FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Gong" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Gong

A gong is one of a wide variety of metal percussion instruments. The term is Malay-Javanese in origin but widespread throughout Asia. The instrument itself appears to have origins in the bronze drums of China, cymbals of central Asia, and perhaps even in European bell-casting techniques. “Percussion” redirects here. ... For the Japanese rock band, see Cymbals (band). ... A bell is a simple sound-making device. ...


Gongs are broadly of three types. Suspended gongs are more or less flat, circular disks of metal suspended vertically by means of a cord passed through holes near to the top rim. Bossed gongs have a raised center boss and are often suspended and played horizontally. Bowl gongs are bowl-shaped, and rest on cushions. Gongs are made mainly from bronze or brass but there are many other alloys in use. Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... “Brazen” redirects here. ... Cymbals are made from four main alloys, all of them copper-based. ...

A gong collection in a Gamelan ensemble of instruments - Indonesian Embassy Canberra
A gong collection in a Gamelan ensemble of instruments - Indonesian Embassy Canberra
An agung, a type of Philippine hanging gong used as part of the Kulintang ensemble
An agung, a type of Philippine hanging gong used as part of the Kulintang ensemble

Contents

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1067, 417 KB) Traditional instruments - the Indonesian Embassy in Australia File links The following pages link to this file: Gong Gamelan Music of Indonesia Wikipedia:Reference desk archive/Humanities/December 2005 ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1067, 417 KB) Traditional instruments - the Indonesian Embassy in Australia File links The following pages link to this file: Gong Gamelan Music of Indonesia Wikipedia:Reference desk archive/Humanities/December 2005 ... Gamelan - Indonesian Embassy in Canberra A gamelan is a kind of musical ensemble of Indonesian origin typically featuring a variety of instruments such as metallophones, xylophones, drums, and gongs; bamboo flutes, bowed and plucked strings, and vocalists may also be included. ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 839 KB) Summary Description: A pair of agungs used by the Maguindanao in the kulintang ensemble. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 839 KB) Summary Description: A pair of agungs used by the Maguindanao in the kulintang ensemble. ... The pair of gongs of the agung The Agungs are the largest gongs of the kulintang ensemble and represent the lowest pitch of all the instrumentation. ... Kulintang is a term for various musical instruments and musical genres which are indigenous to the South-East Asian islands presently known as Indonesia and the Philippines. ...

Types of gong

Suspended gongs are played with beaters and are of two main types: flat faced discs either with or without a turned edge, and gongs with a raised center boss. In general, the larger the gong, the larger and softer the beater. In Western symphonic music the flat faced gongs are generally referred to as tam-tams to distinguish them from their bossed counterparts, although the term "gong" is correct to use for either type.


Large flat gongs may be 'primed' by lightly hitting them before the main stroke, greatly enhancing the sound and causing the instrument "speak" sooner, with a shorter delay for the sound to "bloom". Keeping this priming stroke inaudible calls for a great deal of skill. The smallest suspended gongs are played with bamboo sticks, or even western-style drumsticks. Contemporary & avant-garde music, where different sounds are sought, will often use friction mallets (producing squeals & harmonics), bass bows (producing long tones and high overtones), and various striking implements (wood/plastic/metal) to produce the desired tones.

Pot gongs of the Kulintang
Pot gongs of the Kulintang

Western bossed gongs are available in tuned chromatic sets ranging from one, to four and a half octaves. These are used by various percussion ensembles, orchestras, and solo percussionists (Pierre Favre from Switzerland, Andrea Centazzo from Italy). Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 838 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) en: Description: The eight Philippine horizontally laid, knobbed gongs known as the kulintang used as a main melodic instrument in the kulintang ensemble. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 838 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) en: Description: The eight Philippine horizontally laid, knobbed gongs known as the kulintang used as a main melodic instrument in the kulintang ensemble. ... Kulintang is a term for various musical instruments and musical genres which are indigenous to the South-East Asian islands presently known as Indonesia and the Philippines. ...


Pot gongs are small (6"-13") heavy gongs with a raised center boss (also known as a cup, knob, or nipple) that are suspended on cords within a wooden stand or framework. There can be from 8-10 gongs in either one or two rows. They are commonly played with padded mallets (although wooden sticks may be used) on the boss, producing a fundamental pitch with little overtones. Bossed gong sets are tuned to various scales (pentatonic, 7 note, etc.) and are used as the melodic element in Gamelan music (Indonesia/Java), Kulintang (Philippines), or Piphat (Thailand).


Bowl gongs (also called cup gongs) are similar to Tibetan singing bowls and may be played in many different ways, not all of them strictly percussion. The rim may be rubbed with the finger, for example, or the gong may be struck with a beater. Bowl gongs are used in temple worship, especially in Vajrayana Buddhism. A new Nepalese singing bowl Rin gong at Kiyomizu-dera, Kyoto Singing bowls, also known as Himalayan bowls, cup gongs or (in Japan) rin gongs, are a musical instrument used in Buddhist meditation, dating back many centuries. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... A mandala used in Vajrayana Buddhist practices. ... A silhouette of a Buddha statue at Ayutthaya, Thailand. ...


Traditional suspended gongs

Chau gongs

The Familiar "Chinese" Gong (A 10" Chau Gong).

By far the most familiar to most Westerners is the chau gong or bullseye gong. Large chau gongs, called tam-tams (not to be confused with tom-tom drums), have become part of the symphony orchestra. Sometimes a chau gong is referred to as a Chinese gong, but in fact it is only one of many types of suspended gongs that are associated with China. Chau Gong This is an original photograph by Andrew Alder, taken on 4 September 2003. ... Chau Gong This is an original photograph by Andrew Alder, taken on 4 September 2003. ... A tom-tom (not to be confused with a tamtam) is a cylindrical drum with no snare. ... Orchestra at City Hall (Edmonton). ...


The chau gong is made of copper-based alloy, bronze or brass. It is almost flat except for the rim, which is turned up to make a shallow cylinder. On a 10" gong, for example, the rim extends about a half an inch perpendicular to the gong surface. The main surface is slightly concave when viewed from the direction to which the rim is turned. The centre spot and the rim of a chau gong are left coated on both sides with the black copper oxide that forms during the manufacture of the gong, the rest of the gong is polished to remove this coating. Chau gongs range in size from 7" to 80" in diameter.


The earliest Chau gong is from a tomb discovered at the Guixian site in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China. It dates from the early Western Han Dynasty.


Traditionally, chau gongs were used to clear the way for important officials and processions, much like a police siren today. Sometimes the number of strokes on the gong was used to indicate the seniority of the official. In this way, two officials meeting unexpectedly on the road would know before the meeting which of them should bow down before the other.


Uses of gongs in the symphony orchestra

Richard Wagner was one of the first composers to use the tam-tam in his works. Within a few decades the tam-tam became an important member of the percussion section of a modern symphony orchestra. Fine examples of its use are demonstrated in the symphonies of Gustav Mahler, Dmitri Shostakovich and, to a lesser extent, Sergei Rachmaninov. Karlheinz Stockhausen used a 60" Paiste tam-tam in his Momente. Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... “Mahler” redirects here. ... Dmitri Shostakovich   (Russian: , Dmitrij Dmitrievič Å ostakovič) (September 25 [O.S. September 12] 1906–August 9, 1975) was a Russian composer of the Soviet period. ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff, also Sergey Rachmaninov or Serge Rakhmaninov (Серге́й Васи́льевич Рахма́нинов), (April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist... Karlheinz Stockhausen (born August 22, 1928) is a German composer, and one of the most important and controversial composers of the 20th century. ... The Paiste logo A Paiste 2002 Sound Edge hihat. ... Momente is a work by the German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen, written between 1962 and 1969. ...


Nipple gongs

A very large nipple gong at a Buddhist temple in Roi Et, Isan, Thailand
A very large nipple gong at a Buddhist temple in Roi Et, Isan, Thailand

Nipple gongs have a raised boss or nipple in the centre, often made of a different metal to the rest of the gong. They have a clear resonant tone with less shimmer than other gongs, and two distinct sounds depending on whether they are struck on the boss or next to it. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 580 pixelsFull resolution (1256 × 910 pixel, file size: 435 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A very large Thai gong at a temple in Roi Et, Isan, Thailand. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 580 pixelsFull resolution (1256 × 910 pixel, file size: 435 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A very large Thai gong at a temple in Roi Et, Isan, Thailand. ... ... For other uses, see Isan (disambiguation). ...


Nipple gongs range in size from 6" to 14" or larger. Sets of smaller, tuned nipple gongs can be used to play a tune.


A Bau gong is a type of nipple gong used in Chinese temples for worship.


Opera gongs

An essential part of the orchestra for Chinese opera is a pair of gongs, the larger with a descending tone, the smaller with a rising tone. The larger gong is used to announce the entrance of major players, of men, and to identify points of drama and consequence. The smaller gong is used to announce the entry of lesser players, of women, and to identify points of humour. For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... Emperor Xuan-Zong of Tang (left) and his Consort Yang Yuhuan (right) portrayed in a Chinese Opera 19th century Chinese opera Chinese opera costumes Some athletic jump Chinese opera is a popular form of drama in China. ...


Opera gongs range in size from 7" to 12", with the larger of a pair one or two inches larger than the smaller.


Pasi gongs

A Pasi gong is a medium-size gong 12" to 15" in size, with a crashing sound. It is used traditionally to announce the start of a performance, play or magic. Construction varies, some having nipples and some not, so this type is more named for its function than for its structure or even its sound.


Pasi gongs without nipples have found favour with adventurous middle-of-the-road kit drummers. For the comic book character, see Drummer (comics). ...


Tiger gong

A tiger gong is a slightly descending or less commonly ascending gong, larger than an opera gong and with a less pronounced pitch shift. Most commonly 15" but available down to 8".


Shueng Kwong

A Sheng Kwong gong is a medium to large gong with a sharp staccato sound. In musical notation, the Italian word staccato (literally detached, plural staccatos or staccati) indicates that notes are sounded in a detached and distinctly separate manner, with silence making up the latter part of the time allocated to each note. ...


Wind gong

Wind gongs (also known as Feng or Lion Gongs) are flat bronze discs, with little fundamental pitch, heavy tuned overtones, and long sustain. They are most commonly made of B20 bronze, but can also be made of M63 brass or NS12 nickel-silver. Traditionally, a wind gong is played with a large soft mallet, which gives them a roaring crash to match their namesake. They are lathed on both sides and are medium to large in size, typically 15" to 22" but sizes from 7" to 40" are available. The 22" size is most popular due to its portability and large sound. They are commonly used by drum kit drummers in rock music.


Played with a nylon tip drumstick they sound a bit like the coil chimes in a mantle clock. Some have holes in the centre, but they are mounted like all suspended gongs by other holes near the rim. The smaller sizes (7"-12") have a more bell-like tone due to their thickness and small diameter.


Modern orchestral gongs

As well as the tam-tam, there are a number of new gong types that were created during the 20th century specifically for orchestral use.


Planet gongs

A series of 14 tuned gongs by Paiste, ranging in size from 24" to 38". They are tuned to the vibrational frequencies of the planets, sun, and moon, as determined by Swiss mathematician, Hans Cousto. Planet Gongs are used extensively in therapy, as the different notes/frequencies affect different areas of the body/mind (example: the 38" Earth Gong vibrates at a frequency of 136.10 Hz/C# and affects the Heart Chakra.) The Paiste logo A Paiste 2002 Sound Edge hihat. ...


Sound Creation gongs

A series of 10 theme gongs by Paiste, ranging in size from 11" to 60". These Gongs are designed to evoke various sounds/feelings/moods. Some are designed to be polar opposites, representing balance (Sun/Moon, Fire/Water, Peace/Fight), while 3 correspond to Chakras (head/chest/abdomen), and the Earth Gong (available in 4 sizes: 26/32/38/60") grounds the whole set. The Paiste logo A Paiste 2002 Sound Edge hihat. ...


Other uses

In older Javanese usage and in modern Balinese usage, gong is used to identify an ensemble of instruments. In contemporary central Javanese usage, the term gamelan is preferred and the term gong is reserved for the gong ageng, the largest instrument of the type, or for surrogate instruments such as the gong komodong or gong bumbu (blown gong) which fill the same musical function in ensembles lacking the large gong. In Balinese usage, gong refers to Gamelan Gong Kebyar. Java (Indonesian, Javanese, and Sundanese: Jawa) is an island of Indonesia, and the site of its capital city, Jakarta. ... This article is about the Indonesian island. ... Gamelan - Indonesian Embassy in Canberra A gamelan is a kind of musical ensemble of Indonesian origin typically featuring a variety of instruments such as metallophones, xylophones, drums, and gongs; bamboo flutes, bowed and plucked strings, and vocalists may also be included. ... Two gong rails; the two sets (on unconnected stands) are pélog and sléndro. ... Bumbu is a district in the capital city of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kinshasa. ... --84. ...


Another type of drum is the "slit gong" or slit drum. The people of Vanuatu in particular, cut a large log with 'totem' type carvings on the outer surface and hollow out the centre leaving only a slit down the front. This hollowed out log gives the deep resonance of drums when hit on the outside with sticks. Bass drum made from wood, rope, and cowskin A drum is a musical instrument in the percussion group that can be large, technically classified as a membranophone. ... Slit gong is a primitive type of drum. ... An example of a slit drum from the Philippines known as a kagul by the Maguindanaon people[1] slit drums are percussion instruments, usually made from bamboo, that have parallel slits in one side and one slit across the middle, not always at the center point. ...


Gongs - general

A gong (鑼 pinyin luo2; Malay language or Javanese language: gong-gong or tam-tam) is a percussion sonorous or musical instrument of Chinese origin and manufacture, made in the form of a broad thin disk with a deep rim, that has spread to Southeast Asia - a type of flat bell. Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Not to be confused with the Malayalam language, spoken in India. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ...


Gongs vary in diameter from about 20 to 40 in., and they are made of bronze containing a maximum of 22 parts of tin to 78 of copper; but in many cases the proportion of tin is considerably less. Such an alloy, when cast and allowed to cool slowly, is excessively brittle, but it can be tempered and annealed in a peculiar manner. If suddenly cooled from a cherry-red heat, the alloy becomes so soft that it can be hammered and worked on the lathe, and afterwards it may be hardened by re-heating and cooling it slowly. In these properties it will be observed, the alloy behaves in a manner exactly opposite to steel, and the Chinese avail themselves of the known peculiarities for preparing the thin sheets of which gongs are made. They cool their castings of bronze in water, and after hammering out the alloy in the soft state, harden the finished gongs by heating them to a cherry-red and allowing them to cool slowly. These properties of the alloy long remained a secret, said to have been first discovered in Europe by Jean Pierre Joseph d'Arcet at the beginning of the 19th century. Riche and Champion are said to have succeeded in producing tam-tams having all the qualities and timbre of the Chinese instruments. The composition of the alloy of bronze used for making gongs is stated to be as follows: Copper, 76.52; Tin, 22.43; Lead, 0.26; Zinc, 0.23; Iron, 0.81. The gong is beaten with a round, hard, leather-covered pad, fitted on a short stick or handle. It emits a peculiarly sonorous sound, its complex vibrations bursting into a wave-like succession of tones, sometimes shrill, sometimes deep. In China and Japan it is used in religious ceremonies, state processions, marriages and other festivals; and it is said that the Chinese can modify its tone variously by particular ways of striking the disk. Gongs may have been used on towers in place of place. Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... This article is about the metallic chemical element. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... An alloy is a homogeneous mixture of two or more elements, at least one of which is a metal, and where the resulting material has metallic properties. ... Tempering is a heat treatment technique for metals and alloys. ... For other uses, see Annealing. ... Conventional metalworking lathe In woodturning, metalworking, metal spinning, and glassworking, a lathe is a machine tool which spins a block of material so that when abrasive, cutting, or deformation tools are applied to the block, it can be shaped to produce an object which has rotational symmetry about an axis... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ...


The gong has been effectively used in the orchestra to intensify the impression of fear and horror in melodramatic scenes. The tam-tam was first introduced into a western orchestra by François Joseph Gossec in the funeral march composed at the death of Mirabeau in 1791. Gaspare Spontini used it in La Vestale (1807), in the finale of Act II, an impressive scene in which the high pontiff pronounces the anathema on the faithless vestal. It was also used in the funeral music played when the remains of Napoleon were brought back to France in 1840. Meyerbeer made use of the instrument in the scene of the resurrection of the three nuns in Robert le diable. Four tam-tams are now used at Bayreuth in Parsifal to reinforce the bell instruments, although there is no indication given in the score. The tam-tam has been treated from its ethnographical side by Franz Heger. In more modern music, the tam-tam has been used by composers such as Karlheinz Stockhausen in Mikrophonie I and by George Crumb. Crumb expanded the timbral range of the tam-tam by giving performance directions (in Makrokosmos III: Music For A Summer Evening) such as using a "well-rosined contrabass bow" to bow the tam-tam, producing an eerie harmonic sound, while Stockhausen exploited amplification (via hand-held microphones) of a wide range of scraping, tapping, rubbing, and beating techniques using unconventional implements (plastic dishes, egg timer, cardbord tubes, etc.). For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... François Joseph Gossec, by Antoine Vestier. ... Portrait of Mirabeau Honoré Gabriel Riqueti, Comte de Mirabeau, (often referred to simply as Mirabeau) (March 9, 1749 - April 2, 1791) was a French writer, popular orator and statesman. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Gaspare Spontini (14 November 1774 – 24 January 1851) was an Italian opera composer and conductor. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Giacomo Meyerbeer Giacomo Meyerbeer (September 5, 1791 - May 2, 1864) was a noted opera composer. ... The Bayreuth Festspielhaus (Bayreuth Festival Theatre) is an opera house built to the north of the town of Bayreuth in Germany, dedicated to the performance of Richard Wagners operas. ... Parsifal is an opera, or music drama, in three acts by Richard Wagner. ... Karlheinz Stockhausen (born August 22, 1928) is a German composer, and one of the most important and controversial composers of the 20th century. ... Mikrophonie is the title given by Karlheinz Stockhausen to two of his compositions, written in 1964 and 1965, in which “normally inaudible vibrations . ... George Crumb (born October 24, 1929) is an American composer of modern and avant garde music. ...


Signal gongs

Railcar mounted

The signal bell mounted on a tram, streetcar, cable car or light rail train is known as a gong. It is a bowl-shaped bell typically mounted on the front of the leading car. It is sounded to act as a warning in areas where whistles and horns are prohibited. The "Clang" of the trolley refers to the sound made by the warning gong. In the Tram controls, the gong is operated by a foot lever. A smaller gong with a bell pull is mounted by the rear door of these railcars. It operated by the conductor to notify the motorman that it is safe to proceed. This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 A streetcar is a railway vehicle designed to carry passengers on tracks, usually laid in city streets. ... Cable Car in San Francisco A San Francisco cable car Winding drums on the London and Blackwall cable-operated railway, 1840. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Some of the tram controls discussed in this article. ... A train Conductor // The Conductor is the railway employee charged with the management of a freight, passenger, or various other types of train, and is also the direct supervisor of the trains Train Crew (brakeman, flagman, ticket collector, assistant conductor, on board service personnel). ... A motorman is the person who operates an electrified trolley car, tram, light rail, or rapid transit train. ...


Rail crossing

A railroad crossing with a flashing traffic signal or wigwag will also typically have a warning bell, also known as a gong. The gong is struck by an electric-powered hammer to give motorists and pedestrians an audible warning of an oncoming train. Many railroad crossing gongs are now being replaced by electronic sounding devices that have no moving parts to fail. This article needs cleanup. ... Traffic lights will sometimes differ where there are several lanes of traffic. ... This article is about the wigwag railroad crossing signal. ...


Boxing (sport)

A bowl-shaped center mounted gong is standard equipment in a boxing ring and is known as a gong. It is struck with a hammer to signal the start and end of each round. An example is made by the Everlast boxing equipment company. [1] The expression "saved by the bell" refers to the gong sounding the end of a boxing round. The boxing ring is the space in which a boxing match occurs. ... Everlast is the product name of a boxing equipment manufacturer based in New York. ...


Theater

Electromechanical, electromagnetic or electronic devices producing sound of gong have been installed in Czech theaters to gather audience from lounge to auditorium before show begins or proceeds after interlude.[1] [2] [3]


Time Signal

German radio uses the gong sound to mark the exact time.[4]


Gongs in popular culture

Gongs have been used in upper class households as waking devices, or to summon domestic help.


A man hitting a gong twice starts all Rank films. This iconic figure is known as the "gongman." This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... One of the best known company trademarks in the world is the man-with-the-gong, also known as the Gongman. ...


The Moody Blues' landmark album Days of Future Passed opens with a crescendo roll on tam-tam, and closes with a single stroke which fades to silence. The Moody Blues are a British rock band originally from Birmingham, England. ... Alternate CD Cover Released in 1990 by Polydor as Deram 820 006-2. ...


Queen's classic song Bohemian Rhapsody ends with the sound of a massive tam-tam. Roger Taylor is known for having one of the biggest tam-tams in rock.[2] Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, singer Freddie Mercury and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... Bohemian Rhapsody is a song written by Freddie Mercury and originally recorded by the band Queen for their 1975 album A Night at the Opera. ...


A gong is played in the song What Is and What Should Never Be by Led Zeppellin. Led Zeppelin was a British rock band that was pivotal in the development of hard rock and heavy metal, becoming one of the most popular and influential bands of all time. ...


A gong is also played at the end of the song Dream On by Aerosmith. This article is about the band Aerosmith. ...


In The Addams Family television show, the sound of the gong (activated by a bell pull) would summon Lurch the family butler. Upon appearing, Lurch would utter his basso profundo catchphrase, "You Rang?" For the TV series, see The Addams Family (TV series). ... Lurch is the fictional manservant to The Addams Family created by cartoonist Charles Addams. ... Basso-profundo A basso-profundo is merely an exceptionally low bass. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ...


A gong was the titular feature on The Gong Show, a television variety show/game show spoof that was broadcast in the United States from 1976 until 1980. The gong was used to signal the failure of an act by the show's panel. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A variety show is a show with a variety of acts, often including music and comedy skits, especially on television. ... “Quiz show” redirects here. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


John Bonham used a gong in the piece Moby Dick by Led Zeppelin. John Henry Bonzo Bonham (May 31, 1948 – September 25, 1980) was an English drummer and member of the English rock band Led Zeppelin. ... For the bands 1969 self-titled debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ...


Roger Waters used a gong on stage with Pink Floyd in concerts from 1967-1973 on A Saucerful of Secrets and Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun. The latter was when the gong would burst into flames during live performances. George Roger Waters (born September 6, 1944) is an English rock musician; singer, guitarist, bassist, songwriter, and composer. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... A Saucerful of Secrets is a multi-part instrumental by the rock band Pink Floyd from an album of the same name, released in 1968. ... Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun is a song by British psychedelic rock band Pink Floyd, and is featured on their second album, A Saucerful of Secrets (1968). ...


An eerie gong sounds in WWE superstar The Undertaker's entrance music as well as in the older versions. For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ...


In the British military "gong" is slang for a medal.


List of Gongs

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 814 KB) en: Description: The four Philippine vertically hanged gongs known as the gandingan used as a secondary melodic instrument in the kulintang ensemble. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 814 KB) en: Description: The four Philippine vertically hanged gongs known as the gandingan used as a secondary melodic instrument in the kulintang ensemble. ... The four brass vertical hanging gongs of the Gandingan The gandingan is a set of four vertical bossed gongs and hung in ascending order from the lowest to highest pitch. ... The pair of gongs of the agung The Agungs are the largest gongs of the kulintang ensemble and represent the lowest pitch of all the instrumentation. ... The babendil The babendil is the single gong used in the kulintang ensemble usually handheld and struck with a flat stick of bamboo or rattan upon its rim to obtain sharp, distinct sounds. ... Bonang of Bali The bonang is an instrument used in the gamelan. ... The four brass vertical hanging gongs of the Gandingan The gandingan is a set of four vertical bossed gongs and hung in ascending order from the lowest to highest pitch. ... Two gong rails; the two sets (on unconnected stands) are pélog and sléndro. ... A kempul is an Indonesian musical instrument. ... The kempyang and ketuk (Javanese: kethuk) are two instruments in the gamelan, generally played by the same player, and sometimes played by the same player as the kenong. ... The kenong is one of the instruments used in the Indonesian gamelan. ... The khōng mōn is a gong-circle instrument which is associated with the Mon people of Southeast Asia. ... Kulintang is a term for various musical instruments and musical genres which are indigenous to the South-East Asian islands presently known as Indonesia and the Philippines. ... This article needs cleanup. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Rin gong at Kiyomizu-dera, Kyoto Singing bowls (also known as Tibetan Prayer Bowls, Himalayan bowls or rin gongs in Japan) are type of musical instrument classified as a standing bell. ...

References

  • Luobowan Han Dynasty Tombs in Guixian County (Guangxi Zuang A. R.), by the Museum of the Guangxi Zhuang Nationality (1988, Beijing)
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  1. ^ http://www.sfkpalantir.net/index.php?pid=175
  2. ^ http://webmagazin.cz/index.php?stype=all&id=148
  3. ^ http://rn.rumburk.cz/index.php?id_rubrika=77&page=cislo
  4. ^ http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gong

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links

  • Traditional Music of the Southern Philippines - An online textbook about Southern Philipino Kulintang Music with an extensive section devoted to the Philippine gongs: the kulintang, gandingan, agung and the babendil.
  • Handmade hammered Gongs from Nepal - Various plain and nipple gongs manufactured in Nepal with various decorations and engravings.
  • Video of Cambodian Tribal Gongs being played

See also

  • Space of Gong culture in the Central Highlands of Vietnam
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Gongs

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gong - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2617 words)
The centre spot and the rim of a chau gong are left coated on both sides with the fl copper oxide that forms during the manufacture of the gong, the rest of the gong is polished to remove this coating.
In contemporary central Javanese usage, the term gamelan is preferred and the term gong is reserved for the gong ageng, the largest instrument of the type, or for surrogate instruments such as the gong komodong or gong bumbu (blown gong) which fill the same musical function in ensembles lacking the large gong.
Gongs vary in diameter from about 20 to 40 in., and they are made of bronze containing a maximum of 22 parts of tin to 78 of copper; but in many cases the proportion of tin is considerably less.
Gong (band) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (968 words)
Gong formed in 1967, after Allen—then a member of Soft Machine—was denied entry to the United Kingdom due to a visa complication.
Gong played at the first Glastonbury Festival and were subsequently one of the first acts to sign to Virgin Records, getting first pick of the studio-time ahead of Mike Oldfield.
Gong continued, under the control of drummer Pierre Moerlen (died 2005) and without their two principal members, because of contractual obligations.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m