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Encyclopedia > Goaltender

This article is about the goaltender in ice hockey. For the similar position in other sports, see Goalkeeper. Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... A football goalkeeper leaves the ground to parry a shot on goal In many team sports, a goalkeeper (termed goaltender, netminder, or goalie in some sports) is a designated player that is charged with directly preventing the opposite team from scoring by defending the goal. ...

Patrick Roy, a retired ice hockey goaltender, holds multiple NHL records including most wins, most playoff wins, most games played, and most playoff games played.
Patrick Roy, a retired ice hockey goaltender, holds multiple NHL records including most wins, most playoff wins, most games played, and most playoff games played.

The goaltender (also known colloquially as goalie or netminder) in ice hockey is the player who defends his team's goal net by stopping shots of the puck from entering his team's net, thus preventing the opposing team from scoring. The goalie usually plays in or near the area in front of the net called the goal crease (often referred to simply as the crease). Due to the power and frequency of shots, the goaltender wears special equipment designed to protect the body from direct impact. Only one goalie is allowed to be on the ice for each team at any one time. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (425x606, 46 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Colorado Avalanche Patrick Roy Goaltender User:Aborrows ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (425x606, 46 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Colorado Avalanche Patrick Roy Goaltender User:Aborrows ... Patrick Roy (IPA pronunciation: ), (born October 4, 1965, in Ste. ... NHL redirects here. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... A shot in ice hockey is an attempt by a player to score a goal by striking the puck with his stick in the direction of the net. ... Two standard hockey pucks. ...

Contents

Goaltender play in ice hockey

Privileges

Goaltender is typically a specialized position in ice hockey; at higher levels in the game, no goalies play other positions and no other players play goalie. A typical ice hockey team may have on its roster two or three goaltenders. The goaltender has special privileges that other players do not. He wears special goaltending equipment that is subject to different regulations from those regarding the gear of other players. The goalie may legally hold (or freeze) the puck with his hands to cause a stoppage of play. If a player from the other team hits him without making an attempt to get out of his way, the offending player is penalized. In some leagues, if a goalie's stick breaks, he can continue playing with a broken stick until the play is stopped, unlike other players who must drop any broken sticks immediately. In ice hockey, the goaltender wears specialized goaltending equipment to protect him from the impact of the puck and assist him in making saves. ...


Saves

When a goalie blocks or stops a shot from going into his goal net, that action is called a save. Goalies often use a particular style, but in general they make saves any way they can: catching the puck with their glove hand, deflecting the shot with their stick, blocking it with their leg pads or blocker or another part of their body, collapsing to butterfly position to block any low shot coming, especially in close proximity. After making a save, the goaltender attempts to control the rebound to avoid a goal scored by an opposing player when the goaltender is out of position ('scoring on a rebound'), or simply to allow the goalie's own team to get control of the puck. Goalies often catch a shot if they can to better control how it re-enters play. If there is immediate pressure, a goalie may choose to hold on to the puck (for a second or more, with judgment from the referee) to stop play for a face-off. If a goalie holds on to the puck for too long without any pressure they may be subject to a 2-minute 'delay of game' penalty. Recently, in the NHL and AHL, goalies have been restricted as to where they can play the puck behind the net. To save in a sport means to stop a goal or to maintain the lead. ...


See also: shot on goal, save percentage, and goals against average. In ice hockey, field hockey, indoor lacrosse, or soccer, a shot on goal is a shot that will enter the goal if it is not stopped by the goaltender. ... Save percentage (SV%, SVP, PCT) is an ice hockey statistic that represents the percentage of shots on goal a goaltender stops. ... Goals Against Average (GAAv) is an ice hockey statistic that represents the number of goals netminders concede on average per whole-game played. ...


Glossary & technique

Angle play: The method where, by positioning themselves in a direct line between the shooter and the net, a goaltender covers more of the net than he would otherwise be able to. One of the most notable angle goaltenders was Bernie Parent. Bernie Parent (born April 3, 1945) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey player. ...


See main article: Blocker (ice hockey equipment). A blocker is a form of protection for a goalie playing ice hockey. ...


Blocker: Worn on the right hand (for right-handed goaltenders), the blocker is a rectangular piece of equipment with a glove to hold the stick. It protects the wrist area, and can be used to direct shots away from the net. The blocker should be positioned at one's side, and at a height which allows the goaltender's stick to remain flat on the ice. Some goalies, such as Rick DiPietro of the New York Islanders, have their blocker on the left hand, and their trapper on the right hand. This setup is described as a Full-right goalie.


Butterfly save: On low shots, modern goaltenders usually work in the "butterfly" position, keeping their knees together and their stick covering their five-hole. The glove is kept up, ready for a possible deflection, and the goaltender is focused on the incoming shot. A term common to the sport of hockey, the five-hole refers to the space between a goaltenders legs. ...


Holes one through five: There exist five distinct positions a goaltender needs to cover:

  1. At the corner of the net on the ice on the goaltender's stick side.
  2. At the corner of the net on the ice on the goaltender's glove side.
  3. On the goaltender's glove side, near the upper crossbar.
  4. On the goaltender's stick side, near the upper crossbar.
  5. Between the goaltender's legs. The five-hole is the only hole named by number in the present age.


Leg pads: Worn on the goaltender's legs to both protect the legs and help stop shots. The leg pads may not be more than twelve inches in width. (Current NHL Rules have reduced this to 11" in width, while also restricting the overall height to 38".) The leg pads should come to about three inches above the knee. Pads which are too long will affect balance and timing; pads which are too short will not protect the knees properly. A term common to the sport of hockey, the five-hole refers to the space between a goaltenders legs. ...


Leg pad save: A save made with any part of the leg pads. The goaltender should remain relaxed and skate backwards with the incoming shot, thus helping to absorb the blow and reduce the rebound effect. One type of leg pad save is the butterfly save.


Lie: The angle created between the handle of a goaltender's stick and the paddle. The higher the lie, the closer the stick resembles the capital letter "L".


Paddle: The thick part of the goaltender's stick, not to be confused with the blade; the blade should remain flat on the ice as often as possible.


Paddle down: A type of stance by the goaltender when the play is coming from the corner to the front of the net and the puck carrier is carrying the puck in front of the net looking to score. Here the goaltender puts the stick down on the ground, parallel to the ice, with the leg farthest from the post down and the other up and ready to push. This works well against angled rushes or wraparounds where the skater would normally out skate the goalie. The skater does have the top part of the net to shoot at, but lifting the puck over the goalie from up close tends to be difficult. The paddle down stance is also effective against low passes from behind the net to players looking to score from the slot. Parallel is a term in geometry and in everyday life that refers to a property in Euclidean space of two or more lines or planes, or a combination of these. ...


Poke check: When the goaltender wants to poke the puck away from an opposing puck-carrier, he/she quickly slides his hand up the stick, thrusting forward towards the puck. This is a dangerous move, and occasionally the goaltender will miss and the puck-carrier will be left with an unguarded net.


Screen shot: Screen shots are blind shots. In the screen shot, another player (usually an opponent, but sometimes the goaltender's own teammate) stands between the shooter and the goaltender, obscuring the goaltender's vision of the shot. On a screen shot, the goaltender must do everything possible to try to see the shot, dropping to the butterfly stance and thrusting their trapper out at the sound of a shot. Some goalies, such as Ed Belfour or Ron Hextall, go as far as (illegally) punching players in the head or slashing their legs. Edward John The Eagle Belfour (born April 21, 1965 in Carman, Manitoba, Canada) is an NHL goalie who currently plays for the Florida Panthers of the National Hockey League. ... Ron niggerdick Hextall (born May 3, 1964 in Brandon, Manitoba) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender most often associated with the Philadelphia Flyers of the National Hockey League. ...


Shuffle: A technique for lateral movement when the puck is relatively close to the net. The goaltender slides his/her legs, one at a time, in the desired direction. If the goaltender is not quick this techniques momentarily leaves the five-hole open. This is the most common method of movement for a goaltender.


Skate save: A save made with the goaltender's skate. The goaltender decides which direction the rebound should travel in, and turns his/her skate in that direction. Then, bending the other leg, he/she pushes towards the puck with the off leg, as the bent knee drops to the ice. This move is rarely used and widely thought of as "not effective"


Skating: A common fallacy is that the goaltender can get by with merely adequate skating, and often young players are placed in net due to their poor skating. In fact, the goaltender must be one of the best technical skaters on the team, and must be able to keep up with the moves of every skater on opposing teams. In particular, goaltenders must be adept at lateral skating and quick pivoting.


Stacking the pads: When a goaltender is on the angle, often a sudden pass close to the net will leave the net relatively unguarded. Stacking the pads is a desperation move in which the goaltender slides feet-first, with legs together (and consequently, "stacked"), towards the potential shooter, attempting to cover as much space as possible.


Stance: In a proper stance, the goaltender has the weight on the balls of his/her feet, the trapper and blocker just above knee-height, and the stick flat on the ice. Stance should also be conformed to the goaltenders style and comfort.


Stick: The stick, held by the goaltender in their blocker hand, the blade of the stick should remain flat on the ice. Keep notice of the lie on a new stick. A high lie will force a goaltender to play on their heels, offsetting balance, while a low lie places a goaltender lower to the ice, and may affect high saves.


Stick save: A save made with the goaltender's stick. On stick saves, the goaltender should not keep a tight grip on the stick, instead allowing the shot's momentum to push the stick back into the skates/pads, cushioning the blow.


Stood on his head: This is a term to describe an outstanding performance by an ice hockey goaltender in a short period of time. Often when a goalie lets out a rebound, the opposition returns the shot quickly, and the goalie has to make a quick save. A goalie often falls on his side and "stacks the pads" and appears to nearly stand on their head. The term is derived after Frank Calder, President of the NHL, remarked in 1918 that "they could stand on their head, if they wanted to." This was alluding to the rules change that permitted goalies to fall down to make a save.


T-push: A technique used by goaltenders to move in a lateral direction. To perform a t-push, a goaltender directs his/her outside skate in the desired direction, pushing with both legs, covering the five hole. This method of lateral movement is most effective when the puck is far from the net. Use of this move when the puck is in close will result in a goal through the "5 Hole"


Telescoping: Telescoping is a method of moving inward and outward from the goal crease. Most often used in setting up prior to the puck entering their zone, this move is accomplished by simply allowing your skates to separate, resulting in forward motion, then pulling your skates back together and stopping. At no time during a telescope do your skates leave the ice.


Trapper: This piece of equipment is often referred to simply as the "glove", and it was originally shaped in the same fashion as a baseball glove, it has evolved into a highly specific piece of equipment that is designed specifically for catching the puck. Some of the more significant changes are the use of a "string mesh" in the pocket of the trapper, and the substantial palm and wrist protection. The pocket is the area between the thumb and first finger of the glove, and is where most goaltender's try to catch the puck, as it reduces the discomfort of the goaltender and the chance of a rebound falling out of the glove. The trapper can be held in a variety of positions depending upon the individual goaltender, but the trend among younger goaltenders is to hold the glove with the palm facing towards the shooter, instead of the "shake hands" position that was popular for so long.


Pro-fly: This style of play is derived from the butterfly style of play, although most will argue that this is nothing more than a marketing term. Current leg pad design allows for the full face of the pad to be perpendicular to the ice, maximizing blocking area. This is also called "flaring the pad", almost all modern goaltenders play this style. The stance is very wide and low to maximize the amount of body blocking the net. One of the best goaltenders at this position is Marc-Andre Fleury currently playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins.[citation needed] This is still considered a butterfly motion, as the mechanics of making the save are the same, however it is the design of the leg pad that achieves this rotation more than anything.


Playing styles

Stand-up style

There are many ways to stop the puck and methods of doing this have been created over. The oldest one is the "Stand-up" style. In this style you stop the puck from a standing position, not going down. The Goalies may bend over to stop the puck with their upper body or may kick the puck. Those saves made by kicking are known as kick saves or skate saves. They may also simply use their stick to stop it. This was the style seen in the early NHL and was most commonly used up until the early 90's. One of the more notable goalies who was last seen using stand up was Kirk McLean, but most of the goalies from earlier decades such as Jacques Plante were goalies who were considered pure stand up goalies. In ice hockey, the stand-up style, as the name suggests, refers to a style of goaltending in which the goaltender makes the majority of the saves standing up, or simply put, not falling to his or her knees. ... Kirk Alan McLean was born in Willowdale, Ontario (now part of Toronto) on June 26, 1966. ... Joseph Jacques Omer Jake the Snake Plante (born January 17, 1929 in Shawinigan Falls, Quebec; died February 27, 1986 in Sierre, Switzerland) was a Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender. ...


Toes up style

The style that came after "Stand-up" was "Toes Up". In this style a goalie will go down to stop the puck and will kick their pads outwards with their toes pointed towards the ceiling. In this position, goalies found more success stopping pucks down low than they had in stand up position. This was seen most often from the 70's through mid 90's. Grant Fuhr was the most notable goalie of this style and made a living off amazing and difficult looking saves from this style. (It should be noted that Grant Fuhr was actually a Hybrid Style goaltender (see below), and this style is not really a recognized one. Kick saves are a selection of the hybrid or traditional butterfly goaltender, but do not form the basis of a single style.) Grant S. Fuhr (born September 28, 1962), is a former goaltender in the National Hockey League. ...


Butterfly style

Another style is the "Butterfly," where goalies go down with both pads with their toes pointing outwards and the tops of their pads meeting in the middle. This results in a "wall" of padding without any holes, lowering the chances of low angle shots getting in. Early innovators of this style were goaltending greats Glenn Hall and Tony Esposito, who played during the 50's-60's and 70's-80's, respectively. Hall is generally credited to be among the very first to use this style, and both he and Esposito had tremendous success with it. This is the most widely used style in the NHL today. "Butterfly" goalies have developed methods of sliding in the "Butterfly" position in order to move around fast in one timer situations. As pad size increased, it became a more notable style of goaltending and is still evolving. In ice hockey, the butterfly style refers to a style of goaltending in which the goaltender covers the lower part of the net with his or her leg pads, mainly by dropping down on knees. ... Glenn Hall Glenn Hall (born October 3, 1931, in Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada) was a professional ice hockey goaltender. ... Anthony James Esposito (born April 23, 1943 in Sault Ste. ...


Hybrid style

This style of goaltending is a blend of all styles, where the goaltender primarily relies on reaction and positioning to make saves. Hybrid goaltenders will make kick saves, will utilize the butterfly, and are generally not as predictable as goaltenders who rely heavily on the butterfly as a save selection. While this style is generally not as utilized in the NHL, three goaltenders who have had great success in recent years using it are Martin Brodeur, Dominik Hasek, and Ryan Miller. Martin Pierre Brodeur (born May 6, 1972, in Montreal, Quebec) is a professional ice hockey goaltender who has played his entire National Hockey League career with the New Jersey Devils. ... Dominik Hašek (born January 29, 1965 in Pardubice, Czechoslovakia (now Czech Republic)), also known by his nickname The Dominator, is a professional ice hockey goaltender. ... Ryan Miller (born July 17, 1980 in East Lansing, Michigan) is an American hockey player who is a goaltender for the Buffalo Sabres. ...


Penalties and substitutions

A goalie can get a penalty like any other player, but the goalie tends to have less bodily contact with players from the opposing team and therefore rarely gets a penalty. When he or she does get a penalty, the coach is allowed to select another player, who was on the ice at the time of the infraction, to sit in the penalty box for him or her, unless the goalie has been penalized for fighting. Goalies skate around the ice rink much less during play than other players and are substituted far less frequently in a game; typically, unless he or she performs poorly, a goalie plays out the entire game. As of the 2005-2006 NHL season, if a goalie touches the puck while in the restricted area behind the goal line, the goalie is penalized for delay of game. A penalty is a punishment: a legal sentence, e. ...


Empty net situations

Normally, the goalie plays in or near the goal crease the whole game. However, there are a couple of situations when a goalie may leave the ice rink to be substituted by an attacking player to increase his or her team's chance of scoring a goal. A team temporarily playing with no goalie is said to be playing with an empty net. If the opposing team commits a penalty while the goalie's team has control of the puck, the goalie may leave to be substituted because as soon as the penalized team gets control of the puck, play is stopped by the referee to issue the penalty, before they can score a goal (called a delayed penalty). However, if the team with an empty net puts the puck in their own goal net by mistake, the goal still counts against them.


Also, during the last minute or so of a game, if a team is likely to lose anyway because they are a goal behind and the puck and playing action are on the other team's side of the ice rink, the coach may decide to have the goalie leave the rink to be substituted by an attacking player to increase the team's chance of scoring a goal to tie the game. Since no goalie is protecting the empty net, it is easier for the opposing team to score an empty net goal.


NHL goaltender awards

  • The Vezina Trophy is awarded each year by the NHL to the league's most outstanding goaltender as determined by the general managers of the teams.
  • The William M. Jennings Trophy is awarded each year by the NHL to the goaltender(s) from the team that allowed the fewest goals during the regular season.
  • The Roger Crozier Saving Grace Award is awarded each year by the NHL to the goaltender with the best save percentage during the regular season.

Vezina Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Vezina Trophy is awarded annually to the person deemed the best ice hockey goalkeeper as voted on by the general managers of the teams in the National Hockey League. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... William M. Jennings Trophy at the Hockey Hall of Fame The William M. Jennings Trophy is an annual award given to the goaltender(s) having played a minimum of 25 games for the team in the National Hockey League with the fewest goals scored against it. ... The Roger Crozier Saving Grace Award is one of the National Hockey Leagues many trophies. ...

Goalies credited with goals

A goalie scoring a goal in an NHL game is a very rare feat. Ron Hextall and Martin Brodeur have both accomplished this twice, each doing so once in the regular season and once in the playoffs. Damian Rhodes and José Théodore are the only goalies in NHL history to score a goal in a shutout game. Ron niggerdick Hextall (born May 3, 1964 in Brandon, Manitoba) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender most often associated with the Philadelphia Flyers of the National Hockey League. ... Martin Pierre Brodeur (born May 6, 1972, in Montreal, Quebec) is a professional ice hockey goaltender who has played his entire National Hockey League career with the New Jersey Devils. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... José Nicholas Théodore (Born - September 13, 1976 in Laval, Quebec, Canada) is a French Canadian professional hockey goaltender in the National Hockey League who has played for the Montreal Canadiens and Colorado Avalanche. ...


Antero Niittymäki of the AHL's Philadelphia Phantoms is the only known professional goalie to score in overtime, doing so when the Hershey Bears, needing a win in their last game to make the playoffs, pulled their goalie and an errant pass wound up in their net. Antero Niittymäki ( in IPA) (born June 18, 1980 in Turku, Finland) is a professional ice hockey goaltender currently with the Philadelphia Flyers. ... The American Hockey League (AHL) is regarded as the top professional hockey league in North America outside the National Hockey League (NHL) for which it serves as the primary developmental circuit. ... The Philadelphia Phantoms are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The Hershey Bears are a professional ice hockey team playing in the American Hockey League of which the Bears are also the senior member club. ...


A chronological list of goals scored in the NHL by goalies:

¹ Goals awarded due to the goalie being the last player on his team to touch the puck before the opposition scored on themselves.
² Scored in the playoffs Billy Smith (born December 12, 1950, in Perth, Ontario) was a professional ice hockey player. ... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ... Ron niggerdick Hextall (born May 3, 1964 in Brandon, Manitoba) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender most often associated with the Philadelphia Flyers of the National Hockey League. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 11 is the 101st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (102nd in leap years). ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chris Osgood (born 26 November 1972 in Peace River, Alberta, Canada) is a professional ice hockey player. ... The Hartford Whalers (known as the New England Whalers as a World Hockey Association (WHA) franchise from 1972-79), was a National Hockey League (NHL) team that played from 1979-97. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Martin Pierre Brodeur (born May 6, 1972, in Montreal, Quebec) is a professional ice hockey goaltender who has played his entire National Hockey League career with the New Jersey Devils. ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... José Nicholas Théodore (Born - September 13, 1976 in Laval, Quebec, Canada) is a French Canadian professional hockey goaltender in the National Hockey League who has played for the Montreal Canadiens and Colorado Avalanche. ... January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Evgeni Nabokov (Ru: Евгений Набоков, Jevgenij Nabokov) (born July 25, 1975 in Ust-Kamenogorsk, U.S.S.R., now Kazakhstan), is a professional ice hockey player. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Mika Noronen (born June 17, 1979 in Tampere, Finland) is a Finnish ice hockey goaltender. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chris Mason Chris Mason (born April 20, 1976 in Red Deer, Alberta) is a professional ice hockey goaltender who currently plays for the Nashville Predators of the NHL. Mason was drafted in the 5th round, 122nd overall by the New Jersey Devils in the 1995 NHL Entry Draft. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


See also: NHL Goalies who have scored in a game


See also

Positions on the Hockey Rink
Forwards:
Left winger | Centre | Right winger
Defencemen:
Left defenceman | Right defenceman
Goaltender:
Goaltender
Power forward | Enforcer | Captain | Head coach | Referee & linesman | Pest

Centre or Center in ice hockey is a forward position of a player whose primary zone of play is the middle of the ice, away from the side boards. ... Winger in hockey is a forward position of a player whose primary zone of play on the ice is along the outer playing area. ... Forward is a hockey player position on the ice whose responsibility is primarily offense. ... Defence (defense in the U.S.A.) in hockey is a player position with a primary responsibility to prevent the opposing team from scoring goals. ... A breakaway is a situation in ice hockey in which a player with the puck has no defending players, except for the goaltender, between himself and the opposing goal, leaving him free to skate in and shoot at will (assuming he can skate faster than the defenders trying to catch... National Hockey League The list of National Hockey League (NHL) players is divided into the following lists: By specific groups Current players List of every NHL player List of members of the Hockey Hall of Fame List of members of the United States Hockey Hall of Fame List of NHL... A hockey rink is an ice rink specifically designed for the game of ice hockey. ... Forward is a hockey player position on the ice whose responsibility is primarily offense. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x675, 15 KB)Diagram of a hockey rink File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Winger in hockey is a forward position of a player whose primary zone of play on the ice is along the outer playing area. ... Centre or Center in ice hockey is a forward position of a player whose primary zone of play is the middle of the ice, away from the side boards. ... Winger in hockey is a forward position of a player whose primary zone of play on the ice is along the outer playing area. ... Defence (defense in the U.S.A.) in hockey is a player position with a primary responsibility to prevent the opposing team from scoring goals. ... Defence (defense in the U.S.A.) in hockey is a player position with a primary responsibility to prevent the opposing team from scoring goals. ... Defence (defense in the U.S.A.) in hockey is a player position with a primary responsibility to prevent the opposing team from scoring goals. ... In ice hockey a power forward is a forward who possesses above average offensive skills and plays a tough, physical game. ... Enforcer is a role in ice hockey: the term is sometimes used synonymously with fighter. An enforcers job involves fighting opposing players and intimidating them by virtue of his presence on the ice. ... Luc Robitaille, 2005: the A is also placed on the players left. ... Coach in ice hockey refers to a head coach or an assistant coach given responsibility of organizing player offence and defence. ... American Hockey League referee Dean Morton In ice hockey, an official is a person who has some responsibility in enforcing the rules or maintaining the order of the game. ... In ice hockey, a pest is a type of player who attempts to annoy, anger, or distract opposing players in order to reduce their effectiveness or cause them to take a penalty. ...

External links

  • The Goalies Archive Complete goaltending history of every NHL and WHA teams
  • HockeyGoalies.org Comprehensive list of goalies
  • Goalie Nicknames

  Results from FactBites:
 
Goaltenders' Glossary (Doug Norris' Goaltender Home Page) (1180 words)
The goaltender should remain relaxed and skate backwards with the incoming shot, thus helping to absorb the blow and reduce the rebound effect.
In fact, the goaltender must be one of the best technical skaters on the team, and must be able to keep up with the moves of every skater on opposing teams.
Stacking the pads is a desperation move in which the goaltender jumps feet-first towards the potential shooter, attempting to cover as much space as possible.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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