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Encyclopedia > Goodbye Pork Pie
Goodbye Pork Pie
Directed by Geoff Murphy
Produced by Nigel Hutchinson
Geoff Murphy
Written by Ian Mune,
Geoff Murphy
Starring Tony Barry,
Kelly Johnston,
Bruno Lawrence
Release date(s) 1981
Running time 105 min.
Country New Zealand
Language English
IMDb profile

Goodbye Pork Pie is a 1981 (international release) film directed by Geoff Murphy and written by Ian Mune, with assistance from Geoff Murphy. The film is considered to be one of New Zealand's most popular films, and is occasionally considered New Zealand's equivalent of Easy Rider. It was filmed during November 1979, and during filming, utilized only 24 cast and crew. Its overheads were surprisingly minimal, to the point that the Holden Police cars used doubled as crew and towing vehicles, and that the director Geoff Murphy, performed some of the stunts himself. Image File history File links Goodbye_Pork_Pie_Poster. ... Geoff Murphy directed some significant New Zealand movies in the late 20th century. ... Geoff Murphy directed some significant New Zealand movies in the late 20th century. ... Ian Mune (born 1941) is a New Zealand character actor and director. ... Geoff Murphy directed some significant New Zealand movies in the late 20th century. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Bruno Lawrence (February 12, 1941–June 10, 1995) was a musician and actor, born David Lawrence in Brighton, England. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... Geoff Murphy directed some significant New Zealand movies in the late 20th century. ... Ian Mune (born 1941) is a New Zealand character actor and director. ... Geoff Murphy directed some significant New Zealand movies in the late 20th century. ... Wyatt, Mary (Toni Basil), Billy and Karen wandering the streets of a parade filled New Orleans. ... Geoff Murphy directed some significant New Zealand movies in the late 20th century. ...

Contents

Plot

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The film's story is centered around a North Island-South Island road trip the length of New Zealand. Gerry Austin, who is played by Kelly Johnson is a confused 19 year old who gives a stellar performance. North Island The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, the other being the South Island. ... The South Island The South Island is one of the two major islands of New Zealand, the other being the North Island. ...


At the top of the North Island, Austin opportunistically steals a wallet (although only after trying to return it) accidentally dropped by a wealthy woman named Lesley Morris. He uses the identity inside and takes on her name of Lesley. With his new found identity he rents a (then brand new) yellow Mini, which is nicknamed "Pork Pie" after the name on his bright yellow sun hat and t-shirt. With no particular aim in mind, he drifts down to Auckland. For the new MINI, see MINI (BMW). ...


Meanwhile, dear "John" (Tony Barry), is walking aimlessly through the city after his girlfriend, Sue, dumped him to go to Invercargill. Although it's not clear at this stage, he's on his way to see her in Invercargill.


Gerry is stopped by a traffic officer for failing to wear a seat belt, but rescued when a passing John intervenes and insists Gerry was wearing the belt. Gerry gives John a lift although he doesn't know where he's going. Gerry and John pick up a hitch-hiking troubled 'virgin' ex-ex-pat, Shirley (Claire Oberman), who she says is heading for family in Wanganui, "maybe". Claire Oberman is a Dutch-born British actress, best known for her role as Australian nurse Kate Norris in the television drama Tenko. ...


Immediately, behind Shirl's back, Gerry and John have a $2 bet in which Gerry says he will be "hanging out of her before they reach Wanganui".


Initially they have no trouble with the law, until Gerry leaves a petrol station without paying after filling up. Shirl is horrified that they left without paying and states she would have paid, Gerry says he would have refused this as then he would have had to listen to her talk.


As a result of stealing the petrol the car is reported to the police. At around the same time it is discovered that the stolen wallet was used to hire the Mini and that Gerry is the culprit. The police label them the Blondini gang, and a rather comedic pursuit is on.


The trio drift south, paying their way by selling parts of the car as they drive. In doing this they meet some rather shady characters.


The metaphors aren't subtle. Gradually it becomes clear the only person with a place to go is John, whose heart belongs in Invercargill. The plot is minimal, basically man alone becomes two men alone. But the dialogue is realistic and often witty, as are a series of visual jokes (including a much quoted jump cut from Gerry vomiting to John splurting ketchup on his dinner). The film is really made by a series of non-CGI car chase sequences, including hide and seek in the Horopito Smash Palace car wreckers and a stunning pursuit through Wellington's railway station ending in the Mini driving from a platform into a moving boxcar. Man alone is the archetypal myth of the New Zealand man, an outsider in his own land, and alone in the world. ... Computer-generated imagery (CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics (or more specifically, 3D computer graphics) to special effects. ... Species Pseudowintera is a genus of woody evergreen flowering trees and shrubs, part of family Winteraceae. ... Smash Palace was a New Zealand feature film, released in 1981. ...


The film itself is filmed across New Zealand in Auckland, Wellington, Picton, Christchurch the Southern Alps, Dunedin and finally Invercargill. Schematic map of Auckland. ... For other uses, see Wellington (disambiguation). ... A view of the harbour in Picton. ... Christchurch is the regional capital of Canterbury, New Zealand. ... The Southern Alps is a mountain range which runs along the western side of the South Island of New Zealand. ... Dunedin (ÅŒtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ... Cnr of Esk and Dee Streets, looking up Esk st, one of the main shopping streets of Invercargill. ...


Cast

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Claire Oberman is a Dutch-born British actress, best known for her role as Australian nurse Kate Norris in the television drama Tenko. ... Bruno Lawrence (February 12, 1941–June 10, 1995) was a musician and actor, born David Lawrence in Brighton, England. ...

Summary

Though coming after Sleeping Dogs, the release of Goodbye Pork Pie is considered to be the coming-of-age of New Zealand cinema as it showed that New Zealanders can make successful films about New Zealand. It was the first really financially successful New Zealand film of modern times. Sleeping Dogs is a 1977 film and the first feature film by director Roger Donaldson. ... New Zealand cinema refers to films made by New Zealand-based production companies in New Zealand. ...


Trivia

  • The film was filmed chronologically from start to finish over six weeks in late 1979. Filming began in Kaitaia and ended in Invercargill.
  • The director, Geoff Murphy, was good friends with Tony Barry (Smith) and Bruno Lawrence many years prior to Goodbye Pork Pie. They were all in Bruno's band Blerta.
  • Geoff Murphy would direct another New Zealand car chase related feature film, 1988's Never Say Die, with Temuera Morrison and Tony Barry - in lead roles - being chased by Police from the West Coast to Auckland, in a (much more spacious) Ford Falcon.
  • The film is one of New Zealand's most highly regarded feature films.
  • It was the first New Zealand movie to make a profit at the local box office.
  • The yellow mini was a 1978 Morris Mini 1000, registered IZ6393.
  • Three 1978 Minis were used, loaned from the New Zealand Motor Corporation (assemblers of British Leyland products in NZ). One was set on fire, another got fitted with a Holden engine, and another was cut up.
  • The Police Holden HQs utilized in the film doubled as towing and support vehicles for the cast and crew. It is the same police cars chasing the Mini throughout both the North and South Islands.
  • An early scene in the film shows John and his partner in a taxi, after she has officially left him, crossing the old Mangere Bridge. The new bridge, at the time of the film's production. was on hold for a couple of years in an unfinished state due to prolonged industrial action.
  • A later scene in the film shows Blondini and John in Cromwell, Central Otago. The part of Cromwell shown is now underwater, due to the Lake Dunstan hydroelectric project.
  • The scenes in the Mini done in the Wellington railway station prior to the car being smuggled into a railway wagon destined for the Interislander ferry were very cramped. In the Mini was a camera, a camera operator, sound recordist, actor and stunt driver. The car could only get around the tight corners by utilizing handbrake turns.
  • A scene which involved a traffic officer's Holden car being dumped into a West Coast lake was (due to the budget being too minimal to fly in a stuntman) performed by Geoff Murphy himself, without any considerations to safety - a major issue since no-one had any idea of how deep the lake was. This particular Holden - originally a red car resprayed in Traffic Police colours - was then towed out of the lake, dried out and sent back up to Auckland.
  • A recurring scene that involved a holidaying family in a similar yellow Mini with fighting kids, featured Ian Watkin (a friend of Geoff Murphy and Tony Barry's from Blerta), Geoff Murphy's wife Linus, and two of Bruno Lawrence's kids.
  • Almost all of the dialogue in the chase scenes had to be re-recorded in post-production, due to the loudness of the gravel road surfaces.
  • The scene at McNab, Southland where Gerry is caught by the police shows a decrepit old toilet block at the side of the road. It was actually a temporary structure built specifically for the film.
  • A scene near the end of the film showed an Invercargill hotrod club and their cars, communicating through CB radios with country music playing over the stereos. This hotrod club were "The Southland Sports Car Club".
  • All radio stations shown in broadcast - those being Radio Hauraki (Auckland), Radio Windy (Wellington), 3ZB (Christchurch) and 4XO (Dunedin) - were actual AM radio stations of that time (there was no FM in NZ in 1980).
  • Brass instrumentals, which generally soundtrack the film, were done by John Charles.
  • Street Talk, whose music appears throughout the film, were one of Auckland's major bands of the late 1970s. Led by Hammond Gamble, they almost scored an international record deal from Kim Fowley. They had split up by the time the film was released however.
  • The film had much beneficial assistance from Air New Zealand, the Interislander ferries, and NZ Railways.
  • Goodbye Pork Pie was released to New Zealand cinemas on Waitangi Day (February 6th), 1981.
  • After 10 weeks in New Zealand cinemas, the movie grossed over NZ$1 million dollars.
  • The first time the movie was screened on New Zealand national television it was viewed by over 50% of the population over the age of five - 1.5 million people.
  • Over 25 years since the film was released, Kelly Johnson (Gerry "Blondini" Austin) is still instantly recognisable as being Blondini. He is now a popular lawyer in Whangarei. Apparently whenever he visits clients in prison, they often jokingly shout out "Blondini!", and ask him to steal them a yellow Mini.
  • In 2002, the Wellington dub band Rhombus did a video for their song "Clav Dub", which paid homage to Goodbye Pork Pie. When asked to appear in the video as "Blondini", Kelly Johnson jumped at the chance. The yellow Mini that appeared in the video was actually an Australian Leyland Mini Clubman 1275, and in a much better condition than the cars in the original film.
  • Many New Zealand films since Goodbye Pork Pie, particularly car related ones, have paid homage to it. Notable ones include 1988's Never Say Die (another car chase film, and featuring Tony Barry), and 2001's Snakeskin which in the end scene (after a Valiant VJ convertible is pushed over a cliff and blown up), a Yellow Mini appears, complete with the IZ6393 numberplate.
  • The title was inspired by the song "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat", an elegy to jazz saxophonist Lester Young written by Charlie Mingus.

Geoff Murphy directed some significant New Zealand movies in the late 20th century. ... Bruno Lawrence (February 12, 1941–June 10, 1995) was a musician and actor, born David Lawrence in Brighton, England. ... Blerta were a New Zealand musical and theatrical co-operative, active in the 1970s. ... Geoff Murphy directed some significant New Zealand movies in the late 20th century. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Never Say Die can refer to: 1978 album Never Say Die! by Black Sabbath 1988 film Never Say Die 2001 album Never Say Die by The Rattlers a racehorse named Never Say Die This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... Temuera Derek Morrison (born December 26, 1960) is a New Zealand actor. ... For the new MINI, see MINI (BMW). ... The British Leyland Motor Corporation (often abbreviated to simply BL), was a Britain in 1968. ... This article is about the Australian car manufacturer. ... Mangere Bridge is a bridge over the Manukau Harbour in south-western Auckland, New Zealand, crossing between the suburb also known as Mangere Bridge and the suburb of Onehunga. ... Cromwell is a town in Central Otago in the Otago region of New Zealand. ... Lake Dunstan is located in the South Island of New Zealand. ... Geoff Murphy directed some significant New Zealand movies in the late 20th century. ... Geoff Murphy directed some significant New Zealand movies in the late 20th century. ... Blerta were a New Zealand musical and theatrical co-operative, active in the 1970s. ... Geoff Murphy directed some significant New Zealand movies in the late 20th century. ... Bruno Lawrence (February 12, 1941–June 10, 1995) was a musician and actor, born David Lawrence in Brighton, England. ... Radio Hauraki is a New Zealand radio network, specialising in AOR and classic rock. ... Schematic map of Auckland. ... For other uses, see Wellington (disambiguation). ... Christchurch is the regional capital of Canterbury, New Zealand. ... Radio 4XO was a local radio station in Dunedin, New Zealand which had been around since the 70s. ... Dunedin (ÅŒtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ... Street Talk is Steve Perrys first solo album. ... Schematic map of Auckland. ... Kim Fowley (born 1942) is an American pop and rock singer, songwriter, and record producer, best known for helping record the 1966 novelty record Theyre Coming to Take me Away, Ha Ha, recorded by Jerry Samuels under the name of Napoleon XIV. The B-side consisted of the A... Air New Zealand (IATA: NZ, ICAO: ANZ, and Callsign: New Zealand) ASX: AIZ NZX: AIR is a major scheduled passenger airline based in Auckland, New Zealand. ... Waitangi Day is a public holiday in New Zealand held each year on February 6 to celebrate the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, New Zealands founding document, on that date in 1840. ... Whangarei (the initial consonant is pronounced F as in fa-nga-ray) is the northernmost city in New Zealand and the regional capital of Northland Region. ... Snakeskin is a material that is produced from the hide of a snake. ... Lester Young Lester Willis Young (August 27, 1909 – March 15, 1959), nicknamed Prez, was an American jazz tenor saxophonist and clarinetist. ... Charles Mingus Stamp issued by the USPS on September 16, 1995. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pork pie hat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (335 words)
A pork pie hat or porkpie hat is a felt hat, similar to a Trilby, dating from the mid 19th century, much the same as a fedora, but with a flattened top.
The brim on a pork pie hat is generally on the smaller side, and is worn up, though it can be worn down in the front.
Pork pie hats are often associated with jazz culture, though more recently they have had strong associations with ska.
Goodbye Pork Pie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1634 words)
Goodbye Pork Pie is a 1981 (international release) film directed by Geoff Murphy and written by Ian Mune, with assistance from Geoff Murphy.
The scene at McNab, Southland where Gerry "Pork Pie" Austin is caught by the police shows a decrepit old toilet block at the side of the road.
Goodbye Pork Pie was released to New Zealand Cinemas on February 6th, 1981.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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