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Encyclopedia > Goblet drum
Custom simbati from Egypt
Custom simbati from Egypt

The goblet drum (also chalice drum) is a goblet shaped hand drum used mostly in Arabic, Jewish, Assyrian, Persian, Balkan, Greek, Armenian, Azeri and Turkish music. Its thin, responsive drumhead and resonance help it produce a distinctively crisp sound. It is of ancient origin, and is believed by some to have been invented before the chair.[citation needed] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (600 × 800 pixels, file size: 136 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo taken by Kevin Hartnell on 02/23/2007. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (600 × 800 pixels, file size: 136 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo taken by Kevin Hartnell on 02/23/2007. ... A hand drum is any type of drum that is typically played by striking it with the bare hand rather than a stick, mallet, hammer, or other type of beater. ... Arabic music includes several genres and styles of music ranging from Arab classical to Arabic pop music and from secular to sacred music. ... Jewish music, the music of Jews, is quite diverse and dates back thousands of years. ... Assyrian music is divided into three main sections or periods, The Ancient Period that is of (Ur, Babylon and Nineveh), The middle period or Tribal and Folkloric period, and the Modern Period. ... Moosiqi Asil or Persian music is the traditional and indigenous music of Persia and Persian-speaking countries: musiqi, the science and art of music, and moosiqi, the sound and performance of music (Sakata 1983). ... The music of Southeastern Europe, sometimes characterised by complex rhythm, is a type of music distinct from others in Europe. ... Armenia is in the Caucasus Mountains, and its music is a mix of indigenous folk music, perhaps best_represented by Djivan Gasparyans well-known duduk music, as well as light pop similar to nearby Middle-Eastern countries, and extensive Christian music, due to Armenias status as the oldest Christian... Azerbaijan is in Caucasus but, musically, it is more closely linked to Persian culture. ... Turkish music includes the music of modern Turkey, together with related musics in neighbouring regions that once lay within the former Ottoman Empire, and closely related ethnic variants in Central Asia stretching as far as the Xinjiang Autonomous Region of China. ... A drumhead is a membrane stretched over one or both of the open ends of a drum. ... This article is about resonance in physics. ...

Contents

Names

Goblet drums have many names, according to location.

  • General - darbakeh, tarabuka (دربكة), tablah, tableh (طبلة)
  • Afghanistan - zairbaghali (Dari)
  • Albania - qypi
  • Armenia - doumbek, doumbeg
  • Assyria - dombuk, derbakeh
  • Azerbaijan - dumbul, dunbul
  • Balkans - tarambuke
  • Bukhori - tarbouka
  • Greece - toumberleki, toumpeleki
  • Hungary - dobouk
  • Iran - tombak, tonbak (تُمبَک ,تنبک ,دمبک ,دنبک ,تمبک) or zarb (ضَرب or ضَرب)
  • Israel - darbuka, tarbuka
  • Kurdistan - tepill
  • Lebanon - derbakeh
  • Palestine - durbakeh, derbakeh
  • Romania - darabana, tarabuka
  • Syria - derbakeh
  • Turkey - darbuka, dümbelek
  • Thailand, Laos - klong (or glong) yao (กลองยาว), thon (โทน), glong thap (กลองทับ)
  • West Africa - djembe
    okodarbuk

Bukhori, also known as Bukharic or Bukharan, is an Indo-Iranian language. ... A tonbak (also known as tombak, donbak, dombak and zarb, in Persian تمبک) is a goblet drum from Persia (modern Iran). ...

Technique

Goblet drums are played with a much lighter touch and quite different strokes (sometimes including rolls or quick rhythms articulated with the fingertips) than hand drums such as the djembe, found in Africa. A basic student djembe A djembe (pronounced jem bay) also known as djimbe, jenbe, jembe, yembe or sanbanyi in Susu; is a skin covered hand drum, shaped like a large goblet, and meant to be played with bare hands. ...


There are two main types of goblet drums. The Egyptian style has rounded edges around the head, whereas the Turkish style exposes the edge of the head. The exposed edge allows closer access to the head so finger-snapping techniques can be done, but the hard edge discourages the rapid rolls possible with the Egyptian style.


The goblet drum may be played while held under one arm or by placing it between the knees while seated. It produces a resonant, low-sustain sound while played lightly with the fingertips and palm. Some players move their fists in and out of the bell to alter the tone. There are a variety of rhythms (see dumbek rhythms) that form the basis of the folkloric and modern music and dance styles of the Middle East. Dumbek rhythms are a collection of rhythms that are usually played with hand drums such as the dumbek. ...


There are two main sounds produced by the goblet drum. The first is called the 'doum'. It is the deeper bass sound produced by striking the head near the center with the length of the fingers and palm. The second is called the 'tek' and is the higher-pitched sound produced by hitting near the edge of the head with the fingertips. A 'tek' struck with the secondary hand is also known as a 'ka'. Additionally, there are more complex techniques including snaps, slaps, pops and rolls that are used to ornament the basic rhythm. Hand clapping and hitting the sides of the drum can be used in addition to drumhead sounds.


Another technique commonly used in Bulgaria (see Music of Bulgaria), Turkey (see:Music of Turkey), and Egypt (see Music of Egypt), and is to tap with the fingers of one hand and with a thin stick in the other. In Turkey the stick is called the çubuk, which means wand, or stick. The Gypsies of most of the countries associated with the goblet drum use this technique. Bulgarian music is part of the Balkan tradition, which stretches across Southeastern Europe, and has its own distinctive sound. ... Genres: Alternative - Classical - Dance - Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Military - Ottoman - Opera - Pop - Religious - Rock Awards Kral MV, MÃœ-YAP, MGD Charts Billboard Charts Music Festivals Istanbul International Music Festival, Istanbul International Jazz Festival, Izmir European Jazz Festival, Aspendos International Opera and Ballet Festival Media Rolling Stone (Türkiye), MTV (T... Musicians of Amun, Tomb of Nakht, 18th Dyn, Western Thebes. ... The Rroma people (pronounced rahma, singular Rrom) along with the closely related Sinti people are commonly known as Gypsies. ...


Use in Western classical music

The first known Western classical composition to feature a goblet drum is the opera Les Troyens (1856-1858) by the French composer Hector Berlioz, which calls in the Dance of the Nubian Slaves in Act IV for a tarbuka. Cover of the score of La prise de Troie, the first two acts of Les Troyens. ... Painting of Berlioz by Gustave Courbet, 1850. ...


The first compositions for goblet drum and orchestra were composed by Halim El-Dabh in the 1950s; his Fantasia-Tahmeel was premiered in New York City in 1958, with a string orchestra conducted by Leopold Stokowski. Halim El-Dabh (b. ... Leopold Stokowski (born Antoni Stanisław Bolesławowicz April 18, 1882 in London, England, died September 13, 1977 in Nether Wallop, England) was the conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and the Symphony of the Air. ...


Notable goblet drum players

Recognized worldwide as a virtuosic percussionist specialized in a variety of percussion instruments, Burhan Öçal is interested in combining many genres and cultural traditions, such as jazz and Western classical music, with his own. ... 19th century print of Roma musicians Typically nomadic, the Roma have long acted as wandering entertainers and tradesmen. ... Ottoman classical music (Türk Sanat Müziği) is a kind of music that developed parallel with the Ottoman Empire. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Mısırlı Ahmet Mısırlı Ahmet (Born Ahmet Yıldırım, 1967 in Ankara, Turkey) is a Turkish virtuoso darbuka player. ... The Turkish split-finger technique is a common drumming technique (used mainly on Egyptian style goblet drums) which was made popular by the famous Turkish drummer, Misirli Ahmet. ... Ovidiu Lipan Ţǎndǎricǎ is a Romanian musician (drummer), born in Iaşi, in 1953. ... Transsylvania-Phoenix band logo Transsylvania Phoenix or, more commonly, just Phoenix, is one of the most prominent Romanian Rock and Roll bands of the latest decades, and also the first one to take musical inspiration from ancient Romanian folk themes. ... Halim El-Dabh (b. ... Hani Naser is a great musician from Jordan. ... Hossam Ramzy (Arabic: حسام رمزى ) is a professional percussionist, composer and music arranger. ... Setrak sarkissian, There are many master players of the Tabla, the Arabic goblet-shaped drum, but any discussion of the best of these drummers will surely mention Setrak Sarkissian. ... Hossein Tehrani (1912 – 1974) was an Iranian musician and Tonbak player. ... A tonbak (also known as tombak, donbak, dombak and zarb, in Persian تمبک) is a goblet drum from Persia (modern Iran). ... Pejman Hadadi (Pejman Hadadi (Born 1969 Tehran) is an internationally acclaimed Iranian tonbak player and Persian classical musician. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stoyan Yankoulov (Bulgarian: ) (born 10 September 1966), known as Stundji(Bulgarian:Стунджи) is one of Bulgarias most popular and renowned drummers and percussionists. ... Rony Barrak is a percussionist popularly known for his skill in Darbouka performance. ...

External links

Santur Woman playing the santur in a painting from the Hasht-Behesht Palace in Isfahan Iran, 1669 The santur (سنتور – also santÅ«r, santour, santoor) is a hammered dulcimer of Iran. ... A woodwind instrument is an instrument in which sound is produced by blowing against an edge or by a vibrating with air a thin piece of wood known as a reed. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1656x2208, 681 KB) en: Ottoman military band. ... For other meanings, see Zurna (disambiguation) and Surna (disambiguation) The Zurna (also called Surnay, birbynÄ—, lettish horn, surla, sornai, zournas, zurma) is an Anatolian woodwind instrument. ... The Tulum is a musical instrument, a form of bagpipe from Turkey. ... // Definition An ancient word for bagpipes in Trebizond are in the text of Evliya Çelebi (17. ... The gaida (also spelled gajda) is a bagpipe from South Eastern Europe (The Balkans). ... A duduk The duduk (pronounced ) is a traditional woodwind instrument of Armenian origins. ... The arghul, also spelled argul, arghoul, arghool, argol or yarghul (Palestine), is a traditional Arabic musical instrument. ... For other uses, see Ney (disambiguation). ... A 1919 Kaval. ... The sipsi is a Turkish woodwind instrument. ... A Flageolet is a woodwind musical instrument and a member of the fipple flute family. ... The tin whistle, also called the tinwhistle, whistle, pennywhistle, or Irish whistle, is a simple six-holed woodwind instrument. ... The Taragot is a musical instrument similar to a saxaphone. ... Percussion redirects here. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1440x1920, 530 KB) en: Ottoman military band. ... Moroccan bendir with snares The bendir (erbeni or arbani) is a frame drum used as a traditional instrument throughout North Africa, more specifically in Tunisia. ... The word daf and similar can mean: The word daff is a colloquial short form of daffodil. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Tapan. ... Naqareh The Naqareh is a drum with a rounded back and a hide head. ... A Kus (Persian کوس kÅ«s) is a large-sized ancient Persian kettledrum, similar to a Timpani. ... Kudüm is one of the most fundamental rhythm instruments in classical Turkish music. ... A Turkish crescent, (also Turkish jingle, Chinese pavilion, jingling johnny, Schellenbaum, chapeau chinois) is a percussion instrument consisting of a long pole with numerous bells connected to one end, using crescent shaped crosspieces. ... A pair of zils from the Khan El-Khalili market in Cairo Zils (also zills or finger cymbals) are tiny cymbals used in belly dancing and similar performances. ... Renoirs 1909 painting Dancing girl with castanets Castanets A castanet is a percussion instrument (idiophone), much used in oriental (Moorish and Ottoman music), Roman music, Spanish music and Latin American music. ... Turkish musical instruments can be broadly classified into five categories, namely Ottoman classical, Western influenced modern, Ottoman Harem Music, Folk music and Roman. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Ottoman classical music (Türk Sanat Müziği) is a kind of music that developed parallel with the Ottoman Empire. ... A modern mehter marching band Ottoman military bands are thought to be the oldest variety of military marching band in the world. ... Genres: Alternative - Classical - Dance - Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Military - Ottoman - Opera - Pop - Religious - Rock Awards Kral MV, MÃœ-YAP, MGD Charts Billboard Charts Music Festivals Istanbul International Music Festival, Istanbul International Jazz Festival, Izmir European Jazz Festival, Aspendos International Opera and Ballet Festival Media Rolling Stone (Türkiye), MTV (T...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Goblet drum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (661 words)
The great goblet drum has a single drum head on one end and is open on the other end.
Goblet drums are played with a much lighter touch and quite different strokes (sometimes including rolls or quick rhythms articulated with the fingertips) than hand drums such as the djembe, found in Africa.
The goblet drum may be played while held under one arm or by placing it between the knees while seated.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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