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Encyclopedia > Goblet cell
Goblet cell
Section of mucus membrane of human stomach, near the cardiac orifice. X 45.
c. Cardiac glands.
d. Their ducts.
cr. Gland similar to the intestinal glands, with goblet cells.
mm. Mucous membrane.
m. Muscularis mucosae.
m’. Muscular tissue within the mucous membrane.
Transverse section of a villus, from the human intestine. X 350.
a. Basement membrane, here somewhat shrunken away from the epithelium.
b. Lacteal.
c. Columnar epithelium.
d. Its striated border.
e. Goblet cells.
f. Leucocytes in epithelium.
f’. Leucocytes below epithelium.
g. Bloodvessels.
h. Muscle cells cut across.
Dorlands/Elsevier c_18/12223516

Goblet cells are glandular simple columnar epithelial cells whose sole function is to secrete mucus. Image File history File links Gray1053. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of ectodermic origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... In anatomy, the stomach is a bean-shaped hollow muscular organ of the gastrointestinal tract involved in the second phase of digestion, following mastication. ... The cardia is the anatomical term for the junction orifice of the stomach and the esophagus. ... The cardiac glands of the stomach are few in number and occur close to the cardiac orifice where the esophagus joins the stomach. ... A duct may refer to: Duct (HVAC) (Heating Ventilating and Air-Conditioning), for transfer of air between spaces in a building. ... The crypts of Lieberkühn (or intestinal glands) are glands found in the epithelial lining of the small intestine and colon. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... Section of mucous membrane of human rectum. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Villus (Latin: shaggy hair[1], plural villi) can refer to: Intestinal villus. ... In anatomy, the intestine is the segment of the alimentary canal extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consists of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine (or colon). ... ... A lacteal is a lymphatic capillary that absorbs dietary fats in the villi of the small intestine. ... In zootomy, epithelium is a tissue composed of a layer of cells. ... White blood cells (also called leukocytes or immune cells) are a component of blood. ... The arterial system The blood vessels are part of the circulatory system and function to transport blood throughout the body. ... A top-down view of skeletal muscle Muscle (from Latin musculus little mouse [1]) is contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. ... Elseviers logo. ... Human submaxillary gland. ... Types of epithelium This article discusses the epithelium as it relates to animal anatomy. ... Drawing of the structure of cork as it appeared under the microscope to Robert Hooke from Micrographia which is the origin of the word cell. Cells in culture, stained for keratin (red) and DNA (green). ... Mucus is a slippery secretion of the lining of various membranes in the body (mucous membranes). ...


The majority of the cell's cytoplasm is occupied by mucinogen granules, except at the bottom. Rough endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, the nucleus, and other organelles are concentrated in the basal portion. The apical plasma membrane projects microvilli to increase surface area for secretion.

Contents

Locations

They are found scattered among the epithelial lining of many organs, especially the intestinal and respiratory tracts. In the respiratory tract, they are found inside the trachea, bronchus, and larger bronchioles. The intestine is the portion of the alimentary canal extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consists of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine. ... In humans the respiratory tract is the part of the anatomy that has to do with the process of respiration or breathing. ... The trachea, or windpipe, is a tube that has an inner diameter of about 12mm and a length of about 10-16cm. ... A bronchus (plural bronchi, adjective bronchial) is a caliber of airway in the respiratory tract that conducts air into the lungs. ... The bronchioles are the first airway branches that no longer contain cartilage. ...


Etymology

The term goblet refers to these cells' goblet-like shape. The apical portion is shaped like a cup, as it is distended by abundant mucinogen granules; its basal portion is shaped like a stem, as it is narrow for lack of these granules. Russian chalice A chalice (from Latin calix, cup) is a goblet, intended to hold just drink. ...


There are other cells which secrete mucus (as in the fundic glands of the stomach[1]), but they are not usually called "goblet cells" because they do not have this distinctive shape. The fundus glands (or fundic glands) are found in the body and fundus of the stomach; they are simple tubes, two or more of which open into a single duct. ... In anatomy, the stomach is a bean-shaped hollow muscular organ of the gastrointestinal tract involved in the second phase of digestion, following mastication. ...


Basal secretion

This is the normal base level secretion of mucus. The continuous secretion is accomplished by cytoskeletal movement of secretory granules. The cytoskeleton is a cellular scaffolding or skeleton contained, as all other organelles, within the cytoplasm. ...


Stimulated secretion

Secretion may be stimulated by dust, smoke, etc. Look up dust in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Smoke from a wildfire Smoke is a suspension in air (aerosol) of small particles resulting from incomplete combustion of a fuel. ...


Other stimuli include viruses, bacteria, etc.


Additional images

References

  1. ^ Histology at BU 11303loa - Digestive System: Alimentary Canal: fundic stomach, gastric glands, lumen"

For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ...

External links


 
 

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