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Encyclopedia > Goldman Sachs
The Goldman Sachs Group
Type Public (NYSEGS)
Founded 1869
Headquarters New York, NY
Key people Lloyd Blankfein, Chairman & CEO
Gary Cohn, President & COO
Jon Winkelried, President and COO
John S. Weinberg, Vice Chairman
David A. Viniar, CFO
Edward C. Forst, CAO
Gregory K. Palm, General Counsel
Esta E. Stecher, General Counsel
Kevin W. Kennedy, Head of Human Capital Management
Alan M. Cohen, Global Head of Compliance
Industry Finance and Insurance
Products Investment Banking
Revenue US $37.67 Billion (2006)
Net income US $9.54 Billion (2006)
Employees 34,809 (2007)
Slogan Our clients' interests always come first.
Website www.gs.com

The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc., or simply Goldman Sachs (NYSEGS), is one of the world's largest global investment banks. Goldman Sachs was founded in 1869, and is headquartered in the Lower Manhattan area of New York City at 85 Broad Street.[1] Goldman Sachs has offices in leading financial centers such as New York City, London, Boston, Chicago, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Frankfurt, Zürich, Paris, São Paulo, Bangalore, Mumbai, Hong Kong, Beijing, Mexico City, Singapore, Salt Lake City, Sydney, Dubai, Milan, Melbourne, Tokyo, Taipei, Moscow, Toronto, and Monaco. Image File history File links Goldman_Sachs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... Lloyd Craig Blankfein (born September 20, 1954 in The Bronx, New York City) is the current Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Chairman of Goldman Sachs. ... A chair or seat is also a seat of office, authority, or dignity, such as the chairperson of a committee, or a professorship at a college or university, or the individual that presides over business proceedings. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Gary D. Cohn is a managing director and partner of Goldman Sachs. ... A Chief Operating Officer (COO) is a corporate officer responsible for managing the day-to-day activities of the corporation. ... CFO is usually short for Chief Financial Officer, but may also mean: Carrier frequency offset Ceramic fiber optics Chief Fire Officer Chief of Flight Operations Conselho Federal de Odontologia (cfo. ... Finance and Insurance is an industry group that mainly handles the transfer of paper and money, financial assets. These include: Accounting, Asset Management, Electronic Communications Networks, Financial Services Regulatory Agencies, Investment Banking Investment Firms, Investment Funds, Lending, Outsourced Financial Products & Services Marketing, Securities Brokers & Traders, Stock Exchanges, Trade Facilitation, and... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the tax agency in Ireland of the same name, see Revenue Commissioners. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... USD redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Net income is equal to the income that a firm has after subtracting costs and expenses from the total revenue. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... USD redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about work. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Look up slogan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... Investment banks assist corporations in raising funds in the public markets (both equity and debt), as well as provide strategic advisory services for mergers, acquisitions and other types of transactions. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway Lower Manhattan, from the Brooklyn Bridge, 2005 Rigid airship the USS Akron over Lower Manhattan Lower Manhattan is the southernmost part of the island of Manhattan, the main island and center of business and government of the City of New York. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Broad Street is located in the Financial District in New York City, stretching from South Street to Wall Street. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...   (German: , English: American English: ) is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany, with a mid-2007 population of 663,567. ... For other uses of Zurich, see Zurich (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the city. ... For other uses, see Bangalore (disambiguation). ... , Bombay redirects here. ... Peking redirects here. ... Mexico City (in Spanish: Ciudad de México, México, D.F. or simply México) is the capital city of Mexico. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is Salt Lake Citys top tourist draw. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Coordinates: , Emirate Government  - Emir Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Area [1]  - Metro 4,114 km² (1,588. ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Xinyi District (信義區) Government  - Mayor Hau Lung-bin (KMT)1 E9 Area  - City 271. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ...


Goldman Sachs acts as a financial advisor to some of the most important companies, largest governments, and wealthiest families in the world. It is a primary dealer in the U.S. Treasury securities market. Goldman Sachs offers its clients mergers & acquisitions advisory, provides underwriting services, engages in proprietary trading, invests in private equity deals, and also manages the wealth of affluent individuals and families. This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Primary dealers are banks or brokerage firms who may trade directly with the Federal Reserve System. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ... The capital market is the market for securities, where companies and the government can raise long-term funds. ... This page deals with the combination of two companies into one. ... The phrase mergers and acquisitions (M&A) refers to the aspect of business strategy and management dealing with the merging and/or acquiring of different companies. ... Underwriting refers to the process that a large financial service provider (bank, insurer, investment house) uses to assess the eligibility of a customer to receive their products like equity capital, insurance or credit to a customer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Private equity is a broad term that refers to any type of equity investment in an asset in which the equity is not freely tradable on a public stock market. ...


Due to its secretive firm culture and revolving door relationship with the Federal government, Goldman has recently been referred to as Wall Street's secret society, with former Goldman employees currently heading the New York Stock Exchange, the World Bank, the U.S. Treasury Department, the White House staff, and even rival firms such as CitiGroup and Merrill Lynch. Its landmark profits during the 2007 Subprime mortgage financial crisis led the New York Times to proclaim that Goldman Sachs is without peer in the world of finance[citation needed]. For the revolving door syndrome, see Recidivism. ... A federal government is the common government of a federation. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... For the Europe album, see Secret Society (Europe album). ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... Robert B. Zoellick Robert Bruce Zoellick (IPA: ) (born July 25, 1953) is an American politician and (effective July 1, 2007) the eleventh president of the World Bank. ... Henry Merritt Hank Paulson, Jr. ... Categories: People stubs | Directors of the Office of Management and Budget | American lawyers | 1955 births ... Citigroup Inc. ... Merrill Lynch & Co. ... The subprime mortgage financial crisis, is an ongoing financial crisis that has caused a sharp rise in home foreclosures. ...

Contents

History

Goldman Sachs was founded in 1869 by German Jewish immigrant Marcus Goldman.[2] The company made a name for itself pioneering the use of commercial paper for entrepreneurs and was invited to join the New York Stock Exchange in 1896. It was during this time that Goldman's son-in-law Samuel Sachs joined the firm which prompted the name change to Goldman Sachs. 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Marcus Goldman is the founder of the investment banking firm Goldman Sachs. ... Commercial paper is a money market security issued by large banks and corporations. ... Entrepreneurs created by Thomas Clarke in 2001. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... Samuel Sachs was born in Maryland in 1851. ...


In the early 20th Century, Goldman was a major player in establishing the Initial Public Offering market. It managed one of the largest IPO's to date, that of Sears, Roebuck and Company in 1906. It also became one of the first companies to heavily recruit those with MBA degrees from leading Business Schools, a practice that still continues today. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... “IPO” redirects here. ... Sears, Roebuck and Company is an American mid-range chain of international department stores, founded by Richard Sears and Alvah Roebuck in the late 19th century. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... In the USA a business school is a graduate school which offers an Masters of Business Administration. ...


In 1929, it launched the Goldman Sachs Trading Corp., a closed-end mutual fund with characteristics similar to that of a Ponzi Scheme. The fund failed as a result of the Stock Market Crash of 1929, hurting the firm's reputation for several years afterward.[3] This article deals with U.S. mutual funds. ... A Ponzi scheme is a fraudulent investment operation that involves paying abnormally high returns (profits) to investors out of the money paid in by subsequent investors, rather than from net revenues generated by any real business. ... For the protest against the Communications Decency Act, see Black World Wide Web protest. ...


In 1930, Sidney Weinberg assumed the role of Senior Partner and shifted Goldman's focus away from Trading and towards Investment Banking. It was Weinberg's actions that helped to restore some of Goldman's tarnished reputation. On the back of Weinberg, Goldman was lead advisor on the Ford Motor Company's IPO in 1956, which at the time was a major coup on Wall Street. Under Weinberg's reign the Firm also started an Investment Research division and a Municipal Bond department. It also was at this time that the firm became an early innovator in Risk Arbitrage. Sidney Weinberg (? - July 23, 1969) was a long-time leader of the Wall Street firm Goldman Sachs. ... Investment banks help companies and governments (or their agencies) raise money by issuing and selling securities in the capital markets (both equity and debt). ... “Ford” redirects here. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Coup redirects here. ... In the United States, a municipal bond or muni is a bond issued by a state, city or other local government, or their agencies. ... Risk arbitrage is an investment or trading strategy often associated with hedge funds. ...


Gus Levy joined the firm in the 1950s as a well known securities trader, which started a trend at Goldman where there would be two powers generally vie for supremacy, one from investment banking and one from securities trading. For most of the 1950s and 1960's, this would be Weinberg and Levy. Levy was a pioneer in block trading and the firm established this trend under his guidance. Due to Weinberg's heavy influence at the firm, it formed an Investment Banking Division in 1956 in an attempt to spread around influence and not focus it all on Weinberg. In finance, a block trade is a trade that is usually at least 10,000 shares of a stock or $200,000 of bonds. ...


In 1969, Levy took over as Senior Partner from Weinberg, and built Goldman's trading franchise once again. It is Levy who is credited with Goldman's famous philosophy of being "long term greedy," which implies that as long as money is made over the long term, trading losses in the short term are not to be worried about. That same year, Weinberg retired from the firm.


Another financial crisis for the firm occurred in 1970, when the Penn Central Railroad Company went bankrupt with over $80 million in commercial paper outstanding, most of it issued by Goldman Sachs. The bankruptcy was large, and the resulting lawsuits threatened the partnership capital and life of the firm. It was this bankruptcy that resulted in credit ratings being created for every issuer of commercial paper today by several credit rating services.[4] The Pennsylvania and New York Central Transportation Company, almost always called Penn Central, was an American railroad company that operated from 1968 until 1976. ... Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ... A credit rating assesses the credit worthiness of an individual, corporation, or even a country. ...


During the 1970s, the firm also expanded in several ways. Under the direction of Senior Partner Stanley R. Miller, it opened its first international office in London in 1970, and created a Private Wealth division along with a Fixed Income division in 1972. It also pioneered the "White Knight" strategy in 1974 during its attempts to defend Electric Storage Battery against a hostile takeover bid from International Nickel and Goldman's rival Morgan Stanley.[5] This action would boost the firm's reputation as an investment advisor because it pledged to no longer participate in hostile takeovers. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Traditionally, the wealthiest retail clients of investment firms demanded a greater level of service, product offering and sales personnel than were received by the average clients. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In business, a white knight may be a corporation, a private company, or a person that intends to help another firm. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... A takeover in business refers to one company (the acquirer, or bidder) purchasing another (the target). ... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is one of the largest and the most reputed investment banks headquartered in New York City. ... An investment advisor is an individual or firm that advises their client on investment matters on a professional basis. ...


John Weinberg (the son of Sidney Weinberg), and John C. Whitehead assumed roles of Co-Senior Partners in 1976, once again emphasizing the co-leadership at the firm. One of their most famous initiatives was the establishment of the 14 Business Principles[6] that are still used to this day. John Livingston Weinberg (January 25, 1925 – August 7, 2006) was an American banker. ... John Cunningham Whitehead (b. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the 1980s, the firm made a major move by acquiring J. Aron & Company, a commodities trading firm which merged with the Fixed Income division to become known as Fixed Income, Currencies, and Commodities. J. Aron was a major player in the coffee and gold markets, and the current CEO of Goldman, Lloyd Blankfein, joined the firm as a result of this merger. In 1985 it underwrote the public offering of the Real Estate Investment Trust that owned Rockefeller Center, then the largest REIT offering in history. In accordance with the beginning of the collapse of the Soviet Union, the firm also became largely involved in facilitating the global privatization movement by advising companies that were spinning off from their parent governments. Commodity is a term with distinct meanings in both business and in Marxian political economy. ... Lloyd Craig Blankfein (born September 20, 1954 in The Bronx, New York City) is the current Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Chairman of Goldman Sachs. ... // A Real Estate Investment Trust or REIT (rÄ“t, rhymes with treat) is a tax designation for a corporation investing in real estate that reduces or eliminates corporate income taxes. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... A Real Estate Investment Trust or REIT (rhymes with meet) is a specialized form of investment company in the United States that effectively allows its (usually public) investors to share the ownership of a group of real estate properties. ... The rise of Gorbachev Although reform stalled between 1964–1982, the generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In 1986, the firm formed Goldman Sachs Asset Management, which manages the majority of its mutual funds and hedge funds today. In the same year, the firm also underwrote the IPO of Microsoft, advised General Electric on its acquisition of RCA and joined the London and Tokyo stock exchanges. 1986 also was the year when Goldman became the first United States bank to rank in the top 10 of Mergers and Acquisitions in the United Kingdom. During the 1980s the firm became the first bank to distribute its investment research electronically and created the first public offering of original issue deep-discount bond. Asset management is the method that a company uses to track fixed assets, for example factory equipment, desks and chairs, computers, even buildings. ... A hedge fund is a private investment fund charging a performance fee and typically open to only a limited range of qualified investors. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Ge may refer to: Gê, a group of indigenous Brazilian tribes and their Ge languages Ge (Cyrillic) (Г, г), a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet Ge with upturn (Ґ, ґ), a letter of the Ukrainian alphabet Nikolai Ge, a Russian painter Gē, an ancient Chinese dagger-axe Ge (genus), a genus of butterflies Also... RCA, formerly an acronym for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark owned by Thomson SA through RCA Trademark Management S.A., a company owned by Thomson. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... The Tokyo Stock Exchange ), or TSE, is one of the largest stock exchange markets in the world by monetary volume located in Tokyo, Japan, second only to the New York Stock Exchange. ... This page deals with the combination of two companies into one. ... The phrase mergers and acquisitions (M&A) refers to the aspect of business strategy and management dealing with the merging and/or acquiring of different companies. ... For alternative meanings, see bond (a disambiguation page). ...


Robert Rubin and Stephen Friedman assumed the Co-Senior Partnership in 1990 and pledged to focus on globalization of the firm and strengthening the Merger & Acquisition and Trading business lines. During their reign, the firm introduced paperless trading to the New York Stock exchange and lead-managed the first-ever global debt offering by a U.S. corporation. It also launched the Goldman Sachs Commodity Index (GSCI) and opened a Beijing office in 1994. It was this same year that Jon Corzine assumed leadership of the firm following the departure of Rubin and Friedman. The firm joined David Rockefeller and partners in a 50-50 join ownership of Rockefeller Center during 1994, but later sold the shares to Tishman Speyer in 2000. In 1996, Goldman was lead underwriter of the Yahoo! IPO and in 1998 it was global coordinator of the NTT DoCoMo IPO. In 1999, Henry Paulson took over as Senior Partner. Robert Edward Rubin (born August 29, 1938) is the Chairman of Citigroup. ... Stephen Friedman is the current Chairman of the United States Presidents Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board. ... The rise of multinational corporations and outsourcing have played a crucial part in globalization. ... The Goldman Sachs Commodity Index (GSCI) is a world-production weighted index comprising of 24 commodity futures contracts. ... Peking redirects here. ... Jon Stevens Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is the Governor of New Jersey. ... David Rockefeller, Sr. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... Tishman Speyer Properties is a leading real estate building and operating company set up in 1978 by two founding partners, Jerry Speyer and Robert Tishman. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... A building of NTT DoCoMo in Shinagawa, Tokyo. ...


One of the largest events in the firm's history was its own IPO in 1999. The decision to go public was a tough one that the partners debated for decades. In the end, Goldman decided to offer only a small portion of the company to the public, with some 48% still held by the partnership pool.[7] 22% of the company is held by non-partner employees, and 18% is held by retired Goldman partners and two longtime investors, Sumitomo Bank Ltd. and Hawaii's Kamehameha Activities Assn (the investing arm of Kamehameha Schools). This leaves approximately 12% of the company as being held by the public. Henry Paulson became Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the firm. Hull Trading Company, one of the world’s premier market-making firms, was acquired by Goldman in 1999 for $531 million. Sumitomo Trust & Banking Co. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Name Kamehameha Schools Address 567 South King Street, Suite 200 Town Honolulu, Hawaii Established 1887 Community Urban Type Independent Primary and Secondary Religion Protestant Students Coeducational Grades Preschool to 12 Accreditation Western Association of Schools and Colleges District Kalihi Subdistrict Alewa Hts. ... “Chief executive” redirects here. ...


More recently, the firm has been busy both in Investment Banking and in Trading activities. It purchased Spear, Leeds, & Kellogg, one of the largest specialist firms on the New York Stock Exchange, for $6.3 billion in September 2000. It also advised on a landmark debt offering for the Government of China and the first electronic offering for the World Bank. It merged with JBWere, the Australian investment bank and opened a full-service broker-dealer in Brazil. It expanded its investments in companies to include Burger King, McJunkin Corporation, and in January 2007, Alliance Atlantis alongside CanWest Global Communications to own sole broadcast rights to the CSI franchise. In May 2006, Henry Paulson left the firm to serve as U.S. Treasury Secretary, and Lloyd Blankfein was promoted to Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. Spear, Leeds & Kellogg is a subsidiary of the Goldman Sachs Group. ... Ever since Republic of China founded in January 1st, 1912, China has had several regional and national governments. ... The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ... The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... Alliance Atlantis Alliance Atlantis is a Toronto-based media company. ... CanWest Global Communications Corp. ... CSI: Crime Scene Investigation is a popular Alliance Atlantis/CBS police procedural television series, running since October 2000, about a team of forensic scientists. ... Henry Merritt Hank Paulson, Jr. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ...


On July 6th, 2007, several US newspapers received anonymous threat-letters targeting Goldman Sachs and its employees.


Corporate affairs

Goldman Sachs offices at the Fraumünsterplatz in Zürich (the light-colored building on the left)
Goldman Sachs offices at the Fraumünsterplatz in Zürich (the light-colored building on the left)

As of 2006, Goldman Sachs employed 26,467 people worldwide. It reported earnings of US$9.54 billion and record earnings per share of $19.69.[8] It was reported that the average total compensation per employee in 2006 was US$622,000.[9] However, this number represents the arithmetic mean of total compensation and is highly skewed upwards as several hundred of the top earners command the majority of the Bonus Pools, leaving the median that most employees earn well below this number.[10] The current Chief Executive Officer is Lloyd C. Blankfein. The company ranks #1 in Annual Net Income when compared with 86 peers in the Investment Services sector. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2112x1812, 739 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Zürich Goldman Sachs Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2112x1812, 739 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Zürich Goldman Sachs Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lloyd C. Blankfein is the current Chief Operating Officer (COO) and President of Goldman Sachs. ... Net income is equal to the income that a firm has after subtracting costs and expenses from the total revenue. ...


Recently Goldman Sachs has been increasingly involved in both advising and brokering deals to privatize major highways by selling them off to foreign investors. In addition to advising Indiana on the Toll Road deal, Goldman Sachs has worked with Texas governor Rick Perry's administration on privatization projects, and according to John Schmidt, the former adviser to the Chicago mayor's office, it was a Goldman Sachs representative who first pitched the city on the idea of leasing out the Skyway. Goldman Sachs has played a major role in advising states on how to structure privatization deals—even while positioning itself to invest in the toll road market.[11] For other uses, see Highway (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... James Richard Perry (b. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... Richard M. Daley is the current mayor of Chicago. ... In an urban setting, a skyway, catwalk, or skywalk, is a type of pedway consisting of an enclosed (or covered) bridge between two buildings. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Businesses

Goldman Sachs is divided into three core businesses.


Investment banking

Investment Banking is divided into two divisions and includes Financial Advisory (mergers and acquisitions, investitures, corporate defense activities, restructurings and spin-offs) and Underwriting (public offerings and private placements of equity, equity-related and debt instruments). Goldman Sachs is one of the leading investment banks, appearing in league tables. In mergers and acquisitions, it gained fame historically by advising clients on how to avoid hostile takeovers. Goldman Sachs, for a long time during the 1980s, was the only major investment bank with a strict policy against helping to initiate a hostile takeover, which increased Goldman's reputation immensely. This segment accounts for around 15 percent of Goldman Sachs' revenues. Investment banks help companies and governments (or their agencies) raise money by issuing and selling securities in the capital markets (both equity and debt). ... The phrase mergers and acquisitions (abbreviated M&A) refers to the aspect of corporate strategy, corporate finance and management dealing with the buying, selling and combining of different companies that can aid, finance, or help a growing company in a given industry grow rapidly without having to create another business... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... For other uses, see Stock (disambiguation). ... Thomson Financials standard league tables are rankings of Investment Banks in terms of the dollar volume of deals they work on. ... Hostile takeover can refer to: For the business usage see takeover. ...


Trading

Trading and Principal Investments is the largest of the three core segments, and is the company's profit center. The segment is divided into three divisions and includes Fixed Income, Currency and Commodities (trading in interest rate and credit products, mortgage-backed securities and loans, currencies and commodities, structured and derivative products), Equities (trading in equities, equity-related products, equity derivatives, structured products and executing client trades in equities, options, and Futures contracts on world markets), and Principal Investments (merchant banking investments and funds). This segment consists of the revenues and profit gained from the Bank's trading activities, both on behalf of its clients (known as flow trading) and for its own account (known as proprietary trading). An interest rate is the price a borrower pays for the use of money he does not own, and the return a lender receives for deferring his consumption, by lending to the borrower. ... Credit as a financial term, used in such terms as credit card, refers to the granting of a loan and the creation of debt. ... In finance, a mortgage-backed security (MBS) is an asset-backed security whose cash flows are backed by the principal and interest payments of a set of mortgage loans. ... Equity derivatives are financial derivative products whose value is dependent on the value of an underlying share or group of shares. ... Structured products are synthetic investment instruments specially created to meet the needs that cannot be met from the cash financial instruments available in the markets. ... This article is about options traded in financial markets. ... In finance, a futures contract is a standardized contract, traded on a futures exchange, to buy or sell a certain underlying instrument at a certain date in the future, at a specified price. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Most trading done by Goldman is not speculative, but rather an attempt to profit from bid-ask spreads in the process of acting as a market maker. Around 65 percent of Goldman's revenues and profits are derived from this area. Upon its IPO, Goldman predicted that this segment would not grow as fast as its Investment Banking division and would be responsible for a shrinking proportion of earnings. The opposite has been true, however, and resulted in Lloyd Blankfein's appointment to President and Chief Operating Officer after John Thain's departure to run the NYSE and John L. Thornton's departure for an academic position in China. Speculation involves the buying, holding, and selling of stocks, bonds, commodities, currencies, collectibles, real estate, derivatives or any valuable financial instrument to profit from fluctuations in its price as opposed to buying it for use or for income via methods such as dividends or interest. ... A market maker is a person or a firm which quotes a buy and sell price in a financial instrument or commodity hoping to make a profit on the turn or the bid/offer spread. ... Lloyd Craig Blankfein (born September 20, 1954 in The Bronx, New York City) is the current Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Chairman of Goldman Sachs. ... John Thain in 2006. ... New York Stock Exchange (June 2003) The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is one of the largest stock exchanges in the world. ... John L. Thornton is Professor and Director of Global Leadership at Tsinghua University in Beijing. ...


Asset management and securities services

Asset Management and Securities Services is a rapidly growing business for Goldman as it gains market share. It is separated into two divisions, and includes Asset Management, which provides large institutions and very wealthy individuals with investment advisory, financial planning services, and the management of mutual funds, as well as the so-called alternative investments (hedge funds, funds of funds, real estate funds, and private equity funds). The Securities Services division provides prime brokerage, financing services, and securities lending to mutual funds, hedge funds, pension funds, foundations, and High net worth individuals. This segment accounts for around 19 percent of Goldman's earnings. As of 2006, the Goldman Sachs Asset Management hedge fund is the largest in the United States with $29.5 billion under management.[12] Asset management is the method that a company uses to track fixed assets, for example factory equipment, desks and chairs, computers, even buildings. ... This article deals with U.S. mutual funds. ... A hedge fund is a private investment fund charging a performance fee and typically open to only a limited range of qualified investors. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A private equity fund is a collaboration of funds that directs a private companys or individuals equity, either in the stock market or in real estate. ... Prime Brokerage is the generic name for a bundled package of services offered by investment banks to hedge funds. ... A pension (also known as superannuation) is a retirement plan intended to provide a person with a secure income for life. ... In private banking, a high-net-worth individual (HNWI) is a person with a high net worth. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A hedge fund is a private investment fund charging a performance fee and typically open to only a limited range of qualified investors. ...


In August 2007, it emerged that Goldman had to spend $2 billion to rescue its own Global Equity Opportunities hedge fund from "significant market dislocation".[13] Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... A hedge fund is a private investment fund charging a performance fee and typically open to only a limited range of qualified investors. ...


GS Capital Partners

GS Capital Partners is the private equity arm of Goldman Sachs. It has invested over $17 billion in the 20 years from 1986 to 2006. One of the most prominent funds is the GS Capital Partners V fund, which comprises over $8.5 billion of equity.[14] On April 23, 2007, Goldman closed GS Capital Partners VI with $20 billion in committed capital, $11 billion from qualified institutional and high net worth clients and $9 billion from the firm and its employees. GS Capital Partners VI is the current primary investment vehicle for Goldman Sachs to make large, privately negotiated equity investments.[15] At the start of a business, owners put some funding into the business to finance assets. ...


Major Assets (GS Group)

  • Cogentrix Energy (Energy)
  • American Casino & Entertainment Properties (Casinos)
  • Coffeyville Resources LLC (Refinery)
  • Myers Industries, Inc. (Plastic & Rubber)
  • USI Holdings Corporation (Insurance & Finance)
  • East Coast Power LLC (Energy)
  • Zilkha Renewable Energy (Energy)
  • Queens Moat Houses (Hotels)
  • Sequoia Credit Consolidation (Finance)
  • Shineway Group (Meat Processing)
  • Equity Inns, Inc. (Hotels)
  • KarstadtQuelle property group (Retailer)
  • Nursefinders Inc. (Healthcare)
  • Latin Force Group, LLC (Media)

Predictions

In December 2005, four years after its report on the emerging "BRIC" economies (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), Goldman Sachs named its "Next Eleven" list of countries, using macroeconomic stability, political maturity, openness of trade and investment policies and quality of education as criteria: Bangladesh, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, South Korea, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Turkey and Vietnam.[16] The four BRIC countries: Brazil, Russia, India and China BRIC or BRICs are terms used to refer to the combination of Brazil, Russia, India, and China. ... A Map of the nations in the list. ...


Corporate citizenship

Goldman Sachs has received favorable press coverage for conducting business and implementing internal policies related to reversing global climate change.[17] According to the company web site, the Goldman Sachs Foundation has given $94 million in grants since 1999, with the goal of promoting youth education worldwide.[18] The company also has been on Fortune Magazine's 100 Best Companies to Work For list since the list was launched in 1998.[19]


In November 2007, Goldman Sachs established a donor advised fund called Goldman Sachs Gives that donates to charity funds around the world.[20] Look up Donor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Other Notable Alumni

Categories: People stubs | Directors of the Office of Management and Budget | American lawyers | 1955 births ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... Erin Burnett (born May 3, 1976) is a business news anchor, reporter and interviewer for CNBC television. ... Jon Stevens Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is the Governor of New Jersey. ... This article is about the British comedian. ... Deutsche Bank AG (IPA: [1]) (ISIN: DE0005140008, NYSE: DB) (English: ) is a bank operating worldwide and employing more than 75,000 people (June, 2007). ... This article is about the television personality and host of Mad Money. ... }} Henry Hammill Fowler (September 5, 1908–January 3, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Edward S. Eddie Lampert (born July 27, 1962; [2]) is an American investor, financier and businessman. ... Ocado Logo Ocado is an internet based grocery retailer in the United Kingdom. ... George Herbert Walker IV is a managing director at Goldman Sachs and a second cousin to U.S. President George W. Bush. ... The Bush family: President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Bush, former First Lady Barbara Bush, and former President George H. W. Bush sit surrounded by family in the Red Room (White House) on January 6, 2005, together to celebrate the senior couples 60th wedding anniversary. ... Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. ... Robert B. Zoellick Robert Bruce Zoellick (IPA: ) (born July 25, 1953) is an American politician and (effective July 1, 2007) the eleventh president of the World Bank. ... The Office of the United States Trade Representative, or USTR, is an arm of the executive branch of the United States government that falls within the Executive Office of the President. ... The Deputy Secretary of State of the United States is the chief assistant to the Secretary of State who is responsible for Foreign Affairs. ... The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ... Mark J. Carney (born March 16, 1965 in Fort Smith, Northwest Territories[1]) is expected to succeed David A. Dodge as the Governor of the Bank of Canada on February 1, 2008. ... David Dodge David A. Dodge is the current Governor of the Bank of Canada. ... For the defunct commercial bank, see Bank of Canada (commercial). ... Henry Merritt Hank Paulson, Jr. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ... Robert Edward Rubin (born August 29, 1938) is the Chairman of Citigroup. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ... Citigroup Inc. ...

Criticism and controversy

On August 28, 2007, a former Goldman Sachs associate accused of being the mastermind behind an insider trading scheme, one that pocketed $6.7 million, pleaded guilty in Federal District Court in Manhattan. Insider trading is the trading of a corporations stock or other securities (e. ...


The FBI reported on July 6, 2007, that they are investigating letters sent to newspapers nationwide that say "Goldman Sachs. Hundreds will die. We are inside. You cannot stop us." The letters were post-marked in late June from Queens, New York and were handwritten in red ink on loose leaf paper, signed by "A.Q.U.S.A.".[23] Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ...


In 2005, the firm advised both the New York Stock Exchange and Archipelago, which owns an electronic trading platform, in merger talks. Controversy surrounded the deal as John Thain, who heads the New York Stock Exchange, was a former Goldman Sachs Executive.[24] The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... John Thain in 2006. ...


Also in 2005, Goldman Sachs received criticism from civic groups and New York City politicians when they received approximately $1.6 billion in taxpayer subsidies (mostly through Liberty Bonds) from New York City and state taxpayers to finance the Firm's new headquarters near the World Financial Center in Lower Manhattan in return for a commitment to keep at least 9000 employees and a major trading operation in Manhattan. It also comes with the expectation of the creation of at least 4000 new jobs by 2019.[25] New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Liberty bonds are a special type of war bonds that were sold to support the allied cause in World War I. It could be redeemed for the orginal value of the bond with interest. ... Goldman Sachs New World Headquarters, under construction in Battery Park City The Goldman Sachs New World Headquarters building is a 740-ft tall, 43-story building under construction in the Battery Park City neighborhood in New York City. ... A view of the World Trade Center, World Financial Center, and Battery Park City from the Hudson River on August 26, 2000. ...


In 1986, David Brown was convicted of passing inside information to Ivan Boesky on a takeover deal.[26] Robert Freeman, who was a senior Partner, the Head of Risk Arbitrage, and a protégé of Robert Rubin, was also convicted of insider trading, with his own account and with the firm's.[27] Ivan Frederick Boesky (born March 6, 1937, in Detroit) was notable for his prominent role in a Wall Street insider trading scandal that occurred in the United States in the mid-1980s. ... Robert Edward Rubin (born August 29, 1938) is the Chairman of Citigroup. ...


Recent criticism

Goldman Sachs has recently sold 100 billion dollars of sub prime loans but has also been selling them short. It has also been advising the investor market to sell gold although it is currently following a contrary policy by buying it. Ivankinsman 19:31, 3 December 2007 (UTC)


See also

Main competitors

Barclays Capital is the investment banking division of Barclays Bank plc. ... Banc of America Securities LLC (BAS), based in New York City, is the investment banking subsidiary of Bank of America. ... The Bear Stearns Companies, Inc. ... Citigroup Inc. ... The Credit Suisse Group (SWX:CSGN, NYSE: CS) is a financial services company, headquartered in Zürich, Switzerland. ... Deutsche Bank AG (IPA: [1]) (ISIN: DE0005140008, NYSE: DB) (English: ) is a bank operating worldwide and employing more than 75,000 people (June, 2007). ... Dresdner Kleinwort (DKIB) is the investment bank of Dresdner Bank AG, part of the Allianz Group since July 2001. ... JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM) is one of the oldest financial services firms in the world. ... Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. ... Merrill Lynch & Co. ... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is one of the largest and the most reputed investment banks headquartered in New York City. ... Raymond James is a regional financial services company based in the United States. ... Société Générale (Euronext: GLE) is one of the main European financial services companies and also maintains extensive activities in others parts of the world. ... UBS AG (NYSE: UBS; SWX: UBSN; TYO: 8657) is a diversified global financial services company, with its main headquarters in Basel & Zürich, Switzerland. ... Categories: Stub | Fortune 500 companies | Financial services companies of the United States ...

References

  • Goldman Sachs: The Culture of Success. Lisa Endlich. Little, Brown and Company. 1999. ISBN 0-316-64373-4
  1. ^ Goldman Sachs— Google Maps. Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  2. ^ Spiro, Leah Nathans; Stanley Reed. "INSIDE THE MONEY MACHINE–In a big-is-all business, Goldman vows to go it alone", BusinessWeek, The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc., 1997-12-22. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  3. ^ Fox, Justin. "GOLDMAN: WE RUN WALL STREET", Fortune Magazine, Cable News Network LP, LLLP. A Time Warner Company, 2005-05-16. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  4. ^ Hahn, Thomas K.. "Commercial Paper", in Timothy Q. Cook and Robert K. Laroche editors: Instruments of the Money Market (PDF), Seventh Edition, Richmond, Virginia: Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  5. ^ Rosenkrantz, Holly; Newton-Small, Jay. "Bush Economic Adviser Friedman to Resign, Aide Says", Bloomberg.com, 2004-11-23. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  6. ^ Business Principles. The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  7. ^ Spiro, Leah Nathans. "Goldman Sachs: How Public Is This IPO?", BusinessWeek Online, The McGraw-Hill Companies Inc., 1999-05-17. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  8. ^ GOLDMAN SACHS REPORTS RECORD EARNINGS PER COMMON SHARE OF $19.69 FOR 2006 (PDF) p. 1. The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. (2006-12-12). Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  9. ^ Gavin, Robert. "Good deal: Average Goldman Sachs employee makes $922,000", The Boston Globe, The New York Times Company, 2006-12-12. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  10. ^ Please, Sir, I want Some More. New York Magazine (2005-12-05). Retrieved on 2007-08-24.
  11. ^ Schulman, Daniel. "The Highwaymen", Mother Jones, 2007-01-01. Retrieved on 2007-04-30. 
  12. ^ Pasha, Shaheen. "Banks' love affair with hedge funds", CNNMoney.com, 2006-10-06. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  13. ^ Goldman pumps in $2bn to bail out hedge fund (Times Online)
  14. ^ >GS Capital Partners. The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-02-08.
  15. ^ >GS Capital Partners VI. Business Wire.
  16. ^ Khan, Jasim Uddin. "Bangladesh on Goldman Sachs 'Next Eleven' list", The Daily Star, 2005-12-15. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  17. ^ "The Street Turns Green", Newsweek, Newsweek, Inc., 2007. Retrieved on 23 November, 2007. 
  18. ^ The Goldman Sachs Foundation. The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  19. ^ "100 Best Companies to Work 2007, All Stars", Fortune, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-05-18. 
  20. ^ "Goldman Sachs Establishes Goldman Sachs Gives Charitable Fund". 
  21. ^ Arifa, Akbar. "Baron Cohen comes out of character to defend Borat", The Independent, Independent News and Media Limited, 2006-11-17. Retrieved on 2007-7-19. 
  22. ^ Bank of Canada Press Release
  23. ^ "FBI Probes Goldman Sachs Threat Letters", ABC News, 2007-07-06. Retrieved on 2007-08-06. 
  24. ^ Insana, Ron. "NYSE chief: Hybrid trading system's the way to go", USA Today, USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co. Inc., 2005-08-01. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  25. ^ Lombino, David. "New York Authorizes $1.6B in Liberty Bonds For Goldman Sachs's New Headquarters", The New York Sun, 2005-08-16. Retrieved on 2007-03-06. 
  26. ^ Worthy, Ford S.; Brett Duval Fromson and Lorraine Carson. "WALL STREET'S SPREADING SCANDAL", Fortune Magazine, Cable News Network LP, LLLP. A Time Warner Company, 1986-12-22. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  27. ^ Thomas, Landon Jr.. "Cold Call", New York Magazine, New York Magazine Holdings LLC, 2002-02-18. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 

Lisa Endlich is a notable business writer and former vice-president at Goldman Sachs. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic dic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up fortune in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ron Insana (born March 31, 1961) is currently Senior Analyst for CNBC and Managing Director of Insana Capital Partners. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberty bonds are a special type of war bonds that were sold to support the allied cause in World War I. It could be redeemed for the orginal value of the bond with interest. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Magazines stubs | Time Warner subsidiaries | Business magazines ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Goldman, Sachs & Co.: Lit. Rel. No. 18113 / April 28, 2003 (1037 words)
Goldman Sachs compensated its analysts based at least in part upon their participation in the firm's investment banking-related activities.
Goldman Sachs analysts participated in investment banking marketing efforts, including working with investment bankers to prepare "pitch" materials and in some cases attending the pitch meetings.
Goldman Sachs also has agreed as part of this settlement to retain, at its own expense, an Independent Monitor to conduct a review to provide reasonable assurance that the firm is complying with the structural reforms.
AlterNet: Environment: The Greening of Goldman Sachs (2120 words)
While Goldman Sachs explained that it had simply acted on a "rare opportunity for the firm to benefit global conservation," many people found it hard to trust such a gesture of generosity from a financial institution.
Goldman Sachs is positioning itself to be a leader in the green energy sector.
Maybe Goldman Sachs is the "gold standard" in investment firms for the same reason that it is forward-looking in its sensitivity to environmental concerns: that the leadership of the company is using its brains.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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