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Encyclopedia > Go around

A go around, overshoot or missed approach is an aborted landing of an aircraft which is on final approach. An aircraft is any machine capable of atmospheric flight. ...

Contents

Image File history File links Go-around. ...


Origin of the term

The term arises from the traditional use of circuits at airfields—a landing aircraft will first join the circuit pattern and prepare for landing in an orderly fashion. If for some reason the pilot decides not to land, he can simply fly back up to circuit height, and complete another circuit—in other words, go around again. The term go-around is still used even for modern airliners, though they do not use traditional circuit patterns for landing. At an airfield, the circuit is a conventional standard path for coordinating air traffic that is taking off and landing, as opposed to a practice of so-called straight in approaches and direct climb outs. It is usually employed at small general aviation (GA) airfields, though it is also used... For other uses, see Airport (disambiguation). ... An airliner is a large fixed-wing aircraft (an aeroplane/airplane) initially designed for the transport of paying passengers, and usually operated by an airline company (which owns or leases the aircraft). ...


Reasons for going around

The go-around procedure may be initiated either by the air traffic control or by the captain of the aircraft. Air Traffic Control Towers (ATCTs) at Schiphol Airport Air Traffic Control (ATC) is a service provided by ground based controllers who direct aircraft on the ground and in the air to ensure safe, orderly and expeditious traffic flow. ...


The air traffic controller will instruct the pilot to go around if there is an aircraft, vehicle or object on the runway. The captain will decide to go around if the aircraft is not lined up or configured properly for the approach, no landing clearance was issued, the runway is not visible by the time the aircraft reaches the decision height because of low visibility, or if other dangerous meteorological conditions are experienced on final approach (strong winds or microbursts). In meteorology, visibility is a measure of the distance that can be seen clearly at any given time. ... A microburst is a very localized column of sinking air, producing damaging straight-line winds similar to, but distinguishable from tornadoes. ...


A go around in itself this does not constitute any sort of emergency.


The go around procedure

When the captain is instructed, or decides himself to go around, he will apply full power to the engines, adopt an appropriate climb attitude and airspeed, retract landing gears, retract flaps as necessary and follow the published missed approach procedure (a set path to follow in the event of a go around) or the instructions of the air traffic controller.


Many modern aircraft such as the Airbus series use fly-by-wire systems with go-around modes that automatically set maximum climb power and pitch the aircraft for best performance. On older aircraft, the pilot performs the go-around manually. Airbus S.A.S. better known as simply Airbus, based in Toulouse, France, is the worlds top commercial aircraft manufacturer measured by deliveries and orders for 2003 and 2004. ... A flight control system consists of the flight control surfaces, the respective cockpit controls, connecting linkage, and necessary operating mechanisms to control aircraft in flight The basic fundamentals of aircraft controls has been explained in aeronautics. ...


References

  • avweb.com article

  Results from FactBites:
 
Go around - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (336 words)
A go around, overshoot or missed approach is an aborted landing of an aircraft.
The term go-around is still used even for modern airliners, that do not use traditional circuit patterns for landing, although they are typically assigned a set path to follow in the event of a go around.
A pilot may elect to go around for many reasons, and in itself this does not constitute any sort of emergency.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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