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Encyclopedia > Gnosis
Look up gnosis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

The word gnosis (from the Greek word for knowledge, γνώσις) refers to a Hellenic philosophical term for knowledge. It is also used to mean a form of spiritual knowledge that is more commonly familiar to people as enlightenment though, the Greek word for enlightenment is διαφωτισθούν which would be closer to the word informed rather than knowledge. Gnostic also refers to a follower of one of various near eastern schools of self-realisation flourishing during the early Christian era. Though again as noted above, the term has a much broader application than being exclusive to any sectarian group (see Plato's the Statesmen, Plotinus and gnosiology). Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that French Wiktionary be merged into this article or section. ... Gnosis was a magazine published from 1985 to 1999, devoted to the western esoteric tradition. ... Personification of knowledge (Greek Επιστημη, Episteme) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... Look up Enlightenment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Statesman, or Politikos in Greek and Politicus in Latin, is a four part dialogue contained within the work of Plato. ... Plotinus Plotinus (Greek: ) (ca. ... The term gnosiology (μελέτη της γνώσης) is derived from the Greek words gnosis (knowledge, γνώση) and logos (word or discourse, λόγος). Linguistically, one might compare epistemology, which is derived from the Greek words episteme (knowledge) and logos. ...

Contents

Classical meanings

  • Gnosis being a Greek word has its origin in Greek philosophy. See Plato (c. 427–c. 347 BC), gnostikoi’ (γνοστικοι) and gnostike episteme (γνοστικη επιστημη). Politikos (Πολιτικος) in Greek or Politicus in Latin (258e-267a). Gnostikoi which means the knowledge to influence and control. Gnostike episteme also was used to indicate one's aptitude.[1] The Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus rejected followers of gnosticism as being un-Hellenistic and anti- Plato due to their vilification of Plato's demiurge, see Neoplatonism and Gnosticism. The term is used throughout Greek philosophy as a technical term of experience knowledge in contrast to theoretical knowledge which is akin to epistemology. The term is also related to the study of knowledge retainment (see cognition).
  • Among the sectarian gnostics, gnosis was first and foremost a matter of self acquaintance which was the goal of enlightenment. Also stated as direct knowledge of God through awareness of the divine spark within. Later, Valentinius, more usually called Valentinus, taught that gnosis was the privileged "knowledge of the heart" or "insight" about the spiritual nature of the cosmos, that brought about salvation to the pneumatics - people who believed they could achieve this insight. Gnosis was distinct from the secret teachings they only revealed to initiates once they had reached a certain level of progression. Rather, these teachings were paths to obtain gnosis. Gnostic ideas of salvation were similar to Buddhist conceptions of enlightenment[citation needed], hence gnosis was not expressible by words. (See e.g. ineffability, a quality of realization common to many, if not most, esoteric traditions; see also Jung on the difference between sign and symbol.)
  • Among heresiologists, gnosis denotes different Jewish, Christian or Pagan belief systems of esoteric nature such as, first and foremost, Gnosticism and other dualist systems from the 1st and 2nd centuries A.D., but also Rosicrucianism, Kabbalah, etc.[citation needed]
  • In early Christianity gnosis also carried over from Hellenic philosophy into Greek Orthodoxy via St Clement of Alexandria, Hippolytus of Rome, Hegesippus, and Origen. Gnosis meaning intuitive knowledge, an experience of God. In relation to theosis (deification) and theoria (vision of God)[2].
  • The term Gnosis is related to the Sanskrit jnana (as in Jnana Yoga) and to the Hebrew daath, which is the hidden sphere in the Kabbalah, or that knowledge which was only given to the initiated.[citation needed]
  • In the teachings of Sri Aurobindo, the Gnostic being refers to the future supramental state of divinised humanity, living a spirit-filled existence.[citation needed]

For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... The Statesman, or Politikos in Greek and Politicus in Latin, is a four part dialogue contained within the work of Plato. ... The Statesman, or Politikos in Greek and Politicus in Latin, is a four part dialogue contained within the work of Plato. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Neoplatonism (also Neo-Platonism) is the modern term for a school of philosophy that took shape in the 3rd century AD, based on the teachings of Plato and earlier Platonists. ... Plotinus Plotinus (Greek: ) (ca. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Look up Polemic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Polemic is the art or practice of inciting disputation or causing controversy, for example in religious, philosophical, or political matters. ... The Demiurge, in some belief systems, is a deity responsible for the creation of the physical universe and the physical aspect of humanity. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that Meta-epistemology be merged into this article or section. ... Look up Cognition in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sectarianism is an adherence to a particular sect or party or denomination, it also usually involves a rejection of those not a member of ones sect. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... . It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Spiritual enlightenment. ... -Quevedo Valentinius, also called Valentinus (c. ... Insight: Insight is a piece of information. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... Universe is a word derived from the Old French univers, which in turn comes from the Latin roots unus (one) and versus (a form of vertere, to turn). Based on observations of the observable universe, physicists attempt to describe the whole of space-time, including all matter and energy and... In theology, salvation can mean three related things: freed forever from the punishment of sin Revelation 1:5-6 NRSV - also called deliverance;[1] being saved for something, such as an afterlife or participating in the Reign of God Revelation 1:6 NRSV - also called redemption;[2]) and a process... Buddhism is a dharmic, non-theistic religion, which is also a philosophy and a system of psychology. ... Bodhi, the Pāli and Sanskrit word for awakening or enlightenment, is an abstract noun formed from the verbal root budh (awake, become aware, notice, know or understand), corresponding to the verbs bujjhati (Pāli) and bodhati or budhyate (Sanskrit). ... To say that something is ineffable means that it cannot or should not, for overwhelming reasons, be expressed in spoken words. ... Jung a term used to explain how much fun one is having, or as a salutation or valediction. ... Look up sign in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the Catholic or Orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... Esotericism is knowledge suitable only for an inner circle of the initiated, advanced or privileged. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... It has been suggested that Combative dualism be merged into this article or section. ... The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... The Temple of the Rose Cross, Teophilus Schweighardt Constantiens, 1618. ... Kabbalah (Hebrew: ‎, Tiberian: , Qabbālāh, Israeli: Kabala) literally means receiving, in the sense of a received tradition, and is sometimes transliterated as Cabala, Kabbala, Qabalah, or other permutations. ... // Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Greek Orthodox Church can refer to: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ... Clement of Alexandria (Titus Flavius Clemens), was the first member of the Church of Alexandria to be more than a name, and one of its most distinguished teachers. ... In Greek mythology, Hippolytus was a son of Theseus and either Antiope or Hippolyte. ... Hegesippus (c. ... Origen (Greek: Ōrigénēs, 185–ca. ... Intuition has many meanings across many cultures, including: quick and ready insight seemingly independent of previous experiences and empirical knowledge immediate apprehension or cognition knowledge or conviction gained by intuition the power or faculty of attaining to direct knowledge or cognition without evident rational thought and inference. ... In Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic theology, theosis (Greek: , meaning divinization (or deification, or to make divine), is the call to man to become holy and seek union with God, beginning in this life and later consummated in the resurrection. ... Theoria is contemplation or perception of beauty, esp. ... Jnana is the Sanskrit term for knowledge. ... Daath may refer to: Daath - an aspect of the modern Kabbalah belief system. ... Sri Aurobindo (Bangla: শ্রী অরবিন্দ Sri Ôrobindo, Sanskrit: श्री अरविन्द Srī Aravinda) (August 15, 1872–December 5, 1950) was an Indian nationalist, scholar, poet, mystic, evolutionary philosopher, yogi and guru [1]. After a short political career in which he became one of leaders of the early movement for the freedom of India from British... The Gnostic Being in Sri Aurobindos philosophy refers to the supramental state of divinised humanity, which (as described in the final chapters of The Life Divine) will emerge as a spirit-oriented future existence. ... Supramentalisation is the ultimate stage in the integral yoga of Sri Aurobindo. ... Divinization is the making divine of an earthly entity or activity. ...

Influences on contemporary culture

  • Millions of non-English speakers associate Gnosis with the movement started by Samael Aun Weor.[citation needed] This tradition is now becoming known in English, largely through the efforts of publishers such as Absolute Publishing Group and Thelema Press.
  • Gnosis is the name of magazine [1] published between 1985 and 1999 in California as a "Journal of the Western Inner Traditions" covering traditions of spirituality and mysticism. It was a project of the Lumen Foundation.
  • Among certain modern occult movements, esp. chaos magic, gnosis refers to an altered state of awareness in which the will is "magickally" effective.
  • Modern disciples of Aleister Crowley and his Doctrine of Thelema have also formed a number of Gnostic Religious Organizations. http://user.cyberlink.ch/~koenig/church.htm
  • The Gnosis is the name of ancient sorcery from the North in R. Scott Bakker's Prince of Nothing fantasy epic.
  • One of the ships in Alastair Reynolds' novel Absolution Gap is called the Gnostic Ascension.
  • The World of Darkness roleplaying game Werewolf: The Apocalypse by White Wolf Game Studio used the term gnosis to measure of how attuned to the spiritual world a character, usually a Werewolf, was (and as the primary mechanic for enabling magical effects). In the revamped World of Darkness books the term is used in the Mage: The Awakening roleplaying game, again as an overarching mechanic for measuring the magical power of a character, in this case primarily for mages and similar characters.
  • Punk rock band Bad Religion have a song titled "Billy Gnosis."
  • The Gnosis are mysterious alien attackers in the Xenosaga games for the Sony Playstation 2. The Gnosis have the ability to turn humans into salt by touching them.
  • In the game Baten Kaitos: Eternal Wings and the Lost Ocean for the Nintendo GameCube, Gnosis is the boss at the end of the "Passageway of Souls." Baten Kaitos was created by the same company as Xenosaga, and it is likely a reference to it. Like in Xenosaga, Gnosis is a creature that exists between dimensions.
  • Though not featured, Gnosis is a hovership from Enter The Matrix and The Matrix series.
  • In the cult hit musical Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Hedwig's protege/lover/rival takes the stage name "Tommy Gnosis".
  • The innovative KeyKOS operating system was initially dubbed GNOSIS.
  • GNOSIS are a London based trip rock band [2]
  • In the anime Fafner of the Azure, there is a mass production model Fafner called Gnosis model.

Samael Aun Weor Samael Aun Weor (March 16, 1917 - December 24, 1977) was a prolific writer, lecturer and teacher of occultism. ... Thelema Press is a non-profit organization translating and publishing the Gnostic books of Samael Aun Weor. ... Gnosis was a magazine published from 1985 to 1999, devoted to the western esoteric tradition. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... Mysticism from the Greek μυστικός (mystikos) an initiate (of the Eleusinian Mysteries, μυστήρια (mysteria) meaning initiation[1]) is the pursuit of achieving communion or identity with, or conscious awareness of, ultimate reality, the divine, spiritual truth, or God through direct experience, intuition, or insight; and the belief that such experience is an... The word occult comes from the Latin occultus (clandestine, hidden, secret), referring to knowledge of the hidden. In the medical sense it is used commonly to refer to a structure or process that is hidden, e. ... The chaos star (called a chaosphere, or black hole sun,[citations needed] by some practitioners) is the most popular symbol of chaos magic. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... Thelema is the English transliteration of the Ancient Greek noun : will, from the verb θέλω: to will, wish, purpose. ... Prince of Nothing is a series of fantasy books by the Canadian author Scott Bakker detailing the emergence of Anasurimbor Kellhus. ... Alastair Reynolds is a Welsh science fiction author. ... Absolution Gap is a science fiction book by author Alastair Reynolds. ... This articles content is specific to the fictional setting known as the World of Darkness. ... The logo of White Wolf Publishing, one of White Wolf, Inc. ... A reference from the PS2 game series Xenosaga. Gnosis are entities shrouded in mystery, of which the only known attribute is their hostility toward mankind. ... Xenosaga ) is primarily a series of video games developed by Monolith Soft and published by Namco. ... Baten Kaitos Categories: Computer and video game stubs | GameCube games | 2004 computer and video games ... The Nintendo GameCube , GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... Enter the Matrix is the first video game based on the Matrix series. ... The Matrix series consists primarily of three films, The Matrix, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions. ... Hedwig and the Angry Inch is an off-Broadway musical theater play (1998) and film (2001) about a fictional rock and roll band fronted by a transsexual singer. ... KeyKOS is a persistent, pure capability-based operating system. ... Fafner of the Azure: Dead Aggressor (蒼穹のファフナー: Dead Aggressor SōkyÅ« no Fafner: Dead Aggressor) is a 25-episode anime series produced by Xebec where much of the world had been destroyed by beings known as Festum. ...

Intercultural associations

Gnosis has been associated and often cited as synonymous with terms from numerous cultures and religions:


The word is cognate (from Proto-Indo-European) with the Sanskrit word gnana (pronounced nyana - also spelled jnana) that has an equivalent meaning in Buddhist and Hindu spiritual treatises. In Theravada Buddhism the word for gnosis is añña (lit. 'highest knowledge')[citation needed]. The knowledge to which gnosis refers is that of the unconditioned ground (and source) of phenomenal reality, variously called Brahman (The Upanisads); the Dharmakaya (Mahayana Buddhism); the Tao (Tao Te Ching)[citation needed] and God (Theistic religion). One who having followed a spiritual path in order to return to the origin and arrived at this transcendental knowledge is called a gnostic (Gnani or Jnani in Sanskrit and Hindi).[citation needed] Proto-Indo-European (PIE) may refer to: Proto-Indo-European language the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages Proto-Indo-Europeans, the hypothetical speakers of the reconstructed Proto-Indo-European language Proto-Indo-European roots, A list of reconstructed Proto-Indo-European roots Categories: | ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is an old Indo-Aryan language from the Indian Subcontinent, the classical literary language of the Hindus of India[1], a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Jnana is the Sanskrit term for knowledge. ... Buddhism is a dharmic, non-theistic religion, which is also a philosophy and a system of psychology. ... Hinduism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Brahman (Devanagari: ब्रह्म ) in the Vedantic schools of Hindu philosophy, is the signifying name given to the concept of the unchanging, infinite, immanent and transcendent reality of all things in this universe. ... The Upanishads (; Devanagari ) are part of the Hindu Shruti scriptures which primarily discuss meditation and philosophy and are seen as religious instructions by most forms of Hinduism. ... The Trikaya doctrine (Sanskrit, literally Three bodies or personalities; 三身 Chinese: Sānshén, Japanese: sanjin) is an important Buddhist teaching both on the nature of reality, and what a Buddha is. ... Relief image of the bodhisattva Guan Yin from Mt. ... Taijitu This article is about the Chinese character and the philosophy it represents. ... The Tao Te Ching (道德經, Pinyin: D Jīng, thus sometimes rendered in recent works as Dao De Jing; archaic pre-Wade-Giles rendering: Tao Teh Ching; roughly translated as The Book of the Way and its Virtue (see dedicated chapter below on translating the title)) is... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Theism is the belief in the existence of one or more gods or deities. ...

Bodhi, the Pāli and Sanskrit word for awakening or enlightenment, is an abstract noun formed from the verbal root budh (awake, become aware, notice, know or understand), corresponding to the verbs bujjhati (Pāli) and bodhati or budhyate (Sanskrit). ... Buddhism is a dharmic, non-theistic religion, which is also a philosophy and a system of psychology. ... Moksha - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Hinduism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... // Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Walt Whitman Walter Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... In conservative Protestant Christian eschatology, the rapture (harpazo in Greek in 1 Thessalonians 4:17) is the name given to the event in which all Christians living on earth are simultaneously transported to Heaven to be with Jesus Christ. ... Irfan (Arabic/Persian: عرفان) literally means knowing. ... Marifa (or alternatively marifah) literally means knowledge. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition that found a home in Isalami and encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to God, divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... Sant Mat translates from Hindi into English as The Religion of the Saints. ...

References

  1. ^ Cooper, John M. & Hutchinson, D. S. (Eds.) (1997). Plato: Complete Works, Hackett Publishing Co., Inc. ISBN 0-87220-349-2.
  2. ^ The Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church, SVS Press, 1997. (ISBN 0-913836-31-1) James Clarke & Co Ltd, 2002. (ISBN 0-227-67919-9)pg 218

See also

For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Socrates (Greek: , invariably anglicized as , SÇ’cratÄ“s; circa 470–399 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher who is widely credited for laying the foundation for Western philosophy. ... It has been suggested that Meta-epistemology be merged into this article or section. ... Aristotle (Greek: AristotélÄ“s) (384 BC – March 7, 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Plotinus Plotinus (Greek: ) (ca. ... Numenius of Apamea was a Greek philosopher, who lived in Apamea in Syria and flourished during the latter half of the 2nd century A.D. He was a Neo-Pythagorean and forerunner of the Neo-Platonists. ... Proclus Lycaeus (February 8, 412 – April 17, 485), surnamed The Successor or diadochos (Greek Πρόκλος ὁ Διάδοχος Próklos ho Diádokhos), was a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher, one of the last major Greek philosophers (see Damascius). ... Two historical persons go by the name Iamblichus (Greek: Ιάμβλιχος) A Greek novelist; see Iamblichus (novelist) A neoplatonist philosopher; see Iamblichus (philosopher) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Amelius whose family name was Gentilianus. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Statesman, or Politikos in Greek and Politicus in Latin, is a four part dialogue contained within the work of Plato. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The First International Conference on Neoplatonism and Gnosticism at the University of Oklahoma in 1984 explored the relationship between Neoplatonism and Gnosticism. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The History of Gnosticism is subject to a great deal of debate and interpretation. ... Samael Aun Weor Samael Aun Weor (March 16, 1917 - December 24, 1977) was a prolific writer, lecturer and teacher of occultism. ... Michael Tsarion was born in Northern Ireland and is a researcher of the occult. ... An engraving of Irenaeus ( 130–202), bishop of Lugdunum in Gaul (now Lyon, France). ...

External Links

  • Gnosticweb

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gnosis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1087 words)
Gnosis was distinct from the secret teachings they only revealed to initiates once they had reached a certain level of progression.
The term Gnosis is related to the sanskrit jnana (as in Jnana Yoga) and to the Hebrew daath, which is the hidden sphere in the Kabbalah, or that knowledge which was only given to the initiated.
Gnosis is the name of magazine [2] published between 1985 and 1999 in California as a "Journal of the Western Inner Traditions" covering traditions of spirituality and mysticism.
Gnosticism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (7381 words)
The term gnosis is a Greek word expressing a type of understanding or consciousness gained through personal experience.
However, gnosis itself refers to a very specialised form of knowledge, deriving both from the exact meaning of the original Greek term and its usage in Platonist philosophy.
It is known that Valentinus' students, in further evidence of their intellectual activity, elaborated upon the teachings and materials they received from him (though the exact extent of their changes remains unknown), for example, in the version of the Valentinian myth brought to us through Ptolemy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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