FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Glycemic load

The glycemic load (GL) is a ranking system for carbohydrate content in food portions based on their glycemic index (GI) and the portion size. Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... Glycemic index (also glycaemic index, GI) is a ranking system for carbohydrates based on their immediate effect on blood glucose levels. ...


The usefulness of glycemic load is based on the idea that a high glycemic index food consumed in small quantities would give the same effect as larger quantities of a low glycemic index food on blood sugar. For example, white rice is somewhat high GI, so eating 50g of white rice at one sitting would give a particular glucose curve in the blood, while 25g would give the same curve but half the height. Since the peak height is probably the most important parameter, multiplying the amount of carbohydrates in a food serving by the glycemic index gives an idea of how much effect an actual portion of food has on blood sugar level.


Glycemic load for a single serving of a food can be calculated as the quantity (in grams) of its carbohydrate content, multiplied by its GI, and divided by 100. For example, a 100g slice serving of Watermelon with a GI of 72 and a carbohydrate content of 5g (it contains a lot of water) makes the calculation 5*0.72=3.6, so the GL is 3.6. A food with a GI of 100 and a carbohydrate content of 10g has a GL of 10 (10*1=10), while a food with 100g carbohydrate and a GI of just 10 also has a GL of 10 (100*0.1=10). Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... Binomial name Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. ...


Data on GI and GL comes from the University of Sydney (Human Nutrition Unit) GI database at [1] through [2]. The University of Sydney, established in Sydney in 1850, is the oldest university in Australia. ...


List of foods and their glycemic load, per 100gm serving

Food GI Carbohydrate content
(by weight)
GL
Baguette, white, plain (France) ~95 ~50% ~48
Banana, Mean of 10 studies ~52 ~20% ~10
Carrots, Mean of 4 studies ~47 ~7.5% ~3.5
Corn tortilla (Mexican) ~52 ~48% ~25
Potato, Mean of 5 studies ~50 ~19% ~9.3
Rice, boiled white, mean of 12 studies ~64 ~24% ~15.4
Watermelon ~72 ~5% ~3.6

Glycemic index (also glycaemic index, GI) is a ranking system for carbohydrates based on their immediate effect on blood glucose levels. ... A baguette (French: stick) is a variety of bread distinguishable by its much greater length than width. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Binomial name Daucus carota A carrot (Daucus Carota) is a root vegetable, typically orange or white in color with a woody texture. ... Traditional tortilla making. ... Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a perennial plant of the Solanaceae, or nightshade, family, commonly grown for its starchy tuber. ... Species Oryza glaberrima Oryza sativa Rice is two species (Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima) of grass, native to tropical and subtropical southern & southeastern Asia and to Africa, which together provide more than one fifth of the calories consumed by humans[1]. (The term wild rice can refer to wild species... Binomial name Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. ...

See also

Glycemic index (also glycaemic index, GI) is a ranking system for carbohydrates based on their immediate effect on blood glucose levels. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Glycemic load - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (307 words)
The Glycemic Load (GL) is a ranking system for carbohydrate content in food portions based on their Glycemic Index (GI) and the portion size.
The usefulness of glycemic load is based on the idea that to some extent, a high glycemic index food consumed over a long period would give the same effect as a low glycemic index food on blood sugar.
Glycemic load for a single serving of a food can be calculated as the quantity (in grams) of its carbohydrate content, multiplied by its GI, and divided by 100.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m