FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Goldap" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Goldap

Gołdap (sometimes also spelt Gołdapia, Lithuanian Geldapė) is a Polish town and a seat of a powiat in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodship. It is located between the Szeskie hills and the Puszcza Romnicka forest. It has a population of 13,600 (1998). Powiat is the Polish name for county, a second-level unit of the administrative division and local government in Poland. ... Warmińsko-Mazurskie voivodship since 1999 Coat of Arms of Warmia-Masuria Warmia i Mazury (officially, the Warmińsko-Mazurskie Voivodship) is an administrative region or voivodship of north-eastern Poland. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...


History

The decision to found the city was made by Albert of Prussia in 1565. The first inhabitants arrived in 1566, from Lithuania. The city, located in a profitable location on the crossing of several trade routes, grew rapidly and by 1570 it was granted a city charter. A part of the Ducal Prussia, Goldap shared its fate. After The Deluge it became a part of Kingdom of Prussia and then, in 1871, of Imperial Germany. Albert (May 16, 1490 - March 20, 1568), (Albertus in Latin, Albrecht in German) Grand Master of the Teutonic Order and first duke of Ducal Prussia, was the third son of Frederick of Hohenzollern, prince of Ansbach and Bayreuth, and Sophia, daughter of Casimir IV Jagiello grand duke of Lithuania and... Events March 1 - the city of Rio de Janeiro is founded April 27 - Cebu City is established becoming the first Spanish settlement in the Philippines. ... Events January 7 - Pius V becomes Pope Selim II succeeds Suleiman I as Sultan of the Ottoman Empire Religious rioting in the Netherlands signifies the beginning of the Eighty Years War in the Netherlands. ... Events January 23 - The assassination of regent James Stewart, Earl of Moray throws Scotland into civil war February 25 - Pope Pius V excommunicates Queen Elizabeth I of England. ... Town privileges was an important feature of European towns during most of the 2nd millenium. ... The Prussian Tribute, oil on canvas by Jan Matejko, 1882, 388 x 875 cm, National Museum in Kraków. ... This article is about the history of Poland. ... The Kingdom of Prussia existed from 1701 until 1918, and from 1871 was the leading kingdom of the German Empire, comprising in its last form almost two-thirds of the area of the Empire. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article or section should include material from German Monarchy The term German Empire (the translation from German of Deutsches Reich) commonly refers to Germany, from its consolidation as a unified nation-state on January 18, 1871, until the abdication of Kaiser (Emperor) Wilhelm II on November 9, 1918. ...


The town, known as Geldapė in Lithuanian, by the time was at the south of Lithuanian-speaking part of Prussia, known as Lithuania Minor. In the town in the late middle ages there were majority of Lithuanians and a minority of Germans and Mosurians; surroundings were Lithuanian as well. This situation lasted until early XIXth century. Both voluntary Germanisation and moving of ethnic Germans in the Lithuania Minor was intense, and although Geldapė was not touched by it before, it started to Germanise quite rapidly by early XIX age. By the early XX age less than 5% of people of Geldapė were ethnic Lithuanians (by the time only in the north of Lithuania Minor there remained territories with majorities or significant minorities of Lithuanians). The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1701-1918 The word Prussia (German: Preußen or Preussen, Polish: Prusy, Lithuanian: Prūsai, Latin: Borussia) has had various (often contradictory) meanings: The land of the Baltic Prussians (in what is now parts of southern Lithuania, the Kaliningrad exclave of Russia and... Lithuania Minor (or Prussian Lithuania) was the northern part of East Prussia before WWI, populated mostly by Lithuanians, with Insterburg, Gumbinnen, Labiau, Ragnit, Tilsit and Klaipėda (Memel) as main centers. ... Lithuania Minor (or Prussian Lithuania) was the northern part of East Prussia before WWI, populated mostly by Lithuanians, with Insterburg, Gumbinnen, Labiau, Ragnit, Tilsit and Klaipėda (Memel) as main centers. ... Lithuania Minor (or Prussian Lithuania) was the northern part of East Prussia before WWI, populated mostly by Lithuanians, with Insterburg, Gumbinnen, Labiau, Ragnit, Tilsit and Klaipėda (Memel) as main centers. ...


In 18th and 19th centuries the town was a notable centre of commerce and production of various goods for the local market, as well as an important centre of grain production. In 1818 it became a seat of a county. In 1879 it was joined with the rest of the world by a railway. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ... 1879 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


During the World War I the town was a scene of fierce Russo-German fights and the fronts passed the city twice. As a result, the town was 86% destroyed. It was rebuilt, and soon after the war ended it yet again reached a similar number of inhabitants it had had before. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of Russian history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start...


During World War II it was planned by the German staff as one of the strongholds guarding the rest of German-held East Prussia from the Red Army assaults. As a result of heavy fighting for the city in August of 1944, 90% of the town was yet again destroyed. According to German war-time propaganda, there were ca. 50 civillians killed on purpose by the Red Army. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The Oberkommando des Heeres (OKH) was Germanys Army High Command from 1936 to 1945. ... East Prussia (German: Ostpreu en; Polish: Prusy Wschodnie; Russian: Восточная Пруссия — Vostochnaya Prussiya) was a province of Kingdom of Prussia, situated on the territory of former Ducal Prussia. ... Red Army flag The short forms Red Army and RKKA refer to the Workers and Peasants Red Army, (Рабоче-Крестьянская Красная Армия - Raboche-Krestyanskaya Krasnaya Armiya in Russian), the armed forces organised by the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War in 1918. ... 1944 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


After the war the town, together with a large part of East Prussia, was granted to Poland and a large part of its inhabitants was resettled to West Germany. The remaining Masurians were soon joined by Poles expelled from the Polish areas annexed by the Soviet Union. The town was rebuilt and retained its status as a seat of a powiat. Mazurs are Polish ethnic group from Mazovia (Catholics) or East Prussia (Protestant), the latter often called Masurians in English. ... Powiat is the Polish name for county, a second-level unit of the administrative division and local government in Poland. ...


Today the town of Gołdap remains an important centre of local trade and commerce. There are several small food production facilities (milk plant, industrial slaughterhouse, mill) located there, as well as a paper mill and a small tourist equipment works. In addition, it is one of the centres of tourism, with many skiing, swimming, sailing and leisure centres located both in the town and around it.


External links

  • Gołdap city government webpage (http://www.goldap.pl/)
  • Gołdap web portal (http://www.goldap.info/)
  • Gołdap on the map, via www.pilot.pl (http://www.pilot.pl/index.php3?Z_CITY_NAME=goldap&form_t=1&lang=pl)

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Goldap - Definition, explanation (590 words)
The city, located in a profitable location on the crossing of several trade routes, grew rapidly and by 1570 it was granted a city charter.
A part of the Ducal Prussia, Goldap shared its fate.
After The Deluge it became a part of Kingdom of Prussia and then, in 1871, of Imperial Germany.
Goldap Travel Guide - Goldap Vacations - VirtualTourist.com (264 words)
Goldap Travel Guide - Goldap Vacations - VirtualTourist.com
Home » Travel Guides » Europe » Poland » Goldap
Plan a Goldap vacation with reviews, tips and photos posted by real travelers and Goldap locals.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m