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Encyclopedia > Goddess

A goddess is a female deity. Many cultures have goddesses. Most often these goddesses are part of a polytheistic system that includes multiple deities. Pantheons in various cultures can include both goddesses and gods, and in some cases also intersex deities. This article is about the film. ... The Goddess is a 1958 Columbia Pictures motion picture starring Kim Stanley and Lloyd Bridges. ... For other uses, see Female (disambiguation). ... This article is about the term Deity in the context of mysticism and theology. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... Polytheism is belief in or worship of multiple gods or deities. ... A pantheon (from Greek Πάνθειον, temple of all gods, from πᾶν, all + θεός, god) is a set of all the gods of a particular religion or mythology, such as the gods of Hinduism, Norse, Egyptian, Shintoism, Greek, vodun, Yoruba Mythology and Roman mythology. ... An intersexual is a person (or individual of any unisexual species) who is born with genitalia and/or secondary sexual characteristics of indeterminate sex, or which combine features of both sexes. ...


In both ancient and modern cultures, the symbolism of gendered deities is open to a wide variety of interpretations. The primacy of a monotheistic or near-monotheistic goddess is advocated by some modern matriarchists and pantheists[attribution needed] as a female version of, or analogue to, the Abrahamic god. In some feminist circles the Abrahamic god is perceived as being rooted in the patriarchal concept of dominance — to the exclusion of feminine concepts [1]. Pantheism (Greek: πάν ( pan ) = all and θεός ( theos ) = God) literally means God is All and All is God. It is the view that everything is of an all-encompassing immanent abstract God; or that the universe, or nature, and God are equivalent. ... Abrahamic religions symbols designating the three prevalent monotheistic religions – Judaism, Christianity, and Islam Abrahamic religion is a term commonly used to designate the three prevalent monotheistic religions – Judaism, Christianity, and Islam[1][2] – which claim Abraham (Hebrew: Avraham אַבְרָהָם ; Arabic: Ibrahim ابراهيم ) as a part of their sacred history. ... Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ...


Among duotheists, the primary deities are one goddess and one god, who are seen as together making up a larger whole that is both the transcendent divine as well as the substance of all creation.[citation needed] The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...

Contents

Indo-European religions

See also: Proto-Indo-European religion

Ancient anthropomorphic Ukrainian stone stela (Kernosovka stela), possibly depicting a late Proto-Indo-European god, most likely Dyeus The existence of similarities among the deities and religious practices of the Indo-European peoples allows glimpses of a common Proto-Indo-European religion and mythology. ...

Dharmic religions

Hinduism

Main article: Hindu Goddess

Hinduism is a complex of various belief systems that sees many gods and goddesses as being representative of and/or emanative from a single source, Brahman, understood either as a formless, infinite, impersonal monad in the Advaita tradition or as a dual god in the form of Lakshmi-Vishnu, Radha-Krishna, Devi-Shiva in Dvaita traditions. Shaktas, worshippers of the Goddess, equate this god with Devi, the mother goddess. Such aspects of one god as male god (Shaktiman) and female energy (Shakti), working as a pair are often envisioned as male gods and their wives or consorts and provide many analogues between passive male ground and dynamic female energy.
For example, Brahma pairs with Sarasvati. Shiva likewise pairs with Uma who later is represented through a number of avatars (incarnations): Parvati and the warrior figures, Durga and Kali. All goddesses in Hinduism are sometimes grouped together as the great goddess, Devi. A further step was taken by the idea of the Shaktis. Their ideology based mainly on tantras sees Shakti as the principle of energy through which all divinity functions, thus showing the masculine to be dependent on the feminine. Indeed, in the great shakta scripture known as the Devi Mahatmya, all the goddesses are shown to be aspects of one presiding female force, one in truth and many in expression, giving the world and the cosmos the galvanic energy for motion. It is expressed through both philosophical tracts and metaphor that the potentiality of masculine being is given actuation by the feminine divine. Local deities of different village regions in India were often identified with "mainstream" Hindu deities, a process that has been called "Sanskritization". Others attribute it to the influence of monism or Advaita which discounts polytheist or monotheist categorization. Goddesses are an integral part of Hinduism, and the worship of goddesses is a significant aspect of Hindu religion. ... This page deals with the Hindu concept of The Supreme Reality. ... Advaita Vedanta is probably the best known of all Vedanta schools of Hinduism, the others being Dvaita and Vishishtadvaita. ... For other uses, see Lakshmi (disambiguation). ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... It has been suggested that Shri Vidya be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Shiva (disambiguation). ... Dvaita (Devanagari:द्बैत, Kannada:ದ್ವೈತ) (also known as Tattvavada and Bheda-vada), a school of Vedanta (the most widespread Hindu philosophy) founded by Madhvacharya, stresses a strict distinction between God (Vishnu) and the individual living beings (jivas). ... Shaktism is a denomination of Hinduism that worships Shakti, the Divine Mother, in all of her forms whilst not rejecting the importance of masculine and neuter divinity. ... It has been suggested that Shri Vidya be merged into this article or section. ... Shaktiman, or Shaktimaan, is a fictional character, an Indian television superhero created by Mukesh Khanna and shown on Doordarshan, Indias national television network, beginning September 13, 1997. ... Lakshmi is a common aspect of Shakti Shakti meaning force, power or energy is the Hindu concept or personification of Gods female aspect, sometimes referred to as The Divine Mother. Shakti represents the active, dynamic principles of feminine power. ... This article concerns the Hindu creator god, Brahma. ... This article is about Saraswati, the Hindu goddess. ... For other uses, see Shiva (disambiguation). ... This 14th century statue depicts Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right}. It is housed in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. In Hinduism, Uma is the goddess of beauty and sunlight. ... This article is about the concept in Hindu philosophy. ... For the Harry Potter character, see Parvati Patil. ... In Hinduism, Durga (Sanskrit: ) is a form of Devi, the supreme goddess. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... It has been suggested that Shri Vidya be merged into this article or section. ... This article is an overview of Tantra and an in-depth look at the Tantra of Hinduism. ... THE PRIMEVAL ENERGY One of the unique features of Hinduism is the fact that it conceives Divinity also as Mother Goddess. ... For other uses, see Monist (disambiguation). ...


While the monist forces have led to a fusion between some of the goddesses (108 names are common for many goddesses), centrifugal forces have also resulted in new goddesses and rituals gaining ascendance among the laity in different parts of Hindu world. Thus, the immensely popular goddess Durga was a pre-Vedic goddess who was later fused with Parvati, a process that can be traced through texts such as Kalika Purana (10th century), Durgabhaktitarangini (Vidyapati 15th century), Chandimangal (16th century) etc. In Hinduism, Durga (Sanskrit: ) is a form of Devi, the supreme goddess. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Vidyapati (1352? – 1448?) was born in the village of Bisapi, Madhubani district, Bihar state, India. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ...


Sikhism

The fundamental belief of Sikhism is that God exists as a real entity, but does not have gender. The Sikh Scriptures refer to God as Father and Mother thus: Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ), founded on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and nine successive gurus in fifteenth century Northern India, is the fifth-largest religion in the world. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Guru Granth Sahib. ...

God is my Protector, my Mother and Father. Meditating in remembrance on Him, I do not suffer in sorrow. (1)

Guru Granth Sahib page 1183 The Shri Guru Granth Sahib (Punjabi: , ) is the 11th Guru of Sikhism, the holy book of Sikhism, which is revered as a living Guru by the Sikhs. ...

So the concept of a goddess, although not normally referred to by Sikhs, is in keeping with the holy text of the religion and adheres to the overall concept of God. A Sikh man wearing a turban The adherents of Sikhism are called Sikhs. ...


Graeco-Roman religion

Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture
Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture
Main articles: Greek religion and Roman religion

Ceres (mythology) - statue in the Louvre, Paris File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... In Roman mythology, Ceres was the goddess of growing plants (particularly cereals) and of motherly love. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Greek religion is the polytheistic religion practiced in ancient Greece in form of cult practices, thus the practical counterpart of Greek mythology. ... The term Roman religion may refer to: Ancient Roman religion Imperial cult (Ancient Rome), Sol Invictus Mithraism Roman Christianity Category: ... The Eleusinian Mysteries (Greek: Ἐλευσίνια Μυστήρια) were initiation ceremonies held every year for the cult of Demeter and Persephone based at Eleusis in ancient Greece. ... Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1874) (Tate Gallery, London In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, Persephónē) was the Queen of the Underworld of epic literature. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... Baubo is an old woman in Greek mythology who jested with Demeter when she was down. ... This article is about the Greek goddess. ... A fountain in Madrid depicting Cybele in her chariot drawn by lions, in the Plaza de Cibeles Originally a Phrygian goddess, Cybele (Greek: Κυβέλη) was a deification of the Earth Mother who was worshipped in Anatolia from Neolithic times. ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek goddess. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Celtic religion

Main article: Celtic polytheism

Celtic polytheism refers to the religious beliefs and practices of ancient Celts until the Christianization of Celtic-speaking lands. ... In Celtic mythology, Agrona was a goddess of strife and war worshipped in Britain. ... In Irish mythology as it is presently constituted, Brigit or Brighit (exalted one) was the daughter of the Dagda (and therefore one of the Tuatha Dé Danann) and wife of Bres of the Fomorians. ... In Celtic mythology, Dea Matrona (divine mother goddess) was the goddess of the river Marne in Gaul. ... The Mórrígan (great queen) or Morrígan (terror or phantom queen) (aka Morrígu, Mórríghan, Mór-Ríogain) is a figure from Irish mythology widely considered to be a goddess or former goddess. ... // In ancient Celtic polytheism, Sul or Sulis (also found as Sulevis: see Suleviae) was the deification of spring-water, especially of thermal spring-water, conceived as a nourishing, life-giving Mother goddess. ... In Insular Brythonic mythology, Verbeia was the goddess of the Wharfe River in North Yorkshire, England. ...

Norse religion

Main article: Norse paganism

Surviving accounts of indigenous Norse paganism contain numerous female deities, giantesses and goddesses. Norse paganism or Nordic religion is a termed used to abbreviate the religion preferably amongst the Germanic tribes living in Nordic countries under pre-Christian period that are supported by archaeology findings and early written materials. ...

A statue of Freyja at Djurgården, Stockholm, Sweden. ... Frigg spinning the clouds, by J C Dollman In Norse mythology, Frigg (Eddas) or Frigga (Gesta Danorum) was said to be foremost among the goddesses,[1] the wife of Odin, queen of the Æsir, and goddess of the sky. ... Fulla or Fylla is, in Norse mythology, an ásynja. ... (The term may also refer to Gna. ... Faroe Islands postage stamp - Gullveigs Execution Gullveig (seemingly gold drink or gold might) is, in Norse mythology, a mysterious goddess or giantess who became the igniting source for the War of the Gods. ... In Norse mythology, Hel (sometimes Anglicized or Latinized as Hela) is the queen of Hel, the Norse underworld. ... Hlín is, in Norse mythology, one of the three handmaids of Frigg, together with Fulla and Gna. ... Idun and the Apples (1890) by J. Doyle Penrose. ... Nanna is a moon goddess in Norse mythology, the daughter of Nep and wife of Baldur. ... Nerthus (also sometimes Hertha) is a Germanic fertility goddess who was mentioned by Tacitus in his work entitled Germania. ... The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. ... Nótt rides her horse in this 19th century painting by Peter Nicolai Arbo. ... In Norse mythology, Skaði ‡ is a mountain giantess, wife of the Van god Njord and thus a Van goddess herself. ... The Trundholm sun chariot pulled by a horse is believed to be a sculpture illustrating an important part of Nordic Bronze Age mythology. ...

Abrahamic religions

Monotheist cultures, which recognise only one central deity, generally do characterize that deity as male, implicitly already grammatically by using masculine gender, but also explicitly by terms such as "Father" or "Lord". In all monotheist religions, however, there are mystic undercurrents which emphasize the feminine aspects of the godhead, e.g. the Collyridians in the time of early Christianity, who viewed Mary as a Goddess, the medieval visionary Julian of Norwich, the Judaic Shekinah and the Gnostic Sophia traditions, and some Sufi texts in Islam. For the Celtic Frost album, see Monotheist (album) In theology, monotheism (from Greek one and god) is the belief in the existence of one deity, or in the oneness of God. ... In linguistics, grammatical genders, also called noun classes, are classes of nouns reflected in the behavior of associated words; every noun must belong to one of the classes and there should be very few which belong to several classes at once. ... The Collyridians were an obscure minor early Christian heretical group. ... Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ... Julian of Norwich (c. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Shekinah (שכינה - alternative transliterations Shechinah, Shekhina, Shechina) is the English spelling of the Hebrew language word that means the glory or radiance of God, or God resting in his house or Tabernacle amongst his people. ... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge... For the Gnostic Christians, the Sophia was a central element in their cosmological understanding of the Universe. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to Divine love and the cultivation of the elements of the Divine within the individual human being. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...


Judaism

In Judaism, God (and souls, angels and other spiritual objects) has no gender. However, the word 'God' is grammatically male since Ancient Hebrew, like Modern Hebrew, had no neuter gender, only masculine and feminine. Although Judaism uses masculine words to describe God more than feminine words, Judaism maintains that God has no gender. While God is frequently referred to using masculine formations (because of the grammatical gender of the words generally used to describe God), the majority of objects related to worship in Judaism such as the Torah are grammatically feminine. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... At the bottom of the hands, the two letters on each hand combine to form יהוה (YHVH), the name of God. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ...


Christianity

In Christianity, belief in a feminine deity was deemed characteristic of heresy, but veneration for Mary, the mother of Jesus, as an especially privileged human being, though not as a deity, has continued since the beginning of the Christian faith. Virgin Mary redirects here. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ...


Since the 1980s Christian feminists have challenged this traditional view; some such as Mary Daly no longer consider themselves Christian, but others continue to seek room within their traditions for the Divine Feminine and to press for female spiritual leadership. (See thealogy.) Mary Daly (born October 16, 1928 in Schenectady, New York) is a radical feminist theologian. ... Thealogy is literally the study of the Goddess (Greek θεά, thea, goddess + λόγος, logos, study). In 1993, Charlotte Carons definition of thealogy as reflection on the divine in feminine and feminist terms appeared, but the term actually originates in the writings of Isaac Bonewits in 1974. ...


However, while the term "goddess" was rejected in what is usually considered orthodox Christianity, some Christians believe that God transcends sex, whether masculine or feminine.


Some people believe that the example of Jesus and the tradition of centuries has Christians refer to and address God as "Father", not "Mother". However, this is not the real meaning of the words Jesus used to describe the deity.[citation needed] The original words have a meaning of both mother and father. They believe that in Jesus, who was male, God became incarnate. Pronouns that grammatically are of feminine gender (not pronouns that refer to the female sex, such as the English "she") are used to refer to the Holy Spirit in languages, such as Hebrew, where the word for "spirit" is of feminine grammatical gender. In Greek, where the word for "spirit" is of neuter grammatical gender, the pronoun that refers to it is of neuter gender. In Latin, the pronoun is of masculine gender, referring to the grammatically masculine word "spiritus". However, while in English, a language without grammatical gender, the normal pronoun to refer to a spirit would be "it", the Holy Spirit is customarily referred to as "he", perhaps partly due to the influence of Latin and of the other Germanic languages, in which the word for spirit is of masculine grammatical gender. This article is about the Male sex. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream...


Professedly Christian members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) believe in, but do not worship, a Heavenly Mother, the wife and female counterpart and equal of the Heavenly Father.[2] For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Sarah, also known as Sarai, is sometimes translated (incorrectly) as 'goddess'. It actually means Princess.[citation needed]


Pre-Islamic Arabia and Islam

In pre-Islamic Mecca the goddesses Uzza, al-Manāt and al-Lāt were known as "the daughters of god". Uzzā was worshipped by the Nabataeans, who equated her with the Graeco-Roman goddesses Aphrodite, Urania, Venus and Caelestis. Each of the three goddesses had a separate shrine near Mecca. Uzzā, was called upon for protection by the pre-Islamic Quraysh. "In 624 at the battle called "Uhud", the war cry of the Qurayshites was, "O people of Uzzā, people of Hubal!" (Tawil 1993). This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), al-Ê•uzzā the Mightiest One or the strong (derived from the root Ê•zy) was a pre-Islamic Arabian fertility goddess who was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... Manāt was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), Allāt (a contraction of pre-Arabic *al-ilāhat the Goddess) was a pre-Islamic Arabian goddess who was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... Petra, the Nabataean capital The Nabataeans, a people of ancient Arabia, whose settlements in the time of Josephus gave the name of Nabatene to the border-land between Syria and Arabia from the Euphrates to the Red Sea. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... Simon Vouet, The Muses Urania and Calliope, c. ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Quraish (sura) is also the name of a Surah in the Quran. ... view of Mt. ... Hubal (هبل) was a god worshipped in pagan Arabia, notably at Mecca before the arrival of Islam. ...


According to Ibn Ishaq's controversial account of the Satanic Verses (q.v.), these verses had previously endorsed them as intercessors for Muslims, but were abrogated. Most Muslim scholars have regarded the story as historically implausible, while opinion is divided among western scholars such as Leone Caetani and John Burton, who argue against, and William Muir and William Montgomery Watt, who for its plausibility. Muhammad ibn Ishaq ibn Yasar, or simply Ibn Ishaq (Arabic: , meaning the son of Isaac) (died 767, or 761 (Robinson 2003, p. ... For the novel by Salman Rushdie, see The Satanic Verses. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Leone Caetani (September 12, 1869 - December 25, 1935) was an Italian. ... Sir William Muir (April 27, 1819–1905), was a Scottish Orientalist. ... William Montgomery Watt is a English Islamic scholar. ...


In Islam, God (Allah), although referred to with masculine pronouns, is genderless. For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ...


New religious movements

Discordianism

In Discordianism, Eris or Discordia, is generally venerated as Goddess, as illustrated in the first clause of the Pentabarf: Discordianism is a modern, chaos-centered religion founded circa 1958–1959 by Malaclypse the Younger with the publication of its principal text, the Principia Discordia. ... Eris (ca. ...

"There is no Goddess but Goddess and She is Your Goddess. There is no Erisian Movement but The Erisian Movement and it is The Erisian Movement. And every Golden Apple Corps is the beloved home of a Golden Worm."

She is generally described as a quick-tempered woman who spreads chaos and discord, which are fundamental to life and creativity. However, due to the nature of the religion, this is open to individual interpretation.


Many people liken Eris to a concept or idea, though this may be considered blasphemy by some. For other uses, see Concept (disambiguation). ... IDEA may refer to: Electronic Directory of the European Institutions IDEA League Improvement and Development Agency Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Indian Distance Education Association Integrated Data Environments Australia Intelligent Database Environment for Advanced Applications IntelliJ IDEA - a Java IDE Interactive Database for Energy-efficient Architecture International IDEA (International Institute... For the black metal band, see Blasphemy (band). ...


Reconstructionism

Polytheistic reconstructionists focus on reconstructing polytheistic religions, including the various goddesses and figures associated with indigenous cultures. Romuva Spring JorÄ— festival in Kulionys, Lithuania in 2006. ... Romuva Spring JorÄ— festival in Kulionys, Lithuania in 2006. ...


Wicca

In Wicca "the Goddess" or "the Lady" is a deity of prime importance, along with her consort the Horned God. In the earliest Wiccan publications she is described as a tribal goddess of the witch community, neither omnipotent nor universal, and it was recognised that there was a greater "Prime Mover", although the witches did not concern themselves much with this being.[3] Within many forms of Wicca the Goddess has come to be considered as a universal deity, more in line with her description in the Charge of the Goddess, a key Wiccan text. In this guise she is the "Queen of Heaven", similar to Isis; she also encompasses and conceives all life, much like Gaia. Much like Isis and certain late Classical conceptions of Selene,[4] she is held to be the summation of all other goddesses, who represent her different names and aspects across the different cultures. For other uses, see Wicca (disambiguation). ... The Pashupati-like figure on the Gundestrup cauldron The Horned God is a modern syncretic term, invented to link together numerous male nature gods out of such widely-dispersed and historically unconnected mythologies as the Celtic Cernunnos, the Welsh Caerwiden, the English Herne the Hunter, the Hindu Pashupati, the Greek... The cosmological argument is a metaphysical argument for the existence of God, or a first mover of the cosmos. ... The Charge of the Goddess is a traditional inspirational text sometimes used in Neopaganism and Wicca. ... This article discusses the ancient goddess Isis. ... For other uses, see Gaia. ... This article is about the Greek goddess. ...


The Goddess is often portrayed with strong lunar symbolism, drawing on various cultures and deities such as Diana, Hecate and Isis, and is often depicted as the Maiden, Mother and Crone triad popularised by Robert Graves (see Triple Goddess below). Many depictions of her also draw strongly on Celtic goddesses. ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... For other uses, see Hecate (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the ancient goddess Isis. ... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism, apparently the religion of the Iron Age Celts. ...


Some Wiccans believe there are many goddesses, and in some forms of Wicca, notably Dianic Wicca, the Goddess alone is worshipped, and the God plays very little part in their worship and ritual. This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Pashupati-like figure on the Gundestrup cauldron The Horned God is a modern syncretic term, invented to link together numerous male nature gods out of such widely-dispersed and historically unconnected mythologies as the Celtic Cernunnos, the Welsh Caerwiden, the English Herne the Hunter, the Hindu Pashupati, the Greek...


Triple Goddess

The lunar Triple Goddess symbol.
The lunar Triple Goddess symbol.
Main article: Triple Goddess

Goddesses or demi-goddesses appear in sets of three in a number of ancient European pagan mythologies; these include the Greek Erinyes (Furies) and Moirae (Fates); the Norse Norns; Brighid and her two sisters, also called Brighid, from Irish or Keltoi mythology. Image File history File links Triple-Goddess-Waxing-Full-Waning-Symbol. ... Image File history File links Triple-Goddess-Waxing-Full-Waning-Symbol. ... A Triple Goddess symbol (probably originating from Classical Greek lunar symbolism), representing the three aspects of the moon (waxing crescent, full moon, waning crescent) and womankind (maiden, mother, crone). ... A Triple Goddess symbol (probably originating from Classical Greek lunar symbolism), representing the three aspects of the moon (waxing crescent, full moon, waning crescent) and womankind (maiden, mother, crone). ... Two Furies, from an ancient vase. ... For other meanings, see Fate, a disambiguation page. ... The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. ... In Irish mythology, Brigid or Brighid (exalted one) was the daughter of Dagda (and therefore one of the Tuatha de Danaan) and wife of Bres of the Fomorians. ...


Robert Graves popularised the triad of "Maiden" (or "Virgin"), "Mother" and "Crone", and while this idea did not rest on sound scholarship, his poetic inspiration has gained a tenacious hold. Considerable variation in the precise conceptions of these figures exists, as typically occurs in Neopaganism and indeed in pagan religions in general. Some choose to interpret them as three stages in a woman's life, separated by menarche and menopause. Others find this too biologically based and rigid, and prefer a freer interpretation, with the Maiden as birth (independent, self-centred, seeking), the Mother as giving birth (interrelated, compassionate nurturing, creating), and the Crone as death and renewal (holistic, remote, unknowable) — and all three erotic and wise. Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... Menarche (IPA: ) is the first menstrual period, or first menstrual bleeding in the females of human beings. ... Menopause is the physiological cessation of menstrual cycles associated with advancing age in women. ...


In dominantly Hellenic derived religions and in subsequent New Age and Wiccan religions, often three of the four phases of the moon (waxing, full, waning) symbolise the three aspects of the Triple Goddess: put together they appear in a single symbol comprising a circle flanked by two mirrored crescents. Some, however, find the triple incomplete, and prefer to add a fourth aspect. This might be a "Dark Goddess" or "Wisewoman", perhaps as suggested by the missing dark of the moon in the symbolism above, or it might be a specifically erotic goddess standing for a phase of life between Maiden (Virgin) and Mother, or a Warrior between Mother and Crone. There is a male counterpart of this in the English poem "The Parliament of the Thre Ages". This article is about Earths moon. ... For other uses, see Warrior (disambiguation). ...


Religious feminism

At least since first-wave feminism in the United States, there has been interest in analyzing religion to see if and how doctrines and practices treat women unfairly, as in Elizabeth Cady Stanton's The Woman's Bible. Again in second-wave feminism in the U.S., as well as in many European and other countries, religion became the focus of some feminist analysis in Judaism, Christianity, and other religions, and some women turned to ancient goddess religions as an alternative to Abrahamic religions (Womanspirit Rising 1979; Weaving the Visions 1989). Today both women and men continue to be involved in the Goddess movement (Christ 1997). The popularity of organizations such as the Fellowship of Isis attest to the continuing growth of the religion of the Goddess throughout the world. First-wave feminism refers to a period of feminist activity during the nineteenth century and early twentieth century in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Elizabeth Cady Stanton, (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902), was an American social activist and leading figure of the early womans movement . ... Second-wave feminism refers to a period of feminist activity which began during the early 1960s and lasted through the late 1980s. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Fellowship of Isis (FOI) is multi-religious, multi-racial, and multi-cultural organization. ...


While much of the attempt at gender equity in mainstream Christianity (Judaism never recognized any gender for God) is aimed at reinterpreting scripture and degenderizing language used to name and describe the divine (Ruether, 1984; Plaskow, 1991), there are a growing number of people who identify as Christians or Jews who are trying to integrate Goddess imagery into their religions (Kien, 2000; Kidd 1996,"Goddess Christians Yahoogroup").


Metaphorical reference

The term "goddess" has also been adapted to poetic and secular use as a complimentary description of a non-mythological woman. For example, Shakespeare had several of his male characters address female characters as goddesses, including Demetrius to Helena in A Midsummer Night's Dream ("O Helen, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine!"), Berowne to Rosaline in Love's Labour's Lost ("A woman I forswore; but I will prove, Thou being a goddess, I forswore not thee"), and Bertram to Diana in All's Well That Ends Well. Pisanio also compares Imogen to a goddess to describe her composure under duress in Cymbeline. More recently, CBS News correspondent Bob Simon described Aishwarya Rai as "a Greek goddess with an Indian spirit" while interviewing her on 60 Minutes. [5] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Washington Allstons 1818 painting Hermia and Helena. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ... For the film, see Loves Labours Lost (2000 film). ... For the Chiodos album, see Alls Well That Ends Well (album). ... Dame Ellen Terry as Imogen This article is about Shakespeares play. ... CBS News logo, used from Sept. ... Bob Simon is a CBS News correspondent. ... Aishwarya Rai (Kannada: ಐಶ್ವರ್ಯಾ ರೈ, IPA: ; born November 1, 1973) is an Indian actress. ... This article is about the CBS news magazine. ...


See also

Devi (The Goddess) is a 1960 film by Bengali director Satyajit Ray, starring Soumitra Chatterjee and Sharmila Tagore. ... Satyajit Ray (Bengali:  ) (May 2, 1921–April 23, 1992) was a Bengali Indian filmmaker and polymath. ... God, as a male deity, contrasts with female deities, or goddesses while the term goddess specifically refers to a female deity, words like gods and deities can be applied to all gods collectively, regardless of gender. ... This entry discusses how the Abrahamic faiths of Judaism, Christianity and Islam deal with God and gender. ... Goddess worship is a general description for the veneration of a female Goddess or goddesses. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This list of deities aims at giving information about deities in the different religions, cultures and mythologies of the world. ... This list of deities aims to give information about deities in the different religions, cultures and mythologies of the world. ... A Cucuteni culture statuette, 4th millennium BC. A mother goddess is a goddess, often portrayed as the Earth Mother, who serves as a general fertility deity, the bountiful embodiment of the earth. ... Polytheism is belief in or worship of multiple gods or deities. ... Henotheism (Greek heis theos one god) is a term coined by Max Müller, to mean devotion to a single God while accepting the existence of other gods. ... The Hebrew Goddess by Raphael Patai Series in Jewish Folklore and Anthropology Wayne State University Press ISBN 0-8143-2271-9 The Hebrew Goddess demonstrates that the Jewish religion, far from being pure monotheism, contained from earliest times strong polytheistic elements, chief of which was the cult of the mother... The sacred feminine refers to the mythic representation of the mother goddess symbolized through images and events connected with fertility and reproduction from the earliest times. ... For the Gnostic Christians, the Sophia was a central element in their cosmological understanding of the Universe. ... Shekinah (שכינה - alternative transliterations Shechinah, Shekhina, Shechina) is the English spelling of the Hebrew language word that means the glory or radiance of God, or God resting in his house or Tabernacle amongst his people. ... Lakshmi is a common aspect of Shakti Shakti meaning force, power or energy is the Hindu concept or personification of Gods female aspect, sometimes referred to as The Divine Mother. Shakti represents the active, dynamic principles of feminine power. ... Star Trek: Enterprise starship, see Kumari (Star Trek). ... a. ... Kuan Yin (Pinyin: Guanyin; also written Kwan Yin or in other variants which hyphenate or remove the space between the two words) is the bodhisattva of compassion as venerated by East Asian Buddhists. ... Temple of Anahita: goddess of ancient Persia, Iran. ... Matsu (媽祖, pinyin: Māzǔ, Wade-Giles: Ma-tsu, lit. ... The Sun goddess emerging out of a cave, bringing sunlight back to the universe. ... For other uses, see Oh My Goddess. ...

References

  1. ^ Eisler, Riane "The Challice and the Blade"
  2. ^ Smith, Joseph F. (1909). Man: Origin and Destiny, pp. 348-355. 
  3. ^ Gardner, Gerald [1959] (1988). The Meaning of Witchcraft. Lakemont, GA US: Copple House Books, pp. 26-27. 
  4. ^ Betz, Hans Dieter (ed.) (1989). The Greek Magical Papyri in Translation : Including the Demotic Spells : Texts. University of Chicago Press. 
  5. ^ 60 Minutes, January 2, 2005

It has been suggested that New Forest coven be merged into this article or section. ...

Bibliography

  • Christ, Carol P., Rebirth of the Goddess, Addison-Wesley 1997.
  • Kidd, Sue Monk, The Dance of the Dissident Daughter, HarperSanFrancisco 1996.
  • Jenny Kien, Reinstating the Divine Woman in Judaism, Universal 2000.
  • David Kinsley, Hindu Goddesses: Vision of the Divine Feminine in the Hindu Religious Traditions, ISBN 81-208-0379-5.
  • Plaskow, Judith, Standing Again at Sinai, HarperCollins 1991.
  • Ruether, Rosemary Radford, Woman-Church, Harper & Row 1984.
  • Womanspirit Rising, ed. Carol P. Christ and Judith Plaskow, Harper & Row 1979.
  • Weaving the Visions, ed. Judith Plaskow and Carol P. Christ, Harper & Row 1989.
  • Jackson, Jared, "The Rise of Kristy", New Deity Publications 2006.
  • Ternes, Jacqueline, "Goddess Vision", Harper & Row 1987

  Results from FactBites:
 
GODDESS WORSHIP (1599 words)
Goddess worship was gradually combined with worship of male Gods to produce a variety of Pagan polytheistic religions, among the Greeks, Romans, Celts, etc. Author Leonard Shlain offers a fascinating alternative explanation.
Leonard Shlain, "The Alphabet versus the Goddess," Viking, (1998).
Leonard Shlain, "The Alphabet versus the Goddess," at: http://www.alphabetvsgoddess.com/
Goddess - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2059 words)
A goddess is a female deity, in contrast with a male deity known as a "god".
Goddesses or demi-goddesses appear in sets of three in a number of ancient European pagan mythologies; these include the Greek Erinyes (Furies) and Moirae (Fates); the Norse Norns (Fates); Brighid and her two sisters, also called Brighid, from Irish or Keltoi mythology, and so on.
This might be a "Dark Goddess" or "Wisewoman", perhaps as suggested by the missing dark of the moon in the symbolism above, or it might be a specifically erotic goddess standing for a phase of life between Maiden (Virgin) and Mother, or a Warrior between Mother and Crone.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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