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Encyclopedia > Golden Age
This article is about mythological Golden age(s).
For metaphorical uses, see Golden Age (metaphor). For other uses of "Golden Age" see The Golden Age.
The Golden Age by Pietro da Cortona.
The Golden Age by Pietro da Cortona.

The term Golden age stems from Greek mythology. It refers to the highest age in the Greek spectrum of Iron, Bronze, Silver and Golden ages, or to a time in the beginnings of Humanity which was perceived as an ideal state, or utopia, when mankind was pure and immortal. In literary works, the Golden Age usually ends with a devastating event, which brings about the Fall of Man (see Ages of Man). An analogous idea can be found in the religious and philosophical traditions of the Far East. For example, the Vedic or ancient Hindu culture saw history as cyclical composed of yugas with alternating Dark and Golden ages. The Kali yuga (Iron Age), Dwapara yuga (Bronze Age), Treta yuga (Silver age) and Satya yuga (Golden age) correspond to the four Greek ages. Similar beliefs can be found in the ancient Middle East and throughout the ancient world. A golden age is a period in a field of endeavour where great tasks were accomplished. ... TheGolden Age are an indie, rhythm and blues, rock and roll band from Sheffield, UK. // Current Members Nick Cooper - vocals and rhythm guitar Rich Jones - drums and backing vocals Paul Hoyland - Lead guitar Indy Chanda - Bass History The band was formed in 2003 as a four-piece, consisting of Rich... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (798x980, 173 KB) Summary PIETRO DA CORTONA, The Golden Age (Fresco, Sala della Stufa, Palazzo Pitti, Florence) Licensing This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (798x980, 173 KB) Summary PIETRO DA CORTONA, The Golden Age (Fresco, Sala della Stufa, Palazzo Pitti, Florence) Licensing This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term... Pietro da Cortona, byname of Pietro Berettini (November 1, 1596- May 16, 1669) was a prolific artist and architect of High Baroque. ... Left panel (The Earthly Paradise, Garden of Eden), from Hieronymus Boschs The Garden of Earthly Delights. ... Essentially, original sin is the doctrine, shared in one form or another by most Christian churches, that the sin of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden changed or damaged human nature, such that all human beings since then are innately predisposed to sin, and are powerless to overcome... The Ages of Man are the stages of human existence on the Earth according to Classical mythology. ... The far east as a cultural block includes East Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia and South Asia. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


According to Giorgio de Santillana, the former professor of history at MIT, and co-author of the book Hamlet's Mill[1], there are over 200 myth and folkstories from over 30 ancient cultures that spoke of a cycle of the ages tied to the movement of the heavens. Some Utopianist beliefs, both political and religious, hold that the Golden Age will return after a period of blessedness and gradual decadence is completed. Other proponents, including many modern day Hindus, believe a Golden age will gradually return as a natural consequence of the changing yugas. Hamlets Mill, by Giorgio de Santillana and Hertha von Dechend, is a nonfiction work of history and comparative mythology (particularly the subfield of archaeoastronomy), similar to Joseph Campbells The Masks of God; its essential premise is that much mythology and ancient literature has been badly misinterpreted and that... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into utopia. ...


Some pastoral works of fiction depict life in an imaginary Arcadia as being a continuation of life in the Golden Age; the shepherds of such a land have not allowed themselves to be corrupted into civilization.[2] Titians The Pastoral Concert Pastoral refers to the lifestyle of shepherds and pastoralists, moving livestock around larger areas of land according to seasons and availability of water and feed. ... Arcadia is a poetical name for fantasy land (having more or less the same notation as Utopia ), named after the Greek land. ... Shepherd in Făgăraş Mountains, Romania. ...

Contents

History

"The Course of Empire: The Arcadian or Pastoral State"]] Both in Europe as well as in the Middle East, the idea of a Golden Age is part of a mythical interpretation of history, which divides history into several consequent ages, or (predominantly in the Middle East) into empires or historical epochs. The Golden Age (in India the Satya Yuga) is perceived to have been the first and best age, followed by the Silver Age and so on. The lowest and worst age was the Kali yuga of the Dark Ages when the decay of civilisation reached its nadir, prior to the renaissance period and the present Dwapara yuga. This perception of history is different from the current linear paradigm which does not recognize any cyclicality. The theory of historical ages is often thought to be the mythical expression of a philosophy of history marked by cultural pessimism, or simply the belief of primitive cultures. A few modern theorists such as Walter Cruttenden, author of Lost Star of Myth and Time, believe the cycle of the ages has a basis in fact indirectly due to the motion of the solar system around another form.. Arcadia is a poetical name for fantasy land (having more or less the same notation as Utopia ), named after the Greek land. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Cultural pessimism is a significant presence in the general outlook of many historical cultures: things are going to the dogs, the Golden age is in the past, and the current generation is fit only for dumbing down and cultural careerism. ...


Greek and Roman antiquity

A myth of ages can be seen in Europe in the writings of Hesiod in the late 8th and early 7th century BC. Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived...


The Greek poet Hesiod, around the 8th century BC, in his compilation of the mythological tradition (the poem Works and Days), explained that, prior to the present era, there were other four progressively most perfect ones, the oldest of which was called the Golden age. In this stage: The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) Ruins of the training grounds at Olympia, Greece. ... Hesiod (Hesiodos) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, believed to have lived around the year 700 BCE. From the 5th century BCE, literary historians have debated the priority of Hesiod or of Homer. ... The Ages of Man are the stages of human existence on the Earth according to Classical mythology. ...

[...] they lived like gods without sorrow of heart, remote and free from toil and grief: miserable age rested not on them; but with legs and arms never failing they made merry with feasting beyond the reach of all evils. When they died, it was as though they were overcome with sleep, and they had all good things; for the fruitful earth unforced bare them fruit abundantly and without stint. They dwelt in ease and peace upon their lands with many good things, rich in flocks and loved by the blessed gods.

In this age, Hesiod writes, mankind lived in absolute peace, carefree like the gods because they never aged and death was a falling asleep. The main characteristic of this age according to Hesiod was that the earth produced food in abundance, so that agriculture was rendered superfluous. This characteristic also defines almost all later versions of the myth.


The Orphic school, a religious movement from Thrace which spread to Greece in the 6th century BC, held similar beliefs, including the denomination of the ages with metals. Some Orphics identified the Golden Age with the era of the god Phanes, who was regent over the Olympus before Cronus. In classical mythology however, the Golden Age took place during the reign of Cronus. In the 5th century BC, the philosopher Empedocles emphasised the idea of original peacefulness, innocence and harmony in all of nature, including human society. Orphism or Orphicism is a secret religious movement in the classical Greek world. ... Thraciae veteris typvs. ... Phanes is a Greek deity, hatched from the World-Egg by Kronos and Ananke, and is the primeval deity of procreation and the generation of new life. ... This article refers to a mountain in Greece. ... Classical or Greco-Roman mythology usually refers to the mythology, and the associated polytheistic rituals and practices, of Classical Antiquity. ... Cronus (Ancient Greek Κρόνος, Krónos), also called Cronos or Kronos, was the leader and the youngest of the first generation of Titans, divine descendants of Gaia, the earth, and Uranus, the sky. ... For the volcano, see Empedocles (volcano). ...

The Golden Age by Lucas Cranach the Elder.
The Golden Age by Lucas Cranach the Elder.

Several centuries later (29 BC) the Golden Age was depicted in Virgil's The Georgics. Here, the poet looked back again to sing the good old times before Jupiter, when: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x693, 167 KB) Das goldene Zeitalter um 1530 Holz 73,5 x 105,5 in München Bayrische Staatsgemäldesammlung File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Golden... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x693, 167 KB) Das goldene Zeitalter um 1530 Holz 73,5 x 105,5 in München Bayrische Staatsgemäldesammlung File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Golden... Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus becomes Roman Consul for the fifth time. ... Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), later called Virgilius, and known in English as Virgil or Vergil, was a classical Roman poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the substantially completed Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that became... Georgics Book III, Shepherd with Flocks, Vatican The Georgics, published in 29 BC, is the second major work by the Latin poet Virgil. ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ...

Fields knew no taming hand of husbandmen;

To mark the plain or mete with boundary-line-

Even this was impious; for the common stock

They gathered, and the earth of her own will

All things more freely, no man bidding, bore.

The topic is taken up again by Ovid's in his Metamorphoses (AD 8): Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC – Tomis, now Constanţa AD 17), a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... For other uses, see 8 (disambiguation). ...

The golden age was first; when Man yet new,

No rule but uncorrupted reason knew:

And, with a native bent, did good pursue.

Unforc'd by punishment, un-aw'd by fear, [...]

Peace and harmony prevailed during this age. Humans did not grow old, but died peacefully. Spring was eternal and people were fed on acorns from a great oak as well as wild fruits and honey that dripped from the trees. The spirits of those men who died were known as Daimones and were guides for the later ancient Greeks (who considered themselves to live in the later Iron Age.) Daimones is the name of a sountrack album by singer Anna Vissi. ... The Temple to Athena, the Parthenon Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around three thousand years. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ...


This race eventually died out when Prometheus (a Titan) gave the secret of fire to humans. Zeus punished humans, allowing Pandora to open her box which unleashed all evil in the mortal world. In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Greek: forethought) is the Titan chiefly honored for stealing fire from Zeus in the stalk of a fennel plant and giving it to mortals for their use. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... The Creation of ANESIDORA on a white-ground kylix by the Tarquinia Painter, ca 460 BCE (British Museum In Greek mythology, Pandora (all-gifted) was the first woman. ... Pandoras Box is the box entrusted to the mythological figures Epimetheus and his wife Pandora. ...


Within sequences or cycles of eras, the golden age stands alongside the silver age and the Iron Age, and conditions can improve or decline according to one's conception of mythic progression. A silver age is a name often given to a particular period within a history, typically as a lesser and later successor to a golden age, the metal silver generally being valuable, but less so than gold. ... In mythology, the Iron Age is the age following the golden, silver and bronze ages and characterized by a general degeneration of talent and virtue, and of literary excellence. ... The word mythology (from the Greek μυολογία mythología, from μυολογείν mythologein to relate myths, from μύος mythos, meaning a narrative, and λόγος logos, meaning speech or argument) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use the supernatural to interpret natural events and...


Also Plutarch, the Greek historian and biographer of the 1st century, dealt with the blissful and mythic past of the humanity. Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ... The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ...


Norse

The Old Norse word gullaldr (literally "Golden Age") was used in Völuspá to describe the period after Ragnarök where the surviving gods and their progeny build the city Gimlé on the ruins of Asgard. Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... Völuspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress) is the first poem in the Poetic Edda. ... Odin is depicted falling with his spear Gungnir while Surtr brandishes his sword. ... In Norse mythology, Gimlé (alternately Gimli) was a place where the survivors of Ragnarok were to live. ... In Norse mythology, Asgard (Old Norse: Ásgarður) is the realm of the gods, the Æsir, thought to be separate from the realm of the mortals, Midgard. ...


Hindu

The Indian teachings differentiate the four world ages (Yugas) not according to metals, but according to quality depicted as colors, whereby the white color is the purest quality and belongs to the first, ideal age. These colors were originally assigned to the planet Jupiter, Saturn, Mercury and Mars just like the metals. After the world fall at the end of the fourth, worst age (the Kali yuga) the cycle should be continued, eventually culminating in a new golden age. In Hindu philosophy, the existence of the world is divided into four Yugas (ages): Satya Yuga or Krita Yuga Treta Yuga Dwapara Yuga Kali Yuga According to the rishis of ancient India, the world goes through a continuous cycle of these ages. ...


The Krita Yuga also known as the Satya yuga, the First and Perfect Age, as described in the Mahabharata, a Hindu epic: The Krta Yuga, also spelt Krita Yuga, is considered one of the great yugas (ages, epochs) of Hinduism. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... Hinduism (known as in some modern Indian languages[1]) is a religion that originated on the Indian subcontinent. ... The epic is a broadly defined genre of poetry, and one of the major forms of narrative literature. ...

[...] Men neither bought nor sold; there were no poor and no rich; there was no need to labour, because all that men required was obtained by the power of will; the chief virtue was the abandonment of all worldly desires. The Krita Yuga was without disease; there was no lessening with the years; there was no hatred or vanity, or evil thought whatsoever; no sorrow, no fear. All mankind could attain to supreme blessedness. [...]

The Hindus make reference to at least two overlapping yuga cycles, driven by celestial motions, that affect conditions on earth. One cycle, the Maha Yuga, is millions of years in length and therefore difficult to relate to human history or events. The shorter yuga cycle lasts 24,000 years, including an ascending age of 12,000 years (one daiva yuga) and a descending age of 12,000 years, for a total equal to one precession of the equinox. Both cycles are comprised of the four eras, and the Satya Yuga is the first and the most significant age in each cycle. This Golden Age era lasts 7200 years (out of the 12,000 years in the ascending period) and another 7200 years (out of 12,000 years in the descending period) in the precessional cycle. Knowledge, meditation, and communion with Spirit hold special importance in this era. The average life expectancy of a human being in Satya Yuga is believed to be about 400 years. During Satya Yuga, most people engage only in good, sublime deeds and mankind lives in harmony with the earth. Ashrams become devoid of wickedness and deceit. Natyam (such as Bharatanatyam), according to Natya Shastra, did not exist in the Satya Yuga "because it was the time when all people were happy". Ashrams in ancient India, were Hindu hermitages where sages used to live in peace and tranquility amidst nature. ... ... Bharatanatyam dancer Bharatanatyam (also spelled Bharathanatyam, Bharatnatyam or Bharata Natyam) ( Sanskrit: भारतनाट्यम bʰāratanāṭyam, Tamil:பரதநாட்டியம் ) is a classical dance form originating from Tamil Nadu, a state in Southern India. ... The Natya Shastra or Nātyaśāstra is the principal work of dramatic theory in the Sanskrit drama of classical India. ...


Christianity

According to Tom Whyte and John Ashton's The Quest for Paradise, the Golden Age idea contributed to the modern Christian views of Heaven. John Ashton born 22 February 1948 in Springfield, Massachusetts, USA graduated from the University of Southern California School of Theatre and became an actor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Golden Age is identified with Eden. It is considered to return during the Kingdom of God, the reign of Christ which will never end. See also millennialism. The church father Lactantius availed himself with his description "golden age" of the future thousand-year old of Christ's Kingdom including the usual characteristics (blessedness of entire nature, sumptuous fertility, animal peace, disappearing agriculture and navigation). // Eden may refer to: Garden of Eden, an original meaning, a place east of Eden described in Book of Genesis. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Kingdom of God or Reign of... Christ is the English of the Greek word (Christós), which literally means The Anointed One. ... Millennialism (or chiliasm), from millennium, which literally means thousand years, is primarily a belief expressed in some Christian denominations, and literature, that there will be a Golden Age or Paradise on Earth where Christ will reign prior to the final judgment and future eternal state, primarily derived from the book... Lucius Caelius (or Caecilius?) Firmianus Lactantius was an early Christian author who wrote in Latin (c. ...


Book of Isaiah ch. 65, which somehow is reminisce of the mythological Golden Age descriptions, is believed to refer to that state. The Book of Isaiah (Hebrew: Sefer Yshayah ספר ישעיה) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament, traditionally attributed to Isaiah. ...

17 For, behold, I create new heavens and a new earth: and the former shall not be remembered, nor come into mind.

18 But be ye glad and rejoice for ever in that which I create: for, behold, I create Jerusalem a rejoicing, and her people a joy.

19 And I will rejoice in Jerusalem, and joy in my people: and the voice of weeping shall be no more heard in her, nor the voice of crying.

20 There shall be no more thence an infant of days, nor an old man that hath not filled his days: for the child shall die an hundred years old; but the sinner being an hundred years old shall be accursed.

21 And they shall build houses, and inhabit them; and they shall plant vineyards, and eat the fruit of them.

22 They shall not build, and another inhabit; they shall not plant, and another eat: for as the days of a tree are the days of my people, and mine elect shall long enjoy the work of their hands.

23 They shall not labour in vain, nor bring forth for trouble; for they are the seed of the blessed of the LORD, and their offspring with them.

24 And it shall come to pass, that before they call, I will answer; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear.

25 The wolf and the lamb shall feed together, and the lion shall eat straw like the bullock: and dust shall be the serpent's meat. They shall not hurt nor destroy in all my holy mountain, saith the LORD.

Book of Isaiah

Another connection made by early Christians and Jews was that this was a reference to the Nephilim spoken of in the book of Genesis, as referenced from the Book of Enoch, a pseudopigraphal work. The book of Enoch is quoted in Jude 14, 15. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... ... The brief Epistle of Jude is a book in the Christian New Testament canon. ...


Early modern Europe

In early modern Europe, some called the Enlightenment a second Golden Age (the first assumed to be that of the ancient authors Homer, Aristophanes, Virgil and especially Horace); in England, the Augustan Age and the 18th century were then considered a Golden Age for the progress made in thought (David Hume), science (Royal Society), and literature (Jonathan Swift, Daniel Defoe, Alexander Pope). Look up Enlightenment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Homer (Greek: , ) was an early Greek poet and aoidos (rhapsode) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... Sketch of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: , ca. ... Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), later called Virgilius, and known in English as Virgil or Vergil, was a classical Roman poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the substantially completed Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that became... Horace, as imagined by Anton von Werner Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the Queen (King) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2007 estimate... Augustan Age may refer to The period in Roman history when Caesar Augustus became the first emperor. ... see also: David Hume of Godscroft David Hume (April 26, 1711 – August 25, 1776)[1] was a Scottish philosopher, economist, and historian. ... The premises of The Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... Daniel Defoe Daniel Defoe (1660 [?] â€“ April 1731) was an English writer, journalist and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... Alexander Pope, an English poet best known for his Essay on Criticism and Rape of the Lock Alexander Pope (21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744) is generally regarded as the greatest English poet of the early eighteenth century, best known for his satirical verse and for his translation of Homer. ...


New Age

New Age and Age of Aquarius is considered by adherents of this worldview that will be a renovation of humanity. A New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ... The Age of Aquarius (starting around the 27th century) is one of the twelve astrological ages. ...


ccording to the Celestine Prophecy, a new spiritual awakening is occurring in human culture. This awakening represents the creation of a new, more complete worldview, which replaces a five-hundred-year-old preoccupation with secular survival and comfort. While this technological preoccupation was an important step, our awakening to life's coincidences is opening us up to the real purpose of human life on this planet, and the real nature of our universe. The Celestine Prophecy was first published in 1993 and is the work of James Redfield. ...


Fantasy

In modern fantasy worlds whose background and setting sometime draw heavily on real-world myths, similar or compatible concepts of Golden Age exist in the said world's prehistory; when Deities or Elf-like creatures existed, before the coming of humans. A fantasy world is a type of fictional universe in which magic or other similar powers work. ... In many works of modern fantasy, elves are a race of semi-divine humanoid beings. ... Trinomial name Homo sapiens sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 Humans, or human beings, are bipedal primates belonging to the mammalian species Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man or knowing man) in the family Hominidae (the great apes). ...


For example, a Golden Age exists in Middle-earth legendarium. Arda (the period of our world where The Lord of the Rings is set), was designed to be symmetrical and perfect. After the wars of the Gods, Arda lost its perfect shape (known as Arda Unmarred) and was called Arda Marred. Another kind of 'Golden Age' follows later, after the Elves awoke; the Eldar stay on Valinor, live with the Valar and advance in arts and knowledge, until the rebellion and the fall of the Noldor, reminiscent of the Fall of Man. Eventually, after the end of the world, the Silmarilli will be recovered and the light of the Two Trees of Valinor rekindled. Arda will be remade again as Arda Healed. A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arda is the name given to the Earth in a period of fictional prehistory, wherein the places mentioned in The Lord of the Rings and related material once existed. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the British academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This article is about the fictional setting. ... This article is about the fictional setting. ... Eldar may refer to: Eldar Djangirov, jazz pianist Eldar is also a known Hebrew name. ... Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details about The Silmarillion follow. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Silmarils (Quenya Silmarilli) are three fictional sacred objects in the form of brilliant star-like jewels which contained the unmarred light of the Two Trees. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Two Trees of Valinor are Telperion and Laurelin, the Silver Tree and the Gold that brought light to the Land of the Valar in ancient times. ... This article is about the fictional setting. ...


In The Wheel of Time universe, the Age of Legends is the name given to the previous Age: In this society, channelers were common and Aes Sedai - trained channelers - were extremely powerful, able to make angreal, sa'angreal, and ter'angreal, and holding important civic positions. The Age of Legends is seen as a utopian society without war or crime, and devoted to culture and learning. Aes Sedai were frequently devoted to academic endeavours, one of which inadvertently resulted in a hole - 'The Bore' - being drilled in the Dark One's prison. The immediate effects were not realised, but the Dark One gradually asserted power over humanity, swaying many to become his followers. This resulted in the War of Power and eventually the Breaking of the World. This article is about a fantasy series. ... The Aes Sedai are a society in the fictional universe of Robert Jordans Wheel of Time book series. ... This article is about the concepts and terminology in Robert Jordans fantasy fiction series The Wheel of Time. ...


Another example is in the background of the Lands of Lore classic computer game, the history of the Lands is divided in Ages. One of them is also called Golden Age, where the Lands were ruled by the 'Ancients', no wars existed yet, until that age was over with the 'War of the Heretics'. Lands of Lore or LoL is a classical computer role-playing game series by Virgin Interactive, following the tradition of Dungeon Master but introducing a linear scenario-based storyline, rather than characters and feats. ...


See also

The Ages of Man are the stages of human existence on the Earth according to Classical mythology. ... Arcadia is a poetical name for fantasy land (having more or less the same notation as Utopia ), named after the Greek land. ... // Eden may refer to: Garden of Eden, an original meaning, a place east of Eden described in Book of Genesis. ... Left panel (The Earthly Paradise, Garden of Eden), from Hieronymus Boschs The Garden of Earthly Delights. ... The term Merry England, or in more jocular, half-timbered spelling Merrie England, refers to a semi-mythological, idyllic, and pastoral way of life that the inhabitants of England allegedly enjoyed at some poorly-defined point between the Middle Ages and the onset of the Industrial Revolution. ... Millennialism (or chiliasm), from millennium, which literally means thousand years, is primarily a belief expressed in some Christian denominations, and literature, that there will be a Golden Age or Paradise on Earth where Christ will reign prior to the final judgment and future eternal state, primarily derived from the book... The Satya Yuga (Devanagari: सत्य युग), also called Sat Yuga, Krta Yuga and Krita Yuga in Hinduism, is the Yuga (Age or Era) of Truth, when humankind is governed by gods, and every manifestation or work is close to the purest ideal and mankind will allow intrinsic goodness to rule supreme. ... The Krta Yuga, also spelt Krita Yuga, is considered one of the great yugas (ages, epochs) of Hinduism. ...

References

  1. ^ Giorgio de Santillana, Herta von Dechend: Hamlet's Mill: An Essay Investigating the Origins of Human Knowledge and its Transmission through Myth, ISBN-10: 0879232153 (Hamlet´s Mill at amazon.com)
  2. ^ Bridget Ann Henish, The Medieval Calendar Year, p96, ISBN 0-271-01904-2

External Links

Concepts of Heaven
Christian Kingdom of God | Garden of Eden · Paradise | New Jerusalem | Pearly gates
Jewish Gan Eden | Olam Haba
Islamic Jannah | Houri | Sidrat al-Muntaha
Mormon Celestial Kingdom | Spirit world
Ancient Greek Elysium | Empyrean | Hesperides
Celtic Tír na nÓg | Mag Mell
Norse Valhalla | Asgard
Indo-European Paradise | Svarga | Aaru | The Summerland | Myth of Er | Fortunate Isles
Related concepts Nirvana | Millennialism | Utopianism | Golden Age | Arcadia | The guf | Well of souls

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Golden age - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1781 words)
The age teachings are the mythische expression of a culture-pessimistic historical philosophy, which understands the historical development primarily as nature-necessary purge process of the culture or civilization.
The myth of the initial golden age draws the picture of a sound and normative past, from which the subsequent ages departed by decadence gradually.
In Tolkien's mythology, the Golden Age can be identifed with the Years of the Trees, when Valar and Eldar lived in Valinor, lighted by the Two Trees and the stars.
Golden Age of Comic Books - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (737 words)
The Golden Age of Comic Books was a period in the history of American comic books, generally thought as lasting from 1938 until the late 1940s or early 1950s, during which comic books enjoyed a surge of popularity, the archetype of the superhero was created and defined, and many of the most famous superheroes debuted.
Although the creation of the superhero was the Golden Age's most significant contribution to pop culture, many other genres of comic book appeared on the newsstands side-by-side with Superman and Captain America.
Another notable and enduring non-superhero property created during the Golden Age was the Archie Comics cast of teen-humor characters.
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