broadway theatre is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ...


After the Jones band broke up in 1936, Jenkins worked as a freelance arranger and songwriter, contributing to sessions by Isham Jones, Paul Whiteman, Benny Goodman, Andre Kostelanetz, Lennie Hayton, and others. In 1938, Jenkins moved to Hollywood and worked for Paramount Pictures and NBC, and then became Dick Haymes' arranger for four years. In 1944, Jenkins had a hit song with "San Fernando Valley". 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Paul Whiteman (March 28, 1890 - December 29, 1967) was a popular United States orchestral leader. ... Benny Goodman, born Benjamin David Goodman, (May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986) was a famous Jazz musician, known as King of Swing, Patriarch of the Clarinet, and Swings Senior Statesman. // Childhood and early years Goodman was born in Chicago, the son of poor Jewish immigrants who lived on Chicago... André Kostelanetz (December 22, 1901 - January 13, 1980) was a popular music conductor and arranger, one of the pioneers of easy listening music. ... 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Paramount Pictures logo used since 2003. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Dick Haymes (born September 13, 1918 in Buenos Aires - died March 29, 1980 in Los Angeles) was one of the most popular American male vocalists of the 1940s. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1945, Jenkins joined Decca Records. In 1947, he had a million-seller with "Maybe You'll Be There" and in 1949 had a huge hit with Victor Young's film theme "My Foolish Heart", which was also a success for Billy Eckstine. At the same time, he regularly arranged for and conducted the orchestra for various Decca artists, including Dick Haymes ("Little White Lies", 1947) and Patty Andrews of the Andrews Sisters ("I Can Dream, Can't I", 1949). 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Decca Records is a British record label established in 1929. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ... Victor Young (August 8, 1900 - November 10, 1956) was an Jewish-American composer, violinist and conducter. ... Billy Eckstine (8 July 1914 – 8 March 1993), born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania as William Clarence Eckstein. ... Little White Lies is a popular song. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... a member of the Andrews Sisters band ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ...


During this time, Jenkins also began recording and performing under his own name. One of his enduring works while at Decca was a pair of Broadway-style musical vignettes, "Manhattan Tower" and "California" which saw release several times in the '40s and '50s (the two were paired on a very early Decca LP in 1949), and were even adapted for television. He headlined New York's Capitol Theater between 1949 and 1951 and the Paramount Theater in 1952. He appeared in Las Vegas in 1953 and many times thereafter. He worked for NBC as a TV producer from 1955 to 1957, and performed at the Hollywood Bowl in 1964. A gramophone record, (also vinyl record, phonograph record, LP record, or simply record) is an analogue sound recording medium comprising a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with an inscribed concentric spiral groove. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hollywood Bowl is a modern amphitheatre in Hollywood, California, USA, that is used primarily for music performances. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ...


By 1949, Jenkins was musical director at Decca, and he signed -- despite resistance from Decca's management -- the Weavers, a Greenwich Village folk ensemble that included Pete Seeger among its members. The combination of the Weavers' folk music with Jenkins' orchestral arrangements became immensely popular, to the surprise of everyone involved. Their most notable collaboration was a version of Leadbelly's "Goodnight Irene" (1950) backed by Jenkins' adaptation of the Israeli folk song, "Tzena, Tzena, Tzena". Other notable songs they recorded together are "The Roving Kind", "On Top of Old Smokey" (1951), and "Wimoweh" (1952). 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ... The Weavers were an immensely popular and influential folk music quartet from Greenwich Village, New York, United States. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (pronounced Grennich Village; also known simply the Village) is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City. ... Pete Seeger, 1944 Peter Seeger (born May 3, 1919 in New York City), almost universally known as Pete Seeger, is a folk singer and political activist. ... It has been suggested that Folkies be merged into this article or section. ... Leadbelly, circa 1942; shown with an accordion, though he typically played guitar Leadbelly (born Huddie William Ledbetter; January 29, 1885 – December 6, 1949) was an American folk musician, notable for his strong, clear voice, for his forceful singing, and for his virtuosity as a twelve string guitar player. ... Goodnight Irene, or Irene, is an American folk standard. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Tzena, Tzena, Tzena is a song, originally written in Hebrew by Issachar Miron (né Stefan Michrovsky), a Polish immigrant to what was then Palestine but is now Israel, and Yechiel Chagiz. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Jenkins later moved to Capitol Records where he worked with Frank Sinatra, notably on the albums Where Are You (1957) and No One Cares (1959), and Nat King Cole, with whom he had his greatest successes; Jenkins was responsible for the lush arrangement of "When I Fall in Love" (1957), one of Cole's best-known recordings, and the albums Love Is the Thing (1957) and The Very Thought of You (1958). Jenkins also wrote the music and lyrics for Judy Garland's 1959 album The Letter and conducted several of Garland's London concerts in the early 1960s. Capitol Records Logo Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, founded in 1942. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... When I Fall in Love is a popular song, written by Edward Heyman and Victor Young. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


As rock and roll gained ascendency in the 1960s, Jenkins' lush string arrangements fell out of favor and he worked only sporadically. He arranged Sinatra's September of My Years (1967), for which he won a Grammy, and Sinatra's 1973 comeback album, Ol' Blue Eyes Is Back. He also worked with Harry Nilsson on A Little Touch of Schmilsson in the Night (1973), a collection of pre-rock and roll standards. The Nilsson sessions, with Jenkins conducting, were recorded on video and later broadcast as a television special by the BBC. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Harry Nilsson Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994) was an American songwriter, singer, pianist and guitarist, most popular during the 1960s and 1970s. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation. ...


Although best known as an arranger, Jenkins also wrote well-known several songs including "Goodbye" (Benny Goodman's sign-off tune), "Blue Prelude", "When a Woman Loves a Man" and "Future", composed music for Sinatra's 1979 concept album Trilogy. This page refers to the year 1979. ...


Jenkins died in Malibu, California in 1984 at age 73 of Lou Gehrig's disease. Malibu is a city located in Western Los Angeles County, California. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The motor neurone diseases (MND) are a group of progressive neurological disorders that destroy motor neurons, the cells that control voluntary muscle activity such as speaking, walking, breathing, and swallowing. ...


In November of 2005, Gordon's son Bruce (a sports columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle) wrote a biography titled Goodbye in which Bruce says he learned more about his father than he ever imagined possible.


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
jenkins (935 words)
Gordon Jenkins was born in Webster Groves, Missouri in 1910.
The Gordon Jenkins version of the tune from the 1941 play Pal Joey lasted for 18 weeks on the hit parade and reached the number six position.
The Weavers were reportedly brought to Decca records by Jenkins with the idea of combining their vocal style to that of the big orchestra and chorus.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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