FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Golden Age of Arcade Games
History of…
Video games
Console, handheld, and personal computer games

First generation (1972–1977)
Second generation (1976–1984)
Video game crash of 1983
Third generation (1983–1992)
Fourth generation (1987–1996)
Fifth generation (1993–2002)
Sixth generation (1998–2006)
Seventh generation (2004–)
Video games were introduced as a commercial entertainment medium in 1971, becoming the basis for an important entertainment industry in the late 1970s/early 1980s in the United States, Japan, and Europe. ... A console game is a form of interactive multimedia used for entertainment. ... A handheld video game is a video game designed primarily for handheld game consoles such as Nintendos Game Boy line. ... The first generation of video game consoles lasted from 1972 until 1977. ... The second generation of video game consoles lasted from 1976 until 1984. ... E.T. for the Atari 2600 is considered by many to be emblematic of the crash along with the Atari 2600 version of Pac-Man. ... In the history of video games, the 8-bit era was the third generation of video game consoles, but the first after the video game crash of 1983 and considered by some to be the first modern era of console gaming. ... In the history of video games, the 16-bit era was the fourth generation of video game consoles. ... In the history of computer and video games, the 32-bit / 64-bit /3D era was the fifth generation of video game consoles. ... The sixth-generation era (sometimes referred to as the 128-bit era; see Number of bits below) refers to the computer and video games, video game consoles, and video game handhelds available at the turn of the 21st century. ... In the history of computer and video games, the seventh generation began on November 21, 2004 with the United States release of the Nintendo DS, followed shortly after by the PlayStation Portable on December 12, 2004. ...

Arcade games

Golden Age of Arcade Games
This article contains a timeline of notable events in the history of video arcade gaming: // 1971 The Galaxy Game, the earliest known coin-operated arcade video game, makes its debut on the campus of Stanford University. ...

The Golden Age of Arcade Games was a peak era of arcade game popularity and innovation, lasting from January 18, 1982 to January 5, 1986.[1] Other opinions place this period's beginning in the late 1970s, when color arcade games became more prevalent and video arcades themselves started popping up outside of their traditional bowling alley and bar locales, through to its ending in the mid-1980s.[2] However, some people refer to the golden age as the entire period when arcades were prevalent in general[citation needed], placing its start at the 1978 release of Space Invaders and its end in the mid-1990s with the release of home gaming systems which were equal to or more powerful than typical arcade hardware, such as Sony's PlayStation and Nintendo's N64. Some refer to this latter definition, late 1980s to mid-1990s, as the Silver age.[citation needed] Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... arcade, see Arcade. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... See also: 1977 in video gaming, other events of 1978, 1979 in video gaming, history of video games Events Notable releases Cinematronics releases the Space Wars vector graphics arcade game Hudson releases Lode Runner for Nintendo home systems in Japan. ... Space Invaders ) is an arcade video game designed by Tomohiro Nishikado in 1978. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Game console redirects here. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, was Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ...

Contents

Overview

During the late 1970s, arcade game technology had become sophisticated enough to offer good-quality graphics and sounds, but it was still fairly basic (realistic images and full motion video were not yet available, and only a few games used spoken voice) and so the success of a game had to rely on simple and fun gameplay. This emphasis on the gameplay is why many of these games continue to be enjoyed today despite having been vastly outdated by modern computing technology. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into interactive movie. ...


The Killer List of Videogames (KLOV) web site has compiled a list of the "Top 100 (arcade) Video Games." Fifty of them (including all the games on its Top 10 list) were introduced during the period from 1979 to 1984. The Killer List of Videogames (otherwise known simply as KLOV, pronounced Kay-El-Oh-Vee) is a website devoted to cataloging arcade games past and present. ... 1979 1979 in games 1978 in video gaming 1980 in video gaming Notable events of 1979 in video gaming. ... 1984 1984 in games 1983 in video gaming 1985 in video gaming Notable events of 1984 in video gaming. ...


Business

The Golden Age was a time of great technical and design creativity in arcade games. Games were designed in a wide variety of genres while developers had to work within strict limits of available processor power and memory. The era also saw the rapid spread of video arcades across North America and Japan. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... arcade, see Arcade. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ...


At this time, arcade games started to appear in supermarkets, restaurants, liquor stores, gas stations and many other retail establishments looking for extra income. Popular games occasionally caused a crush of teenagers, eager to try the latest entertainment entry.[citation needed] Packaged food aisles in a Fred Meyer store in Portland, Oregon A supermarket is a departmentalized self-service store offering a wide variety of food and household merchandise. ... A typical restaurant in uptown Manhattan A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to be consumed on the premises. ... A liquor store in Decatur, Georgia. ... Modern gas station A filling station, gas station or petrol station is a facility that sells fuel for road motor vehicles – usually petrol (US: gas/gasoline), diesel fuel and LPG. The term gas station is mostly particular to the United States of America and Canada, where petrol is known...


Probably the most successful arcade game companies of this era were Namco (especially in Japan) and Atari (especially in the United States). Other notables include Nintendo (whose mascot, Mario, was introduced in 1981's Donkey Kong), Bally Midway Manufacturing Company (who later was purchased by Williams), Capcom, Cinematronics, Konami, Sega, Taito, Williams, and SNK. Namco Ltd ) is a amusement company based in Japan, best known overseas for video games development. ... This article is about a corporate game company. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Mario ) is a video game character created by Japanese game designer Shigeru Miyamoto and the official mascot of Nintendo. ... 1981 1981 in games 1980 in video gaming 1982 in video gaming Notable events of 1981 in computer and video games. ... Donkey Kong ) is an arcade game released by Nintendo in 1981. ... Midway Games (NYSE: MWY) is an American video game publisher. ... Williams is a long-standing electronic gaming and amusement company based in Chicago, Illinois. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... Cinematronics was a pioneering arcade game developer that had its heyday in the era of vector display games. ... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ... This article is about the video game company. ... The Taito Corporation (タイトー株式会社, taitou kabushikigaisha) TYO: 9646 is a Japanese developer of video game software and arcade hardware. ... Williams is a long-standing electronic gaming and amusement company based in Chicago, Illinois. ... “SNK” redirects here. ...


Technology

Arcades began to gain momentum in the late 1970s with games such as Gee Bee (1978) and Galaxian (1979) and became widespread in 1980 with Pac-Man, King and Balloon, Tank Battalion, and others. The central processing unit in these games allowed for more complexity than earlier discrete circuitry games such as Atari's Pong (1972). The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Gee Bee is Namcos very first arcade game, released in 1978. ... See also: 1977 in video gaming, other events of 1978, 1979 in video gaming, history of video games Events Notable releases Cinematronics releases the Space Wars vector graphics arcade game Hudson releases Lode Runner for Nintendo home systems in Japan. ... Galaxian is a 1979 fixed shooter arcade game by Namco. ... 1979 1979 in games 1978 in video gaming 1980 in video gaming Notable events of 1979 in video gaming. ... 1980 1980 in games 1979 in video gaming 1981 in video gaming Notable events of 1980 in computer and video games. ... Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and licensed for distribution by Midway Games in 1979. ... King and Balloon is an arcade game that was released by Namco in 1980. ... Tank Battalion is an arcade game that was released by Namco in 1980. ... “CPU” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Digital (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pong (disambiguation). ... See also: 1971 in video gaming, other events of 1972, 1973 in video gaming, history of video games Events May 24: Magnavox unveils the Odyssey at a Burlingame, California convention. ...


The Golden Age saw developers experimenting with new hardware, creating games which used the crisp lines of vector displays as opposed to standard raster displays. A few of these games became great hits, such as 1980's Battlezone and Tempest and 1983's Star Wars, all from Atari, but vector technology fell out of favor with arcade game companies due to the high cost of repairing vector displays. (Vectrex, a home video game system with a built-in vector display, was released in 1982.) Example showing effect of vector graphics versus raster graphics. ... Imagine the smiley face in the top left corner as an RGB bitmap image. ... 1980 1980 in games 1979 in video gaming 1981 in video gaming Notable events of 1980 in computer and video games. ... For articles with similar titles, see Battle zone (disambiguation). ... Tempest is an arcade game by Atari Inc. ... 1983 1983 in games 1982 in video gaming 1984 in video gaming Notable events of 1983 in computer and video games. ... Star Wars is an arcade game produced by Atari and released in 1983. ... The Vectrex is an 8-bit video game console developed by General Consumer Electric (GCE) and later bought by Milton Bradley Company. ... A computer display monitor, usually called simply a monitor, is a piece of electrical equipment which displays viewable images generated by a computer without producing a permanent record. ... 1982 1982 in games 1981 in video gaming 1983 in video gaming Notable events of 1982 in computer and video games. ...


Developers also experimented with laserdisc players for delivering movie-quality animation. The first game to exploit this technology, 1983's Dragon's Lair from Cinematronics, was three years in the making. It was a sensation when it was released (and, in fact, the laserdisc players in many machines broke due to overuse), but the genre dwindled in popularity because the games were fairly linear and depended less on reflexes than on memorizing sequences of moves. Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... 1983 1983 in games 1982 in video gaming 1984 in video gaming Notable events of 1983 in computer and video games. ... Dragons Lair was one of the first laserdisc video games, released in June 1983 by Cinematronics. ... Cinematronics was a pioneering arcade game developer that had its heyday in the era of vector display games. ...


New controls cropped up in a few games, though, arguably, joysticks and buttons remained the favorites for most manufacturers. Atari introduced the trackball with 1978's Football. Night Driver included a life-like steering wheel, Paperboy used a bicycle handlebar and Hogan's Alley introduced tethered light guns to the arcade market. Other specialty controls, such as pedals in racing games and a crossbow-shaped light gun in Crossbow, also debuted in this era. For other uses, see Joystick (disambiguation). ... Logitech TrackMan A trackball is a pointing device consisting of a ball housed in a socket containing sensors to detect rotation of the ball about two axes—like an upside-down mouse with an exposed protruding ball. ... See also: 1977 in video gaming, other events of 1978, 1979 in video gaming, history of video games Events Notable releases Cinematronics releases the Space Wars vector graphics arcade game Hudson releases Lode Runner for Nintendo home systems in Japan. ... Night Driver is a 1976 arcade game by Atari. ... A modern road cars steering wheel Steering wheels from different periods A steering wheel is a type of steering control used in most modern land vehicles, including all mass-production automobiles. ... Paperboy is a 1984 arcade game by Atari Games. ... For other uses, see Bicycle (disambiguation). ... Drop handlebars on a racing bicycle allow the rider a variety of positions for aerodynamics and comfort. ... Hogans Alley is a 1984 arcade game by Nintendo. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Gameplay

Galaga, a successful game of the Golden Age, borrows its theme from Galaxian and adds twists of its own. Some enemies attempt to "capture" the player's fighter and he can try to retrieve it later.

With the enormous success of the early games, dozens of developers jumped into the development and manufacturing of arcade video games. Some simply copied the "invading alien hordes" idea of Space Invaders and turned out successful imitators like Galaxian, Galaga, and Gaplus, while others tried new concepts and defined new genres. Rapidly evolving hardware allowed new kinds of games which surpassed the shoot-em-up gameplay of the earliest games. Screenshot from the arcade game Galaga, stage one. ... Screenshot from the arcade game Galaga, stage one. ... Galaga is a fixed shooter arcade game that was released by Namco in 1981 (and also licensed to Midway). ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... Space Invaders ) is an arcade video game designed by Tomohiro Nishikado in 1978. ... Galaxian is a 1979 fixed shooter arcade game by Namco. ... Galaga is a fixed shooter arcade game that was released by Namco in 1981 (and also licensed to Midway). ... Gaplus, far more commonly known as Galaga 3, is a fixed shooter arcade game that was released by Namco in 1984. ...


Games such as Donkey Kong and Qix introduced new types of games where skill and timing are more important than shooting as fast as possible. Other examples of innovative games are Atari Games' Paperboy where the goal is to successfully deliver newspapers to customers, and Namco's Phozon where the object is to duplicate a shape shown in the middle of the screen. The theme of Exidy's Venture is dungeon exploration and treasure-gathering. One innovative game, Q*Bert, played upon the user's sense of depth perception in order to deliver a novel experience. Donkey Kong ) is an arcade game released by Nintendo in 1981. ... Qix (pronounced kiks) is an arcade game, released by Taito America Corporation in 1981. ... Atari Games was an American producer of arcade games, and originally part of Atari Inc. ... Paperboy is a 1984 arcade game by Atari Games. ... Phozon is an arcade game that was released by Namco in 1983. ... Exidy was one of the largest creators of arcade video games during the early period of video games, from 1974-1983. ... Venture is a 1981 arcade game by Exidy. ... The dungeons of Blarney Castle. ... This article is about the arcade game, for the DJ, see Q-bert (DJ) Q*bert is a 1982 arcade game from Gottlieb. ... Depth perception is the visual ability to perceive the world in three dimensions. ...


Some games of this era were so popular that they entered the popular culture. The release of Pac-Man in 1980 caused such a sensation that it initiated what is now referred to as "Pac-Mania" (which later became the title of the last coin-operated game in the series, released in 1987). Released by Namco, the game featured a yellow, circle-shaped creature trying to eat dots through a maze while avoiding pursuing enemies. Though no one could really agree what the "hero" or enemies represented (sometimes they were referred to as ghosts, other times goblins or just monsters), the game was extremely popular; there are anecdotes to the effect that some game owners had to empty the game's coin bucket every hour in order to prevent the game's coin mechanism from jamming from having too many coins in the receptacle. The game spawned an animated television series, numerous clones, Pac-Man branded foods and a hit pop song, Pac-Man Fever. Though many popular games quickly entered the lexicon of popular culture, most have since left, and Pac-Man is unusual in remaining a recognized term in pop culture, along with Donkey Kong, Mario Bros., and Frogger. Popular culture, sometimes abbreviated to pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and licensed for distribution by Midway Games in 1979. ... 1980 1980 in games 1979 in video gaming 1981 in video gaming Notable events of 1980 in computer and video games. ... 1987 1987 in games 1986 in video gaming 1988 in video gaming Notable events of 1987 in video gaming. ... Namco Ltd ) is a amusement company based in Japan, best known overseas for video games development. ... Pac-Man Fever is a 1982 album recorded by Buckner & Garcia. ... This article is about the video game. ...


The enormous popularity of arcade games also led to the very first video game strategy guides; these guides (rare to find today) discussed in exacting detail the patterns and strategies of each game, including variations, to a degree that few guides seen since can match. "Turning the machine over" by making the score counter overflow and reset to zero was often the final challenge of a game for those who mastered it, and the last obstacle to getting the highest score.




Most Popular Games

The games below were some of the most popular and influential games of the era. All occupy a position in the KLOV's "Top 100 Videogames" list [3]. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 298 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (480 × 965 pixel, file size: 127 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arcade cabinet Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 298 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (480 × 965 pixel, file size: 127 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arcade cabinet Metadata... This article is about the video game character. ...

1978 Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...

1979 Space Invaders ) is an arcade video game designed by Tomohiro Nishikado in 1978. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ...

1980 Asteroids is a popular vector-based video arcade game released in 1979 by Atari. ... Galaxian is a 1979 fixed shooter arcade game by Namco. ... Lunar Lander was an early computer game that originally ran on the DEC GT40 graphics terminal (frequently connected to a PDP-10 mainframe computer) in 1974. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...

1981 For articles with similar titles, see Battle zone (disambiguation). ... Berzerk is a multi-directional shooter video game, released in 1980 by Stern Electronics of Chicago. ... Centipede is a vertically-oriented shoot em up arcade game produced by Atari in 1980. ... Defender is a horizontally-scrolling shoot em up arcade game created by Williams Electronics in 1980. ... Missile Command is a 1980 arcade game by Atari. ... Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and licensed for distribution by Midway Games in 1979. ... Phoenix is a popular shoot em up arcade game created and manufactured by Amstar Electronics (which was located in Phoenix, Arizona) in 1980, and licensed to Centuri for US distribution, and to Taito for Japanese distribution. ... Star Castle is a vector-based fixed shooter arcade game, made by Cinematronics in 1980. ... Tempest is an arcade game by Atari Inc. ... Warlords is a video game released by Atari for the Atari 2600 console in 1981. ... Gameplay screenshot from the C64 Wizard Of Wor is an arcade game from 1980, developed by Midway, and later ported to the Commodore 64 as well as the Atari 2600. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...

1982 Donkey Kong ) is an arcade game released by Nintendo in 1981. ... This article is about the video game. ... Galaga is a fixed shooter arcade game that was released by Namco in 1981 (and also licensed to Midway). ... Ms. ... Qix (pronounced kiks) is an arcade game, released by Taito America Corporation in 1981. ... Vanguard (J: ヴァンガード) is a 1981 arcade game developed by SNK. The game is known as one of the first scrolling shooters ever made and is additionally notable by being the first shoot em up where a player can shoot in four directions. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...

1983 Burgertime ( バーガータイム) is a 1982 Japanese arcade game created by Data East Corporation for its DECO Cassette System. ... Dig Dug is an arcade game released by Namco in 1982 to run on Namco Galaga hardware. ... Joust is a classic arcade game by Williams Electronics that was produced in 1982. ... Moon Patrol is a classic arcade game by Irem that was first released in 1982. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For the Futurama character, see Cubert Farnsworth. ... Robotron: 2084 (often simply called Robotron) is an arcade game created in 1982 by the company Vid Kidz (Eugene Jarvis and Larry Demar) for Williams Electronics. ... Time Pilot is a 1982 arcade game by Konami and distributed in the US by Centuri, designed by Yoshiki Okamoto. ... Tron was a 1982 arcade game created by Bally Midway based on the movie Tron, which was also released in 1982. ... Xevious is a vertical scrolling shooter arcade game by Namco, released in 1982. ... Zaxxon is a 1982 arcade game developed by Ikegami Tsushinki and released by Sega. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ...

1989 Dragons Lair was one of the first laserdisc video games, released in June 1983 by Cinematronics. ... Elevator Action is a 1983 arcade game by Taito. ... This article is about the original arcade game and its ports. ... For other uses, see Spy Hunter (disambiguation). ... Star Wars is an arcade game produced by Atari and released in 1983. ... Tapper is a 1983 arcade game released by Bally Midway. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...

1991 Final Fight ) is a beat em up series from Capcom. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ...

Street Fighter II ) is a 1991 competitive fighting game by Capcom. ...

The End of the Era

The Golden Age cooled as copies of popular games began to saturate the arcades. Arcades remained commonplace through the early 1990s and there were still new genres being explored, but most new games were shooters, maze games, and other variations on old familiar themes. For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay. ...


New generations of home computers and home video game consoles also sapped interest from arcades. Earlier consoles, such as the Atari 2600 and Mattel's Intellivision, were general-purpose and were meant to play a variety of games, and often could not measure up to arcade game hardware, which was built for the singular purpose of providing a single game well. In fact, the glut of poor-quality home video game systems contributed in no small way to the video game crash of 1983. Children playing on a Amstrad CPC 464 in the 1980s. ... Game console redirects here. ... The Atari 2600, released in October 1977, is the video game console credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in. ... Mattel headquarters in El Segundo Mattel Inc. ... The Intellivision is a video game console released by Mattel in 1979. ... ET for the Atari 2600 is considered by many to be emblematic of the crash along with the Atari 2600 version of Pac-Man. ...


But the debut of the Nintendo Entertainment System (1985) began to level the playing field by providing a reasonably good arcade experience at home. In the early to mid 1990s, the Super Nintendo and the Sega Megadrive greatly improved home play and some of the technology was even integrated into a few arcade machines. By the time of the Sony PlayStation (1995) and the Nintendo 64 (1996), both of which boasted true 3D graphics, many video game arcades across the country had gone out of business. “NES” redirects here. ... 1985 1985 in games 1984 in video gaming 1986 in video gaming Notable events of 1985 in video gaming. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System, also known as Super Nintendo, Super NES or SNES, is a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Brazil, Europe, and Australia. ... Sega MegaDrive 2 European version with joypad, game cart + box Sega Mega Drive (Japanese: メガドライブ Mega Doraibu) was a 16-bit video game console released by Sega. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... 1995 1995 in games 1994 in video gaming 1996 in video gaming Notable events of 1995 in video gaming. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, was Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... 1996 1996 in games 1995 in video gaming 1997 in video gaming Notable events of 1996 in video gaming. ... The rewrite of this article is being devised at Talk:3D computer graphics/Temp. ...


The arcade game industry still exists today, but in a greatly reduced form. Arcade game hardware is often based on home game consoles to facilitate porting an arcade game to a home system; there are arcade versions of Sega Dreamcast (NAOMI), Sony PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube (Triforce), and Microsoft Xbox (Chihiro) home consoles. Some arcades have survived by expanding into ticket-based prize redemption and more physical games with no home console equivalent, such as skee ball and whack-a-mole. Some genres, such as dancing and rhythm games (such as Dance Dance Revolution, part of the Bemani series) continue to be popular in arcades, particularly in Japan. In computer science, porting is the process of adapting software so that an executable program can be created for a computing environment that is different from the one for which it was originally designed (e. ... The Dreamcast , code-named White Belt, Black Belt, Dural, Dricas, Vortex, Katana, Shark and Guppy during development) is Segas final video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. ... The Sega NAOMI (New Arcade Operation Machine Idea) is a development of the Sega Dreamcast technology as a basis for an arcade system board. ... PS2 redirects here. ... The Nintendo GameCube (Japanese: ゲームキューブ; originally code-named Dolphin during development; abbreviated as GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the 128-bit era; the same generation as Segas Dreamcast, Sonys PlayStation 2, and Microsofts Xbox. ... The Triforce is an arcade system board developed jointly by Nintendo, Namco, and Sega, with the first games appearing in 2002. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... The Sega Chihiro system is a Sega arcade system board based on the architecture of the Microsoft Xbox. ... The object is to collect as many points as possible by rolling balls into the holes. ... Whac-A-Mole is a popular arcade redemption game invented in 1971 by Bobs Space Racers Inc. ... Dance Dance Revolution, a. ... Bemani (ビーマニ, biimani) is Konamis music video game division. ...


The relative simplicity yet solid gameplay of many of these early games has inspired a new generation of fans who can play them on mobile phones or with emulators such as MAME. Some classic arcade games are reappearing in commercial settings, such as Namco's Ms. Pac-Man 20 Year Reunion / Galaga Class of 1981 two-in-one game [4], or integrated directly into controller hardware (joysticks) with replaceable flash drives storing game ROMs. This article is about emulators in computer science. ... MAME is an emulator application designed to recreate the hardware of arcade game systems in software, with the intent of preserving gaming history and preventing vintage games from being lost or forgotten. ...


Legacy

The Golden Age of Arcade Games spawned numerous cultural icons and even gave some companies their identity. Elements from games such as Space Invaders, Pac-Man, Donkey Kong, Frogger, and Centipede are still recognized in today's popular culture. Space Invaders ) is an arcade video game designed by Tomohiro Nishikado in 1978. ... Pac-Man is an arcade game developed by Namco and licensed for distribution by Midway Games in 1979. ... Donkey Kong ) is an arcade game released by Nintendo in 1981. ... This article is about the video game. ... Centipede is a vertically-oriented shoot em up arcade game produced by Atari in 1980. ...


The phenomenal success of these early video games has led many hobbyists who were teenagers during the Golden Age to collect some of these classic games. Since few have any commercial value any longer, they can be acquired for US$200 to US$500 (though fully restored games can cost much more). USD redirects here. ...


Some fans of these games have companies devoted to restoring the classic games, and others, such as Arcade Renovations, which produces reproduction art for classic arcade games, focus solely on one facet of the restoration activity. Many of these restorationers have set up websites on the Internet full of tips and advice on restoring games to mint condition. There are also several newsgroups devoted to discussion around these games, and a few conventions such as California Extreme [5] dedicated to classic arcade gaming. A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Mint Condition is a six-person R&B band from the Twin Cities. ... A newsgroup is a repository usually within the Usenet system, for messages posted from many users at different locations. ...


References

  • The Official Price Guide to Classic Video Games by David Ellis (2004), ISBN 0-375-72038-3
  • The Ultimate History of Video Games: From Pong to Pokémon--The Story Behind the Craze That Touched Our Lives and Changed the World by Steven L. Kent (2001), ISBN 0-7615-3643-4
  • The Golden Age of Video Game Arcades (a 200-page story contained within Twin Galaxies' Official Video Game & Pinball Book of World Records) by Walter Day (1998), ISBN 1-887472-25-8
  1. ^ The Golden Age of Video Game Arcades, Ch. 01 - The Golden Age of Video Game Arcades, February 8, 1998Retrieved August 21, 2007.
  2. ^ The Golden Age of Video Game Arcades, Ch. 13 - The Golden Age Ends, February 8, 1998Retrieved August 21, 2007.
  3. ^ The Top Coin-Operated Videogames of All Time - The International Arcade Museum
  4. ^ Ms. Pac-Man/Galaga - Class Of 1981. Retrieved on September 10, 2006.
  5. ^ California Extreme. Retrieved on November 24, 2006.

Dave Ellis (born 1965) is an author and computer game designer. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

See also

This arcade cabinet, containing Centipede, is an upright. ... This is a list of arcade games organized alphabetically by name. ... This is a list of video game consoles by the era they appeared in. ...

External links


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m