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Encyclopedia > Goat
Domestic Goat

Conservation status
Domesticated
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Bovidae
Subfamily: Caprinae
Genus: Capra
Species: C. aegagrus
Subspecies: C. a. hircus
Trinomial name
Capra aegagrus hircus
(Linnaeus, 1758)

The domestic goat (Capra aegagrus hircus) is a subspecies of goat domesticated from the wild goat of southwest Asia and Eastern Europe. The goat is a member of the Bovidae family and is closely related to the sheep, both being in the goat antelope subfamily Caprinae. Species See Species and subspecies The genus Capra is a genus of mammals composed of nine species, including the Ibex, the West Caucasian Tur, the East Caucasian Tur, the Markhor, and the Wild Goat. ... Look up goat in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 231 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Families Antilocapridae Bovidae Camelidae Cervidae Giraffidae Hippopotamidae Moschidae Suidae Tayassuidae Tragulidae Leptochoeridae † Chaeropotamidae † Dichobunidae † Cebochoeridae † Entelodontidae † Anoplotheriidae † Anthracotheriidae † Cainotheriidae † Agriochoeridae † Merycoidodontidae † Leptomerycidae † Protoceratidae † Xiphodontidae † Amphimerycidae † Helohyidae † Gelocidae † Merycodontidae † Dromomerycidae † Raoellidae † Choeropotamidae † Sanitheriidae † The even-toed ungulates form the mammal order Artiodactyla. ... Subfamilies Bovinae Cephalophinae Hippotraginae Antilopinae Caprinae A bovid is any of almost 140 species of cloven-hoofed mammals belonging to the family Bovidae. ... Genera Capricornis Nemorhaedus Rupicapra Oreamnos Budorcas Ovibos Hemitragus Ammotragus Pseudois Capra Ovis Pantholops A goat antelope is any of the species of mostly medium-sized herbivores that make up the subfamily Caprinae or the single species in subfamily Panthalopinae. ... Species See Species and subspecies The genus Capra is a genus of mammals composed of nine species, including the Ibex, the West Caucasian Tur, the East Caucasian Tur, the Markhor, and the Wild Goat. ... Binomial name Capra aegagrus Erxleben, 1777 Subspecies Capra aegagrus aegagrus Capra aegagrus blythi Capra aegagrus chialtanensis Capra aegagrus cretica Capra aegagrus hircus Capra aegagrus turcmenica The wild goat (Capra aegagrus) is a common type of goat species, with a distribution ranging from Europe and Asia Minor to central Asia and... Trinomial nomenclature is a taxonomic naming system that extends the standard system of binomial nomenclature by adding a third taxon. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Domesticated animals, plants, and other organisms are those whose collective behavior, life cycle, or physiology has been altered as a result of their breeding and living conditions being under human control for multiple generations. ... Binomial name Capra aegagrus Erxleben, 1777 Subspecies Capra aegagrus aegagrus Capra aegagrus blythi Capra aegagrus chialtanensis Capra aegagrus cretica Capra aegagrus hircus Capra aegagrus turcmenica The wild goat (Capra aegagrus) is a common type of goat species, with a distribution ranging from Europe and Asia Minor to central Asia and...  Southwest Asia in most contexts. ... Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR... Subfamilies Bovinae Cephalophinae Hippotraginae Antilopinae Caprinae A bovid is any of almost 140 species of cloven-hoofed mammals belonging to the family Bovidae. ... Species See text. ... Genera Capricornis Nemorhaedus Rupicapra Oreamnos Budorcas Ovibos Hemitragus Ammotragus Pseudois Capra Ovis Pantholops A goat antelope is any of the species of mostly medium-sized herbivores that make up the subfamily Caprinae or the single species in subfamily Panthalopinae. ... Genera Capricornis Nemorhaedus Rupicapra Oreamnos Budorcas Ovibos Hemitragus Ammotragus Pseudois Capra Ovis Pantholops A goat antelope is any of the species of mostly medium-sized herbivores that make up the subfamily Caprinae or the single species in subfamily Panthalopinae. ...


Domestic goats are one of the oldest domesticated species. For thousands of years, goats have been used for their milk, meat, hair, and skins over much of the world.[1] In the last century they have also gained some popularity as pets.[2] A glass of cows milk. ... This article is about the food. ... This article is about animals kept for companionship. ...


Female goats are referred to as does or nannies (or, less frequently, as mishas), intact males as bucks or billies; their offspring are kids. Castrated males are wethers. Goat meat from younger animals is called kid, and from older animals is sometimes called chevon, or in some areas mutton. Castration (also referred as: gelding, neutering, orchiectomy, orchidectomy, and oophorectomy) is any action, surgical, chemical, or otherwise, by which a male loses the functions of the testes or a female loses the functions of the ovaries. ...

Contents

Etymology

The Modern English word "goat" comes from the Old English gat which meant "she-goat", and this in turn derived from Proto-Germanic *gaitaz (compare Old Norse and Dutch geit'(meaning' "goat"), German Geiß' ("she-goat") and Gothic gaits, ("goat")) ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ghaidos meaning "young goat" but also "play" (compare Latin haedus meaning "kid"). The word for "male goat" in Old English was bucca (which survives as "buck", meaning certain male herbivores) until a shift to "he-goat" (and also "she-goat") occurred in the late 12th century. "Nanny goat" originated in the 18th century and "billy goat" in the 19th. Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... Gothic is an extinct Germanic language that was spoken by the Goths. ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages, spoken by the Proto-Indo-Europeans. ... Buck may refer to any of the following: Look up Buck in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Amalthée et la chèvre de Jupiter (Amalthea and Jupiter's goat) Commissioned by the Queen of France in 1787 for the royal dairy at Rambouillet
Amalthée et la chèvre de Jupiter (Amalthea and Jupiter's goat) Commissioned by the Queen of France in 1787 for the royal dairy at Rambouillet

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 395 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,780 × 2,700 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 395 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,780 × 2,700 pixels, file size: 2. ... Amalthea, in Greek mythology, is the foster-mother of Zeus. ... Eugénie de Montijo, the last Empress of France Marie Antoinette, Queen of Louis XVI was beheaded during the French Revolution This is a list of the women who have been Queens consort or Empresses consort of the realm of France. ... Rambouillet is a commune in the metropolitan area of Paris, France. ...

History

Goats seem to have been first domesticated roughly 10,000 years ago in the Zagros Mountains of Iran.[3] Ancient cultures and tribes began to keep them for easy access to milk, hair, meat, and skins. Domestic goats were generally kept in herds that wandered on hills or other grazing areas, often tended by goatherds who were frequently children or adolescents, similar to the more widely known shepherd. These methods of herding are still used today. The Zagros Mountains (In Persian:رشته‌کوه‌های زاگرس) make up Irans second largest mountain range. ... http://www. ... A glass of cows milk. ... A goatherd is a person who herds goats for a living. ... A separate article is about the punk band called The Adolescents. ... Shepherd in FăgăraÅŸ Mountains, Romania. ... A man herding goats in Tunisia Herding is the act of bringing individual animals together into a group, maintaining the group and moving the group from place to place—or any combination of those. ...


Historically, goat hide has been used for water and wine bottles in both traveling and transporting wine for sale. It has also been used to produce parchment, which was the most common material used for writing in Europe until the invention of the printing press. For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... German parchmenter, 1568 Parchment is a material for the pages of a book or codex, made from fine calf skin, sheep skin or goat skin. ... Write redirects here. ... The printing press is a mechanical device for printing many copies of a text on rectangular sheets of paper. ...


Anatomy

Goats are ruminants. They have a four-chambered stomach consisting of the rumen, the reticulum, the omasum, and the abomasum. A ruminant is any hooved animal that digests its food in two steps, first by eating the raw material and regurgitating a semi-digested form known as cud, then eating the cud. ... The rumen, also known as the fardingbag or paunch forms the larger part of the reticulorumen, which is the first chamber in the alimentary canal of ruminant animals. ... Reticulum (Latin for reticle), is one of the minor southern (declination -60 degrees) constellations. ... The omasum, also known as the manyplies, is the third compartment of the stomach in ruminants. ... The abomasum is the fourth and final stomach compartment of the stomach in ruminants. ...


Goats have horizontal slit-shaped pupils, an adaptation which increases peripheral depth perception.[4]. Because goats' irises are usually pale, the pupils are much more visible than in animals with horizontal pupils but very dark irises, such as sheep, cattle and most horses. The term pupil can also mean student. ... Peripheral vision is a part of vision that occurs outside the very center of gaze. ... Depth perception is the visual ability to perceive the world in three dimensions. ... In anatomy, the iris (plural irises or irides) is the most visible part of the eye of vertebrates, including humans. ...


Some breeds of sheep and goats appear superficially similar, but goat tails are short and point up, whereas sheep tails hang down and are usually longer (though some are short, and some long ones are docked). Docking is used as a term for the intentional removal of part of an animals tail or ears. ...


Reproduction

In some climates, goats are able to breed at any time of the year. In temperate climates and among the Swiss breeds, the breeding season commences as the day length shortens, and ends in early spring. Does of any breed come into heat every 21 days for 2 to 48 hours. A doe in heat typically flags her tail often, stays near the buck if one is present, becomes more vocal, and may also show a decrease in appetite and milk production for the duration of the heat. IT FEELS REALLY GOOD IF YOU IMATATE THE ANIMALS. LOL! “Mounting” redirects here. ... The estrous cycle (also oestrous cycle; originally derived from Latin oestrus) comprises the recurring physiologic changes that are induced by reproductive hormones in most mammalian placental females. ...

A doe and her twin offspring.
A doe and her twin offspring.

Bucks (intact males) of Swiss and northern breeds come into rut in the fall as with the doe's heat cycles. Rut is characterized by a decrease in appetite and obsessive interest in the does. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1067 pixel, file size: 453 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Domestic goat family of a mother and her two week old kids. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1067 pixel, file size: 453 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Domestic goat family of a mother and her two week old kids. ... The Rut is the period of time when antlered ungulates, such as deer, sheep, elk, moose, caribou, ibex, goats, pronghorn and Asian and African antelope, mate. ...


In addition to natural mating, artificial insemination has gained popularity among goat breeders, as it allows easy access to a wide variety of bloodlines. AIH redirects here. ... This article concerns Breeder, an occupation in agriculture, animal husbandry, or animal fancy. ... For the scientific journal Heredity see Heredity (journal) Heredity (the adjective is hereditary) is the transfer of characters from parent to offspring, either through their genes or through the social institution called inheritance (for example, a title of nobility is passed from individual to individual according to relevant customs and...


Gestation length is approximately 150 days. Twins are the usual result, with single and triplet births also common. Less frequent are litters of quadruplet, quintuplet, and even sextuplet kids. Birthing, known as kidding, generally occurs uneventfully. Right before kidding the doe will have a sunken area around the tail and hip. Also she will have heavy breathing, a worried look, become restless and show great display of affection for her keeper. The mother often eats the placenta, which gives her much needed nutrients, helps stanch her bleeding, and is believed by some[attribution needed] to reduce the lure of the birth scent for predators. Gestation is the carrying of an embryo or fetus inside a female viviparous animal. ... Fraternal twin boys in the tub The term twin most notably refers to two individuals (or one of two individuals) who have shared the same uterus (womb) and usually, but not necessarily, born on the same day. ... Identical triplet brothers at graduation. ... Identical Triplet Sisters A multiple birth results when more than one human baby is born from a single pregnancy. ... Identical Triplet Sisters A multiple birth results when more than one human baby is born from a single pregnancy. ... Identical Triplet Sisters A multiple birth results when more than one human baby is born from a single pregnancy. ... Mother goat eating placenta Rat eating its offsprings placenta after birth Placentophagy (from placenta + Greek φαγειν, to eat) is the act of mammals eating the placenta of their young after childbirth. ...


Freshening (coming into milk production) occurs at kidding. Milk production varies with the breed, age, quality, and diet of the doe; dairy goats generally produce between 660 to 1,800 L (1,500 and 4,000 lb) of milk per 305 day lactation. On average, a good quality dairy doe will give at least 6 lb (2.7 l) of milk per day while she is in milk, although a first time milker may produce less, or as much as 16 lb (7.3 l) or more of milk in exceptional cases. Meat, fiber, and pet breeds are not usually milked and simply produce enough for the kids until weaning. The litre or liter (see spelling differences) is a unit of volume. ... Kittens nursing Lactation describes the secretion of milk from the mammary glands, the process of providing that milk to the young, and the period of time that a mother lactates to feed her young. ... This article is about animals kept for companionship. ... A breastfeeding infant Breastfeeding is the practice of a woman feeding an infant (or sometimes a toddler or a young child) with milk produced from her mammary glands, usually directly from the nipples. ...


Diet

Goats are reputed to be willing to eat almost anything. The digestive systems of a goat allow nearly any organic substance to be broken down and used as nutrients.

A goat feeding on weeds.
A goat feeding on weeds.

Contrary to this reputation, they are quite fastidious in their habits, preferring to browse on the tips of woody shrubs and trees, as well as the occasional broad leaved plant. However, it can fairly be said that goats will eat almost anything in the botanical world. Their plant diet is extremely varied and includes some species which are toxic or detrimental to cattle and sheep. This makes them valuable for controlling noxious weeds and clearing brush and undergrowth. They will seldom eat soiled food or contaminated water unless facing starvation. This is one of the reasons why goat rearing is most often free ranging since stall-fed goat rearing involves extensive upkeep and is seldom commercially viable. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1861x1858, 422 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Domestic goat User:ShadowHalo/Images ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1861x1858, 422 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Domestic goat User:ShadowHalo/Images ... Yellow starthistle, a thistle native to southern Europe and the Middle East that is an invasive weed in parts of North America. ... This article is about extreme malnutrition. ... Free range is a method of farming husbandry where the animals are permitted to roam freely instead of being contained in small sheds. ...


Goats do not usually consume garbage, tin cans, or clothing, although they will occasionally eat items made primarily of plant material, which can include wood. They have an intensely inquisitive and intelligent nature: they will explore anything new or unfamiliar in their surroundings. They do so primarily with their prehensile upper lip and tongue. This is why they investigate items such as buttons, camera cases or clothing (and many other things besides) by nibbling at them, occasionally even eating them. Waste inside a wheelie bin Waste in a bin bag Waste, rubbish, trash, garbage, or junk is unwanted or undesired material. ... For the American naval slang term, see destroyer. ... A baby wearing many items of winter clothing: headband, cap, fur-lined coat, shawl and sweater. ... Prehensility is the quality of an organ that has adapted for grasping or holding. ...


The digestive physiology of a very young kid (like the young of other ruminants) is essentially the same as that of a monogastric animal. Milk digestion begins in the abomasum, the milk having bypassed the rumen via closure of the reticular/esophageal groove during suckling. At birth the rumen is undeveloped, but as the kid begins to consume solid feed, the rumen soon increases in size and in its capacity to absorb nutrients. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ruminantia. ... A monogastric organism has only one stomach, and is the alternate gastric complex to a four-chambered stomach known as a ruminant. ... The abomasum is the fourth and final stomach compartment of the stomach in ruminants. ...


Goats will consume, on average, 4.5 units of dry matter per 100 units of body-weight per day.[citation needed]


Goat uses

A goat is useful to humans both alive and dead, first as a renewable provider of milk and fibre, and then as meat and hide. Some charities provide goats to impoverished people in poor countries, because goats are easier and cheaper to manage than cattle, and have multiple uses. In addition, goats are used for driving and packing purposes. This article is about charitable organizations. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ...


For instance, the intestine is used to make "catgut", which is still in use as a material for internal human sutures. The horn of the goat, which signifies wellbeing (Cornucopia) is also used to make spoons etc.[5] Catgut is the name applied to cord of great toughness and tenacity prepared from the intestines of sheep/goat, or occasionally from those of the hog, horse, mule, pig, and donkey. ... For other uses, see Suture (disambiguation). ... Cornucopia held by the Roman goddess Aequitas on the reverse of this antoninianus struck under Roman Emperor Claudius II. The cornucopia (Latin Cornu Copiae), literally Horn of Plenty and also known as the Harvest Cone, is a symbol of food and abundance dating back to the 5th century BC. In... For other uses, see Spoon (disambiguation). ...


Meat

The Boer goat - in this case a buck - is a widely-kept meat breed.
The Boer goat - in this case a buck - is a widely-kept meat breed.

The taste of goat meat is similar to that of lamb meat; in fact, in some parts of Asia, particularly India, the word "mutton" is used to describe both goat and lamb meat. However, some feel that it has a similar taste to veal or venison, depending on the age and condition of the goat. It can be prepared in a variety of ways including stewed, curried, baked, grilled, barbecued, minced, canned, or made into sausage. Goat jerky is also another popular variety. In India, the rice-preparation of mutton biryani uses goat meat as its primary ingredients to produce a rich taste. "Curry goat" is a traditional West Indian dish. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... A female Boer Goat The Boer goat was developed in South Africa in the early 1900s for meat production. ... Sheep redirects here. ... Veal is the meat of young calves (usually male) appreciated for its delicate taste and tender texture. ... Leg of venison on apple sauce with dumplings and vegetables Venison is meat of the family Cervidae. ... In cooking, stewing means preparing vegetables or meat by simmering it in liquid. ... This article is about the dish. ... Baking is the technique of cooking food in an oven by dry heat applied evenly throughout the oven. ... Food cooking on a charcoal grill Grilling is a form of cooking that involves direct heat. ... A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. ... Mincing is a cooking technique in which food ingredients are finely divided. ... For other uses, see Canning (disambiguation). ... This article is about the prepared meat. ... Hong Kong style unpackaged jerky Jerky is meat that has been cut into strips trimmed of fat, marinated in a spicy, salty or sweet liquid, and then dried with low heat (usually under 70°C/160°F) or occasionally salted and sun-dried. ... Iraqi Biryani (as served in Amman, Jordan) The name biryani or biriani (Urdu بریانی ;Hindi बिरयानी) is derived[1] from the Persian word beryā(n) (بریان) which means fried or roasted. Biryani is a family of Middle Eastern, Southern Asian dishes made from a mixture of spices, rice (usually basmati), meat/vegetables and... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ...


Nutritionally, goat meat is healthier than mutton as it is lower in fat and cholesterol, and comparable to chicken. It also has more minerals than chicken,[6] and is lower in total and saturated fats than other meats.[7] One reason for the leanness is that goats do not accumulate fat deposits or "marbling" in their muscles; chevon (goat meat) must ideally be cooked longer and at lower temperatures than other red meats.[8] It is popular in the Middle East, South Asia, Africa, northeastern Brazil, the West Indies, and Belize. Chevon, as yet, is not popular in most western nations, though it is among the fastest growing sectors of the livestock industry in the US.[citation needed] An unweaned lamb Legs of lamb in a supermarket cabinet The terms lamb, hoggett or mutton are culinary names for the meat of a domestic sheep. ... Cholesterol is a sterol (a combination steroid and alcohol). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Saturated fat is fat that consists of triglycerides containing only saturated fatty acids. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ...


Other parts of the goat including organs are also equally edible. Special delicacies include the brain (where legal) and liver. The head and legs of the goat may be smoked and used to prepare unique spicy dishes and soup. Human brain In animals, the brain (enkephale) (Greek for in the skull), is the control center of the central nervous system, responsible for behavior. ... For the bird, see Liver bird. ... Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Smoking Smoking is the process of curing, cooking, or seasoning food by exposing it for long periods of time to the smoke from a wood fire. ... For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Soup (disambiguation). ...


One of the most popular goats grown for meat is the South African Boer, introduced into the United States in the early 1990s. The New Zealand Kiko is also considered a meat breed, as is the Myotonic or "fainting goat", a breed originating in Tennessee. A young fainting goat in the midst of a myotonic fainting spell. ...


Milk, butter and cheese

A goat being milked
A goat being milked

Some goats are bred for milk, which can be drunk fresh, although pasteurization is recommended to reduce naturally occurring bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.[9] If the strong-smelling buck is not separated from the does, his scent will affect the milk. Goat milk is commonly processed into cheese, goat butter, ice cream, cajeta and other products. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... A glass of cows milk. ... Binomial name Rosenbach 1884 Staphylococcus aureus , literally Golden Cluster Seed and also known as golden staph, is the most common cause of staph infections. ... E. coli redirects here. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... For other uses, see Butter (disambiguation). ... Missing image Ice cream is often served on a stick Boxes of ice cream are often found in stores in a display freezer. ... Cajeta is a Mexican confection of caramelized milk that takes its name from the small wooden boxes it was traditionally packed in. ...


Goat milk can successfully replace cow milk in diets of those who are allergic to cow milk.[10] However, like cow milk, goat milk has lactose (sugar) and may cause gastrointestinal problems for individuals with lactose intolerance.[10] It also contains a form of Casein, a Protein in all Mammal's milk. Lactose is a disaccharide that consists of β-D-galactose and β-D-glucose molecules bonded through a β1-4 glycosidic linkage. ... Casein (from Latin caseus cheese) is the most predominant phosphoprotein found in milk and cheese. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ...


Goat's milk is naturally homogenized, which means the cream remains suspended in the milk, instead of rising to the top, as in raw cow's milk. If the milk is kept scrupulously clean, it can be drunk raw, greatly improving the benefits.


Many dairy goats, in their prime, average 6 to 8 pounds of milk daily (roughly 3 to 4 quarts) during a ten-month lactation, giving more soon after freshening and gradually dropping in production toward the end of their lactation. The milk generally averages 3.5 percent butterfat. A doe may be expected to reach her heaviest production during her third or fourth lactation.[11] It is also said that "formula derived from goats' milk is unsuitable for babies who are lactose intolerant as it contains similar levels of lactose to cow's-milk-based infant formulae."[12] Butterfat or milkfat is the fatty portion of milk. ...


Goat butter is white (compared to yellow butter from cow's milk) because the goats produce milk with the yellow beta-carotene converted to a colorless form of vitamin A. For other uses, see Butter (disambiguation). ... Beta-carotene is a form of carotene with β-rings at both ends. ...


Goat cheese is known as chèvre in France, after the French word for "goat". Some varieties include Rocamadour and Montrachet.[13] Feta is a well-known Greek variety that may be made with a blend of goat and sheep milk. Goats Cheese Goats milk cheese, goat cheese or Chèvre cheese is cheese made from goats milk (chèvre is French for goat). ... Country of origin France Region, town Périgord, Quercy Source of milk Goats Pasteurized No Texture Soft Aging time 12-15 days Certification French AOC 1996 Rocamadour is a French cheese from the regions of Périgord and Quercy. ... Country of origin Greece Region, town N/A Source of milk Goat, sheep or mixture of these Pasteurised Depends on variety Texture Depends on variety Aging time min. ...


Fiber

Some goats are bred for the fiber from their coats. Most goats have softer insulating hairs nearer the skin, and longer guard hairs on the surface. The desirable fiber for the textile industry is the former, and it goes by several names (mohair, fleece, goat wool, cashmere, etc., explained below). The coarse guard hairs are worthless as they cannot be spun or dyed. The proportion and texture varies between breeds, and has been a target of selective breeding for millennia. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,048 × 1,536 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,048 × 1,536 pixels, file size: 1. ... The angora goat is a goat from the Angora region in Asia Minor, near present-day Ankara. ... Fiber or fibre[1] is a class o f materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. ... Guard hairs are the longest, thickest hairs in a mammals coat. ... The Textile industry (also known in the United Kingdom and Australia as the Rag Trade) is a term used for industries primarily concerned with the design or manufacture of clothing as well as the distribution and use of textiles . ... A breed is a domesticated subspecies or infrasubspecies of an animal. ... Selective breeding in domesticated animals is the process of developing a cultivated breed over time. ...


The Cashmere goat produces a fiber, cashmere wool, which is one of the best in the world. It is very fine and soft. Most goats produce cashmere fiber to some degree, however the Cashmere goat has been specially bred to produce a much higher amount of it with fewer guard hairs. from: http://www. ... Kashmere redirects here. ...


The Angora breed produces long, curling, lustrous locks of mohair. The entire body of the goat is covered with mohair and there are no guard hairs. The locks constantly grow and can be four inches or more in length. Angora crossbreeds, such as the pygora and the nigora, have been created to produce mohair and/or cashmere wool in a smaller, easier-to-manage animal. Not to be confused with Mohair (band). ... The Pygora goat, a cross between the pygmy goat and the angora goat, is a breed that produces beautiful cashmere fiber (wool or coat), but with the smaller size of the pygmy. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Not to be confused with Mohair (band). ... Kashmere redirects here. ...


Goats do not have to be slaughtered to harvest the wool, which is instead sheared (cut from the body) in the case of Angora goats, or combed, in the case of Cashmere goats. However, the Angora goat usually gets shorn twice a year with an average yield of about 10 pounds while the Cashmere goat grows its fiber once a year and it takes about a week to comb out by hand, yielding only about 4 ounces. Look up Slaughter in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In physics and mechanics, shear refers to a deformation that causes parallel surfaces to slide past one another (as opposed to compression and tension, which cause parallel surfaces to move towards or away from one another). ...

An Angora goat being sheared
An Angora goat being sheared

The fiber is made into products such as sweaters and doll's hair. Both cashmere and mohair are warmer per ounce than wool and are not scratchy or itchy or as allergenic as wool sometimes is. Both fibers command a higher price than wool, compensating for the fact that there is less fiber per goat than there would be wool per sheep. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ...


In South Asia, cashmere is called "pashmina" (from Persian pashmina, "fine wool") and these goats are called pashmina goats (these well-fleeced animals are often mistaken for sheep). Since these goats actually belong to the upper Kashmir and Laddakh region, their wool came to be known as "cashmere" in the West. The pashmina shawls of Kashmir, with their intricate embroidery, are very famous. Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... Farsi redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Kashmir (or Cashmere) may refer to: Kashmir region, the northwestern region of the Indian subcontinent India, Kashmir conflict, the territorial dispute between India, Pakistan, and the China over the Kashmir region. ... Tikse monastery, Ladakh Hemis Monastery in the 1870s Ladakh is the largest district of the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir, covering more than half the area of the state (of which it is the eastern part). ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Goat breeds

Goat breeds fall into somewhat overlapping, general categories.


Feral

San Clemente Island goats first arrived on San Clemente Island from Santa Catalina Island in 1875. ...

Dairy

Main article: Dairy goat
Herds may be rented out to enact brush (scrub) control, as with this herd "hired" to clear blackberry brambles from the University of Washington campus.
Herds may be rented out to enact brush (scrub) control, as with this herd "hired" to clear blackberry brambles from the University of Washington campus.

Dairy goats are personable, hardy, and a very rewarding animal. ... An Anglo-Nubian is a species of domestic goat. ... The Golden Guernsey is a rare breed of goat from the Bailiwick of Guernsey on the Channel Islands. ... LaMancha is a type of goat noted for its lack of or much reduced external ears. ... The Nigerian Dwarf goat is a miniature dairy goat breed of West African ancestry, developed in the United States. ... The Oberhasli is a goat from the eponymous district of the Canton of Berne (Switzerland). ... Saanen goats. ... The Stiefelgeiss also known as the Booted Goat for its odd leg markings is a species of domestic mountain goats with origins in the uplands St. ... The Toggenburg is a breed of goats, named after the region in Switzerland where the breed originates, the Toggenburg valley. ... For other uses of the term, see goat (disambiguation). ... Anthem: Arrorró Capital Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Santa Cruz de Tenerife Official language(s) Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 13th  7,447 km²  1. ... The cabra majorera or Fuerteventura goat is a species of dairy goat native to the Canary Islands. ... Morro Jable Fuerteventura, a Spanish island, is one of the Canary Islands, in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Africa. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,944 × 2,592 pixels, file size: 936 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,944 × 2,592 pixels, file size: 936 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... This article is about the wireless e-mail device. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ...

Fiber

The angora goat is a goat from the Angora region in Asia Minor, near present-day Ankara. ... After 25 years of selective breeding, the Australian Cashmere Goat has evolved into a distinctive breed of goat, far removed from its bush goat origins. ... The Pygora goat, a cross between the pygmy goat and the angora goat, is a breed that produces beautiful cashmere fiber (wool or coat), but with the smaller size of the pygmy. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

Meat

A female Boer Goat The Boer goat was developed in South Africa in the early 1900s for meat production. ... Background The Kiko goat was developed exclusively by Goatex Group LLC, a New Zealand corporation which has been solely responsible for the breeding of Kiko goats in New Zealand. ... The Stiefelgeiss also known as the Booted Goat for its odd leg markings is a species of domestic mountain goats with origins in the uplands St. ... A young fainting goat in the midst of a myotonic fainting spell. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Kalahari Red is a breed of goat originating from South Africa. ...

Companion

  • Pygmy
  • Nigerian Dwarf
  • Australian Miniature Goat

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Nigerian Dwarf goat on a farm in Ontario, Canada The Nigerian Dwarf goat is a miniature dairy goat breed of West African ancestry. ...

Skin

Black Bengal Goat from Bangladesh Black Bengal Goat is the common name for a small breed of goat found in Bangladesh and north-eastern India (Assam and West Bengal). ...

Showing

A Nigerian Dwarf dairy nanny in show clip. This doe shows good dairy character with high, wide hips and clean, uniform mammaries with two teats.
A Nigerian Dwarf dairy nanny in show clip. This doe shows good dairy character with high, wide hips and clean, uniform mammaries with two teats.

Goat breeders' clubs frequently hold shows, where goats are judged on traits relating to conformation, udder quality, evidence of high production, longevity, build and muscling (meat goats and pet goats) and fiber production and the fiber itself (fiber goats). People who show their goats usually keep registered stock and the offspring of award-winning animals command a higher price. Registered goats, in general, are usually higher-priced if for no other reason than that records have been kept proving their ancestry and the production and other data of their sires, dams, and other ancestors. A registered doe is usually less of a gamble than buying a doe at random (as at an auction or sale barn) because of these records and the reputation of the breeder. Children's clubs such as 4-H also allow goats to be shown. Children's shows often include a showmanship class, where the cleanliness and presentation of both the animal and the exhibitor as well as the handler's ability and skill in handling the goat are scored. In a showmanship class, conformation is irrelevant since this is not what is being judged. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 682 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,237 × 1,088 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 682 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,237 × 1,088 pixels, file size: 1. ... Nigerian Dwarf goat on a farm in Ontario, Canada The Nigerian Dwarf goat is a miniature dairy goat breed of West African ancestry. ... This article concerns Breeder, an occupation in agriculture, animal husbandry, or animal fancy. ... A show is a judged event or display in the hobby of animal fancy or in the occupation of animal husbandry. ... Conformation generally means structural arrangement. ... A cow udder with 4 teats An udder is the mammary organ of cattle and some other mammals, including goats and sheep. ... Sign announcing 4-H membership on a ranch in Larimer County, Colorado. ... Showmanship is a dog competition. ...


Various "Dairy Goat Scorecards" (milking does) are systems used for judging shows in the US. The American Dairy Goat Association (ADGA) scorecard for an adult doe includes a point system of a hundred total with major factors including general appearance, the dairy character of a doe (physical traits that aid and increase milk production), body capacity, and specifically for the mammary system. Young stock and bucks are judged by different scorecards which place more emphasis on the other three categories; general appearance, body capacity, and dairy character.


The American Goat Society (AGS)] has a similar, but not identical scorecard that is used in their shows. The miniature dairy goats may be judged by either of the two scorecards. The "Angora Goat scorecard" used by the Colored Angora Goat Breeder's Association or CAGBA (which covers the white and the colored goats) includes evaluation of an animal's fleece color, density, uniformity, fineness, and general body confirmation. Disqualifications include: a deformed mouth, broken down pasterns, deformed feet, crooked legs, abnormalities of testicles, missing testicles, more than 3 inch split in scrotum, and close-set or distorted horns. The pastern is a part of the horse between the fetlock joint and the hoof, or between the wrist and forepaw of a dog. ...


In religion

The Scapegoat by William Holman Hunt (1854).
The Scapegoat by William Holman Hunt (1854).

Goats are mentioned many times in the Bible. A goat is considered a "clean" animal by Jewish dietary laws and was slaughtered for an honored guest. It was also acceptable for some kinds of sacrifices. Goat-hair curtains were used in the tent that contained the tabernacle (Exodus 25:4). On Yom Kippur, the festival of the Day of Atonement, two goats were chosen and lots were drawn for them. One was sacrificed and the other allowed to escape into the wilderness, symbolically carrying with it the sins of the community. From this comes the word "scapegoat". A leader or king was sometimes compared to a male goat leading the flock. In the New Testament, Jesus told a parable of The Sheep and the Goats. (Gospel of Matthew 25) The Scapegoat, by William Holman Hunt, 1854. ... The Scapegoat, by William Holman Hunt, 1854. ... William Holman Hunt - Self-Portrait. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... The circled U indicates that this can of tuna is certified kosher by the Union of Orthodox Congregations. ... This article is about the second book in the Torah. ... Yom Kippur (Hebrew:יוֹם כִּפּוּר ) is a Jewish holiday, known in English as the Day of Atonement. ... The Scapegoat by William Holman Hunt, 1854. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... // For a comparison of parable with other kinds of stories, see Myth, legend, fairy tale, and fable. ... The Sheep and the Goats or The Judgement of the Nations was a discourse of Jesus recorded in the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ...


Goats are also often prevalant in Satanic and occult imagery.


References

  1. ^ Coffey, Linda, Margo Hale, and Ann Wells; "Goats: Sustainable Production Overview.
  2. ^ McLeod, Lianne; "Goats as Pets" at About.com.
  3. ^ anonymous; "Goat busters track domestication", Science News 8 April 2000.
  4. ^ Experiments On The Function Of Slit-Form Pupils, Toronto Univ. Studies in Psychology v. 2
  5. ^ anonymous; Goat-Horn Spoon.
  6. ^ Addrizzo, John R.; "Use of Goat Milk and Goat Meat as Therapeutic Aids in Cardiovascular Diseases", Meat Goat Production Handbook.
  7. ^ Luginbuhl, Jean-Marie; "Meat Goat Production in North Carolina"North Carolina State University Cooperative Extension.
  8. ^ anonymous; "UF, FAMU Work to Make Goat Part of Mainstream American Diet", UF News 2 August 2001.
  9. ^ Ekici, K, &alii; "Isolation of Some Pathogens from Raw Milk of Different Milch Animals", Pakistan Journal of Nutrition v 3 (2004) #3, pp 161-162.
  10. ^ a b The World's Healthiest Foods. "Milk, goat."
  11. ^ American Dairy Goat Association
  12. ^ Professor Martin Marshall - Deputy Chief Medical Officer - Department of Health (22 August 2006). WITHDRAWAL FROM SALE OF INFANTS MILKS BASED ON GOATS' MILK ON 17 SEPTEMBER 2006 (HTML) (english). non-urgent memo. Department of Health. Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  13. ^ Encyclopedia

North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Species See text. ... Sheep are commonly bred as livestock. ... Dairy goats are personable, hardy, and a very rewarding animal. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A Yule Goat from Uppland, Sweden. ... The Gävle Goat from 2004 The Gävle Goat (known in Swedish as the Julbocken i Gävle or Gävlebocken) is a giant version of a traditional Swedish Yule Goat figure made of straw that stands in (Slottstorget) Castle Square in central Gävle. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Goats
Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Breeds of Livestock - Goat Breeds (113 words)
The goat, along with sheep, were among the earliest domesticated animals.
Goat remains have been found at archaeological sites in western Asia, such as Jericho, Choga, Mami, Djeitun and Cayonu, which allows domestication of the goats to be dated at between 6000 and 7000 B.C. However, unlike sheep, their ancestry is fairly clear.
The major contributor of modern goats is the Bezoar goat which is distributed from the mountains of Asia Minor across the Middle East to Sind.
Cashmere Goats (577 words)
American goats were found to be producing down but not in enough quantity to make it economically viable.
Cashmere goats are raised for their fiber, meat, and ability to rejuvenate weedy pastures.
The amount of Cashmere a goat produces depends on a number of factors, the most important of which is how much selective breeding is in the genetic background.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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