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Encyclopedia > Goodfellas
Goodfellas

Theatrical poster
Directed by Martin Scorsese
Produced by Irwin Winkler
Written by Nicholas Pileggi
Martin Scorsese
Narrated by Ray Liotta
Lorraine Bracco
Starring Ray Liotta
Robert De Niro
Joe Pesci
Lorraine Bracco
Paul Sorvino
Cinematography Michael Ballhaus
Editing by Thelma Schoonmaker
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) Flag of Italy September, 1990
(premiere at VFF)
Flag of the United States September 19, 1990
Flag of Australia October 18, 1990
Running time 145 minutes
Country USA
Language English
Budget $25,000,000
Gross revenue $$46,836,394
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Goodfellas (also spelled GoodFellas) is an Academy Award winning 1990 crime drama film directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the book Wiseguy by Nicholas Pileggi, the true story of mob informer Henry Hill. Image File history File links Goodfellas2. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ... Irwin Winkler (born May 25, 1931) is an American film producer and director. ... Nicholas Pileggi (born February 22, 1933 in New York City, New York) is an American author and screenwriter, best known for writing the book Wiseguy, which he adapted into the movie Goodfellas, and for writing the book and screenplay Casino. ... Ray Liotta[1] (born December 18, 1954) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... Lorraine Bracco (born October 2, 1954[1]) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominated and Screen Actors Guild winning American actress best known for her roles as Karen Hill in Goodfellas and Dr. Jennifer Melfi on the hit HBO TV series, The Sopranos. ... Robert Mario De Niro, Jr. ... Joseph Frank Joe Pesci ( Born February 9, 1943 ) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, comedian and singer. ... Paul Anthony Sorvino (born April 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York City) is an Italian-American character actor whose career has largely been the portrayal of authority figures, both as legal enforcer and criminal, in television, stage, and film. ... Michael Ballhaus (born 5 August 1935, Eichelsdorf, Lower Franconia, Bavaria, Germany) is a German cinematographer and director of photography. ... Thelma Schoonmaker (born January 3, 1940) is an American Academy Award-winning film editor who has worked with director Martin Scorsese for over thirty-five years. ... “WB” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... This article is about the year. ... The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... USD redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The year 1990 in film involved some significant events. ... The police procedural is a sub-genre of the mystery story which tries to demonstrate accurately the activities of a police force as they investigate crimes. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ... Nicholas Pileggi (born February 22, 1933 in New York City, New York) is an American author and screenwriter, best known for writing the book Wiseguy, which he adapted into the movie Goodfellas, and for writing the book and screenplay Casino. ... This article is about the criminal society. ... Henry Hill (born June 11, 1943) is a famous former FBI informant whose life was immortalized in the book Wiseguy by crime reporter Nicholas Pileggi. ...


The film stars Ray Liotta as Hill, Robert De Niro as Jimmy Conway (who is actually based on Jimmy Burke), Joe Pesci (who won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as the sociopath Tommy DeVito, who was based on Tommy DeSimone), Lorraine Bracco as Hill's wife Karen Hill, and Paul Sorvino as Paulie Cicero (who is based on Paul Vario). Ray Liotta[1] (born December 18, 1954) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... Robert Mario De Niro, Jr. ... U.S. Marshals mugshot of James Jimmy the Gent Burke taken on April 12, 1979 not long after the Lufthansa heist. ... Joseph Frank Joe Pesci ( Born February 9, 1943 ) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, comedian and singer. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Antisocial personality disorder (APD) is a personality disorder which is often characterised by antisocial and impulsive behaviour. ... Thomas Tommy DeSimone (c1950 - 1979) was a New York gangster and an associate of the Luchesse Mafia Family. ... Lorraine Bracco (born October 2, 1954[1]) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominated and Screen Actors Guild winning American actress best known for her roles as Karen Hill in Goodfellas and Dr. Jennifer Melfi on the hit HBO TV series, The Sopranos. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Henry Hill (mobster). ... Paul Anthony Sorvino (born April 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York City) is an Italian-American character actor whose career has largely been the portrayal of authority figures, both as legal enforcer and criminal, in television, stage, and film. ... Paul Vario (July 9, 1914 – November 22, 1988) was a member of the U.S. Italian Mafia and a Caporegime in the Lucchese Family. ...

Contents

Plot

Henry Hill (Ray Liotta) admits,"As far back as I can remember, I've always wanted to be a gangster," idolizing the Lucchese crime family gangsters in his blue-collar, predominantly Italian neighborhood in East New York, Brooklyn in 1955. Feeling the connection of being a part of something, Henry quits school and goes to work for them. Ray Liotta[1] (born December 18, 1954) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... The Lucchese crime family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities in New York City, USA, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... A blue-collar worker is a working class employee who performs manual or technical labor, such as in a factory or in technical maintenance trades, in contrast to a white-collar worker, who does non-manual work generally at a desk. ... Languages Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Corsican, Sardinian, Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Ladin, Friulian Religions predominantly Roman Catholic      The Italians are a Southern European ethnic group found primarily in Italy and in a wide-ranging diaspora throughout Western Europe, the Americas and Australia. ... East New York is a primarily low to middle income neighborhood in the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...


Henry is taken under the wing of the local mob capo, Paul "Paulie" Cicero (Paul Sorvino) (based on the actual Lucchese mobster Paul Vario) and Cicero's close Irish associate Jimmy Conway (Robert De Niro) (based on Jimmy Burke) who help to cultivate Henry's criminal career through different phases. Henry is also introduced to the entire network of the crime syndicate run by Paulie. This does not cite its references or sources. ... Paul Anthony Sorvino (born April 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York City) is an Italian-American character actor whose career has largely been the portrayal of authority figures, both as legal enforcer and criminal, in television, stage, and film. ... Paul Vario (July 9, 1914 – November 22, 1988) was a member of the U.S. Italian Mafia and a Caporegime in the Lucchese Family. ... Robert Mario De Niro, Jr. ... U.S. Marshals mugshot of James Jimmy the Gent Burke taken on April 12, 1979 not long after the Lufthansa heist. ...


Henry and his friends soon become daring and dangerous. Conway loves hijacking trucks, and Tommy DeVito (Joe Pesci in his Academy Award-winning performance based on Thomas DeSimone) is an aggressive psychopath with a hair-trigger temper. Henry commits the Air France Robbery and it makes his début. The friends hang out at the Copacabana night club enjoying the fabulous time they've been given behind their criminal activities. At one point, Henry meets and soon marries a no-nonsense Jewish girl from the Five Towns named Karen. Karen is both troubled and turned on by Henry's criminal activities. Joseph Frank Joe Pesci ( Born February 9, 1943 ) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, comedian and singer. ... Thomas Anthony Two-Gun Tommy DeSimone (May 24, 1950 – January 14, 1979[1]) was a gangster and associate of the Lucchese crime family in New York. ... See Also: Antisocial Personality Disorder Theoretically, psychopathy is a three-faceted disorder involving interpersonal, affective and behavioral characteristics. ... In 1967 mobster Henry Hill, aged 23, pulled off a robbery at the Air France air-cargo terminal in New York Citys JFK International Airport to the tune of $420,000. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The Five Towns is an informal grouping of villages and hamlets in Nassau County, New York, United States on the South Shore of western Long Island adjoining the border with Queens County in New York City. ...


On June 11, 1970, Tommy, with Jimmy's help, brutally beats Billy Batts (Frank Vincent), a prominent mobster of the Gambino crime family in Henry's own restaurant for an insult Batts made about Tommy when he used to be a shoeshine boy. Thinking that he's dead and realizing that this is an offense that can get all of them killed, they take the body upstate and find Batts still alive in the trunk of Henry's car. Tommy angrily takes a knife he had borrowed from his mother's place and stabs him a few times and Jimmy finishes Batts off by shooting him. After the incident, Henry and his friends return to remove the body, out of fear that it would become discovered during imminent land development at the burial spot. Henry also gets a mistress named Janice Rossi (Gina Mastrogiacomo), with whom he goes out secretly on several nights. One night, Tommy tries to provoke a young servant named Michael "Spider" Gianco (played by at-the-time unknown, Michael Imperioli). Tommy takes out his pistol and gratuitously shoots Spider in the foot. The next night, Spider stands up to Tommy, who instantly shoots him to death. When Karen finds out that Henry has been cheating on her, she breaks down and wakes him up at his mistress's bed, threatening him with a gun pointed at his face. She angrily asks him whether he loves Rossi. A shocked yet confident Henry repeatedly tells Karen that he only loves his wife, until Karen breaks into tears and Henry violently subdues her onto the carpet floor. He in turn threatens her with the gun, saying that he already has enough problems to worry about, such as the possibility of getting murdered on the streets. is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Redirect page ... Frank Vincent (born Frank Vincent Gattuso on August 4, 1939) is an Italian-American actor. ... John Gotti, The Dapper Don The Gambino Crime Family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities based in New York City, United States, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ... Gina Mastrogiacomo (November 5, 1961 - May 2, 2001) born in great neck ny she moved to [[New York city] when she was 18 and later became an actress who gained some fame for the role of Janice Rossi in Martin Scorseses film Goodfellas. ... Michael Spider Gianfranco-Gianco (born ca. ... James Michael Imperioli (born March 26, 1966 in Mount Vernon, New York), commonly known as Michael Imperioli, is an Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor who is best known for his role as Christopher Moltisanti on The Sopranos. ...


Henry and Jimmy are sent to get money from an indebted Florida gambler in Tampa who says that he can't give them the money, even after Henry and Jimmy beat him up. They hang him in the lion's den, just to scare him even more. Henry and most of the crew (except for Tommy) are then arrested, thanks to the gambler's sister, who is a typist for the FBI. Henry makes deals in prison, and when he gets out, he commits the infamous Lufthansa Heist at JFK airport. But even after the successful heist, things begin to shake up. The robbers buy gifts for their girlfriends, wives and families from their share of the stolen money, and so Jimmy orders anyone involved in the heist to be killed one by one, out of fear of being traced. Henry establishes himself in the drug trade after seeing its amazing value. Meanwhile, Tommy is deceived into thinking that he's going to be "made" or become a prominent member of the Mafia. He is instead righteously executed by the Gambino crime family for Billy Batts' murder. However, Henry and Jimmy learn that they can't become "made men", because of Henry's half, and Jimmy's full, Irish heritage. This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Tampas skyline For alternate meanings, see Tampa (disambiguation) Tampa is a city located in Hillsborough County on the west coast of Florida. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... The 1978 Lufthansa Heist was an airport robbery planned by Jimmy Burke, an associate of the Lucchese crime family, and carried out by several of his associates. ... John F. Kennedy International Airport (IATA Airport Code: JFK, ICAO Airport Code: KJFK) is the main international airport in New York City, and is one of the largest airports in the world. ... John Gotti, The Dapper Don The Gambino Crime Family is one of the Five Families that controls organized crime activities based in New York City, United States, within the nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). ...


On Sunday, May 11, 1980, Henry needs to make a big criminal deal with associates in Atlanta, and needs help. He drives nearly all over town, getting his brother from the hospital, and cooking food for the family, all the while being a nervous wreck from lack of sleep and the amount of cocaine he has taken. Henry is finally caught by narc agents and is sent to jail. When he returns home, he learns from Karen that she has flushed sixty-thousand dollars worth of cocaine down the toilet to prevent it from falling into the hands of the narcs. Henry and his family are left penniless. Henry soon is excluded by Paulie for lying to him about his involvement in the drug trade, and becomes a mole for the FBI while in the Witness Protection Program to protect himself and his family. He then says that he still loves the life of organized crime, and hates the fact that he's now going to have a normal life. is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... NARC, narc or nark may refer to: Narcotic, an addictive drug derived from opium NARC, a song on Interpols album Antics Narc, an Orc-like character in the parody Bored of the Rings Narc (film), a 2002 film about dirty cops involved in policing the drug trade Narc (Narcotics... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... In the United States, the Witness Protection Program (also known as WITSEC) is established by the Witness Protection Act, which in turn sets out the manner in which the U.S. Attorney General may provide for the relocation and protection of a witness or potential witness of the federal government...


Cast

Actor Role Based on
Ray Liotta Henry Hill Henry Hill
Robert De Niro Jimmy Conway Jimmy Burke
Joe Pesci Tommy DeVito Tommy DeSimone
Lorraine Bracco Karen Hill Karen Hill (née Friedman)
Paul Sorvino Paul Cicero Paul Vario
Chuck Low Morrie Kessler Martin Krugman
Frank DiLeo Tuddy Cicero Theodoro Vario
Frank Sivero Frankie Carbone Paolo LiCastri
Johnny Williams Johnny Roastbeef Angelo Sepe
Mike Starr Frenchy Robert McMahon
Frank Vincent Billy Batts William "Billy Batts" DeVino
Jim Colella Jim Colella Jim Colella
Samuel L. Jackson "Stacks" Edwards Parnell Steven "Stacks" Edwards
Frank Adonis Anthony Stabile Anthony Stabile
Catherine Scorcese Tommy DeVito's Mother Thomas DeSimone's Grandmother
Gina Mastrogiacomo Janice Rossi Linda Coppociano
Debi Mazar Sandy Megan Cooperman
Margo Winkler Belle Kessler Fran Krugman
Welker White Lois Byrd Judy Wicks
Julie Garfield Michalia Conway Mickey Burke
Detective Ed Deacy himself himself
Christopher Serrone young Henry Hill young Henry Hill
Charles Scorsese Vinnie Thomas Agro
John Manca Nicky Eyes Himself
Michael Imperioli "Spider" Michael "Spider" Gianco
Tony Darrow Sonny Bunz Angelo McConnach
Tony Ellis Bridal Shop Owner Jerome Asaro
Elizabeth Whitcraft Tommy's Girlfriend at the Copa Theresa Ferrara
Anthony Powers Jimmy Two Times  ?

Ray Liotta[1] (born December 18, 1954) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... FBI mugshot of Henry Hill taken in 1980. ... Robert Mario De Niro, Jr. ... James Jimmy Conway was a fictional character played by Robert De Niro in the film Goodfellas. ... U.S. Marshals mugshot of James Jimmy the Gent Burke taken on April 12, 1979 not long after the Lufthansa heist. ... Joseph Frank Joe Pesci ( Born February 9, 1943 ) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, comedian and singer. ... Thomas Tommy DeSimone (c1950 - 1979) was a New York gangster and an associate of the Luchesse Mafia Family. ... Lorraine Bracco (born October 2, 1954[1]) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominated and Screen Actors Guild winning American actress best known for her roles as Karen Hill in Goodfellas and Dr. Jennifer Melfi on the hit HBO TV series, The Sopranos. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Henry Hill (mobster). ... The French word née (feminine) or né (masculine) (or the English word nee) is still commonly used in some newspapers when mentioning the maiden name of a woman in engagement or wedding announcements. ... Paul Anthony Sorvino (born April 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York City) is an Italian-American character actor whose career has largely been the portrayal of authority figures, both as legal enforcer and criminal, in television, stage, and film. ... Paul Vario (July 9, 1914 – November 22, 1988) was a member of the U.S. Italian Mafia and a Caporegime in the Lucchese Family. ... Chuck Low (born Charleston Lewis Lau on December 1, 1937) is a character actor made famous from his role as Morrie Kessler in Martin Scorseses Goodfellas. ... Martin Marty Krugman. ... Frank DiLeo began his music industry career as a sales representative and promotion executive for CBS Records in 1968. ... Frank Sivero (born Francesco LoGiudice on January 6, 1952 in Agrigento, Sicily, Italy) is a character actor, famous for playing the roles of Genco Abbandando in Mario Puzos and Francis Ford Coppolas The Godfather: Part II and Franky Carbone in Martin Scorseses Goodfellas. ... Paolo LiCastri (June 5, 1935 Castellammare del Golfo, Sicily – June 13, 1979 Flatlands, Brooklyn ) was a made man, or Man of Honor who worked under Carlo Gambino and Carmine Galante. ... Angelo J. (John) Sepe a. ... Mike Starr (born Michael William Salvatore July 29, 1950 in Queens, New York) is an Italian-American actor. ... Robert McMahon a. ... Frank Vincent (born Frank Vincent Gattuso on August 4, 1939) is an Italian-American actor. ... William Billy Batts Devino (January 19, 1921 - June 11, 1970) was born William Paul DeVino in Brooklyn, New York and was described as a long time friend of John Gotti and a made member of the Gambino Family in the 1960s. ... Samuel Jackson redirects here. ... Parnell Steven Stacks Edwards (January 15, 1947 Baton Rouge, Louisiana-December 18, 1978 Queens, New York) was an African-American petty thief and supporter of the Black Panther Party who became associated with the infamous Jimmy Burke during the 1978 Lufthansa Heist. ... Anthony Stabile a. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Gina Mastrogiacomo (November 5, 1961 - May 2, 2001) born in great neck ny she moved to [[New York city] when she was 18 and later became an actress who gained some fame for the role of Janice Rossi in Martin Scorseses film Goodfellas. ... Debi Mazar, on cover of Deborah Mazar (born August 15, 1964 in Queens, New York), better known as Debi Mazar, is an American actress, best known for her trademark Jersey Girl-type appearances, and as edgy, sharp-tongued women in independent films. ... Ed Deacy (born 28 April 1946 in Brooklyn) is a New York City police detective, who has had notable singing and acting gigs. ... Charles Scorsese (May 8, 1913 – August 23, 1993) was an Italian-American minor film actor. ... Thomas Agro (akas: T.A., Tipp, Thomas Ambrosiano) was born on the Upper East Side of New York City. ... James Michael Imperioli (born March 26, 1966 in Mount Vernon, New York), commonly known as Michael Imperioli, is an Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor who is best known for his role as Christopher Moltisanti on The Sopranos. ... Michael Spider Gianfranco-Gianco (born ca. ... Angelo McConnach was a Lucchese crime family associate of Irish-Italian descent and brother-in-law to Lucchese crime family capo Paul Vario. ... Elizabeth Whitcraft is an American actress who played small parts in some notable American films in the 1980s and 1990s. ... Theresa Ferrara (born 1952, Five Towns – May 18, 1979 Barnegat Inlet, Toms River, New Jersey) was an Italian-American Lucchese crime family associate. ...

Development

Goodfellas is based on New York crime reporter Nicholas Pileggi's book Wiseguy. Martin Scorsese never intended to make another mob film until he read a review of the book and this inspired him to read it[1] while working on the set of Color of Money in 1986.[2] He had always been fascinated by the Mob lifestyle and was drawn to Pileggi's book because it was the most honest portrayal of gangsters he had ever read.[3] After he read Pileggi's book, the filmmaker knew what approach he wanted to take: "To begin Goodfellas like a gunshot and have it get faster from there, almost like a two-and-a-half-hour trailer. I think it's the only way you can really sense the exhilaration of the lifestyle, and to get a sense of why a lot of people are attracted to it."[4] According to Pileggi, Scorsese cold-called the writer and told him, "I've been waiting for this book my entire life." To which Pileggi replied "I've been waiting for this phone call my entire life".[5] Nicholas Pileggi (born February 22, 1933 in New York City, New York) is an American author and screenwriter, best known for writing the book Wiseguy, which he adapted into the movie Goodfellas, and for writing the book and screenplay Casino. ... The Color of Money was a 1984 novel by American writer Walter Tevis, continuing the story of Fast Eddie Felson from The Hustler (1959). ...


Scorsese originally intended to direct the film before The Last Temptation of Christ, but when funds materialized to make Last Temptation, he decided to postpone Wise Guy. He was drawn to the documentary aspects of Pileggi's book. "The book Wise Guys gives you a sense of the day-to-day life, the tedium - how they work, how they take over certain nightclubs, and for what reasons. It shows how it's done".[5] He saw Goodfellas as the third film in an unplanned trilogy of films that examined the lives of Italian-Americans "from slightly different angles".[6] He has often described the film as "a mob home movie" that is about money because "that's what they're really in business for".[3] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Screenplay

Scorsese and Pileggi collaborated on the screenplay and over the course of the 12 drafts it took to reach the ideal script, the reporter realized that "the visual styling had to be completely redone . . . So we decided to share credit".[5] They decided which sections of the book they liked and put them together like building blocks.[7] Scorsese persuaded Pileggi that they did not need to follow a traditional narrative structure. The director wanted to take the gangster film and deal with it episode by episode but start in the middle and move backwards and forwards. Scorsese would compact scenes and realized that if they were kept short, "the impact after about an hour and a half would be terrific".[7] He wanted to do the voiceover like the opening of Jules and Jim and use "all the basic tricks of the New Wave from around 1961".[7] Since the title of Pileggi's book had already been used for a TV series and for Brian De Palma's 1986 comedy Wise Guys, Pileggi and Scorsese decided to change the name of their film to Goodfellas.[7] Jules and Jim (French: Jules et Jim) is a 1962 French film directed by François Truffaut and based on the semi-autobiographical novel by Henri-Pierre Roché. Truffaut described the book as a perfect hymn to love and perhaps to life . He came across it during the mid 1950s... The New Wave (French: La Nouvelle Vague) was a blanket term coined by critics for a group of French filmmakers of the late 1950s and 1960s, influenced (in part) by Italian Neorealism. ... First season cast of Wiseguy Wiseguy (1987-1990) was a U.S. television program about Vincent Vinnie Terranova, an undercover agent of the OCB (Organized Crime Bureau), a fictional division of the FBI. Produced by Stephen J. Cannell, the show differed from previous crime dramas in its use of story... Brian De Palma (born Brian Russell DePalma on September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is a controversial American film director, best known for directing the Al Pacino classic Scarface, and the Academy Award-winning The Untouchables. ... Wise Guys is a 1986 feature film directed by Brian De Palma. ...


Casting

Once Robert De Niro agreed to play Conway, Scorsese was able to secure the money needed to make the film.[2] The director cast Ray Liotta after De Niro saw him in Jonathan Demme's Something Wild and Scorsese was surprised by "his explosive energy" in that film.[6] The actor had read Pileggi's book when it came out and was fascinated by it. A couple of years afterwards, his agent told him that Scorsese was going to direct a film version. In 1988, Liotta met the director over a period of a couple of months and auditioned for the film.[3] The actor campaigned aggressively for a role in the film but the studio wanted a well-known actor. "I think they would've rather had Eddie Murphy than me", the actor remembers.[8] Jonathan Demme (born February 22, 1944, in Baldwin, New York) is an American film director, producer and writer. ... Something Wild is a musical album released in 1997 by Finnish melodic death metal band Children of Bodom. ... For other uses, see Eddie Murphy (disambiguation). ...


To prepare for the role, De Niro consulted with Pileggi who had research material that had been discarded while writing the book.[9] De Niro often called Hill several times a day to ask how Burke walked, held his cigarette, etc.[10][11] Driving to and from the set, Liotta listened to FBI audio cassette tapes of Hill, so he could practice speaking like his real-life counterpart.[11] To research her role, Lorraine Bracco tried to get close to a Mob wife but was unable to because they exist in a very tight-knit community. She decided not to meet the real Karen because she "thought it would be better if the creation came from me. I used her life with her parents as an emotional guideline for the role".[12] Paul Sorvino had no problem finding the voice and walk of his character but found it challenging finding "that kernal of coldness and absolute hardness that is antithetical to my nature except when my family is threatened".[13]


Principal photography

The film was shot in 1989 in New York City. Scorsese broke the film down into sequences and storyboarded everything because of the complicated style throughout. According to the filmmaker, he "wanted lots of movement and I wanted it to be throughout the whole picture, and I wanted the style to kind of break down by the end, so that by his [Henry] last day as a wiseguy, it's as if the whole picture would be out of control, give the impression he's just going to spin off the edge and fly out."[1] He claims that the film's style comes from the first two or three minutes of Jules and Jim: extensive narration, quick edits, freeze frames, and multiple locale switches.[4] It was this reckless attitude towards convention that mirrored the attitude of many of the gangsters in the film. Scorsese remarked, "So if you do the movie, you say, 'I don't care if there's too much narration. Too many quick cuts? - That's too bad.' It's that kind of really punk attitude we're trying to show".[4] He adopted a frenetic style in order to almost overwhelm the audience with images and information[7] He also put a lot of detail in every frame because the gangster life is so rich. The use of freeze frames was done because Scorsese wanted images that would stop "because a point was being reached" in Henry's life.[7] Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Freeze Frame is the twelfth album by American rock band J. Geils Band, released in 1981 (see 1981 in music). ...


Joe Pesci did not judge his character but found the scene where he kills Spider for talking back to his character hard to do because he had trouble justifying the action until he forced himself to feel the way Tommy did.[3] Lorraine Bracco found the shoot to be an emotionally difficult one because it was such a male-dominated cast and realized that if she did not make her "work important, it would probably end up on the cutting room floor".[3] When it came to the relationship between Henry and Karen, Bracco saw no difference between an abused wife and her character.[3]


According to Pesci, improvisation and ad-libbing came out of rehearsals where Scorsese let the actors do whatever they wanted. He made transcripts of these sessions, took the lines that the actors came up with that he liked best, and put them into a revised script that the cast worked from during principal photography.[9] The cast did not meet Henry Hill during the film's shoot but a few weeks before it premiered, Liotta met him in an undisclosed city. Hill had seen the film and told the actor that he loved it.[3]


The long tracking shot through the Copacabana nightclub came about because of a practical problem - the filmmakers could not get permission to go in the short way and this forced them to go round the back.[7] Scorsese decided to do it in one shot in order to symbolize Henry's whole life is ahead of him and according to the director, "It's his seduction of her [Karen] and it's also the lifestyle seducing him".[7] Henry's last day as a wiseguy was the hardest part of the film for Scorsese to shoot because he wanted to create the character's state of anxiety and the way the mind races when on drugs for people who had never been under the influence of cocaine and amphetamines.[7] The director ended the film with Henry regretting that he is no longer a wiseguy and Scorsese said, "I think the audience should get angry at him and I would hope they do - and maybe with the system which allows this".[7] For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... Amphetamine is a synthetic drug originally developed (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ...


Post-production

Scorsese wanted to depict the film's violence realistically, "cold, unfeeling and horrible. Almost incidental."[2] However, he had to remove ten frames of blood in order to ensure an R rating from the MPAA.[6] With a budget of $25 million dollars, Goodfellas was Scorsese's most expensive film to date but still only a medium budget by Hollywood standards.[7] It was also the first time he was obliged by Warner Bros. to preview the film. It was shown twice in California and a lot of audiences were "agitated" by Henry's last day as a wiseguy sequence and Scorsese argued that that was the point of the scene.[7] One of the favorite scenes for test audiences was the one where Tommy tells the story and Henry is responding to him - the "what's so funny about me" scene. According to Scorsese, it was all improvised and he kept adding set-ups in order to let the entire moment play out.[7] The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) is a non-profit trade association formed to advance the interests of movie studios. ...


Soundtrack

Goodfellas Music from the Motion Picture
Goodfellas Music from the Motion Picture cover
Soundtrack by Various Artists
Released October 9, 1990
Genre Soundtrack
Length 37:23
Label Atlantic / Wea

Scorsese chose the songs for Goodfellas only if they commented on the scene or the characters "in an oblique way".[6] The only rule he adhered to with the soundtrack was to use music which could only have been heard at that time.[7] For example, if a scene took place in 1973, he could use any song that was current or older. According to Scorsese, a lot of non-dialogue scenes were shot to playback. For example, he had "Layla" playing on the set while shooting the scene where the dead bodies are discovered in the car and the meat-truck.[7] Sometimes, the lyrics of songs were put between lines of dialogue to comment on the action.[7] Image File history File links Goodfellas2. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... WEA may refer to: Warner Music Group, previously known as Warner-Elektra-Atlantic Werner Erhard and Associates, a successor organisation to Erhard Seminars Training and precursor to Landmark Education Washington Education Association White Eagle Aviation, airline based in Poland Workers Educational Association World Energy Assessment, Energy and the Challenge of...


Track listing

Songs on the movie's soundtrack CD.

  1. "Rags to Riches" - Tony Bennett
  2. "Sincerely" - The Moonglows
  3. "Speedo" - The Cadillacs
  4. "Stardust" - Billy Ward and His Dominoes
  5. "Look in My Eyes" - The Chantels
  6. "Life Is But a Dream" - The Harptones
  7. "Remember (Walkin' in the Sand)" - Shangri-Las
  8. "Baby, I Love You" - Aretha Franklin
  9. "Beyond the Sea" - Bobby Darin
  10. "Sunshine of Your Love" - Cream
  11. "Mannish Boy" - Muddy Waters
  12. "Layla (Piano Exit)" - Derek and the Dominos

Rags to Riches is a popular song. ... For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ... Sincerely is a popular song. ... The Moonglows were an influental American R&B and doo wop group, featuring such legendary singers as Bobby Lester, Harvey Fuqua, Alexander Graves and Prentiss Barnes, along with guitarist Billy Johnson. ... The Cadillacs were an American rock-and-roll and doo-wop group from Harlem, New York; active from 1953 to 1962. ... Stardust may refer to several concepts: In space and aviation: another name for cosmic dust Stardust (spacecraft), a comet coma sample return spacecraft Star Dust (aeroplane), a British airliner that vanished in 1947 In music: Stardust (song), a 1927 jazz-pop song by Hoagy Carmichael Stardust (album), a record album... The Chantels were the first black female group to have nationwide success. ... The Harptones never had a top forty pop hit, or even a record on the national R&B charts, yet they are still considered one of the most influential doowop groups, both for their lead singer, Willie Winfield, one of the best voices of the doo-wop era, and their... The Shangri-Las on the cover of a modern collection of their works. ... Baby, I Love You was written by Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich, and Phil Spector. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Beyond the Sea is the English language version of the song La Mer by Charles Trenet. ... Bobby Darin (born Walden Robert Bobby Cassotto, May 14, 1936 – December 20, 1973) was one of the most popular American big band performers and rock and roll teen idols of the late 1950s. ... Sunshine of Your Love is a song by the British supergroup Cream, released on the Disraeli Gears album. ... Cream were a classic 1960s British rock band, which consisted of guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1915 – April 30, 1983), better known as Muddy Waters, was an American blues musician and is generally considered the Father of Chicago blues. He is also the actual father of blues musician Big Bill Morganfield. ... Layla is the title track on the Derek and the Dominos album Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, released in December 1970. ... Derek and the Dominos were a blues-rock supergroup formed in the spring of 1970 by guitarist and singer Eric Clapton with Bobby Whitlock, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon, who had all played with him in Delaney & Bonnie & Friends. ...

Complete song list

Songs used in the movie in chronological order:

Rags to Riches is a popular song. ... For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Otis Williams (born Otis Miles, Jr. ... The Moonglows were an influental American R&B and doo wop group, featuring such legendary singers as Bobby Lester, Harvey Fuqua, Alexander Graves and Prentiss Barnes, along with guitarist Billy Johnson. ... The Italian tenor Giuseppe Di Stefano (born 24 July 1921) is a famous opera singer whose career spanned from the late 1940s to the early 1970s. ... The Cadillacs were an American rock-and-roll and doo-wop group from Harlem, New York; active from 1953 to 1962. ... The Italian tenor Giuseppe Di Stefano (born 24 July 1921) is a famous opera singer whose career spanned from the late 1940s to the early 1970s. ... Compilation album cover Billy Ward and the Dominoes were one of the top American R&B groups of the 1950s, and launched the careers of both Clyde McPhatter and Jackie Wilson. ... For the Korean singer, see Shim Mina. ... The Marvelettes was an American singing girl group on the Motown label. ... John Royce Mathis (b. ... Betty Curtis (b. ... Then He Kissed Me is a song written by Phil Spector, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry. ... The Crystals were one of the most successful girl groups of the 1960s. ... The Chantels were the first black female group to have nationwide success. ... Bobby Vinton (born April 16, 1935) is an American pop music singer. ... The Harptones never had a top forty pop hit, or even a record on the national R&B charts, yet they are still considered one of the most influential doowop groups, both for their lead singer, Willie Winfield, one of the best voices of the doo-wop era, and their... Leader of the Pack is a 1964 pop song recorded by girl group The Shangri-Las. ... The Shangri-Las on the cover of a modern collection of their works. ... Al Jolson (May 26, 1886–October 23, 1950) was a highly acclaimed American singer, comedian and actor of Jewish heritage whose career lasted from 1911 until his death in 1950. ... The Jazz Singer (1927) is a U.S. movie musical and the first feature-length motion picture with talking sequences. ... For the song by The Beatles, see Birthday (song). ... Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti, June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an Italian-American singer, film actor, and comedian. ... The Crystals were one of the most successful girl groups of the 1960s. ... Atlantis is a 1968 song written and recorded by Donovan, released as a single in the UK and on an LP and as a single in the US. // Theme The introduction is a quiet monologue regarding the idea that Atlantis was a highly advanced antediluvian civilization, that Atlantean colonists were... For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ... Jerry Vale (b. ... The Shangri-Las on the cover of a modern collection of their works. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Beyond the Sea is the English language version of the song La Mer by Charles Trenet. ... Bobby Darin (born Walden Robert Bobby Cassotto, May 14, 1936 – December 20, 1973) was one of the most popular American big band performers and rock and roll teen idols of the late 1950s. ... Boulevard of Broken Dreams was a 1934 hit song by Al Dubin (words) and Harry Warren (music), set in Paris. ... Audio sample Info (help· info) This article is about The Rolling Stones song. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Jack Jones may refer to: Jack Jones (banker) Jack Jones (singer) (born 1938) Jack Jones (novelist) (1884–1970) Jack Jones (trade union leader) (born 1913) Lance-Corporal Jack Jones - a character in the sitcom Dads Army Jack Jones (actor) (There have been several actors with this name. ... Monkey Man is a song by English rock and roll band the Rolling Stones featured on their 1969 album Let It Bleed. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Frosty the Snowman is a popular Christmas song written by Walter Jack Rollins and Steve Nelson and recorded by Gene Autry and the Cass County Boys in 1950. ... The Ronettes first album The Ronettes were a girl group of the 1960s from New York City, best known for their work with producer Phil Spector. ... Christmas (Baby Please Come Home) is a song by Darlene Love from the 1963 Christmas compilation album, A Christmas Gift for You from Phil Spector. ... Darlene Love (born Darlene Wright, 26 July 1941, Los Angeles, California) is an American popular music singer. ... The Bells of St. ... The Drifters are a long-lived American doo wop/R&B vocal group, originally formed by Clyde McPhatter (of Billy Ward & the Dominoes) in 1953. ... Unchained Melody is a popular song with music by Alex North and lyrics by Hy Zaret. ... For the House of Pain MC, see Danny Boy (singer). ... Sunshine of Your Love is a song by the British supergroup Cream, released on the Disraeli Gears album. ... Cream were a classic 1960s British rock band, which consisted of guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... Layla is the title track on the Derek and the Dominos album Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, released in December 1970. ... Derek and the Dominos were a blues-rock supergroup formed in the spring of 1970 by guitarist and singer Eric Clapton with Bobby Whitlock, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon, who had all played with him in Delaney & Bonnie & Friends. ... Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994) was an American songwriter, singer, pianist, and guitarist, most popular during the 1960s and 1970s. ... Memo From Turner is a song by English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Magic Bus is one of The Whos most popular songs. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994) was an American songwriter, singer, pianist, and guitarist, most popular during the 1960s and 1970s. ... Monkey Man is a song by English rock and roll band the Rolling Stones featured on their 1969 album Let It Bleed. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Mannish Boy is a classic blues song by Muddy Waters. ... McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1915 – April 30, 1983), better known as Muddy Waters, was an American blues musician and is generally considered the Father of Chicago blues. He is also the actual father of blues musician Big Bill Morganfield. ... This article is about the song made famous by Frank Sinatra. ... For the professional wrestler, see Sid Eudy. ... Layla is the title track on the Derek and the Dominos album Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, released in December 1970. ... Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE[2] (born 30 March 1945) [3], nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... Derek and the Dominos were a blues-rock supergroup formed in the spring of 1970 by guitarist and singer Eric Clapton with Bobby Whitlock, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon, who had all played with him in Delaney & Bonnie & Friends. ...

Reception

Distribution

Goodfellas has its world premiere at the 1990 Venice Film Festival where Scorsese received the Silver Lion award for Best Director.[14] It was given a wide release in North America on September 21, 1990 in 1,070 theaters with an opening weekend gross of USD $6.3 million. It went on to make $46.8 million domestically, well above its $25 million budget.[15] The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


The film received mostly positive reviews from critics and currently has a 96% rating at Rotten Tomatoes and a 89 metascore at Metacritic. In his review for The New York Times, Vincent Canby wrote, "More than any earlier Scorsese film, Goodfellas is memorable for the ensemble nature of the performances . . . The movie has been beautifully cast from the leading roles to the bits. There is flash also in some of Mr. Scorsese's directorial choices, including freeze frames, fast-cutting and the occasional long tracking shot. None of it is superfluous".[16] USA Today gave the film four out of four stars and called it, "great cinema - and also a whopping good time".[4] David Ansen, in his review for Newsweek magazine, wrote "Every crisp minute of this long, teeming movie vibrates with outlaw energy".[17] However, Anthony Lane in the The Independent wrote, "There is a short, needling comedy of violence and cowardice somewhere inside this stylish film, and it is worth watching more than once to prise it free. Scorsese himself chickened out, I think; perhaps the Mob got to him after all".[18] William Fugazy, of the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations, a watchdog group on ethnic injustice, which claims a membership of 10 million and consists of 76 of the largest heritage groups in the United States, called for a boycott of the film and wanted Warner Bros. to ban it. "It's the worst stereotyping, the worst portrayal of the Italian community I've ever seen. Far worse than The Godfather. One killing after another", he said.[19] Scorsese responded to this criticism by saying, "As Nick Pileggi always points out, there are 18 to 20 million Italian-Americans. Out of that, there are only 4,000 alleged organised crime members. But, as Nick says, they cast a very long shadow".[7] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Vincent Canby (July 27, 1924 – September 15, 2000) was an American film critic. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... David Ansen is movie critic and senior editor for Newsweek, where he has been reviewing movies since 1977. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Anthony Lane (born 1962) has been a film reviewer on The New Yorker magazine since 1993. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... “WB” redirects here. ... The Godfather is a 1972 film adaptation of the novel of the same name, written by Mario Puzo, directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Marlon Brando and Al Pacino. ...


Awards

Goodfellas was nominated for six Academy Awards including Joe Pesci for Best Actor in a Supporting Role, Lorraine Bracco for Best Actress in a Supporting Role, Best Picture, Scorsese for Best Director, Thelma Schoonmaker for Best Film Editing, and Scorsese and Nicholas Pileggi for Best Adapted Screenplay.[20] When Joe Pesci won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor (the only Academy Award the film won),[21] his entire speech was "This is an honor and a privilege, thank you".[22] It is the third shortest Oscar-acceptance speech, after William Holden's, who simply said, "Thank you", upon winning for Stalag 17, and Alfred Hitchcock's, who merely said, "Thanks," when he received an Honorary Oscar. Later, Pesci admitted that he did not say more, because "I really didn't think I was going to win".[22] Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... Thelma Schoonmaker (born January 3, 1940) is an American Academy Award-winning film editor who has worked with director Martin Scorsese for over thirty-five years. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... The Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States. ... Joseph Frank Joe Pesci ( Born February 9, 1943 ) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, comedian and singer. ... William Holden (April 17, 1918 – ca. ... Stalag 17 is a 1953 war film which tells the story of a group of American G.I.s held in a German World War II prisoner of war camp who come to believe one of their number is a traitor. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ...


Goodfellas was nominated for five Golden Globes including Best Director, Best Motion Pictures, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actress, and Best Screenplay.[23] It failed to win any of these awards. Scorsese's film won three awards from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts including Best Film, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay.[24] The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Drama has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in 1944 for a performance in a motion picture released in the previous year. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in 1944 for a performance in a motion picture released in the previous year. ... For the main article see Golden Globe Awards. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... This page lists the winners and nominees for the BAFTA Award for Best Film, BAFTA Award for Best Film not in the English Language and Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film for each year, in addition to the retired earlier versions of those awards. ... Winners of the BAFTA Award for Best Direction presented by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. ... The British Film Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay: 2006: The Last King of Scotland - Peter Morgan and Jeremy Brock Casino Royale - Neal Purvis, Robert Wade and Paul Haggis The Departed - William Monahan The Devil Wears Prada - Aline Brosh McKenna Notes on a Scandal - Patrick Marber 2005 - Brokeback Mountain - Larry...


The New York Film Critics Circle voted Goodfellas the Best Film of 1990, Robert De Niro was named Best Actor for his performance in the film and in Awakenings, and Scorsese was voted Best Director.[25] The Los Angeles Film Critics Association also voted Scorsese as Best Director, GoodFellas as Best Film,[25] awards for Pesci and Bracco as Best Supporting Actor and Actress, respectively, and Best Cinematography to Michael Ballhaus for his work on the film.[26] The National Board of Review voted Pesci as Best Supporting Actor.[27] The National Society of Film Critics voted Goodfellas Best Film of 1990 and Scorsese as Best Director.[28] American Film magazine declared Goodfellas the best film of 1990 according to a poll of 80 movie critics.[29] New York Film Critics Circle Awards are given annually to honor excellence in cinema worldwide by an organization of film reviewers from New York City-based publications. ... The New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given by the New York Film Critics Circle to honor the finest achievements in filmmaking. ... This article is about a 1990 film. ... The Los Angeles Film Critics Association (LAFCA) was founded in 1975. ... Michael Ballhaus (born 5 August 1935, Eichelsdorf, Lower Franconia, Bavaria, Germany) is a German cinematographer and director of photography. ... The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures was founded in 1909 in New York City, just 13 years after the birth of cinema, to protest New York City Mayor George McClennans revocation of moving-picture exhibition licenses on Christmas Eve 1908. ... The National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the annual film awards given by the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures. ... The National Society of Film Critics or NSFC is an American film critic organization. ... The National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Picture is an annual award given by National Society of Film Critics to honor the best film of the year. ... The National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Director is an annual award given by National Society of Film Critics to honor the best film director of the year. ...


Legacy

  • GoodFellas is #94 on the American Film Institute's list of 100 Years, 100 Movies and #92 on its updated version from 2007.
  • In 2000 the United States Library of Congress deemed the film "culturally significant" and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry. In 2005 Total Film, named GoodFellas as the greatest film of all time.
  • Roger Ebert, a friend and supporter of Scorsese, named GoodFellas the "best mob movie ever" and placed it among the best films of the nineties.[30] Premiere magazine listed Joe Pesci as #96 on its list of The 100 Greatest Movie Characters of All Time, calling him "perhaps the single most irredeemable character ever put on film".[31]
  • Channel 4 placed Goodfellas at #10 in their 2002 poll The 100 Greatest Films.
  • In 2006, in their 201 Greatest Films poll, Goodfellas was voted in at number 9, while Total Film placed it at #1 in their 2005 edition of the 100 Greatest Movies.

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The first of the AFI 100 Years. ... AFI’s 100 Years. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... Total Film, published by Future Publishing, is the United Kingdoms second best-selling film magazine, after the longer-established Empire from Emap. ... While there is no agreement upon the greatest film of all time, it is possible to list films considered the greatest ever by a sizeable populace of the film-watching community in the English-speaking world. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Premiere is an American and New York City-based film magazine published by Hachette Filipacchi Médias, beginning publication in 1987. ... This article is about the British television station. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Malcolm, Derek. "Made Men", Film Comment, September/October 1990. 
  2. ^ a b c Goodwin, Richard. "The Making of Goodfellas", Hotdog. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Linfield, Susan. "Goodfellas Looks at the Banality of Mob Life", New York Times, September 16, 1990. 
  4. ^ a b c d Clark, Mike. "GoodFellas step from his childhood", USA Today, September 19, 1990. 
  5. ^ a b c Kelly, Mary Pat. "Martin Scorsese: A Journey", Thunder Mouth Press, March 2003. 
  6. ^ a b c d Gilbert, Matthew. "Scorsese Tackles the Mob", Boston Globe, September 16, 1990. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Thompson, David; Ian Christie. "Scorsese on Scorsese", Faber and Faber, 1996, pp. 150-161. 
  8. ^ Portman, Jamie. "Goodfellas Star Prefers Quiet Life", Toronto Star, October 1, 1990. 
  9. ^ a b Arnold, Gary. "Real Fellas Talk about Mob Film", Washington Times, September 25, 1990. 
  10. ^ Wolf, Buck. "Rap Star 50 Cent Joins Movie Mobsters", ABC News, November 8, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-06-24. 
  11. ^ a b Papamichael, Stella. "GoodFellas: Special Edition DVD (1990)", BBC, October 22, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-06-24. 
  12. ^ Witchel, Alex. "A Mafia Wife Makes Lorraine Bracco a Princess", New York Times, September 27, 1990. 
  13. ^ Van Gelder, Lawrence. "At the Movies", New York Times, October 12, 1990. 
  14. ^ Malcolm, Derek. "The Venice Film Festival ends in uproar", The Guardian, September 17, 1990. 
  15. ^ "Goodfellas", Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2008-03-20. 
  16. ^ Canby, Vincent. "A Cold-Eyed Look at the Mob's Inner Workings", The New York Times, September 19, 1990. 
  17. ^ Ansen, David. "A Hollywood Crime Wave", Newsweek, September 17, 1990. 
  18. ^ Lane, Anthony. "The Mob gets to Scorsese", The Independent, October 28, 1990. 
  19. ^ "U.S. Italians outraged by new Scorsese movie", Reuters, September 17, 1990. 
  20. ^ "And the Oscar Nominees Are ...", Associated Press, February 14, 1991. 
  21. ^ Rohter, Larry. "Kevin Costner and Dances With Wolves Win Top Oscar Prizes", New York Times, March 26, 1991. 
  22. ^ a b Dhesi, Japinder. "Worst awards performances", The Guardian, September 20, 2004. Retrieved on 2008-03-20. 
  23. ^ "Godfather lands 7 Globe nominations", Toronto Star, December 28, 1990. 
  24. ^ "GoodFellas, Cinema Paradiso dominate the British Oscars", Associated Press, March 18, 1991. 
  25. ^ a b Spillman, Susan. "Critics join mob honoring GoodFellas", USA Today, December 19, 1990. 
  26. ^ Landis, David. "Ganging up to praise GoodFellas", USA Today, December 17, 1990. 
  27. ^ Spillman, Susan. "Wolves dances away with award", USA Today, December 14, 1990. 
  28. ^ Fox, David J. "Critics say they're jolly GoodFellas", Toronto Star, January 8, 1991. 
  29. ^ Arnold, Gary. "GoodFellas targeted for even more acclaim", Washington Times, February 19, 1991. 
  30. ^ "Best Films of the '90s", Ebert & Roeper, February 27, 2000. Retrieved on 2008-03-26. 
  31. ^ "The 100 Greatest Movie Characters of All Time", Premiere. Retrieved on 2008-03-26. 

The Film Comment is a renowned film journal published by the Film Society of Lincoln Center. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... March 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → // Events March 1, 2003 Iraq disarmament crisis: The Turkish speaker of Parliament voids the vote accepting U.S. troops involved in the planned invasion of Iraq into Turkey on constitutional grounds. ... 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This article is about the year. ... ABC News logo ABC News Special Report ident, circa 2006 ABC News is a division of American television and radio network ABC, owned by The Walt Disney Company. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pronounced is known as a financial market data provider and a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The Washington Times is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1982 as a conservative alternative to the Washington Post by members of the controversial Unification Church. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... At the Movies with Ebert & Roeper is a movie review television program featuring film critic Roger Ebert and columnist Richard Roeper, both of the Chicago Sun-Times. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Premiere is an American and New York City-based film magazine published by Hachette Filipacchi Médias, beginning publication in 1987. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Awards
Preceded by
Dead Poets Society
BAFTA Award for Best Film
1991
Succeeded by
The Commitments
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ... Whats a Nice Girl Like You Doing in a Place Like This? is a 1963 short film that Martin Scorsese created while a student at New York Universitys Tisch School of the Arts. ... Its Not Just You, Murray! (1964) is a short film directed by Martin Scorsese. ... Martin Scorseses six-minute short The Big Shave 1967 is also known as Viet 67. ... Whos That Knocking at My Door (1967), originally entitled I Call First, is legendary director Martin Scorseses first feature film. ... ... Boxcar Bertha (1972), one of acclaimed director Martin Scorseses earliest films, is an extremely loose adaptation of Sister of the Road, the fictionalized autobiography of radical and transient Bertha Thompson as written by physician Dr. Ben L. Reitman (Ben Reitman). ... For other uses, see Mean Streets (disambiguation). ... Italianamerican is a film made in ???? Catherine and Charles Scorsese featuring in a homemade documentary and acting as themselves, Martin Scorsese´s parents. ... Alice is a 1974 film which tells the story of a widow who moves with her young son to Tucson, Arizona to start her life over again, and finds a job working at a diner. ... This article is about the 1976 American film. ... For other uses, see New York, New York (disambiguation). ... The Last Waltz was a concert by the Canadian-American rock group, The Band, held on Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1976, at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. ... This article is about the 1980 film. ... The King of Comedy is a feature film made in 1981. ... After Hours is an American comedy thriller film released in 1985, directed by Martin Scorsese and written by Joseph Minion. ... The Color of Money was a 1984 novel by American writer Walter Tevis, continuing the story of Fast Eddie Felson from The Hustler (1959). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... New York Stories is an anthology film which was released in the USA in March 1989. ... Cape Fear is a 1991 film, directed by Martin Scorsese. ... The Age of Innocence is an Academy Award-winning film released in 1993 by Columbia Pictures, directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer and Winona Ryder. ... ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ... A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies is a four-hour documentary in which Scorsese examines a selection of his favorite American films grouped according to three different types of directors: the director as an illusionist: D.W. Griffith or F. W. Murnau, who created new editing techniques... Kundun is a 1997 film written by Melissa Mathison and directed by Martin Scorsese, both of whom (along with several other members of the production) were banned by the Chinese Government from ever entering Tibet as a result of making the film. ... My Voyage to Italy (Italian: Il mio viaggio in Italia) is a personal documentary by acclaimed Italian-American director Martin Scorsese. ... Bringing Out the Dead is a film released in 1999. ... Gangs of New York is a 2002 film set in the middle 19th century in the Five Points district of New York City. ... The Blues is a 2003 documentary film series produced by Martin Scorsese, dedicated to the history of blues music. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation) The Aviator is an Academy Award-winning 2004 biographical drama film, directed by Martin Scorsese, and based largely on the book Hughes by Richard Hack. ... For other uses, see No direction home (disambiguation). ... The Departed is an Academy Award winning 2006 crime thriller film directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson and Mark Wahlberg. ... Shine a Light is the tentatively titled documentary film by Martin Scorsese spanning the career of rock and roll band the Rolling Stones. ... Bold text You Can Count on Me is a 2000 movie, starring Laura Linney, Mark Ruffalo, Rory Culkin and Matthew Broderick, written and directed by Kenneth Lonergan. ... Nyfes is a 2004 greek film. ... The Young Victoria is a Jean-Marc Vallée film set for 2008 release. ... Dead Poets Society is an Academy Award-winning 1989 film, directed by Peter Weir. ... This page lists the winners and nominees for the BAFTA Award for Best Film, BAFTA Award for Best Film not in the English Language and Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film for each year, in addition to the retired earlier versions of those awards. ... The novel The Commitments was made into a film in 1991, directed by Alan Parker. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Goodfellas (1990) (897 words)
"Goodfellas" is one of the best films I have ever seen.
I am a huge fan of Pesci, and I tend to love his characters, but he really makes you feel sick towards his character in "Goodfellas," while at the same time taking a strange liking to him.
Anyway, "Goodfellas" has to be one of the best films I've ever seen--a true modern classic that will be remembered for what it is: One of the greatest tales told on screen.
Goodfellas: Special Edition (1990) (2609 words)
GoodFellas makes it obvious that loyalty only goes so far; throughout the movie, virtually every character does whatever he needs to do to get by - screw the other person, no matter who they are.
GoodFellas doesn't exactly shatter that image - the focus clearly resides mostly on the males - but Scorsese does make a much greater attempt to demonstrate the female side of things and their perspective.
The prior release of GoodFellas came out very early in DVD’s existence, and it suffered from two strikes: it was a “flipper” that split the movie onto two sides of one disc, and it failed to offer anamorphic enhancement.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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