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Encyclopedia > God Save the Queen
God Save the Queen
Publication of an early version in The Gentleman's Magazine, 15 October 1745. The title, on the Contents page, is given as "God save our lord the king: A new song set for two voices".
Publication of an early version in The Gentleman's Magazine, 15 October 1745. The title, on the Contents page, is given as "God save our lord the king: A new song set for two voices".
National and Royal Anthem of Flag of Australia Australia (royal)
Flag of Canada Canada (royal)
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Flag of New Zealand New Zealand (national and royal)
Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom (national and royal)
Also known as God Save the King
(when the monarch is male)
Lyrics Author unknown
Music Composer unknown

God Save the Queen (instrumental) Image File history File links Size of this preview: 530 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1064 × 1204 pixel, file size: 112 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): God Save the... The Gentlemans Magazine was the first general-interest magazine, and the most influential periodical of its time. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Jamaica. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Bahamas. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ...

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"God Save the Queen", or "God Save the King", is an anthem used in a number of Commonwealth realms; it is the national anthem of the United Kingdom, one of the two national anthems of New Zealand and Cayman Islands, and the royal anthem of Australia, Canada, the Isle of Man, Belize and Jamaica. In countries not previously part of the British Empire the tune of "God Save the Queen" has also been used as the basis for different patriotic songs, though still generally connected with royal ceremony. The authorship of the song is unknown, and beyond its first verse, which is consistent, it has many historic and extant versions: Since its first publication, different verses have been added and taken away and, even today, different publications include various selections of verses in various orders.[1] In general only one, or sometimes two verses are sung, but on rare occasions three.[2] One or two bars may also form a part of the Vice Regal Salute in Commonwealth realms outside the United Kingdom. The words of the song, like its title, are adapted to the gender of monarch, with "King" replacing "Queen", "he" replacing "she", and so forth, when a king reigns. In the United Kingdom, the last line of the third verse is also changed (see below). The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... A royal anthem is a patriotic song, much like a national anthem that recognizes the nations monarch. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... In the Commonwealth Realms, a Vice Regal Salute is a short piece of music played in front of a governor-general, governor or lieutenant governor as a form of salute to him/her during certain formal ceremonies. ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ...

Contents

History

The origin of the tune is surrounded by uncertainty, myth and speculation. In The Oxford Companion to Music, Percy Scholes devotes about four pages to this subject,[3] pointing out the similarities to an early plainsong melody, although the rhythm is very distinctly that of a galliard, and he gives examples of several such dance tunes that bear a striking resemblance to "God Save the King/Queen". Scholes quotes a keyboard piece by Dr. John Bull (1619) which has some strong similarities to the modern tune, depending on the placing of accidentals that at that time were unwritten in certain cases and left to the discretion of the player (see musica ficta). He also points to several pieces by Henry Purcell, one of which includes the opening notes of the modern tune, set to the words "God Save The King". The Oxford Companion to Music, tenth edition. ... Percy Alfred Scholes (1877–1958) was a musician, journalist and prolific writer, whose best-known achievement was the compilation of the Oxford Companion to Music. ... Broadly speaking, plainsong is the name given to the body of traditional songs used in the liturgies of the Catholic Church. ... The galliard (gaillarde, in French) was a form of Renaissance dance and music popular all over Europe in the 16th century. ... John Bull (1562 or 1563–March 15, 1628) was an Welsh composer, musician, and organ builder. ... An accidental is a musical notation symbol used to raise or lower the pitch of a note from that indicated by the key signature. ... In European music prior to about 1600, musica ficta (from Latin, false or feigned music) referred to chromatically altered pitches, not notated in the music, which were to be supplied by singers. ... Henry Purcell Henry Purcell (IPA: ;[1] September 10 (?),[2], 1659–November 21, 1695), was an English Baroque composer. ...


The first definitive published version of the present tune appeared in 1744 in Thesaurus Musicus, as a setting of the familiar first verse, and the song was popularised in Scotland and England the following year, with the landing of Charles Edward Stuart. It was recorded as being sung in London theatres in 1745, with, for example, Thomas Arne writing a setting of the tune for the Drury Lane Theatre. This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Charles Edward Stuart (31 December 1720 – 31 January 1788), known in Scots Gaelic as Teàrlach Eideard Stiùbhairt, was the exiled claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and is now commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. ... Thomas Augustine Arne (1710-March 5, 1778) was an English composer, best known for the popular patriotic song, Rule Britannia, which is still frequently sung, notably at the Last Night of the Proms; and also his musical settings of songs from the plays of William Shakespeare. ... Currently home to Lord Of The Rings, the musical. ...


Scholes' analysis includes mention of "untenable" and "doubtful" claims, as well as "an American misattribution". Some of these are:

  • A tale, widely believed in France, that the tune Grand Dieu Sauve Le Roi, was written by Jean-Baptiste Lully to celebrate the healing of Louis XIV's anal fistula.[4] Lully set words by the Duchess of Brinon to music, and the tune was plagiarised by Handel. Translated in Latin under the name Domine, Salvum Fac Regem, it became the French anthem until 1792.[5] After the Battle of Culloden, the Hanover dynasty would have adopted this melody as the British anthem. Scholes points out gross errors of date which render these claims untenable, and they have been ascribed to a 19th-century forgery, the Souvenirs of the Marquise de Créquy.[6]
  • James Oswald: He is a possible author of the Thesaurus Musicus, so may have played a part in the history of the song, but is not a strong enough candidate to be cited as the composer of the tune.
  • Dr. Henry Carey: Scholes refutes this attribution, firstly, on the grounds that Carey himself never made such a claim. Secondly, when the claim was made by Carey's son (as late as 1795), it was accompanied by a request for a pension from the British Government on that score. Thirdly, the younger Carey claimed that his father had written parts of it in 1745, even though the older Carey had died in 1743. It has also been claimed that the work was first publicly performed by Carey during a dinner in 1740 in honour of Admiral Edward "Grog" Vernon, who had captured the Spanish harbour of Porto Bello (then in Colombia, now Panama) during the War of Jenkins' Ear.

Scholes recommends the attribution "traditional" or "traditional; earliest known version by John Bull (1562–1628)". The English Hymnal (musical editor Ralph Vaughan Williams) gives no attribution, stating merely "17th or 18th cent."[7] Jean-Baptiste Lully. ... Louis XIV redirects here. ... An anal fistula is an abnormal infection that grows a second head between the epithelialised surface of the anal canal and (usually) the perianal skin. ... “Handel” redirects here. ... Belligerents Great Britain Jacobites Commanders William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender Strength 8,000 ca. ... Charlotte-Victoire de Froullay de Tessé, Marquise de Créquy de Heymont de Canaples dAmbrières (1699? 1701? 1714? - 1803) was a member of a very old family of French nobility, the Créquy (often spelled Créqui), that counted several distinguished public servants and prelates, in particular in... James Oswald (1711-1769) was a Scots composer and music publisher. ... Henry Carey is the name of either Henry Charles Carey (1793-1879) - an American economist Henry Carey (died 1743) - dramatist and song-writer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the town in Panama. ... Combatants British Empire Spain Commanders Edward Vernon James E. Oglethorpe George Anson Charles Knowles Blas de Lezo Manuel de Montiano Andrés Reggio The War of Jenkins Ear was a conflict between Great Britain and Spain that lasted from 1739 to 1748. ... The English Hymnal was published in 1906 for the Church of England under the editorship of Percy Dearmer and Ralph Vaughan Williams. ... A statue of Ralph Vaughan Williams in Dorking. ...


Use in the United Kingdom

The phrase "God Save the King" has continued to be used quite separately from the song, as seen in this poster from World War I.
The phrase "God Save the King" has continued to be used quite separately from the song, as seen in this poster from World War I.

"God Save the Queen" is the national anthem of the United Kingdom. Like many aspects of British constitutional life, its official status derives from custom and use, not from Royal Proclamation or Act of Parliament. In general only one or two verses are sung, but on rare occasions three.[2] The variation in the United Kingdom of the lyrics to "God Save the Queen" is the oldest amongst those currently used, and forms the basis on which all other versions used throughout the Commonwealth are formed; though, again, the words have varied throughout the years. In sport, "God Save the Queen" is usually used as the English national anthem only, while Scotland and Wales have their own anthems in sports such as Rugby, Cricket and so on.[8] This only occurs in sports in which the four countries compete independently. One exception being football where both England and Northern Ireland use "God Save the Queen". Therefore, when the two teams play each other just one anthem is played. Scotland use "Flower of Scotland" and Wales use "Land of My Fathers" (Welsh: "Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau"). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (506 × 758 pixel, file size: 149 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) WW I poster - It is far better to face the bullets than to be killed at home by a bomb. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (506 × 758 pixel, file size: 149 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) WW I poster - It is far better to face the bullets than to be killed at home by a bomb. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... A proclamation (Lat. ... An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... There is no official national anthem of Scotland[1]. However, there is a complex and on-going social and political dispute amongst many contenders for the title of the nations de jure song, which has polarised much of the public. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... For the Irish FAs all-Ireland international team, see Ireland national football team (IFA). ... First international Scotland 0–0 England  (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Scotland 11–0 Ireland  (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 February 1901) Biggest defeat  Uruguay 7–0 Scotland (Basel, Switzerland; 19 June 1954) World Cup Appearances 8 (First in 1954) Best result Round 1, all European Championship Appearances 2 (First... The Scotland rugby team lines up for the national anthem Flower of Scotland (Flùr na h-Alba in Gaelic) is an unofficial national anthem of Scotland, a role for which it competes against the older Scotland the Brave. ... First international  Scotland 4 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 26 March 1876) Biggest win Wales 11 - 0 Ireland  (Wrexham, Wales; 3 March 1888) Biggest defeat  Scotland 9 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 March 1878) World Cup Appearances 1 (First in 1958) Best result Quarter-finals, 1958 The Wales national football team... Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau (pronounced , usually translated as land of our fathers init, but literally old country of my fathers) is, by tradition, the national anthem of Wales. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...


In sports like formula one, or the Olympics, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are usually competing as one nation and therefore "God Save the Queen" is used to represent anyone or any team that comes from the United Kingdom.[8] F1 redirects here. ... Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Medal count Winter Olympic Games Medal count Olympic sports Medal counts Participating NOCs Olympic symbols Olympics WikiProject Olympics Portal Athens 2004 • Beijing 2008 Torino 2006 • Vancouver 2010 ...


Lyrics in the United Kingdom

The phrase "God Save the King" is much older than the song, appearing, for instance, several times in the King James Bible.[9] Scholes says that as early as 1545 "God Save the King" was a watchword of the Royal Navy, with the response being "Long to reign over us".[10][11] He also notes that the prayer read in churches on anniversaries of the Gunpowder Plot includes words which might have formed part of the basis for the second verse "Scatter our enemies... assuage their malice and confound their devices". The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... A contemporary sketch of the conspirators. ...


In 1745, The Gentleman's Magazine published "God save our lord the king: A new song set for two voices", describing it as "As sung at both Playhouses" (the Theatres Royal at Drury Lane and Covent Garden).[12] The Gentlemans Magazine was the first general-interest magazine, and the most influential periodical of its time. ... Currently home to Lord Of The Rings, the musical. ... The Floral Hall of the Royal Opera House The Royal Opera House is a performing arts venue in London. ...


Traditionally, the first performance was thought to have been in 1745, when it was sung in support of King George II, after his defeat at the Battle of Prestonpans by the army of the Charles Edward Stuart, son of James Francis Edward Stuart, the Jacobite claimant to the British throne, whose forces were mostly Scottish Catholics. George II (George Augustus; 10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... Combatants British Army Jacobites Commanders John Cope Charles Edward Stuart Strength ca. ... Charles Edward Stuart (31 December 1720 – 31 January 1788), known in Scots Gaelic as Teàrlach Eideard Stiùbhairt, was the exiled claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and is now commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. ... The Prince James, Prince of Wales (James Francis Edward Stuart; The Old Pretender or The Old Chevalier; 10 June 1688 – 1 January 1766) was the son of the deposed James II and VII. As such, he claimed the English, Scottish and Irish thrones (as James III and VIII) from the... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ...


It is sometimes claimed that, ironically, the song was originally sung in support of the Jacobite cause: the word "send" in the line "Send him victorious" could imply that the king was absent. Also there are examples of early eighteenth century Jacobean drinking glasses which are inscribed with a version of the words and were apparently intended for drinking the health of King James II. James II and VII (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[2] was King of England, King of Scots,[1] and King of Ireland from 6 February 1685 to 11 December 1688. ...


Scholes acknowledges these possibilities but argues that the same words were probably being used by both Jacobite and Hanoverian supporters and directed at their respective kings.[13]


Standard version in the United Kingdom

God Save the Queen (standard version)

God save our gracious Queen,1
Long live our noble Queen,
God save the Queen:
Send her victorious,
Happy and glorious,
Long to reign over us:
God save the Queen.
O Lord, our God, arise,
Scatter her enemies,
And make them fall.
Confound their politics,
Frustrate their knavish tricks,
On Thee our hopes we fix,
God save us all.
Thy choicest gifts in store,
On her be pleased to pour;
Long may she reign:
May she defend our laws,
And ever give us cause
To sing with heart and voice
God save the Queen.*

* When the monarch of the time is male, beyond the other alterations mentioned above, the last line of the third verse is changed to "with heart and voice to sing/ God Save the King".

There is no definitive version of the lyrics. However, the version consisting of the following three verses has the best claim to be regarded as the 'standard' UK version, appearing not only in the 1745 Gentleman's Magazine, but also in publications such as The Book of English Songs: From the Sixteenth to the Nineteenth Century (1851),[14] National Hymns: How They are Written and how They are Not Written (1861),[15] Household Book of Poetry (1882),[16] and Hymns Ancient and Modern, revised version (1982).[17] The same version with verse two omitted appears in publications including Scouting for boys (1908),[18] and on the U.K. Government's "Monarchy Today" website.[19] At the Queen's Golden Jubilee Party at the Palace concert, Prince Charles referred in his speech to the "politically incorrect second verse" of the National Anthem. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the European Union. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ...


In the United Kingdom, the first verse is the only verse typically sung, even at official occasions, although the third verse is sung in addition on rare occasions, and usually at the Last Night of the Proms. A Promenade concert in the Royal Albert Hall, 2004. ...


Around 1745, the anti-Jacobite sentiment was captured in a fourth verse, with a prayer for the success of George Wade's army then assembling at Newcastle. These words attained some short-term popularity, although they did not appear in the published version in Gentleman's Magazine: Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... The Rt. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ...

Lord, grant that Marshal Wade,
May by thy mighty aid,
Victory bring.
May he sedition hush and like a torrent rush,
Rebellious Scots to crush,
God save the King.

This verse was abandoned soon after, and certainly before the song became accepted as the UK national anthem in the 1780s and 1790s.[20][21]
Various other attempts were made during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to add verses to commemorate particular royal or national events. For example, according to Fitzroy Maclean, when Jacobite forces bypassed Wade's force and reached Derby, but then retreated and when their garrison at Carlisle surrendered to a second government army led by King George's son, the Duke of Cumberland, another verse was added.[22] Other short-lived verses were notably anti-French.[23] However, none of these survived into the twentieth century.[24] This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see Carlisle (disambiguation). ... Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland (April 15, 1721–October 31, 1765), a younger son of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline, was a noted military leader. ...

God Save the Queen
God Save The Queen 2007 St Giles Fair.ogg
God Save the Queen sung by the public at St Giles' Fair, Oxford, 2007.
details and copyright info
In case of problems, see media help.

Martyrs Memorial at the southern end of St Giles. St Giles is a wide street leading north from the centre of Oxford, England. ...

Alternative UK versions

There have been several attempts to improve the song by rewriting the words. In the nineteenth century there was some lively debate about the national anthem and, even then, verse two was considered to be slightly offensive. Notably, the question arose over the phrase "scatter her enemies." Some thought it placed better emphasis on the respective power of Parliament and the Crown to change "her" to "our"; others pointed out that the theology was somewhat dubious and substituted "thine" instead. Sydney G. R. Coles wrote a completely new version, as did Canon F. K. Harford.[25] In 1836, William Edward Hickson wrote four alternative verses. The first, third, and fourth of these verses are appended to the National Anthem in the English Hymnal (which only includes verses one and three of the original lyrics). William Edward Hickson (1803-22 March 1870) was a British educational writer. ... The English Hymnal was published in 1906 for the Church of England under the editorship of Percy Dearmer and Ralph Vaughan Williams. ...


William Hixton's alternative version

William Hixton's alternative (1836) version includes the following verses, of which the first, third, and fourth have some currency as they are appended to the National Anthem in the English Hymnal.

Official peace version

A less militaristic version of the song, entitled "Official peace version, 1919", was first published in the hymn book Songs of Praise in 1925.[26] This was "official" in the sense that it was approved by the British Privy Council in 1919.[13] However, despite being reproduced in some other hymn books, it is largely unknown today.[27] For other uses, see Hymn (disambiguation). ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... For other uses, see Hymn (disambiguation). ...

Performance in the United Kingdom

The style most commonly heard in official performances was proposed as the "proper interpretation" by King George V, who considered himself something of an expert (in view of the number of times he had heard it). An Army Order was duly issued in 1933, which laid down regulations for tempo, dynamics and orchestration. This included instructions such as that the opening "six bars will be played quietly by the reed band with horns and basses in a single phrase. Cornets and side-drum are to be added at the little scale-passage leading into the second half of the tune, and the full brass enters for the last eight bars". The official tempo for the opening section is a metronome setting of 60, with the second part played in a broader manner, at a metronome setting of 52.[28] In recent years the prescribed sombre-paced introduction is often played at a faster and livelier tempo. George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... For other uses, see Tempo (disambiguation). ...


Until the latter part of the 20th century, theatre and concert goers were expected to stand to attention while the anthem was played after the conclusion of a show. In cinemas this brought a tendency for audiences to rush out while the end credits played to avoid this formality.


The anthem continues to be played at traditional formal events, particularly those with a royal connection, such as Wimbledon, Royal Ascot, Henley Royal Regatta and The Proms. The Championships, Wimbledon (commonly referred to as Wimbledon) is the oldest tennis championship in the world. ... Ascot Racecourse is a racecourse, located in the village of Ascot in the English county of Berkshire used for thoroughbred horse racing. ... A race taking place at Henley Regatta 2004 Henley Royal Regatta is a rowing event held every year on the river Thames by the town of Henley-on-Thames, England. ... A Promenade concert in the Royal Albert Hall, 2004. ...


The anthem was traditionally played at closedown on the BBC and with the introduction of commercial television to the UK this practice was adopted by some ITV regions. BBC Two never played the anthem at closedown, and ITV dropped the practice in the late 1980s, but it continued on BBC One until 8 November 1997 (thereafter BBC1 began to simulcast with News 24 after end of programmes). The tradition is carried on, however, by BBC Radio 4, which usually plays the anthem as a transition piece between the end of the Radio Four broadcasting and the move to BBC World Service. Radio 4 and Radio 2 also play the National Anthem at 0700 and 0800 on the actual and official birthdays of the Queen and the birthdays of senior members of the Royal Family. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Simulcast is a contraction of simultaneous broadcast, and refers to programs or events broadcast across more than one medium at the same time. ... BBC News 24 is BBC News 24-hour news television channel in the UK, its international counterpart being BBC World. ... old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... The BBC World Service is one of the most widely recognised international broadcasters, transmitting in 33 languages to many parts of the world through multiple technologies. ... This article is about the monarchy-related concept. ...


The anthem usually prefaces the The Queen's Christmas Message (although in 2007 it appeared at the end, taken from a recording of the 1957 television broadcast), and important royal announcements, such as of royal deaths, when it is played in a slower, sombre arrangement. The Royal Christmas Message (currently coined The Queens Christmas Message) is broadcast by the Sovereign of the Commonwealth Realms to the Commonwealth at Christmas. ...


Other United Kingdom anthems

Frequently, when an anthem is needed for one of the constituent countries of the UK – at an international sporting event, for instance – an alternative song is used: // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ...

  • At international test cricket matches, England have, since 2004, used "Jerusalem" as the anthem.
  • At international rugby league matches, England have used "Land of Hope and Glory", but in the 2005 internationals changed to "God Save the Queen".
  • "The Song of the Western Men" (otherwise known as Trelawny) has popularly been considered to be the Cornish anthem, and is sung at Cornish rugby matches and events such as Saint Piran's day and other Cornish gatherings. However some Cornish nationalists argue that Bro Goth Agan Tasow, which is in Cornish rather than English, should be adopted. This is the anthem used by the Gorsedh Kernow for the last 75 plus years ("The Land of My Fathers", but literally, "Old Country of my Fathers"), and has a similar tune to the Welsh National anthem and the Breton anthem. Bro Goth Agan Tasow is not heard as often due to it being sung in Cornish. Those who prefer an anthem in English also sometimes use "Hail to the Homeland".
  • Recently the British and Irish Lions rugby union tour used the song "The Power of Four", but this anthem was especially designed for the tour.
  • In April 2007 there was an Early Day Motion, number 1319, to the UK Parliament to propose that there should be a separate England anthem: "That this House ... believes that all English sporting associations should adopt an appropriate song that English sportsmen and women, and the English public, would favour when competing as England". An amendment (EDM 1319A3) was proposed by Evan Harris that the song "should have a bit more oomph than God Save the Queen and should also not involve God."[29]

For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... “Jerusalem (song)” redirects here. ... Land of Hope and Glory is an English patriotic song. ... I Vow to Thee, My Country is an British patriotic song and Anglican hymn. ... For the womens version of the game, see Womens Test cricket. ... The logo of the England Cricket Team which shows the three Lions of England below a five-pointed crown The England cricket team is the national cricket team which represents England and Wales. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... This article is about the country. ... The Scotland rugby team lines up for the national anthem Flower of Scotland (Flùr na h-Alba in Gaelic) is an unofficial national anthem of Scotland, a role for which it competes against the older Scotland the Brave. ... Scotland the Brave (Scottish Gaelic: Alba an Aigh) is a patriotic song and one of the main contenders to be considered as a national anthem of Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau (pronounced , usually translated as land of our fathers init, but literally old country of my fathers) is, by tradition, the national anthem of Wales. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... (pronounced ) is the national anthem of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Londonderry Air (or Derry Air) is an anthem of Northern Ireland. ... For the House of Pain MC, see Danny Boy (singer). ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... This article is about the constituent country. ... Irelands Call is a song commissioned by the Irish Rugby Football Union for use at international rugby union fixtures featuring the Irish rugby union team. ... (pronounced ) is the national anthem of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Song of the Western Men is a song by Robert Stephen Hawker, and is better known in Cornwall, and overseas, by the title of Trelawny. (published in 1824). ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... Flag of Cornwall The Cornwall Rugby Football Union (CRFU) was formed in 1883. ... For the coastal town and a municipality in southwestern Slovenia please see Piran (Italian Pirano) Saint Piran or Perran is the patron saint of tin-miners. ... The Cornish self-government movement (sometimes referred to as Cornish nationalism) is a social movement which seeks greater autonomy for the area of Cornwall. ... Bro Goth Agan Tasow (Dear Land of Our Fathers) is the anthem of Cornwall. ... For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ... This article is about the historical kingdom, duchy and French province, as well as one of the Celtic nations. ... Flag of Cornwall Hail to the Homeland is one of the unofficial anthems of Cornwall. ... For the Great Britain Lions rugby league football team with a similar name, see Great Britain national rugby league team. ... The Power of Four is a joint anthem for the four Home Nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland (where Ireland refers to both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland). ... Early day motion is a phrase used in the Westminster system for motions tabled by Members of Parliament for debate on an early day. In practice, they are never debated but are mostly used for MPs to publicise and express support for their own pet projects. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... Evan Harris Dr Evan Leslie Harris MP (born 21 October 1965) is a Liberal Democrat politician in the United Kingdom. ...

Use in other Commonwealth countries

"God Save the King/Queen" was exported around the world via the expansion of the British Empire, serving as each country's national anthem. Throughout the Empire's evolution into the Commonwealth of Nations, the song declined in use in most states which became independent. In some countries it remains as one of the official national anthems, such as in New Zealand,[30] or as an official royal anthem, as is the case in Canada, Australia, Jamaica and the Isle of Man, to be played during formal ceremonies involving national royalty or vice-royalty; in Australia, the song has standing through a Royal Proclamation issued by Governor-General Sir Ninian Stephen on 19 April 1984.[31] Two or three bars form a part of the Vice Regal Salute played either for Governors-General, Governors, or Lieutenant-Governors. For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ... A royal anthem is a patriotic song, much like a national anthem that recognizes the nations monarch. ... The Rt. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... In the Commonwealth Realms, a Vice Regal Salute is a short piece of music played in front of a governor-general, governor or lieutenant governor as a form of salute to him/her during certain formal ceremonies. ... Governor-General (or Governor General) is a term used both historically and currently to designate the appointed representative of a head of state or their government for a particular territory, historically in a colonial context, but no longer necessarily in that form. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... A Lieutenant Governor or Lieutenant-Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ...


Use in Canada

In Canada "God Save the Queen" has not been adopted as the Royal Anthem by statute or proclamation, however it has come to be used as such through convention, and is sometimes sung together with "O Canada" at public events.[32] The Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces regulates that "God Save the Queen" be played as a salute to the monarch and other members of the Canadian Royal Family, though it may also be used as a hymn, or prayer. The words are not to be sung when the song is played as a military salute.[33] For other uses, see O Canada (disambiguation). ... The Department of National Defence, frequently referred to by its acronym DND, is the department within the government of Canada with responsibility for Canadas military, known as the Canadian Forces. ... This article is about the monarchy of Canada, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, the other Commonwealth realm monarchies, and other relevant articles, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. Queen of Canada redirects here. ... This article is about the monarchy of Canada, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, the other Commonwealth realm monarchies, and other relevant articles, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. Queen of Canada redirects here. ...


Queen Elizabeth II stipulated that the arrangement in G major by Lieutenant Colonel Basil H. Brown be used in Canada. The authorised version to be played by pipe bands is Mallorca.[33] Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Simon Fraser University Pipe Band, winner of 4 World Pipe Band Championships in the past decade, in competition at the 2005 Bellingham Highland Games A pipe band is a musical ensemble consisting of pipers and drummers. ... Location Location of Mallorca in Balearic Islands Coordinates : 39° 30’N , 3°0E Time Zone : CET (UTC+1) - summer: CEST (UTC+2) General information Native name Mallorca (Catalan) Spanish name Mallorca Postal code 07001-07691 Area code 34 (Spain) + 971 (Illes Balears) Website http://www. ...


Canadian lyrics

As "God Save the Queen" is the unofficial Royal Anthem of Canada,[34] the first verse has been translated into French for use in that country, as shown below. A royal anthem is a patriotic song, much like a national anthem that recognizes the nations monarch. ...

Dieu protège la reine
De sa main souveraine!
Vive la reine!
Qu'un règne glorieux,
Long et victorieux
Rende son peuple heureux.
Vive la reine!

A bilingual verse was often sung in Canada on Remembrance Day: Remembrance Day also known as Poppy Day, Armistice Day (the event it commemorates), or Veterans Day in the United States is a day to commemorate the sacrifices of members of the armed forces and of civilians in times of war, specifically since the First World War. ...

Dieu sauve notre reine,
Notre glorieuse reine,
Vive la reine!
Send her victorious,
Happy and glorious,
Long to reign over us,
God Save the Queen!

As sung in English in Canada, God Save the Queen has an additional English verse, sung after the first or second verse, which is also given below. In general use in Canada, however, only the first verse is sung.

Our loved Dominion bless
With peace and happiness
From shore to shore;
And let our Empire be
Loyal, united, free
True to herself and Thee
God save the Queen.
Further information: Canadian royal symbols

There are many symbols reflecting Canadas status as a constitutional monarchy, including those of the Monarch, or the vice-regal representatives. ...

Use in New Zealand

The New Zealand national anthems are "God Save The Queen" and "God Defend New Zealand"; however, "God save the Queen" is generally only played when the Sovereign or other member of the Royal Family is present, or on certain occasions such as Anzac Day. Anzac Day is commemorated by Australia and New Zealand on 25 April every year to remember members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who landed at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. Anzac Day is also a public holiday in the Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and...


In New Zealand, the second more militaristic verse is replaced with Hixtons verse "Nor in this land alone..." (often sung as Not in this land alone"), otherwise known as a "Commonwealth verse". However, that verse is primarily used only when the anthem is played past the first verse.


Use elsewhere

"God Save the King" was the first song to be used as a national anthem, although the Netherlands' national anthem, the Wilhelmus, is older. Its success prompted a number of imitations, notably in France and, later, Germany. Both commissioned their own songs to help construct a concrete national(ist) identity. The first German national anthem used the melody of "God Save the King" with the words changed to Heil dir im Siegerkranz, and sung to the same tune as the UK version. The tune was either used or officially adopted as the national anthem for several other countries, including those of Russia (until 1833) and Switzerland (Rufst Du, mein Vaterland or O monts indépendants, until 1961). Molitva russkikh, considered to be the first Russian anthem, was also sung to the same music. Het Wilhelmus (The William [viz. ... Heil dir im Siegerkranz (Hail to the Crown) was from 1871 to 1918 the national anthem of the German Empire. ... Rufst du, mein Vaterland (French: O Monts indépendants; Italian: Ci chiami o patria; Romansch: E clomas, tger paeis) was the former national anthem of Switzerland, which was replaced in 1961 by the Swiss Psalm. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Molitva russkikh (The Prayer of Russians, Russian: ) was the national anthem of Russia starting from 1815 until 1833. ...


It is also the melody to the United States patriotic hymn "America" (also known by its first line, "My Country, 'Tis of Thee"), and was played during the Presidential Inauguration parade of President George W. Bush on 20 January, 2001. In Iceland it is sung to the poem of Eldgamla Ísafold. The tune is also used as Norway's royal anthem entitled Kongesangen, and was used for the Swedish royal anthem between 1805 and 1893, entitled Bevare gud vår kung. For other uses, see Hymn (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: America My Country, Tis of Thee, also known as America, is an American patriotic song. ... Inauguration Day is the day on which the President of the United States is sworn in and takes office. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... A royal anthem is a patriotic song, much like a national anthem that recognizes the nations monarch. ... Kongesangen is Norways Royal anthem. ... Bevare Gud vÃ¥r Kung, literally God Save our King, is a song written by Abraham Niclas Edelcrantz as a song of honour to the King of Sweden. ...


The tune is still used as the national anthem of Liechtenstein, Oben am jungen Rhein. When England played Liechtenstein in a Euro 2004 qualifier, the same tune was therefore played twice, causing some minor confusion. Oben am jungen Rhein (Up above the young Rhine) is the national anthem of Liechtenstein. ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... Euro 2004 Logo The 2004 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly called Euro 2004, was held in Portugal between 12 June and 4 July 2004. ...


The melody of "God Save the King" has been, and continues to be, used as a hymn tune by Christian churches in various countries. The United Methodists of the southern United States, Mexico, and Latin America, among other denominations (usually Protestant), play the same melody as a hymn. The Christian hymn "Glory to God on High" is frequently sung to the same tune, as well as an alternative tune that fits both lyrics. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Hymn. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ...


Musical adaptations

Classical composers

In total, about 140 composers, including Beethoven, Haydn and Brahms, have used the tune in their compositions.[2]


Johann Christian Bach composed a set of variations on "God Save the King" for the finale to his sixth keyboard concerto (Op. 1) written c. 1763. Johann Christian Bach, painted in London by Thomas Gainsborough, 1776 (Museo Civico, Bologna) Johann Christian Bach (September 5, 1735 – January 1, 1782) was a composer of the Classical era, the eleventh and youngest son of Johann Sebastian Bach. ...


Joseph Haydn was impressed by the use of "God Save the King" as a national anthem during his visit to London in 1794, and on his return to Austria wrote a tune to the national anthem, the Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser ("God Save Emperor Franz"), for the birthday of the Emperor Franz of Austria. The tune of "God Save the King" was later adopted for the Prussian national anthem Heil Dir im Siegerkranz. Haydn redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser (God Save Emperor Francis) is an anthem to the Emperor Francis II of the Holy Roman Empire and later of Austria, written by Lorenz Leopold Haschka (1749-1827) and set to a tune written by Joseph Haydn in 1797. ... Francis I in Austrian coronation regalia, 1832 Austrian thaler of Francis II, dated 1821. ...


Siegfried August Mahlmann in the early 19th century wrote alternate lyrics to adapt the hymn for the Kingdom of Saxony, as "Gott segne Sachsenland" ("God Save Saxony").[35] The Kingdom of Saxony, lasting between 1806 and 1918, was an independent member of a number of historical confederacies in Germany, finally being absorbed into the Weimar Republic in 1918. ...


Ludwig van Beethoven composed a set of seven piano variations in the key of C major to the theme of "God Save the King", catalogued as WoO.78 (1802–1803). However, he also quotes it in his "battle symphony" Wellington's Victory. “Beethoven” redirects here. ... The word Woo may have a number of meanings: Courtship. ... Wellingtons Victory, Op. ...


Muzio Clementi, another composer who used the theme to "God Save the King", placed this theme into his Symphony No. 3 in B major. This work is dubbed the "Great National" and is catalogued as WoO. 34. Muzio Clementi (January 24, 1752 – March 10, 1832) was a classical composer, and acknowledged as the first to write specifically for the piano. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The word Woo may have a number of meanings: Courtship. ...


Franz Liszt wrote a piano paraphrase on the anthem. Liszt redirects here. ...


Johann Strauss I quoted God Save the Queen in full at the end of his waltz Huldigung der Königin Victoria von Grossbritannien (Homage to Queen Victoria of Great Britain) Op. 103, where he also quoted Rule, Britannia! in full at the beginning of the piece. Johann Strauss I Johann Strauss I (German: Johann Strauß) born in Vienna, (March 14, 1804 – September 25, 1849) was an Austrian Romantic composer known particularly for his waltzes and for popularizing it alongside Josef Lanner thereby (without intention) setting the foundations for his sons to carry on his musical dynasty. ... For other uses, see Waltz (disambiguation). ... Rule, Britannia! is a British patriotic song, originating from the poem Rule, Britannia by James Thomson and set to music by Thomas Arne in 1740. ...


Arthur Sullivan quotes the anthem at the end of his ballet Victoria and Merrie England. Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (May 13, 1842 – November 22, 1900) was an English composer best known for his operatic collaborations with librettist W. S. Gilbert. ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... Victoria and Merrie England is an 1897 ballet by Arthur Sullivan, written to commemorate Queen Victorias Diamond Jubilee — a remarkable sixty years on the throne. ...


Claude Debussy opens with a brief introduction of God Save the King in one of his preludes, Hommage à S. Pickwick Esq. P.P.M.P.C. The piece draws its inspiration from the main character of the Charles Dickens novel The Pickwick Papers. Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... Claude Debussys Préludes are two sets of pieces for solo piano. ... Dickens redirects here. ... The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens. ...


Niccolò Paganini wrote a set of highly virtuosic variations on "God Save the King" as his Opus 9. Niccolò (or Nicolò) Paganini (October 27, 1782 – May 27, 1840) was an Italian violinist, violist, guitarist, and composer. ...


Gioachino Rossini used this anthem in the last scene of his "Il viaggio a Reims", when all the characters, coming from many different European countries, sing a song which recalls their own homeland. Lord Sidney, bass, sings "Della real pianta" on the notes of "God save the King". Samuel Ramey used to interpolate a spectacular virtuoso cadenza at the end of the song. Gioachino Rossini. ... For other uses, see Reims (disambiguation). ... For the American film director, see Sam Raimi. ... In music, a cadenza (Italian for cadence) is, generically, an improvised or written-out ornamental passage played or sung by a soloist or soloists, usually in a free rhythmic style, and often allowing for virtuosic display. ...


Rock adaptations

Jimi Hendrix of the The Jimi Hendrix Experience played an impromptu version of "God Save the Queen" to open his set at the Isle of Wight Festival 1970. Just before walking onto the stage, he can be seen (on the DVD) and heard to ask "How does it go again?" in reference to the said UK national anthem. He was able just to hear it mimicked by voice and then perform it. His relatively accurate lead-guitar rendition of "God Save the Queen' can be viewed in stark contrast to his performance of "The Star-Spangled Banner" at the Woodstock Festival, 1969. Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... The Experience redirects here. ... Poster for the Isle of Wight Festival 1970 - Artist: David Fairbrother Roe The 1970 Isle of Wight Festival was held on August 26 - 31, 1970. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... The Star Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States. ... The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was an event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ...

Queen - A Night at the Opera
"Bohemian Rhapsody"
(Track 11)
"God Save the Queen"
(Track 12)
(end of album)

The rock band Queen recorded an instrumental version of "God Save the Queen" on their 1975 album A Night at the Opera. It was arranged by guitarist Brian May and features his distinctive layers of overdubbed electric guitars. A tape of this version would be played at the end of almost every concert, with Freddie Mercury walking around the stage wearing a crown and a cloak on their Magic Tour in 1986. The band played "God Save the Queen" at the end of all of their concerts. On 3 June 2002, during the Queen's Golden Jubilee, Brian May performed the anthem on his Red Special electric guitar for Party at the Palace, performing from the roof of Buckingham Palace. Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bass guitarist John Deacon joining the following year. ... For other uses, see A Night at the Opera (disambiguation). ...   is a song written by Freddie Mercury and originally recorded by the band Queen for their 1975 album A Night at the Opera. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bass guitarist John Deacon joining the following year. ... For other uses, see A Night at the Opera (disambiguation). ... For the Australian film composer, see Brian May (composer). ... Les Paul, a pioneer of multi-track recording. ... -1... -1... Also see: 2002 (number). ... A Golden Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 50th anniversary of a monarchs reign. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Two different electric guitars. ... The Party at the Palace was a pop concert held in London in 2002. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ...


A version of "God Save the Queen" by Madness features the melody of the song played on kazoos. It was included on the compilation album The Business. Madness are a British pop/ska band from Camden Town, London, that formed in 1976. ... For the visual effects software, Kazoo, see ZOO Digital Group. ...


Nickelodeon's The Ren and Stimpy Show parodied the song as The Royal Anthem of the Canadian Kilted Yaksmen. The Ren and Stimpy Show was an American animated television series created by Canadian animator John Kricfalusi. ...


References

  1. ^ cf. the versions in the hymn books English Hymnal, Hymns Ancient and Modern and Songs of Praise and the version at the website royalty.gov.uk.
  2. ^ a b c Monarchy Today pages at royal.gov.uk website (HTML). Retrieved on 2007-04-01.
  3. ^ Scholes, Percy A. The Oxford Companion to Music, Tenth Edition. Oxford University Press. 
  4. ^ Patricia Ranum. A Sweet Servitude: A Musician's Life at the Court of Mlle de Guise (html).
  5. ^ see the sheet music available online: Domine Salvum Fac Regem (pdf). Retrieved on 2007-04-01.
  6. ^ Souvenirs, Vol 1, Chapter IV (HTML). Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  7. ^ Dearmer, Percy; Vaughan Williams, Ralph (1906). The English Hymnal with Tunes. Oxford University Press, p724. Hymn No. 560 "National Anthem"
  8. ^ a b National anthems & national songs (html). British Council. Retrieved on 2008-02-02.
  9. ^ 1 Samuel x. 24; 2 Samuel xvi. 16 and 2 Kings xi. 12
  10. ^ Wood, William (1919). Flag and Fleet: How the British Navy Won the Freedom of the Seas. Macmillan. 
  11. ^ "The Watchword in the Night shall be, 'God save King Henrye!' The other shall answer, 'Long to raign over Us!'
  12. ^ The Gentleman's Magazine Vol. 15, Oct. 1745, p.552
  13. ^ a b Scholes p.412
  14. ^ Mackay, Charles (1851). The Book of English Songs: From the Sixteenth to the Ninteenth Century, p.203. 
  15. ^ White, Richard Grant (1861). National Hymns: How They are Written and how They are Not Written. Rudd & Carleton, p.42. 
  16. ^ Dana, Charles Anderson (1882). Household Book of Poetry, p.384. 
  17. ^ (1982) Hymns Ancient and Modern, Revised Version. SCM-Canterbury Press Ltd, p.504. ISBN 0907547060. 
  18. ^ Baden-Powell, Robert (1908). Scouting for Boys, p.341. 
  19. ^ Monarchy Today website (HTML). Retrieved on 2007-04-01.
  20. ^ Richards, Jeffrey (2002). Imperialism and Music: Britain 1876 to 1953. Manchester University Press, p.90. ISBN 0719045061.  "A fourth verse was briefly in vogue at the time of the rebellion, but was rapidly abandoned thereafter: God grant that Marshal Wade...etc"
  21. ^ "The history of God Save the King": The Gentleman's Magazine, Vol 6 (new series), 1837, p.373. "There is an additional verse... though being of temporary application only, it was but short-lived...[but]...it was stored in the memory of an old friend of my own... 'Oh! grant that Marshal Wade... etc.'
  22. ^ Maclean, Fitzroy (1989). Bonnie Prince Charlie. Canongate Books Ltd.. ISBN ISBN 0-86241-568-3.  Note that the verse he quotes appears to have a line missing.
  23. ^ For example the verse quoted in the book Handel by Edward J. Dent (see: text at project Gutenberg and at Fullbooks.com)
  24. ^ Richards p.90.
  25. ^ Richards p.91
  26. ^ Dearmer, Percy; Vaughan Williams, Ralph (1925). Songs of Praise. Oxford University Press. 
  27. ^ Forgotten National Anthem Sung at Halesowen Service. Retrieved on 2007-03-30. Article in the Black Country Bugle describes it as an "unusual and little known version of the national anthem...taken from the order of service for the blessing of Halesowen’s borough charter...on Sunday, 20th September, 1936."
  28. ^ Percy A Scholes: Oxford Companion to Music, Tenth Edition, Oxford University Press
  29. ^ Parliamentary Information Management Services. Early day Motion 1319
  30. ^ Letter from Buckingham Palace to the Governor-General of New Zealand (HTML). Retrieved on 2007-04-03. - Royal assent that the two songs should have equal status
  31. ^ Commonwealth of Australia Gazette; No. S 142; 19 April, 1984
  32. ^ Department of Canadian Heritage: Royal anthem "God Save The Queen" (HTML). Retrieved on 2007-04-01.
  33. ^ a b Department of National Defence: The Honours, Flags and Heritage Structure of the Canadian Forces; p. 503
  34. ^ Royal Anthem "God Save the Queen" at Government of Canada website www.gc.ca (HTML). Retrieved on 2007-08-25.
  35. ^ Granville Bantock (1913). Sixty Patriotic Songs of All Nations. Ditson, p. xv. 

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External links

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
God Save the Queen
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
God Save the Queen
  • Official Royal webpage on the anthem
  • Department of Canadian Heritage - Royal anthem page
  • God Save Great George our King: - article discussing different versions of the lyrics
  • Le 'God save the king' à Saint-Cyr
  • Himnuszok - The Himnuszok website has a vocal version of the first three verses of "God Save the Queen". (Hungarian)
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the monarchy of Canada, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, the other Commonwealth realm monarchies, and other relevant articles, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. Queen of Canada redirects here. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article refers to the Commonwealths concept of the monarchys legal authority. ... This article is about the monarchy of Canada, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, the other Commonwealth realm monarchies, and other relevant articles, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. Queen of Canada redirects here. ... Each of the provinces within Canada uses a Westminster System of constitutional monarchy for its government, under Queen Elizabeth II as the reigning Queen of Canada since February 6, 1952. ... The Dominion of Canada was created by the British North America Act (now known as the Constitution Act) of 1867. ... The Dominion of Canada was created by the British North America Act (now known as the Constitution Act) of 1867. ... This article is about the monarchy of Canada, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, the other Commonwealth realm monarchies, and other relevant articles, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. Queen of Canada redirects here. ... Image File history File links Royal_Standard_of_Canada. ... A viceroy is a royal official who governs a country or province in the name of and as representative of the monarch. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada, or (masculine): Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state. ... The following is a list of the Governors and Governor General of Canada and the previous territories and colonies that now make up the country. ... In Canada, the lieutenant-governor (often without a hyphen[1], pronounced ), in French lieutenant-gouverneur/lieutenant-gouverneure (always with a hyphen), is the Canadian Monarchs, or Crowns, representative in a province, much as the Governor General is her representative at the national level. ... In the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Queen-in-Council is the legal designation of the executive branch of government. ... The Queen-in-Parliament (or King-in-Parliament when there is a male monarch) is a British constitutional law term for the British Crown in its legislative role, acting with the advice and consent of the House of Commons and House of Lords. ... HM Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada and Commander-in-Chief of the Canadian Forces, presides over the rededication of the Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France, next to her husband Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, wearing the uniform of the Royal Canadian Regiment, April, 2007. ... Her Majesty the Queen of Canada presents a tablet of Balmoral granite with the ciphers of both herself and her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria, at the First Nations University of Canada, May 17, 2005. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Crown copyright is a form of copyright claim used by the governments of a number of Commonwealth realms. ... The Queens Printer (or Kings Printer when the monarch is male) is a position defined by letters patent under the royal prerogative in the United Kingdom. ... Part of the ceremony of the Changing of the Guard in Whitehall, London. ... There are many symbols reflecting Canadas status as a constitutional monarchy, including those of the Monarch, or the vice-regal representatives. ... The Coat of Arms of Canada, formally known as The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada,[1] is the official coat of arms of the Canadian monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch, and are officially known... In the British and other Commonwealth armies, the Colonel-in-Chief of a regiment is its (usually Royal) patron. ... This is a list of Canadian organizations with designated royal status and/or under the patronage of members of the Canadian Royal Family, listed by the king or queen who granted the designation. ... // Members of the Royal Family have visited Canada numerous times since the late 18th century. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... In contrast to Australian republicanism, there has been little national debate about ending the Monarchy in Canada. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Anthem 4 England - English National Anthem (924 words)
Petition the PM - We the undersigned petition the Prime Minister to initiate a Parliamentary debate on the adoption of a national anthem for England that is distinct from the British national anthem.
There's absolutely nothing wrong with God save the Queen apart from the fact that it is the British anthem; the musical equivalent of the Union Flag..............Oh and, as a song, it blows.
God Save the Queen can continue to be the British anthem, to be sung as a celebration of Britishness or the monarch, by the individual nations of Britain, or by the English, Scots, Welsh and Irish when they are gathered together as Brits.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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