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Encyclopedia > Gooseberry
Wikipedia:How to read a taxobox
How to read a taxobox
Gooseberry
cultivated Eurasian gooseberry
cultivated Eurasian gooseberry
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Saxifragales
Family: Grossulariaceae
Genus: Ribes
Species: R. uva-crispa
Binomial name
Ribes uva-crispa
L.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Ribes uva-crispa
See Physalis peruviana for the tomato-like fruit commonly known as the Cape gooseberry and kiwifruit for the fruit sometimes known as the Chinese gooseberry.

The gooseberry Ribes uva-crispa (syn. R. grossularia) is a species of Ribes, native to Europe, northwestern Africa and southwestern Asia. It is one of several similar species in the subgenus Grossularia; for the other related species (e.g. North American Gooseberry Ribes hirtellum), see the genus page Ribes. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 176 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Beschreibung: Stachelbeeren Autoren: Kornelia und Hartmut Häfele Quelle: http://www. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Divisions Green algae Chlorophyta Charophyta Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta—liverworts Anthocerotophyta—hornworts Bryophyta—mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) †Rhyniophyta—rhyniophytes †Zosterophyllophyta—zosterophylls Lycopodiophyta—clubmosses †Trimerophytophyta—trimerophytes Pteridophyta—ferns and horsetails Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta—seed ferns Pinophyta—conifers Cycadophyta—cycads Ginkgophyta—ginkgo Gnetophyta—gnetae Magnoliophyta—flowering plants... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants (also called angiosperms) are the dominant and most familiar group of land plants. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class: this name is formed by replacing the termination -aceae in the name Magnoliaceae by the termination -opsida (Art 16 of the ICBN). ... Families See text. ... For the commune of the Ardèche in southern France, see Ribes, France. ... Species Syme whitecurrant L. redcurrant L. blackcurrant L. Eurasian gooseberry North American gooseberry Flowering currant Northern red currant Miccosukee Gooseberry and about 150 others The genus Ribes of flowering plants is the only one placed in the family Grossulariaceae. ... In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal system of naming species. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 23, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Physalis peruviana (commonly known as the Cape Gooseberry, Ground-cherry, Golden Berry, or Inca Berry) is a species of Physalis indigenous to Central America, but grows well in Africa. ... The kiwifruit (commonly known as kiwi) is the edible fruit of a cultivar group of the woody vine Actinidia deliciosa and hybrids between this and other species in the genus Actinidia. ... In scientific classification, synonymy is the existence of multiple systematic names to label the same organism. ... Species Syme whitecurrant L. redcurrant L. blackcurrant L. Eurasian gooseberry North American gooseberry Flowering currant Northern red currant Miccosukee Gooseberry and about 150 others The genus Ribes of flowering plants is the only one placed in the family Grossulariaceae. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... World map showing the location of Asia. ... Species Syme whitecurrant L. redcurrant L. blackcurrant L. Eurasian gooseberry North American gooseberry Flowering currant Northern red currant Miccosukee Gooseberry and about 150 others The genus Ribes of flowering plants is the only one placed in the family Grossulariaceae. ...


Although usually placed as a subgenus within Ribes, a few taxonomists treat Grossularia as a separate genus, although hybrids between gooseberry and blackcurrant (e.g. the Jostaberry) are possible. The subgenus Grossularia differs somewhat from currants, chiefly in their spiny stems, and in that their flowers grow one to three together on short stems, not in racemes. Taxonomy (from Greek &#964;&#945;&#958;&#953;&#957;&#959;&#956;&#943;&#945; from the words taxis = order and nomos = law) may refer to either a hierarchical classification of things, or the principles underlying the classification. ... // This article is about a biological term. ... It is a myth that people either go crazy for the flavor or they totally dislike it. ... Inflorescence The jostaberry (pronounced yostaberry) (Ribes x culverwellii) is a complex cross in the Ribes genus. ... A Phalaenopsis flower Rudbeckia fulgida A flower, (<Old French flo(u)r<Latin florem<flos), also known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in flowering plants (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). ... This inflorescence of the terrestrial orchid Spathoglottis plicata is a typical raceme. ...

Gooseberry (variety Jewettà) - watercolour 1894
Gooseberry (variety Jewettà) - watercolour 1894

Contents

Gooseberry. ... Gooseberry. ...

Growth Habit

The gooseberry is a straggling bush growing to 1-3 m tall, the branches being thickly set with sharp spines, standing out singly or in diverging tufts of two or three from the bases of the short spurs or lateral leaf shoots, on which the bell-shaped flowers are produced, singly or in pairs, from the groups of rounded, deeply-crenated 3 or 5 lobed leaves. The fruit is smaller than in the garden kinds, but is often of good flavour; it is generally hairy, but in one variety smooth, constituting the R. uva-crispa of writers; the colour is usually green, but plants are occasionally met with having deep purple berries. A broom shrub in flower A shrub or bush is a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category of woody plant, distinguished from a tree by its multiple stems and lower height, usually less than 6 m tall. ...


Range

Currant and gooseberry output in 2005
Currant and gooseberry output in 2005

The gooseberry is indigenous in Europe and western Asia, growing naturally in alpine thickets and rocky woods in the lower country, from France eastward, perhaps as far as the Himalaya. In Britain it is often found in copses and hedgerows and about old ruins, but has been so long a plant of cultivation that it is difficult to decide upon its claim to a place in the native flora of the island. Common as it is now on some of the lower slopes of the Alps of Piedmont and Savoy, it is uncertain whether the Romans were acquainted with the gooseberry, though it may possibly be alluded to in a vague passage of Pliny the Elder's Natural History; the hot summers of Italy, in ancient times as at present, would be unfavourable to its cultivation. Abundant in Germany and France, it does not appear to have been much grown there in the Middle Ages, though the wild fruit was held in some esteem medicinally for the cooling properties of its acid juice in fevers; while the old English name, Fea-berry, still surviving in some provincial dialects, indicates that it was similarly valued in Britain, where it was planted in gardens at a comparatively early period. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 351 pixelsFull resolution (1425 × 625 pixel, file size: 58 KB, MIME type: image/png)This bubble map shows the global distribution of currant and gooseberry output in 2005 as a percentage of the top producer (Russia - 463,500 tonnes). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 351 pixelsFull resolution (1425 × 625 pixel, file size: 58 KB, MIME type: image/png)This bubble map shows the global distribution of currant and gooseberry output in 2005 as a percentage of the top producer (Russia - 463,500 tonnes). ... A currant can refer to Redcurrants and blackcurrants, berries of the genus Ribes. ... World map showing the location of Asia. ... For the climate of the mountains named the Alps, see climate) for a region above the tree-line. ... The rocky side of a mountain creek near Orosí, Costa Rica. ... A forest is an area with a high density of trees (or, historically, a wooded area set aside for hunting). ... Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ... A copse is an English term for a small lowland woodland. ... For other meanings, see hedge. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Piedmont is a region of northwestern Italy. ... Flag of Savoy This article is about the historical region of Savoy. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Naturalis Historia Pliny the Elders Natural History is an encyclopedia written by Pliny the Elder. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmakos (φάρμακον) meaning drug, and logos (λόγος) meaning science) is the study of how substances interact with living organisms to produce a change in function. ... Acidity redirects here. ... An analogue medical thermometer showing the temperature of 38. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


William Turner describes the gooseberry in his Herball, written about the middle of the 16th century, and a few years later it is mentioned in one of Thomas Tusser's quaint rhymes as an ordinary object of garden culture. Improved varieties were probably first raised by the skilful gardeners of Holland, whose name for the fruit, Kruisbezie, may have been easily corrupted into the present English vernacular word. Towards the end of the 18th century the gooseberry became a favourite object of cottage-horticulture, especially in Lancashire, where the working cotton-spinners have raised numerous varieties from seed, their efforts having been chiefly directed to increasing the size of the fruit. William Turner (c. ... Holland is a region in the central-western part of the Netherlands with a population of 6. ... Lancashire (archaically, the County of Lancaster) is a county palatine of England, lying on the Irish Sea. ... Cotton ready for harvest. ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ...


Climate

Of the many hundred sorts enumerated in recent horticultural works, few perhaps equal in flavour some of the older denizens of the fruit-garden, such as the old rough red and hairy amber. The climate of the British Islands seems peculiarly adapted to bring the gooseberry to perfection, and it may be grown successfully even in the most northern parts of Scotland where it is commonly known as a "grozet"; indeed, the flavour of the fruit is said to improve with increasing latitude. In Norway even, the bush flourishes in gardens on the west coast nearly up to the Arctic circle, and it is found wild as far north as 63°. The dry summers of the French and German plains are less suited to it, though it is grown in some hilly districts with tolerable success. The gooseberry in the south of England will grow well in cool situations, and may be sometimes seen in gardens near London flourishing under the partial shade of apple trees; but in the north it needs full exposure to the sun to bring the fruit to perfection. It will succeed in almost any soil, but prefers a rich loam or black alluvium, and, though naturally a plant of rather dry places, will do well in moist land, if drained. Under the Interpretation Act 1978 of the United Kingdom, the term British Islands refers to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, together with the Crown Dependencies: the Bailiwicks of Jersey and of Guernsey (which in turn includes the smaller islands of Alderney, Herm and Sark) in the... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border Satellite image of the Arctic surface The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Species Malus domestica Malus sieversii Apple is the fruit (pome) of the genus Malus belonging to the family Rosaceae, and is one of the most widely cultivated tree fruits. ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... Loess field in Germany Surface-water-gley developed in glacial till, Northern Ireland Technically, Soil forms the pedosphere: the interface between the lithosphere (rocky part of the planet) and the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. ...

red gooseberries
red gooseberries

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (571x800, 228 KB) Beschreibung: Stachelbeere (Ribes uva-crispa) Fotograf: Darkone, 26. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (571x800, 228 KB) Beschreibung: Stachelbeere (Ribes uva-crispa) Fotograf: Darkone, 26. ...

Propagation

The varieties are most easily propagated by cuttings planted in the autumn, which root rapidly, and in a few years form good fruit-bearing bushes. Much difference of opinion prevails regarding the mode of pruning this valuable shrub; it is probable that in different situations it may require varying treatment. The fruit being borne on the lateral spurs, and on the shoots of the last year, it is the usual practice to shorten the side branches in the winter, before the buds begin to expand; some reduce the longer leading shoots at the same time, while others prefer to nip off the ends of these in the summer while they are still succulent.


When large fruit is desired, plenty of manure should be supplied to the roots, and the greater portion of the berries picked off while still small. If standards are desired, the gooseberry may be with advantage grafted or budded on stocks of some other species of Ribes, R. aureum, the ornamental golden currant of the flower garden, answering well for the purpose. The giant gooseberries of the Lancashire fanciers are obtained by the careful culture of varieties specially raised with this object, the growth being encouraged by abundant manuring, and the removal of all but a very few berries from each plant. Single gooseberries of nearly 2 oz. in weight have been occasionally exhibited; but the produce of such fanciful horticulture is generally insipid.


Pests

The bushes at times suffer much from the ravages of the caterpillars of the gooseberry or magpie moth, Abraxas grossulariala, which often strip the branches of leaves in the early summer, if not destroyed before the mischief is accomplished. The most effectual way of getting rid of this pretty but destructive insect is to look over each bush carefully, and pick off the larvae by hand; when larger they may be shaken off by striking the branches, but by that time the harm is generally done; the eggs are laid on the leaves of the previous season. Equally annoying in some years is the smaller larva of the V-moth, Semiothisa wauaria, which often appears in great numbers, and is not so readily removed. The gooseberry is sometimes attacked by the grub of the Gooseberry sawfly (Nematus ribesii) of which several broods appear in the course of the spring and summer, and are very destructive. The grubs bury themselves in the ground to pass into the pupal state; the first brood of flies, hatched just as the bushes are coming into leaf in the spring, lay their eggs on the lower side of the leaves, where the small greenish larvae soon after emerge. For the destruction of the first broods it has been recommended to syringe the bushes with tar-water; perhaps a very weak solution of carbolic acid might prove more effective. The powdered root of white hellebore is said to destroy both this grub and the caterpillars of the gooseberry moth and V-moth; infusion of foxglove, and tobacco-water, are likewise tried by some growers. If the fallen leaves are carefully removed from the ground in the autumn and burnt, and the surface of the soil turned over with the fork or spade, most eggs and chrysalids will be destroyed. Spraying the plants with potassium sulphide has been found useful in fending off a variety of further parasites and fungi (such as the American gooseberry mildew) which may attack gooseberries specifically. Caterpillar of the Emperor Gum Moth A caterpillar is the larval form of a member of the Order Lepidoptera (the insect order comprising butterflies and moths). ... A moth is an insect closely related to the butterfly. ... A larval insect A larva (Latin; plural larvae) is a juvenile form of animal with indirect development, undergoing metamorphosis (for example, insects or amphibians). ... Families (Cephoidea)   Cephidae-stem sawflies (Megalodontoidea)   Megalodontidae   Pamphilidae-leaf-rolling      & web-spinning sawflies (Orussoidea)   Orussidae-parasitic wood wasps (Siricoidea)   Siricidae- horntails (Tenthredinoidea)   Argidae-argid sawflies   Blasticotomidae   Cimbicidae-cimbicid sawflies   Diprionidae-conifer sawflies   Pergidae-pergid sawflies   Tenthredinidae-common sawflies (Xyeloidea)   Anaxyelidae-cedar sawflies   Xyelidae-xyelid sawflies   Xiphydriidae-wood wasps Symphyta is... Nematus ribesii (syn. ... Species See text(#Species) Hellebores (the Genus Helleborus in the Family Ranunculaceae) are perennial flowering plants that are often grown in gardens for decorative purposes, as well as for their purported medicinal abilities and uses in witchcraft. ... Species Digitalis ferruginea Digitalis grandiflora Digitalis lanata Digitalis lutea Digitalis obscura Digitalis purpurea Digitalis is a genus of about 20 species of herbaceous biennials, perennials and shrubs in the foxglove family Scrophulariaceae. ... This article is about the product manufactured from Tobacco plants (Nicotiana spp. ...


Like other Ribes, the gooseberry serves as an alternate host for white pine blister rust, which can cause serious damage to white pines. For this reason, there are laws against gooseberry cultivation in some places. Binomial name Cronartium ribicola J.C.Fisch. ... There are three main subgenera of Pinus, the subgenus Strobus (White pines or soft pines), the subgenus Ducampopinus (Pinyon, Bristlecone and Lacebark pines), and the subgenus Pinus (Typical pines, or yellow or hard pines). ...


Etymology

The first part of the word has been usually treated as an etymological corruption either of the Dutch word Kruisbezie or the allied German Krausbeere, or of the earlier forms of the French groseille. Alternatively the word has been connected to the Middle High German krus (curl, crisped), in Latin as grossularia. However, the New English Dictionary takes the obvious derivation from goose and berry as probable; the grounds on which plants and fruits have received names associating them with animals are so often inexplicable, that the inappropriateness in the meaning does not necessarily give good grounds for believing that the word is an etymological corruption. Not to be confused with Entomology, the study of insects. ... Middle High German (MHG, German Mittelhochdeutsch) is the term used for the period in the history of the German language between 1050 and 1350. ... The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a comprehensive multi-volume dictionary published by the Oxford University Press. ... Look up goose in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Several types of berries from the market. ... Divisions Green algae Chlorophyta Charophyta Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta—liverworts Anthocerotophyta—hornworts Bryophyta—mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) †Rhyniophyta—rhyniophytes †Zosterophyllophyta—zosterophylls Lycopodiophyta—clubmosses †Trimerophytophyta—trimerophytes Pteridophyta—ferns and horsetails Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta—seed ferns Pinophyta—conifers Cycadophyta—cycads Ginkgophyta—ginkgo Gnetophyta—gnetae Magnoliophyta—flowering plants... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... “Animalia” redirects here. ...


The term 'gooseberry' is also colloquial slang given to a person who is seen as the third wheel.


Other fruits called gooseberries

As well as the other species in the subgenus Grossularia, two other unrelated plants are sometimes termed 'gooseberry'.


The fruit called the "Cape gooseberry" is produced by the species Physalis peruviana in the family Solanaceae, native to the Andes. Physalis peruviana (commonly known as the Cape Gooseberry, Ground-cherry, Golden Berry, or Inca Berry) is a species of Physalis indigenous to Central America, but grows well in Africa. ... Genera Acnistus Atropa (deadly nightshade) Browallia Brugmansia (angels trumpet) Brunfelsia Calibrachoa Capsicum (sweet peppers) Cestrum Chamaesaracha Combera Crenidium Cuatresia Cyphanthera Cyphomandra Datura (jimsonweed) Hyoscyamus (henbane) Iochroma Juanulloa Lycium (boxthorn) Mandragora (mandrake) Nicandra Nicotiana (tobacco) Nierembergia or cupflower Nolana Petunia Physalis (tomatillo) Scopolia Solandra Solanum (tomato, potato, eggplant) Streptosolen Withania...


The fruit called the "Chinese gooseberry", now more commonly known as kiwifruit, is produced by the species Actinidia deliciosa, in the family Actinidiaceae. As its name implies, it was originally cultivated in China, but was taken to New Zealand, where cultivars were selected, and the fruit renamed kiwifruit. These are now grown in many areas, and marketed worldwide under that name - though the older name is sometimes still seen in Australia. The kiwifruit (commonly known as kiwi) is the edible fruit of a cultivar group of the woody vine Actinidia deliciosa and hybrids between this and other species in the genus Actinidia. ... Binomial name Actinidia deliciosa C.F.Liang. ... Genera Actinidia Clematoclethra Saurauia Ref: Delta 2002-08-04 Actiniaceae is a small family of plants. ... This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ...


The "Indian gooseberry" is produced by the species Phyllanthus emblica. Binomial name Phyllanthus emblica Gaertn. ...


References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gooseberry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1302 words)
Towards the end of the 18th century the gooseberry became a favourite object of cottage-horticulture, especially in Lancashire, where the working cotton-spinners have raised numerous varieties from seed, their efforts having been chiefly directed to increasing the size of the fruit.
The climate of the British Islands seems peculiarly adapted to bring the gooseberry to perfection, and it may be grown successfully even in the most northern parts of Scotland where it is commonly known as a "grozet"; indeed, the flavour of the fruit is said to improve with increasing latitude.
The fruit called the "Cape gooseberry" is produced by the species Physalis peruviana in the family Solanaceae, native to the Andes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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