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Encyclopedia > Good Friday
Good Friday
Observed by Most Christians
Type Christian
Significance Commemorates the crucifixion and death of Jesus Christ
Date Friday immediately preceding Easter Sunday
2007 date April 6
2008 date March 21 (Western)
April 25 (Eastern)
2009 date April 10 (Western)
April 17 (Eastern)
Celebrations No traditional celebrations
Observances Prayer and vigil services, fasting, almsgiving, some family gatherings
Related to Passover, Christmas (which celebrates the birth of Jesus), Septuagesima, Quinquagesima, Shrove Tuesday, Ash Wednesday, Lent, Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday and Holy Saturday which lead up to Easter, Easter Sunday (primarily), Ascension, Pentecost, Whit Monday, Trinity Sunday, and Corpus Christi which follow it

Good Friday, also called Holy Friday or Great Friday, is the Friday preceding Easter Sunday. It commemorates the crucifixion and death of Jesus Christ at Calvary. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Western Christianity... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which developed in Greece, Russia, Armenia, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, northeastern Africa and southern India over several centuries of religious antiquity. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Western Christianity... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which developed in Greece, Russia, Armenia, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, northeastern Africa and southern India over several centuries of religious antiquity. ... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ... Vigil, tacuinum sanitatis casanatensis (XIV century) This article is about the period of sleeplessness. ... Fasting is primarily the act of willingly abstaining from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time. ... Zakât (or Zakaat or Zakah) (English:tax, alms, tithe) (Arabic: زكاة, Old (Quran) Arabic: زكوة) is the third of the Five Pillars of Islam. ... This article is about the Jewish holiday. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Septuagesima (in full, Septuagesima Sunday) is the name given to the third from the last Sunday before Lent in the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches. ... Quinquagesima is the name for the Sunday before Ash Wednesday. ... Pancakes with strawberry syrup and black currants Shrove Tuesday is the term used in the United Kingdom,[1] Ireland,[2] and Australia[3] to refer to the day after Shrove Monday (or the more old fashioned Collop Monday) and before Ash Wednesday (the liturgical season of Lent begins on Ash... In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ... For other uses, see Lent (disambiguation). ... For the book by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... The Last Supper - museum copy of Master Pauls sculpture, from the main altar in St. ... Holy Saturday is the day before Easter in the Christian calendar. ... Easter (also called Pascha) is generally accounted the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed March or April each year to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead (after his death by crucifixion; see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year, almost two... Also refers to the process of gaining Enlightenment and several meditation techniques. ... … The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Medival... Trinity Sunday is the first Sunday after Pentecost in the Western Christian liturgical calendar. ... Corpus Christi Procession in Germany This article is about the Catholic feast of Corpus Christi. ... Easter (also called Pascha) is generally accounted the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed March or April each year to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead (after his death by crucifixion; see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year, almost two... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Golgotha redirects here. ...

Contents

Original Events of Good Friday

A Good Friday procession in Bombay by Indian Roman Catholics, depicting the Way of the Cross
A Good Friday procession in Bombay by Indian Roman Catholics, depicting the Way of the Cross

According to the New Testament, Jesus was arrested in the Garden of Gethsemane by the Temple Guards through the guidance of his disciple, Judas Iscariot. Judas received money for betraying Jesus. He told the guards that whomever he kisses is the one they are to arrest. Jesus was brought to the house of Annas, who is the father-in-law of the current high priest, Caiaphas. There he is interrogated with little result, and sent bound to Caiaphas the high priest, where the Sanhedron had assembled (John 18:1-24). The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... A diagram of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre based on a german documentary, claimed to be the site of Calvary and the Tomb of Jesus. ... The seven sayings of Jesus on the cross are a traditional collection of seven short phrases uttered by Jesus at his crucifixion immediately before he died, gathered from the four Gospels. ... This article or section should be merged with Mumbai Mumbai (previously known as Bombay) is the worlds most populous conurbation, and is the sixth most populous agglomeration in the world. ... Distribution of Christian population in different Indian states [1] Christianity is Indias third-largest religion, following Hinduism and Islam. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Garden of Gethsemane. ... For other uses, see Judas. ... Annas (also Ananus), son of Seth, was a Jewish High Priest from AD 6 to 15 and remained an influential leader afterwards. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Yhosef Bar Kayafa (Hebrew יְהוֹסֵף בַּר קַיָּפָא, ), also known as Caiaphas (Greek Καϊάφας) in the New Testament, was the Jewish high priest to whom Jesus was taken after his arrest in the garden of Gethsemane, and who played a part in Jesus trial before the Roman Governor, Pontius Pilate. ...


Conflicting testimony against Jesus is brought forth by many witnesses, to which Jesus answers nothing. Finally the high priest adjures Jesus to respond under solemn oath, saying "I adjure you, by the Living God, to tell us, are you the Anointed One, the Son of God?" Jesus testifies in the affirmative, "You have said it, and in time you will see the Son of Man seated at the right hand of the Almighty, coming on the clouds of Heaven." The high priest condemns Jesus for blasphemy, and the Sanhedron concurs with a sentence of death (Matthew 26:57-66). Peter also denies Jesus three times during the interrogations. Jesus already knew that Peter would deny him three times. For the black metal band, see Blasphemy (band). ...


In the morning, the whole assembly brings Jesus to the Roman governor Pontius Pilate, under charges of subverting the nation, opposing taxes to Caesar, and making himself a king (Luke 23:1-2). Pilate authorizes the Jewish leaders to judge Jesus according to their own Law and execute sentencing, however the Jewish leaders reply that they are not allowed by the Romans to carry out a sentence of death (John 18:31). Pilate redirects here. ...


Pilate questions Jesus, and tells the assembly that there is no basis for sentencing. Upon learning that Jesus is from Galilee, Pilate refers the case to the ruler of Galilee, King Herod, who was in Jerusalem for the Passover Feast. Herod questions Jesus but receives no answer; Herod sends Jesus back to Pilate. Pilate tells the assembly that neither he nor Herod have found guilt in Jesus; Pilate resolves to have Jesus whipped and released (Luke 23:3-16). For other uses, see Galilee (disambiguation). ... Herod I, also known as Herod the Great was an ancient king of Judaea. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Jewish holiday. ...


It was a custom during the feast of Passover for the Romans to release one prisoner as requested by the Jews. Pilate asks the crowd who they would like to be released. Under the guidance of the chief priests, the crowd asks for Barabbas, who had been imprisoned for committing murder during an insurrection. Pilate asks what they would have him do with Jesus, and they demand, "Crucify him" (Mark 15:6-14). Pilate's wife had seen Jesus in a dream earlier that day; she forewarns Pilate to "have nothing to do with this righteous man" (Matthew 27:19). This article is about the biblical character Barabbas. ...


Pilate has Jesus flogged, then brings him out to the crowd to release him. The chief priests inform Pilate of a new charge, demanding Jesus be sentenced to death "because he claimed to be God's son." This possibility filled Pilate with fear, and he brought Jesus back inside the palace and demanded to know from where he came (John 19:1-9).


Coming before the crowd one last time, Pilate declares Jesus innocent, washing his own hands in water to show he has no part in this condemnation. Nevertheless, Pilate hands Jesus over to be crucified in order to forestall a riot (Matthew 27:24-26). The sentence written is "Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews." Jesus carries his cross to the site of execution (assisted by Simon of Cyrene), called the place of the Skull, or "Golgotha" in Hebrew and "Calvary" in Latin. There he is crucified along with two criminals (John 19:17-22). Calvary (Golgotha) was the hill outside Jerusalem on which Jesus was crucified. ...


Jesus agonizes on the cross for three hours, during which there is darkness over the whole land.[1] With a loud cry, Jesus gives up his spirit. There is an earthquake, tombs break open, and the curtain in the Temple is torn from top to bottom. The centurion on guard at the site of crucifixion declares, "Truly this was God's Son!" (Matthew 27:45-54) Centurion can mean: In the military: Centurion (Roman army), a professional officer of the Roman army who commanded a large amount of men. ...


Joseph of Arimathea, a member of the Sanhedrin and secret follower of Jesus, who had not consented to his condemnation, goes to Pilate to request the body of Jesus (Luke 23:50-52). Pilate asks confirmation from the centurion whether Jesus is dead (Mark 15:44). A soldier pierced the side of Jesus with a lance causing blood and water to flow out (John 19:34), and the centurian informs Pilate that Jesus is dead (Mark 15:45). Joseph of Arimathea by Pietro Perugino. ...


Joseph of Arimathea takes the body of Jesus, wraps it in a clean linen shroud, and places it in his own new tomb that had been carved in the rock (Matthew 27:59-60) in a garden near the site of crucifixion. Another secret follower of Jesus and member of the Sanhedrin named Nicodemus (John 3:1) also came bringing 75 pounds of myrrh and aloes, and places them in the linen with the body of Jesus, according to Jewish burial customs (John 19:39-40). They rolled a large rock over the entrance of the tomb (Matthew 27:60). Then they returned home and rested, because at sunset began the Sabbath (Luke 23:54-56). Nicodemus (Greek: Νικόδημος) was a Pharisee and a member of the Sanhedrin, who, according to the Gospel of John, showed favour to Jesus. ... 100g of Myrrh. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ...


On the third day, Sunday, which is now known as Easter Sunday, Jesus rose from the dead. This article is about the Christian festival. ...


Names in different languages

The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Dutch is a West Germanic, Low German language spoken worldwide by around 21 million people. ... The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... French (le français, la langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Italian is a Romance language spoken by about 70 million people, most of whom live in Italy. ... Portuguese (português) is a Romance language predominantly spoken in Portugal, Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde, and East Timor. ... Tagalog (pronunciation: ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Catalan (Català, Valencià) is a Romance language spoken by as many as approximately 12 million people in portions of Spain, France, Andorra and Italy, although the majority of Catalan speakers are in Spain. ... Vietnamese (tiếng Việt, tiếng Việt Nam, or Việt ngữ), a tonal language, is the national and official language of Vietnam (Việt Nam). ... The Japanese language is a spoken and written language used mainly in Japan. ... Bulgarian is an Indo-European language, a member of the South branch of the Slavic languages, along with Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, and Slovenian. ... The Czech language is one of the West Slavic languages, along with Slovak, Polish, Pomeranian, and Sorbian. ... The Greek language (Greek Ελληνικά, IPA // – Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of some 3,000 years. ... The Hungarian language is a Finno-Ugric language spoken in Hungary and in adjacent areas of Romania, Slovakia, Ukraine, Serbia, Croatia, Austria, Slovenia (all territories lost after World War I). ... Lithuanian is the official language of Lithuania, spoken by about 4 million native Lithuanians. ... Polish (polski, język polski) is the official language of Poland. ... Romanian (limba română ) is an Eastern Romance language, spoken by about 28 million people, most of them in Romania, Moldova (where it is the official language) and nearby countries. ... Serbo-Croatian or Croato-Serbian (sometimes just Croatian or Serbian) (srpskohrvatski, cрпскохрватски, hrvatskosrpski, hrvatski ili srpski or srpski ili hrvatski), earlier also Serbo-Croat, is a South Slavic language. ... Sinhalese or Sinhala (සිංහල, ISO 15919: , pronounced ], earlier referred to as Singhalese) is the mother tongue of the Sinhalese, the largest ethnic group of Sri Lanka. ... This article needs cleanup. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Russian (русский язык ) is the most widely spoken of the Slavic languages. ... Ukrainian is an East Slavic language, one of three members of this language group, the other two being Russian and Belarusian. ... Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngwén) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: Hànyǔ, Huáyǔ, or Zhōngwén) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... The Geez language (or Giiz language) is an ancient language that developed in the Ethiopian Highlands of the Horn of Africa as the language of the peasantry. ... Irish (Gaeilge), a Goidelic language spoken in Ireland, Britain, and the USA, is constitutionally recognised as the first official language of the Republic of Ireland. ... Danish is one of the Scandinavian languages, a sub-group of the Germanic group of the Indo-European language family. ... Finnish is spoken by the majority in Finland and by Ethnic Finns outside of Finland. ... Icelandic (íslenska) is a North Germanic language spoken in Iceland. ... Norwegian is a Germanic language spoken in Norway. ... Swedish (svenska) is a language spoken principally in Sweden, Finland (Finland-Swedish, Swedish: finlandssvenska), Åland and in the coastland of Estonia Swedish is classified as a member of the East section of the Scandinavian languages, a sub-group of the Germanic group of the Indo-European language family. ... Tagalog (pronunciation: ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ...

In the Roman Catholic Church

The Roman Catholic Church treats Good Friday as a fast day, which in the Latin Rite Church is understood as having only one full meal (but smaller than a regular meal) and two collations (a smaller repast, two of which together do not equal one full meal). In countries where Good Friday is not a day of rest from work, the afternoon liturgical service is usually put off until a few hours after the recommended time of 3 p.m. Fasting is primarily the act of willingly abstaining from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time. ... The Latin Rite is one of the 23 sui iuris particular Churches within the Catholic Church. ...

Crucifix prepared for veneration on Good Friday.
Crucifix prepared for veneration on Good Friday.

The Roman Rite has no celebration of Mass after that of the Lord's Supper on Holy Thursday evening until that of the Easter Vigil, and the only sacraments celebrated are Penance and Anointing of the Sick.[2] While there is no celebration of the Eucharist, Holy Communion is distributed to the faithful only in the Service of the Passion of the Lord, but can be taken at any hour to the sick who are unable to attend this service.[3] Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article, refers to the sui juris particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church that developed in the area of western Europe and northern Africa where Latin was for many centuries the language of education and culture. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... In the Christian calendar, Holy Thursday (also called Maundy Thursday) is the Thursday before Easter, the day on which the Last Supper is said to have occurred. ... The Easter Vigil, also called the Paschal Vigil or the Great Vigil of Easter, is a service held in many Christian churches as the first official celebration of the Resurrection of Jesus. ... In Roman Catholic teaching, the Sacrament of Penance (commonly called Confession, Reconciliation or Penance) is the method given by Christ to the Church by which individual men and women may be freed from sins committed after receiving Baptism. ...


The altar remains completely bare, without cross, candlesticks or altar cloths.[4] It is customary to empty the holy water fonts in preparation of the blessing of the water at the Easter Vigil.[5] Traditionally, no bells are rung on Good Friday or Holy Saturday until the Easter Vigil. The Easter Vigil, also called the Paschal Vigil or the Great Vigil of Easter, is a service held in many Christian churches as the first official celebration of the Resurrection of Jesus. ...


The Celebration of the Passion of the Lord takes place in the afternoon, ideally at three o'clock, but for pastoral reasons a later hour may be chosen.[6] The vestments used are red.[7] Before 1970, they were black except for the Communion part of the rite, for which violet was used,[8] and before 1955 black was used throughout.[9]If a bishop celebrates, he wears a plain mitre.[10]


The liturgy consists of three parts: the Liturgy of the Word, the Veneration of the Cross, and Holy Communion.


The first part, the Liturgy of the Word, consists of the reading or chanting of Isaiah 52:13-53:12, Hebrews 4:14-16, 5:7-9, and the Passion account from the Gospel of John, which is often divided between more than one singer or reader. This part concludes with a series of prayers: for the Church, the Pope, the clergy and laity of the Church, those preparing for baptism, the unity of Christians, the Jewish people, those who do not believe in Christ, those who do not believe in God, those in public office, those in special need.[11] The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ...


The second part of the Good Friday liturgy is the Veneration of the Cross: a crucifix, not necessarily the one that is normally on or near the altar at other times, is solemnly displayed to the congregation and then venerated by them, individually if possible, while special chants are sung.[12] The Crucifix, a cross with corpus, a symbol used in Catholicism in contrast with some other Christian communions, which use only a cross. ...

Communion from the Reserved Sacrament on Good Friday (Our Lady of Lourdes, Philadelphia).
Communion from the Reserved Sacrament on Good Friday (Our Lady of Lourdes, Philadelphia).

The third and last part is Holy Communion according to a rite based on that of the final part of Mass, from the Our Father on. The Eucharist, consecrated at the Mass of Holy Thursday is distributed at this service.[13] Before the reform of Pope Pius XII, only the priest received Communion in the framework of what was called the "Mass of the Presanctified", which included the usual Offertory prayers, with the placing of wine in the chalice, but which omitted the Canon of the Mass.[14] In Christian practice, the Bread and Wine of the Communion constitute the sacrament of the altar. ... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... In the Christian calendar, Holy Thursday (also called Maundy Thursday) is the Thursday before Easter, the day on which the Last Supper is said to have occurred. ... Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... This article incorporates text from the public domain Catholic Encyclopedia Canon of the Mass (Canon Missæ, Canon Actionis) is the name used in the Roman Missal of the Tridentine period for the part of the Mass that began after the Sanctus with the words Te igitur. ...


Priest and people then depart in silence, and the altar cloth is removed, leaving the altar bare except for the cross and two or four candlesticks.[15]

The Way of the Cross, celebrated at the Colloseum in Rome on Good Friday.
The Way of the Cross, celebrated at the Colloseum in Rome on Good Friday.

In addition to the prescribed liturgical service, the Stations of the Cross are often prayed either in the church or outside, and a prayer service may be held from midday to 3.00 p.m., known as the Three Hours' Agony. In countries such as Malta, Italy, Philippines and Spain, processions with statues representing the Passion of Christ are held. The Stations of the Cross (or Way of the Cross; in Latin, Via Crucis or Via Dolorosa) refers to the depiction of the final days (or Passion) of Jesus, and the Roman Catholic and Anglican devotion commemorating the Passion. ... The Colosseum in Rome, Italy The Colosseum, originally known as the Flavian Amphitheater (lat. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... A liturgy is the customary public worship of a religious group, according to their particular traditions. ... The 12th Station of the Cross - Jesus dies on the Cross. ... The Three Hours Agony or Tre Ore is a service held in some Roman Catholic churches on Good Friday from noon till 3 oclock to commemorate the Passion of Christ. ...


In Polish churches, a tableau of Christ's Tomb is unveiled in the sanctuary. Many of the faithful spend long hours into the night grieving at the Tomb, where it is customary to kiss the wounds on the Lord's body. A life-size figure of Christ lying in his tomb is widely visited by the faithful, especially on Holy Saturday. The tableaux may include flowers, candles, figures of angels standing watch, and the three crosses atop Mt Calvary, and much more. Each parish strives to come up with the most artistically and religiously evocative arrangement in which the Blessed Sacrament, draped in a filmy veil, is prominently displayed.


Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ

El Greco's Jesus Carrying the Cross, 1580.
El Greco's Jesus Carrying the Cross, 1580.

The Roman Catholic tradition includes specific prayers and devotions as acts of reparation for the sufferings and insults that Jesus suffered during His Passion on Good Friday. These Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ do not involve a petition for a living or deceased beneficiary, but aim to repair the sins against Jesus. Some such prayers are provided in the Raccolta Catholic prayer book (approved by a Decree of 1854, and published by the Holy See in 1898) which also includes prayers as Acts of Reparation to the Virgin Mary.[16][17][18][19] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (951x1300, 166 KB) Christ Carrying the Cross as portrayed by EL GRECO - Domenikos Theotokopoulos 1580 Uploaded to en. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (951x1300, 166 KB) Christ Carrying the Cross as portrayed by EL GRECO - Domenikos Theotokopoulos 1580 Uploaded to en. ... For the Vangelis album, see El Greco (album). ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Raccolta is the first collection of work from Vivaldi. ...


In his encyclical Miserentissimus Redemptor on reparations, Pope Pius XI called Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ a duty for Catholics and refered to them as "some sort of compensation to be rendered for the injury" with respect to the sufferings of Jesus.[20] Pope Pius XI (Latin: ; Italian: Pio XI; May 31, 1857 – February 10, 1939), born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti, reigned as Pope from February 6, 1922 and as sovereign of Vatican City from 1929 until his death on February 10, 1939. ...


Pope John Paul II referred to Acts of Reparation as the "unceasing effort to stand beside the endless crosses on which the Son of God continues to be crucified".[21] Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of...


An example: Malta

The statue of Our Lady of Sorrows (or La Pietà) used during the Good Friday procession, Żejtun, Malta

The Holy Week commemorations reach their peak on Good Friday as the Roman Catholic Church celebrates the passion of Jesus. Solemn celebrations take place in all churches together with processions in different villages around Malta and Gozo. During the celebration, the narrative of the passion is read in some localities. The Adoration of the Cross follows. Good Friday processions take place in Birgu, Bormla, Ghaxaq, Luqa, Mosta, Naxxar, Paola, Qormi, Rabat, Senglea, Valletta, Żebbuġ (Città Rohan) and Żejtun. Processions in Gozo will be in Nadur, Victoria (St. George and Cathedral), Xaghra and Żebbuġ, Gozo. Image File history File links Statuegoodfriday. ... Image File history File links Statuegoodfriday. ... Chapel of St. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Gozo (Maltese: Għawdex) is an island of the Maltese archipelago in the Mediterranean Sea, the island is part of the Southern European country Malta and is the second largest after the island of Malta itself within the archipelago. ... For the early state in Chad, see Birgu Kingdom. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Għaxaq is a village in the south of Malta. ... Luqa or Ħal Luqa (meaning poplar in Aramaic) is a village located in the south east of Malta (Europe). ... Mosta (or Il-Mosta) is a town situated in the middle of the island of Malta, to the north-west of Valletta. ... Naxxar (or In-Naxxar) is a village in the central north of Malta, with a population of about 11,947 people (Nov 2005). ... // Paola, (or old name Casal Paula), is a town in the south of Malta, with a population of 8,856 people (Nov 2005). ... The arch of Grandmaster Emanoel Pinto de Fonseca. ... Mausoleum of Mohammed V through mosque ruins NASA image of Rabat Rabat (Arabic الرباط, transliterated ar-Rabāṭ or ar-Ribāṭ), population 1. ... Senglea is a fortified city in the east of Malta, mainly in the Grand Harbour area. ... Valletta (Maltese: , commonly referred to as Il-Belt - The City) is the capital city of Malta. ... See also: Å»ebbuÄ¡, Gozo for the small village on the island of Gozo. ... Chapel of St. ... Aerial view of Nadur Nadur (or In-Nadur) is a village on Gozo Island, Malta. ... Victoria (also called Rabat) is the capital of Gozo, an island of the Maltese archipelago in the Mediterranean Sea. ... Ix-Xagħra (pronounced shara in Maltese) is a village on the island of Gozo (Malta). ... The small town of Iż-Å»ebbuÄ¡ is on the island of Gozo in Malta. ...


The following site is about Good Friday Celebration in Valletta, The Capital City of Malta. [22]


An example: The Philippines

In the predominantly Roman Catholic Philippines, the day is commemorated with street processions, the Way of the Cross, and a Passion play called the Senakulo. The Church keeps the day solemn by not tolling the church bells, and no Mass will be celebrated. In some communities (most famously in San Fernando, Pampanga), the processions include devotees who self-flagellate and sometimes even have themselves nailed to crosses as expressions of penance despite health issues and disapproval from the church.[23] After three o'clock in the afternoon of Good Friday (the time at which Jesus is traditionally believed to have died), noise is discouraged, some radio stations and television stations sign off, businesses automatically close, and the faithful are urged to keep a very solemn and prayerful disposition through to Easter Sunday. The Stations of the Cross (or Way of the Cross; in Latin, Via Crucis or Via Dolorosa) refers to the depiction of the final days (or Passion) of Jesus, and the Roman Catholic and Anglican devotion commemorating the Passion. ... A Passion play is a dramatic presentation depicting the suffering and death of Jesus. ... San Fernando (Spanish for Saint Ferdinand) may refer to: Argentina San Fernando, Buenos Aires, city of the Greater Buenos Aires. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Province of Pampanga Region: Central Luzon (Region III) Capital: City of San Fernando Founded: December 11, 1571 Population: 2000 census—1,882,730 (10th largest) Density—863 per km² (4th highest) Area: 2,180. ... For other uses, see Radio (disambiguation). ... TV redirects here. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ...


Major television networks are paid to broadcast events at Roman Catholic parishes. These events include the reading of the Seven Last Words, the recitation of the Stations of the Cross, and the service of the Commemoration of the Lord's Passion. TV redirects here. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The 12th Station of the Cross - Jesus dies on the Cross. ...


Churches of Byzantine tradition

Icon of the Crucifixion, 16th century, by Theophanes the Cretan (Stavronikita Monastery, Mount Athos).
Icon of the Crucifixion, 16th century, by Theophanes the Cretan (Stavronikita Monastery, Mount Athos).

Because of the penitence and sorrow associated with the Crucifixion, the Divine Liturgy is never celebrated on Good Friday, which Byzantine Christians (Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholics) call "Holy and Great Friday", except when this day coincides with the feast of the Annunciation (which falls on the fixed date of March 25). Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lamentation from Stavronikita monastery, Mount Athos. ... Stavronikita monastery, South-East view Stavronikita monastery (Greek: Μονή Σταυρονικήτα) is an orthodox christian monastery at the monastic state of Mount Athos in Greece, dedicated to St. ... Capital Karyes Official languages Koine Greek, Church Slavonic, Modern Greek, Russian, Serbian, Georgian, Bulgarian, Romanian (both liturgical and civil use), Modern Greek (civil use) Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 390 km²  150 sq mi  Population  -   estimate 2,250  Demonyms: Athonite, Hagiorite (English); Αθωνίτης, Αγιορίτης (Greek). ... The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the Eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... The Greek Catholic Church is a Catholic Church of the Eastern Rite. ... For other uses, see Annunciation (disambiguation). ...


The faithful revisit the events of the day through public reading of the Psalms and Gospels, and singing hymns about Christ's death. Rich visual imagery and symbolism as well as stirring hymnody are remarkable elements of these observances. In the Orthodox understanding, the events of Holy Week are not simply an annual commemoration of past events, but the faithful actually participate in the death and resurrection of Jesus. Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... For other uses, see Hymn (disambiguation). ... For the 1958 novel of the same name by Louis Aragon, see La Semaine Sainte. ...

Each hour of this day is the new suffering and the new effort of the expiatory suffering of the Savior. And the echo of this suffering is already heard in every word of our worship service - unique and incomparable both in the power of tenderness and feeling and in the depth of the boundless compassion for the suffering of the Savior. The Holy Church opens before the eyes of believers a full picture of the redeeming suffering of the Lord beginning with the bloody sweat in the Garden of Gethsemane up to the crucifixion on Golgotha. Taking us back through the past centuries in thought, the Holy Church brings us to the foot of the cross of Christ erected on Golgotha, and makes us present among the quivering spectators of all the torture of the Savior.[24]

Holy and Great Friday is observed as a strict fast, and adult Byzantine Christians are expected to abstain from all food and drink the entire day to the extent that their health permits. "On this Holy day neither a meal is offered nor do we eat on this day of the crucifixion. If someone is unable or has become very old [or is] unable to fast, he may be given bread and water after sunset. In this way we come to the holy commandment of the Holy Apostles not to eat on Great Friday."[24] Look up Fast, FAST in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Matins of Holy and Great Friday

The Byzantine Christian observance of Holy and Great Friday, which is formally known as The Order of Holy and Saving Passion of our Lord Jesus Christ, begins on Thursday night with the Matins of the Twelve Passion Gospels. Scattered throughout this Matins service are twelve readings from all four of the Gospels which recount the events of the Passion from the Last Supper through the Crucifixion the burial of Jesus. The first of these twelve readings John 13:31-18:1 is the longest Gospel reading of the year. Just before the sixth Gospel reading, which recounts Jesus being nailed to the cross, a large cross is carried out of the sanctuary by the priest, accompanied by incense and candles, and is placed in the center of the nave (where the congregation gathers), with a two-dimensional painted icon of the body of Christ (soma or corpus) affixed to it. As the cross is being carried, the priest or a chanter chants a special antiphon: For the Anglican service of Mattins see Morning Prayer Matins is the early morning prayer service in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox liturgies of the canonical hours. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... For the painting by Leonardo da Vinci, see The Last Supper (Leonardo). ... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... A reliquary in the form of an ornate Christian Cross Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope... This article is about religious workers. ... Incense is composed of aromatic organic materials. ... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A cantor is a musician working in a church with responsibilities for the singing in the church. ... This article is about the musical term. ...

Today He who hung the earth upon the waters is hung upon the Cross (three times).
He who is King of the angels is arrayed in a crown of thorns.
He who wraps the heaven in clouds is wrapped in the purple of mockery.
He who in Jordan set Adam free receives blows upon His face.
The Bridegroom of the Church is transfixed with nails.
The Son of the Virgin is pierced with a spear.
We venerate Thy Passion, O Christ (three times).
Show us also Thy glorious Resurrection.[25]

During the service, all come forward to kiss the feet of Christ on the cross. After the Canon, a brief, moving hymn, The Wise Thief is chanted by singers who stand at the foot of the cross in the center of the nave. The service does not end with the First Hour, as usual, but with a special dismissal by the priest. A canon is a structured hymn used in a number of Eastern Orthodox services. ...


Royal Hours

The next day, in the forenoon on Friday, all gather again to pray the Royal Hours, a special expanded celebration of the Little Hours (including the First Hour, Third Hour, Sixth Hour, Ninth Hour and Typica) with the addition of scripture readings (Old Testament, Epistle and Gospel) and hymns about the Crucifixion at each of the Hours (some of the material from the previous night is repeated). This service is somewhat more festive in character, and derives its name of "Royal" from both the fact that the Hours are served with more solemnity than normal, commemorating Christ the King who humbled himself for the salvation of mankind, and also from the fact that this service was in the past attended by the Emperor and his court. The Royal Hours are a particularly solemn celebration of the Little Hours in the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches. ... The Little Hours are the fixed daytime hours of prayer in the Liturgy of the Hours of the Roman Catholic Church. ... None, or the Ninth Hour, is a fixed time of prayer of the Divine Office of almost all the traditional Christian liturgies. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church has the belief that all Orthodox regardless of jurisdiction are united in the One, Holy, and Universal Church. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... An epistle (Greek επιστολη, epistolÄ“, letter) is a writing directed or sent to a person or group of persons, usually a letter and a very formal, often didactic and elegant one. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ...


Vespers of Holy and Great Friday

The epitaphios ("winding sheet"), depicting the preparation of the body of Jesus for burial.
The epitaphios ("winding sheet"), depicting the preparation of the body of Jesus for burial.

In the afternoon, around the 3 p.m. all gather for the Vespers of the Taking-Down from the Cross, commemorating the Deposition from the Cross. The Gospel reading is a concatenation taken from all four of the Gospels. During the service, the body of Christ (the soma) is removed from the cross, as the words in the Gospel reading mention Joseph of Arimathea, wrapped in a linen shroud, and taken to the altar in the sanctuary. Near the end of the service an epitaphios or "winding sheet" (a cloth embroidered with the image of Christ prepared for burial) is carried in procession to a low table in the nave which represents the Tomb of Christ; it is often decorated with an abundance of flowers. The epitaphios itself represents the body of Jesus wrapped in a burial shroud, and is a roughly full-size cloth icon of the body of Christ. Then the priest may deliver a homily and everyone comes forward to venerate the epitaphios. In the Slavic practice, at the end of Vespers, Compline is immediately served, featuring a special Canon of the Crucifixion of our Lord and the Lamentation of the Most Holy Theotokos by Symeon the Logothete. The Epitaphios (Greek: Επιτάφιος, epitaphios, or Επιτάφιον, epitaphion; Slavonic: Плащаница, plashchanitsa) is a large cloth icon, embroidered and often richly adorned, which is used during the services of Great Friday and Holy Saturday in the Eastern Orthodox Churches and those Eastern Catholic Churches which follow the Byzantine rite. ... This article is about the string operation of computer programming. ... Joseph of Arimathea by Pietro Perugino. ... Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Epitaphios (Greek: Επιτάφιος, epitaphios, or Επιτάφιον, epitaphion; Slavonic: Плащаница, plashchanitsa) is a large cloth icon, embroidered and often richly adorned, which is used during the services of Great Friday and Holy Saturday in the Eastern Orthodox Churches and those Eastern Catholic Churches which follow the Byzantine rite. ... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, called Church of the Resurrection (Anastasis) by Eastern Christians, is a Christian church now within the walled Old City of Jerusalem. ... In the Roman Catholic Church and in the Eastern Orthodox Church, a homily is usually given during Mass (or Divine Liturgy for Orthodox) at the end of the Liturgy of the Word. ... Slavic and Slavonic are used interchangably in English, with the former perferred in US English, and the latter in English. ... Compline or Complin is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian tradition of canonical hours. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ...


Matins of Holy and Great Saturday

The Epitaphios being carried in procession.
The Epitaphios being carried in procession.

On Friday night, the Matins of Holy and Great Saturday, a unique service known as the The Lamentation at the Tomb (O Epitaphios Threnos) is celebrated. This service is also sometimes called Jerusalem Matins. Much of the service takes place around the tomb of Christ in the center of the nave. A unique feature of the service is the chanting of the Lamentations or Praises (Engkomia), which consist of verses chanted by the clergy interspersed between the verses of Psalm 119 (which is, by far, the longest psalm in the Bible). At the end of the Great Doxology, while the Trisagion is sung, the epitaphios is taken in procession around the outside the church, and is then returned to the tomb. Some churches observe the practice of holding the epitaphios at the door, above waist level, so the faithful most bow down under it as they come back into the church, symbolizing their entering into the death and resurrection of Christ. Psalm 119 is the longest psalm as well as the longest chapter in the Bible. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... The Great Doxology is an ancient hymn of praise to the Trinity which is chanted or read daily in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic Churches. ... The Trisagion (Thrice Holy) is a standard hymn of the Divine Liturgy in most of the Eastern Orthodox Churches, Oriental Orthodox Churches and Eastern Catholic Churches. ... It has been suggested that Krestny khod be merged into this article or section. ...


The Troparion (hymn of the day) of Good Friday is: Troparion (also tropar, plural: troparia) in Byzantine music and in the religious music of Eastern Orthodoxy is a short hymn of one stanza, or one of a series of stanzas (this may carry the further connotation of a hymn interpolated between psalm verses). ...

The noble Joseph, when he had taken down Thy most pure Body from the tree, wrapped it in fine linen, and anointed it with spices, and placed it in a new tomb.
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, both now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.
The angel came to the myrrh-bearing women at the tomb and said:
Myrrh is fitting for the dead, but Christ has shown Himself a stranger to corruption. Joseph of Arimathea by Pietro Perugino. ... The Tree of Life as represented in Kabbalah, containing the Sephiroth. ... In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... Eastern Orthodox icon of Mary Magdalene as a Myrrhbearer The term Myrrhbearers (Greek: Μυροθόραε, Myrophorae; Slavonic: Святых Жен Мироносиц) refers to the women who came to the tomb of Christ early in the morning and were the first witnesses of the Resurrection of Jesus. ... 100g of Myrrh. ...

Anglican Communion

The 1662 Book of Common Prayer did not specify a particular rite to be observed on Good Friday but local custom came to mandate an assortment of services, including the Seven Last Words from the Cross and a three-hour service consisting of Matins, Ante-communion (using the Reserved Sacrament in high church parishes) and Evensong. In recent times revised editions of the Prayer Book and Alternative Service Book have re-introduced pre-Reformation forms of observance of Good Friday corresponding to those in today's Roman Catholic Church, with special nods to the rites that had been observed in the Church of England prior to the Henrican, Edwardian and Elizabethan reforms, including Creeping to the Cross. For the novel, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... The seven sayings of Jesus on the cross are a traditional collection of seven short phrases uttered by Jesus at his crucifixion immediately before he died, gathered from the four Gospels. ... For the Anglican service of Mattins see Morning Prayer Matins is the early morning prayer service in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox liturgies of the canonical hours. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... In Christian practice, the Bread and Wine of the Communion constitute the sacrament of the altar. ... High Church relates to ecclesiology and liturgy in Christian theology and practice. ... Evening Prayer according to the Book of Common Prayer is a liturgy used in the Church of England in the late afternoon or evening. ... For the novel, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... The Alternative Service book 1980 was the first complete prayer book produced by the Church of England since 1662. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... This box:      King Henry VIII of England. ...


Other Protestant Traditions

Many Protestant communities hold special services on this day as well. In the German Lutheran tradition from the 16th to the 20th century, this was the most important holiday, and abstention from all worldly works was expected. Lutheranism had no restrictions on the celebration of Holy Communion on Good Friday; on the contrary, it was a prime day on which to receive Holy Communion, and services were often accentuated by special music such as the St. Matthew Passion by Lutheran Johann Sebastian Bach. Mid-20th century Lutheran liturgical practice moved away from Holy Communion celebrated on Good Friday, and among the major North American Lutheran bodies today, Holy Communion is not celebrated on Good Friday, but rather on Maundy Thursday. Moravians hold a Lovefeast on Good Friday as they receive Holy Communion on Maundy Thursday. The Methodist Church also commemorates Good Friday with a service of worship, often based on the Seven Last Words from the Cross.[26][27] Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ... Bachs St. ... “Bach” redirects here. ... The Last Supper - museum copy of Master Pauls sculpture, from the main altar in St. ... The Moravian Seal, as rendered by North Carolina artist Marie Nifong. ... A Lovefeast service is a service dedicated to Christian love, and is most famously practiced by, but not limited to, the Moravians. ... The Last Supper - museum copy of Master Pauls sculpture, from the main altar in St. ... The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination, and the second-largest Protestant one, in the United States. ... In the protestant denominations of Christianity, a service of worship is a meeting whose primary purpose is the worship of God. ... The seven sayings of Jesus on the cross are a traditional collection of seven short phrases uttered by Jesus at his crucifixion immediately before he died, gathered from the four Gospels. ...


Some Baptist, many Sabbatarian and non-denominational churches do not celebrate Good Friday, instead observing the Crucifixion on Wednesday to coincide with the Jewish sacrifice of the Passover Lamb (which Christians believe is an Old Testament pointer to Jesus Christ). A Wednesday Crucifixion of Jesus Christ allows for Christ to be in the tomb (heart of the earth) for three days and three nights as he told the Pharisees he would be (Matthew 12:40), rather than two nights and a day if he died on Friday. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Etymology: Latin sabbatarius, from sabbatum sabbath Function: noun 1 : one who observes the Sabbath on Saturday in conformity with the letter of the fourth commandment 2 : an adherent of Sabbatarianism Function: adjective 1 : of or relating to the Sabbath 2 : of or relating to the Sabbatarians or Sabbatarianism External links... In Christianity, the term non-denominational refers to those churches which have not formally aligned themselves with an established denomination, or remain otherwise officially autonomous. ... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Jewish holiday. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ...


Customs associated with Good Friday

In many countries with a strong Christian tradition such as Bermuda, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Mexico, the countries of the Caribbean, Germany, Malta, Australia, New Zealand[28][29][30] and the United Kingdom, the day is observed as a public or federal holiday. The term Anglophone Caribbean is used to refer to the independent English-speaking countries of the Caribbean region. ... This is the list of holidays by country. ...


In many English-speaking countries, most shops are closed for the day and advertising from television and radio is withdrawn to some degree. // Advert redirects here. ...


In Canada, banks and government offices (at all levels) and public sector businesses are closed, along with most private sector businesses (except in Quebec). This article is about the Canadian province. ...


In Hong Kong, all businesses and government offices are closed for a public holiday.


In the United States, Good Friday is not a government holiday. Private businesses and certain other institutions may close or not for Good Friday, according to their preferences. The stock market is closed on Good Friday. However, the vast majority of businesses are open on Good Friday. Some public schools may incidentally be closed on Good Friday because of the proximity of secular "spring break" holidays. The postal service operates, and banks regulated by the federal government do close for Good Friday.

Hot cross buns
Hot cross buns

Ireland, a predominantly Catholic country, prohibits all alcohol from being sold on Good Friday. The day is a bank holiday, but not a public holiday. All pubs and many restaurants in Ireland close for the duration of the day. It is similar to Christmas Day in this regard. This tradition has come under criticism of late, with secular businesses claiming a loss in earnings by way of a religious festival. Many people cross the border to Northern Ireland to shop or visit pubs or restaurants. Hot cross buns. ... Hot cross buns. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...


In Germany, comedic theater performances and events which include public dancing are illegal on the day (although this restriction is enforced unevenly); cinemas and television are not affected, although many TV channels show religious material on the day. The enforcement of these rules even on non-Christians has met with increased opposition in the last decade.


In South Africa, the government regulates the opening of businesses and entertainment outlets on this day (as with Christmas Day). All government offices, schools and certain businesses are closed on Good Friday by law. The buying and selling of alcohol is prohibited.


In India, Good Friday is a Central Government as well as a State holiday, although Stock Markets are usually closed. Some other businesses are also closed in states where Christians are in the majority like Assam, Goa, and Kerala (higher percentage of Christians, even though not the majority) but the majority of businesses are open on Good Friday in rest of the country. Most schools are closed on Good Friday. , Assam (  ) (Assamese: অসম Ôxôm) is a north eastern state of India with its capital at Dispur, a suburb of the city Guwahati. ... For other uses, see Goa (disambiguation). ... , Kerala ( ; Malayalam: കേരളം; ) is a state on the Malabar Coast of southwestern India. ...


In Muslim-majority Indonesia, Good Friday is a national holiday. All government offices, schools and certain businesses are closed on Good Friday by law and many newspapers choose not to publish on this day. Public holiday is also observed in Singapore and in the Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... For other uses, see Sabah (disambiguation). ... For the river, see Sarawak River. ...


Eastern Orthodox Christians are not supposed to eat at all on this day and the next, while the Roman Catholic Church observes fasting and abstinence for this day as well as Ash Wednesday. Fasting is primarily the act of willingly abstaining from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time. ... This article is about the practice of abstinence in general. ... In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ...


In many English speaking countries, hot cross buns are eaten. Hot cross buns Czech hot cross buns called mazanec A hot cross bun is a type of sweet spiced bun made with currants and leavened with yeast. ...


In Bermuda, kites are flown. They are often handmade with wooden sticks, colorful tissue paper, glue, and string. The shape of the kite and the use of wood is meant to symbolize the cross that Jesus died on. Also, the kite flying in the sky symbolizes his ascension to heaven. A kite is a man-made, heavier-than-air object, designed to fly by opposing the force of the wind with the tension of a string held by the operator. ... A reliquary in the form of an ornate Christian Cross Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Also refers to the process of gaining Enlightenment and several meditation techniques. ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ...


Traditionally, Roman Catholics are to abstain from eating meat every Friday of the year as penance. Nowadays, this is only a requirement during Fridays of Lent; during Fridays of the rest of the year, other methods of penance may be followed, for example an extra prayer. As a modern tradition, many Roman Catholics (and members of other Christian denominations as well) will eat fish and vegetables on Good Friday. For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Vegetables on a market Vegetable is a nutritional and culinary term denoting any part of a plant that is commonly consumed by humans as food, but is not regarded as a culinary fruit, nut, herb, spice, or grain. ...


There is no horse racing on Good Friday in the UK. However, in 2008, betting shops will open for the first time. The BBC has for many years introduced its 7 am News broadcast on Radio 4 on Good Friday with a verse from Isaac Watts' hymn "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross". For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Isaac Watts (July 17, 1674 – November 25, 1748) is recognised as the Father of English Hymnody, as he was the first prolific and popular English hymnwriter, credited with some 750 hymns. ... The hymn, When I Survey the Wondrous Cross, was written by Isaac Watts, and published in Hymns and Spiritual Songs in 1707. ...


In Sweden, Good Friday - as well as Easter Monday - is a national holiday. Some shops are open a few hours in the morning. People not particularly religious use Good Friday as a day of meeting relatives. The biggest community, Church of Sweden, does not celebrate Mass and therefore no Eucharist is distributed. Linked below is an English description of the Good Friday service. [31] Bishop Lennart Koskinen with some young people. ...


In Louisiana, the Cajuns have a tradition to not dig in the dirt on Good Friday.[citation needed] This article is about the U.S. State. ... Cajuns are an ethnic group consisting essentially of the descendants of Acadians who came from Nova Scotia to Louisiana as a result of their refusal to swear allegiance to the British Crown. ...


Calculating the Date of Good Friday

Good Friday is the Friday before Easter, which is calculated differently in Eastern Christianity and Western Christianity (see Computus for details). Easter falls on the first Sunday following the Paschal Full Moon, the full moon on or after 21 March, taken to be the date of the vernal equinox. The Western calculation uses the Gregorian calendar, while the Eastern calculation uses the Julian calendar, whose 21 March now corresponds to the Gregorian calendar's 3 April. The calculations for identifying the date of the full moon also differ. See Easter Dating Method (Astronomical Society of South Australia). This article is about the Christian festival. ... Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which developed in Greece, Russia, Armenia, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, northeastern Africa and southern India over several centuries of religious antiquity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Western Christianity... Computus (Latin for computation) is the calculation of the date of Easter in the Christian calendar. ... The Paschal Full Moon roughly corresponds to the first full moon of Spring. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Equinox (disambiguation). ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... The Julian calendar was a reform of the Roman calendar which was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Matthew 27:45; Mark 15:13; Luke 23:44
  2. ^ Roman Missal: Good Friday, 1
  3. ^ Roman Missal: Good Friday, 2
  4. ^ Roman Missal, Good Friday, 3
  5. ^ Letter of the Congregation for Divine Worship, 14 March 2003
  6. ^ Roman Missal: Good Friday, 4
  7. ^ Roman Missal: Good Friday, 5
  8. ^ 1962 edition of the Roman Missal
  9. ^ 1920 typical edition of the Roman Missal
  10. ^ Caeremoniale Episcoporum, 315
  11. ^ Roman Missal: Good Friday, 7-13
  12. ^ Roman Missal: Good Friday, 14-21
  13. ^ Roman Missal: Good Friday, 22-31
  14. ^ 1920 typical edition of the Roman Missal
  15. ^ Roman Missal: Good Friday, 32-33
  16. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/12775a.htm
  17. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/12620a.htm
  18. ^ Joseph P. Christopher et al, 2003 The Raccolta St Athanasius Press ISBN 978-0970652669
  19. ^ Ann Ball, 2003 Encyclopedia of Catholic Devotions and Practices ISBN 087973910X
  20. ^ Miserentissimus Redemptor Encyclical of Pope Pius XI [http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/pius_xi/encyclicals/documents/hf_p-xi_enc_08051928_miserentissimus-redemptor_en.html
  21. ^ Vatican archives http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/letters/2000/documents/hf_jp-ii_let_20001021_riparatrici_en.html
  22. ^ [1]
  23. ^ Dozens ignore warnings to re-enact crucifixion. The Independent (2008-03-22). Retrieved on 2008-03-23.
  24. ^ a b Bulgakov, Sergei V. (1900), "Great Friday", Handbook for Church Servers, 2nd ed., Kharkov: Tr. Archpriest Eugene D. Tarris, pp. 543, <http://www.transfigcathedral.org/faith/Bulgakov/0543.pdf>. Retrieved on 25 October 2007
  25. ^ Archimandrite Kallistos (Ware) and Mother Mary (2002), "Service of the Twelve Gospels", The Lenten Triodion, South Cannan, PA: St. Tikhon's Seminary Press, pp. 587
  26. ^ Christians mark Good Friday. The Daily Reflector. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  27. ^ Good Friday. United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  28. ^ Holidays Act 2003 (New Zealand), Section 17 Days that are public holidays
  29. ^ Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal Act 1990 (New Zealand), Section 3 Shops to be closed on Anzac Day morning, Good Friday, Easter Sunday, and Christmas Day
  30. ^ Broadcasting Act 1989 (New Zealand), Section 79A Hours during which election programmes prohibited, Section 81 Advertising hours
  31. ^ GOOD FRIDAY SERVICE

Pope Pius XI (Latin: ; Italian: Pio XI; May 31, 1857 – February 10, 1939), born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti, reigned as Pope from February 6, 1922 and as sovereign of Vatican City from 1929 until his death on February 10, 1939. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

  • Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ
  • The Belfast Agreement, also known as the Good Friday Agreement
  • Easter/Good Friday controversy

The Good Friday Agreement (Irish: ), lesser known as the Belfast Agreement (Irish: ), and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement was a major political development in the Northern Ireland peace process. ... Easter/Good Friday controversy refers to modern controversy surrounding the public acknowledgement and celebration of Easter and Good Friday, especially in the United States. ...

Related Holy Days

Eastertide, or the Easter Season, begins on Easter Sunday and continues until Pentecost in the Christian liturgical calendar, thus spanning a total of seven weeks. ... Easter Monday is the day after Easter Sunday and is celebrated as a holiday in some largely Christian cultures, especially Roman Catholic cultures. ... Also refers to the process of gaining Enlightenment and several meditation techniques. ... … The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ...

External links

The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... The Catholic Encyclopedia is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by the Roman Catholic Church, designed to give authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. Starting in 1993, the encyclopedia (now in the public domain) was placed on the Internet through a world-wide... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... Christ - Coptic Art Coptic Orthodox Christianity is the indigenous form of Christianity that, according to tradition, the apostle Mark established in Egypt in the middle of the 1st century AD (approximately AD 60). ... Psilocybin (also known as psilocybine) is a psychedelic alkaloid of the tryptamine family, found in psilocybin mushrooms. ... For the 1958 novel of the same name by Louis Aragon, see La Semaine Sainte. ... For the book by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... In Christianity, Holy Wednesday is the Wednesday of Holy Week, the week before Easter. ... The Last Supper - museum copy of Master Pauls sculpture, from the main altar in St. ... Holy Saturday is the day before Easter in the Christian calendar. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Good Friday - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2047 words)
The Catholic Good Friday in the Roman Rite afternoon service involves a series of readings and meditations, as well as the (sung) reading of the Passion account from the Gospel of John which is often read dramatically, with the priest, one or more readers, and the congregation all taking part.
After three o'clock in the afternoon of Good Friday (the time at which Jesus is traditionally believed to have died), noise is discouraged, radio stations and television stations sign off, businesses automatically close, and the faithful are urged to keep a solemn and prayerful disposition through Easter Sunday.
Good Friday experiment, a test conducted on Good Friday, 1962, at Boston University's Marsh Chapel by Walter Pahnke on a number of divinity students, to determine the usefulness of psilocybin for facilitating mystical experience.
Good Friday - MSN Encarta (124 words)
The name “Good Friday” is generally believed to be a corruption of “God’s Friday”.
From the 16th century onward, the Good Friday service took place in the morning; in 1955 Pope Pius XII decreed that it be held in the afternoon or evening.
Good Friday is a legal holiday in many Christian countries.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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