FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Golden Gate Park

Golden Gate Park, located in San Francisco, California, is a large urban park. At 1017 acres (4.1 km²), it is in the shape of a long rectangle, similar in shape but 174 acres (0.7 km²) larger than Central Park in New York. Golden Gate is the third most visited city park in America. Nickname: The City by the Bay; Fog City; The City; Baghdad by the Bay Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... A Central Park landscape An urban park, also known as a municipal park, is a park that is built in cities mostly to reduce air pollution and as a place to relax. ... A Central Park landscape Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres or 3. ...

An aerial view of Golden Gate Park from The Panhandle (at left, east, edge of picture) to the Pacific Ocean
An aerial view of Golden Gate Park from The Panhandle (at left, east, edge of picture) to the Pacific Ocean

Contents

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1085x222, 156 KB) Summary Description: Composite aerial photograph of San Franciscos Golden Gate Park taken from a Boeing 747 on Virgin Atlantic flight to London Medium: Color photograph Location: San Francisco, CA Date: March 20, 2006 Author: Alexander Marks (Bungopolis... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1085x222, 156 KB) Summary Description: Composite aerial photograph of San Franciscos Golden Gate Park taken from a Boeing 747 on Virgin Atlantic flight to London Medium: Color photograph Location: San Francisco, CA Date: March 20, 2006 Author: Alexander Marks (Bungopolis... The Panhandle from Clayton Street The Panhandle is a park in San Francisco, California that forms a panhandle with Golden Gate Park. ...

History

The domed Conservatory of Flowers is one of the world's largest. It is built of traditional wood sash and glass pane construction. It has been extensively renovated several times since its construction.
The domed Conservatory of Flowers is one of the world's largest. It is built of traditional wood sash and glass pane construction. It has been extensively renovated several times since its construction.

In the 1860s, San Franciscans began to feel the need for a spacious public park like the one that was taking shape in New York. Golden Gate Park was carved out of unpromising sand and shore dunes that were known as the "outside lands." The tireless field engineer William Hammond Hall prepared a survey and topographic map of the park site in 1870 and became commissioner in 1871. He was later named California's first State Engineer and developed an integrated flood control system for the Sacramento Valley when he was not working on Golden Gate Park. The actual plan and planting were developed by Hall and his assistant, John McLaren, who had apprenticed in Scotland, the homeland of many of the nineteenth century's best professional gardeners. The initial plan called for grade separations of transverse roadways through the park, as Frederick Law Olmsted had provided for Central Park, but budget constraints and the positioning of the Arboretum and the Concourse aborted the plan. In 1876, the plan was almost exchanged for a racetrack favored by "the Big Four" millionaires, Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins, Collis P. Huntington, and Charles Crocker. Hall resigned and all the park commissioners followed him. Fortunately for the city, the original plan was soon back on track. By 1886, streetcars delivered over 47,000 people to Golden Gate Park on one weekend afternoon; the city's population at the time was about 250,000. Hall selected McLaren as his successor in 1887. Conservatory of Flowers, Golden Gate Park, photographed by me Aug 2003 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Conservatory of Flowers, Golden Gate Park, photographed by me Aug 2003 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The domed Conservatory of Flowers is one of the worlds largest. ... // The First Transcontinental Railroad in the USA is built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... William Hammond Hall (1846 in Hagerstown, Maryland, United States of America - 1934) was a civil engineer who was the first State Engineer of California, and designed Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, CA. After serving with the U.S. army engineers in the Civil War, Hall was assigned in the... A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... The Sacramento Valley is the portion of the California Central Valley that lies to the north of the San Joaquin-Sacramento Delta. ... Statue of John McLaren, Golden Gate Park Dr John Hays McLaren (1846 – 1943) served as superintendent of the Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, CA for 53 years. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity(English) Wha daur meddle wi me? (Scots)[1] Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots[2] Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... Frederick Law Olmsted, oil painting by John Singer Sargent, 1895, Biltmore Estate, Asheville, North Carolina Daniel France (September, 1988 was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City, the countrys oldest coordinated system of... Alternate meaning: The Big Four (novel) The Big Four were the chief entrepreneurs in the building of the Central Pacific Railroad, the western portion of the First Transcontinental Railroad in the United States. ... Amasa Leland Stanford (March 9, 1824–June 21, 1893) was an American business tycoon, politician and founder of Stanford University. ... Mark Hopkins (September 1, 1813 – March 29, 1878) was one of four principal investors who formed the Central Pacific Railroad along with Leland Stanford, Charles Crocker and Collis Huntington in 1861. ... Collis Potter Huntington (October 22, 1821 – August 13, 1900) was one of the Big Four of western railroading (along with Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins and Charles Crocker) who built the Southern Pacific Railroad and other major interstate train lines. ... subject_name=Charles Crocker| image_name=ccrocker. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ...

The North Windmill
The North Windmill

The first stage stabilized the ocean dunes that covered three-quarters of the park area with tree plantings. By 1875, about 60,000 trees, mostly Blue Gum Eucalyptus, Monterey pine and Monterey cypress, were planted. By 1879, that figure more than doubled to 155,000 trees over 1,000 acres (4 km²). Later McLaren scoured the world through his correspondents for trees. When McLaren refused to retire at age 60, as was customary, the San Francisco city government was bombarded with letters: when he reached 70, a charter amendment was passed to exempt him from forced retirement. He lived in McLaren Lodge in Golden Gate Park until he died at age 90, in 1943. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 432 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1492 × 2068 pixel, file size: 567 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) North Windmill in Golden Gate Park. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 432 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1492 × 2068 pixel, file size: 567 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) North Windmill in Golden Gate Park. ... Binomial name Eucalyptus globulus Labill. ... Binomial name Pinus radiata D.Don Pinus radiata (family Pinaceae) is known in English as Monterey Pine in some parts of the world (mainly in the USA, Canada and the British Isles), and Radiata Pine in others (primarily Australia, New Zealand and Chile). ... Binomial name Cupressus macrocarpa Hartw. ...


In 1903, a pair of Dutch-style windmills were built at the extreme western end of the park. These pumped water throughout the park. The north windmill has been restored to its original appearance and is adjacent to a flower garden, a gift of Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands. These are planted with tulip bulbs for winter display and other flowers in appropriate seasons. Murphy's Windmill in the south of the park is currently being restored. For other uses, see Wilhelmina (disambiguation). ... Species See text Tulip (Tulipa) is a flower commonly associated with The Netherlands. ...


Most of the water used for landscape watering and for various water features is now provided by the use of highly processed and recycled effluent from the city's sewage treatment plant, located at the beach some miles away to the south near the San Francisco Zoo. In the 1950s the use of this effluent during cold weather caused some consternation, with the introduction of artificial detergents but before the advent of modern biodegradable products. These "hard" detergents would cause long-lasting billowing piles of foam to form on the creeks connecting the artificial lakes and could even be blown onto the roads, forming a traffic hazard. In the context of creating Plutonium at the Hanford Site, effluent refers to the cooling water that is discharged from a nuclear reactor that may or may not be radioactive. ... The San Francisco Zoo, (previously Fleishhacker Zoo) is a zoo in San Francisco, California housing more than 250 different animal species. ... // Recovering from World War II and its aftermath, the economic miracle emerged in West Germany and Italy. ...


Major features

Japanese Tea Garden

A step-stone bridge in the Japanese Tea Garden
A step-stone bridge in the Japanese Tea Garden

The five acre (20,000 m²) Japanese tea garden at Golden Gate Park is an immensely popular feature. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2137x1535, 1193 KB)A garden path bridge in the Tea Garden of San Franciscos Golden Gate Park. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2137x1535, 1193 KB)A garden path bridge in the Tea Garden of San Franciscos Golden Gate Park. ... A step-stone bridge is a simple means for a pedestrian to cross a watercourse during periods of low flow while keeping feet and (particularly) footwear dry. ... A log bridge in the French Alps near Vallorcine. ... A decorative moon bridge in the Tea Garden, long a particular favorite of youth accompanying their parents. ...


The Music Concourse Area

The Music Concourse is an open area with three water fountains surrounded with maple trees positioned uniformly. There is also a stage on the east side. The buildings near the concourse area include The California Academy of Sciences and De Young Museum.


In 2003, the Music Concourse is also undergoing a series improvements to include an underground 800-car parking garage, narrowing of the roadways in the Music Concourse, the addition of bike lanes, and the elimination of existing surface parking.


De Young Museum

Named for M. H. de Young, the San Francisco newspaper magnate, the De Young Museum was opened January 1921. Its original building had been part of The California Midwinter International Exposition of 1894, of which Mr. de Young was the director. The de Young has been completely rebuilt and re-opened in 2005. Michael Harry de Young (September 30, 1849 - February 15, 1925), an American journalist and businessman, born in St. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The M. H. de Young Memorial Museum is a fine arts museum located in San Franciscos Golden Gate Park. ... The Main Concourse. ...


Academy of Sciences

The California Academy of Sciences is one of the largest natural history museums in the world, and also houses the Steinhart Aquarium and the Morrison Planetarium. The Academy of Sciences carries exhibits of reptiles and amphibians, astronomy, prehistoric life, various gems and minerals, earthquakes, and aquatic life. The California Academy of Sciences is one of the ten largest natural history museums in the world. ...


In September 12, 2005, Academy of Sciences started a complete reconstruction, with completion scheduled for 2008; until then it is temporarily located downtown in the SoMa area. South of Market or SoMa (South of Market) is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. ...


San Francisco Botanical Garden at Strybing Arboretum

A trail through the redwood forest section of the arboretum.
A trail through the redwood forest section of the arboretum.

The San Francisco Botanical Garden at Strybing Arboretum was laid out in the 1890s, but funding was insufficient until Helene Strybing willed funds in 1926. Planting was begun in 1937 with WPA funds supplemented by local donations. This 55 acre (222,500 m²) arboretum contains more than 7,500 plant species. Photo of redwood trail in Strybing Arboretum, San Francisco, taken July 2004 by User:Stan Shebs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Photo of redwood trail in Strybing Arboretum, San Francisco, taken July 2004 by User:Stan Shebs File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... McBean Wildfowl Pond and Primitive Plant Garden at SF Botanical Garden Pond at Dwarf Conifer collection of SF Botanical Garden Redwood trail The San Francisco Botanical Garden (formerly Strybing Arboretum) is a large botanical garden in San Franciscos Golden Gate Park. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... WPA is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings: Washington Project for the Arts, an arts organization based in Washington, D.C. Walter Payton Award, in U.S. Division I-AA football War Powers Act, a U.S. federal law, also known as the Trading with the Enemy Act and... An arboretum is a botanical garden primarily devoted to trees and other woody plants, forming a living collection of trees intended at least partly for scientific study. ...


AIDS Memorial Grove

The AIDS Memorial Grove has been in progress since 1988 and is still the only national AIDS memorial in the U.S.. The Grove's executive director, Thom Weyand, has said that "part of the beauty of the grove is that as a memorial which receives no federal money, it is blessedly removed from the fight over the controversy of AIDS." The AIDS Memorial Grove in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California, is dedicated to individuals who have died as a result of acquired imune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). ... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from...


Stow Lake

Stow Lake surrounds the prominent Strawberry Hill, now an island with an electrically pumped waterfall. Rowboats, pedalboats, and electrically powered boats can be rented at the boathouse. Much of the western portion of San Francisco can be seen from the top of this hill, which at its top contains one of the reservoirs that supply a network of high-pressure water mains that exclusively supply specialized fire hydrants throughout the city. Hopetoun Falls near Otway National Park, Victoria, Australia A waterfall is usually a geological formation resulting from water, often in the form of a stream, flowing over an erosion-resistant rock formation that forms a sudden break in elevation. ...


Spreckels Lake

San Francisco Model Yacht Club boat on Spreckels Lake
San Francisco Model Yacht Club boat on Spreckels Lake

Spreckels Lake is located on the northern side of the park near 36th Avenue. One can usually find model yachts sailing on Spreckels Lake. Many of these are of the type used before the advent of the modern radio controlled model. The yachts are set up by their owners, and most include either an auxiliary wind vane or main sheet linkage to control the rudder in response to varying wind conditions. The yachts are then released, and pole handlers will walk down each side of the lake with a padded pole to prevent the yachts from colliding with the lake edge. The lake has been specifically designed for this type of operation, as it has a vertical edging (allowing the yachts to closely approach the shore) and a paved walkway around the entire edge. At one location near a grassy area, "duckling ramps" allow young wildlife to leave the pond safely. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 441 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1000 × 1360 pixel, file size: 460 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)San Francisco Model Yacht Club X class (1000 square inches, few other restrictions), beating upwind on Spreckles Lake in San Franciscos Golden... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 441 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1000 × 1360 pixel, file size: 460 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)San Francisco Model Yacht Club X class (1000 square inches, few other restrictions), beating upwind on Spreckles Lake in San Franciscos Golden... Model yachting is the pastime of building and racing model yachts. ... 1:10 scale radio controlled car (Saab Sonett) A radio controlled (R/C) model is a model that is steerable with the use of radio control. ...


Conservatory of Flowers

The Conservatory of Flowers is one of the world's largest conservatories built of traditional wood and glass panes. It was prefabricated for local entrepreneur James Lick for his Santa Clara, California, estate but was still in its crates when he died in 1876. A group of San Franciscans bought it and offered it to the city, and it was erected in Golden Gate Park and opened to the public in 1879. In 1883, a boiler exploded and the main dome caught fire. A restoration was undertaken by Southern Pacific magnate Charles Crocker. It survived the earthquake of 1906 only to suffer another fire in 1918. In 1933 it was declared unsound and closed to the public, only to be reopened in 1946. In 1995, after a severe storm with 100 mph (160 km/h) winds damaged the structure, shattering 40% of the glass, the conservatory had to be closed again. It was cautiously dissected for repairs and finally reopened in September 2003. The domed Conservatory of Flowers is one of the worlds largest. ... James Lick James Lick (August 25, 1796 – October 1, 1876) was an American carpenter, piano builder, land baron, and patron of the sciences. ... Official website: http://www. ... The Southern Pacific Railroad (AAR reporting mark SP) was an American railroad. ... subject_name=Charles Crocker| image_name=ccrocker. ... Arnold Genthes famous photograph of San Francisco following the earthquake, looking toward the fire on Sacramento Street The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 was a major earthquake that struck San Francisco and the coast of northern California at 5:12 A.M. on Wednesday, April 18, 1906. ...


Kezar Stadium

Kezar Stadium, the one-time home of the AAFC and NFL San Francisco 49ers, was built between 1922 and 1925 in the southeast corner of the park. The old 59,000-seat stadium was demolished in 1989 and replaced with a modern 9,044-seat stadium. The Stadium is currently home to the California Victory. Kezar Stadium is a stadium located in the southeastern corner of Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, California. ... The All-America Football Conference (AAFC) was a professional American football league that challenged the rival National Football League from 1946 to 1949. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager none Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division (1946... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


John F. Kennedy Drive

John F. Kennedy Memorial Drive was the new name for North Drive, winding from the East end of the park to the Great Highway after the Kennedy Assassination. The portion east of the 19th Avenue park crossing is closed to motor traffic on Sundays and holidays, providing a popular oasis for pedestrians, bicyclists, and skaters. In 1983 the other major transverse road, South Drive, was renamed as Martin Luther King Jr. Drive. John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... The Great Highway is a small highway and street in San Francisco that runs along Ocean Beach on the western side of the city. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ...


Minor Features

There are also a number of more naturalistically landscaped lakes throughout the park, several linked together into chains, with pumped water creating flowing creeks.


A paddock corrals a small herd of bison, captive in the Park since 1892.[1] Binomial name Bison bison (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ...


Golden Gate Park in Film

A scene from the Charlie Chaplin film A Jitney Elopement, filmed in Golden Gate Park.
A scene from the Charlie Chaplin film A Jitney Elopement, filmed in Golden Gate Park.

San Francisco has a long, storied history of being featured in film, but possibly because of its relative seclusion from downtown areas and limited vistas of major landmarks, Golden Gate Park has rarely enjoyed the cinematic spotlight,[2] though Charlie Chaplin filmed scenes for at least two movies there (A Jitney Elopement and In the Park, both from 1915). The cloaked Klingon ship in Star Trek IV is parked there. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “Charles Chaplin” redirects here. ... A Jitney Elopement was Charlie Chaplins fifth film for Essanay Films. ... A Jitney Elopement was Charlie Chaplins fifth film for Essanay Films. ... In the Park was Charlie Chaplins fourth film for Essanay Films. ... Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (Paramount Pictures, 1986; see also 1986 in film) is the fourth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ...


See also

The Panhandle from Clayton Street The Panhandle is a park in San Francisco, California that forms a panhandle with Golden Gate Park. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia of San Francisco (4594 words)
The fact that Golden Gate Park has endured as the playground of the recreation-hungry city is a testament to its visionary founders and hardworking keepers.
At the turn of the century, Golden Gate Park was the free Disneyland of its time, with attractions ranging from animals and birds to lush plantings and numerous types of recreational and athletic activities.
Hall considered the park to be a place to enjoy nature without the trappings of the city, a place that did not include a lot of structures, particularly ones that did not contribute to the true park experience.
Golden Gate Park (1018 words)
Golden Gate Park is one of the largest man-made parks in the world.
Golden Gate Park became center-stage for a mini-revolution of sorts, hosting numerous concerts and the magical Summer of Love.
A group called the Alliance for Golden Gate Park says the design of the new museum is completely out of place in a park environment.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m