FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Gloucester Cathedral
Gloucester Cathedral from the north east in 1828.
Gloucester Cathedral from the north east in 1828.

Gloucester Cathedral, in Gloucester, England, stands in the north of the city near the river. It originated with the foundation of an abbey dedicated to Saint Peter in 681 (dissolved by King Henry VIII of England). The foundations of the present church were laid by Abbot Serlo (1072-1104). Walter Gloucester (d. 1412) its historian, became its first mitred abbot in 1381. Until 1541, Gloucester lay in the see of Worcester, but the separate see was then constituted, with John Wakeman, last abbot of Tewkesbury, as its first bishop. The diocese covers the greater part of Gloucestershire, with small parts of Herefordshire and Wiltshire. Gloucester Cathedral from the north east in 1828. ... Gloucester Cathedral from the north east in 1828. ... Gloucester (pronounced ) is a city and district in south-west England, close to the Welsh border. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... Saint Peter, portrayed by Peter Paul Rubens in a papal chasuble and pallium holding keys, was one of the twelve disciples of Jesus and the first Pope of the Catholic Church. ... // Events August 9 - The Bulgars win the war with the Byzantine Empire; the latter signs a peace treaty, which is considered as the birth-date of Bulgaria Wilfrid of York is expelled from Northumbria by Ecgfrith and retires into Sussex Births Deaths January 10 - Pope Agatho Ebroin, Mayor of the... The Dissolution of the Monasteries (referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries) was the formal process, taking place between 1536 and 1540, by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the Roman Catholic monastic institutions in England and took them to himself, as the... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Events June 12 - Peasants Revolt: In England rebels arrive at Blackheath. ... Events The first official translation of the entire Bible in Swedish February 12 - Pedro de Valdivia founds Santiago de Chile. ... The city of Worcester (pronounced Wuh-ster) is the county town of Worcestershire in England; the river Severn runs through the middle, with the citys large Worcester Cathedral overlooking the river. ... The Abbey of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, is the second largest parish church in England. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced [ ˈglɒstəʃəʳ]; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a ceremonial and administrative county in southwest England. ... Herefordshire is a county in the West Midlands region of England. ... Wiltshire (abbreviated Wilts) is a large southern English county. ...

The cathedral from the south west in 1895.

The cathedral consists of a Norman nucleus, with additions in every style of Gothic architecture. It is 420 feet long, and 144 feet wide, with a beautiful central tower of the 15th century rising to the height of 225 ft. and topped by four graceful pinnacles, a famous landmark. The nave is massive Norman with Early English roof; the crypt, under the choir, aisles and chapels, is Norman, as is the chapter house. The crypt is one of the four apsidal cathedral crypts in England, the others being at Worcester, Winchester and Canterbury. Image File history File links Gloucester Cathedral from the South West. ... Image File history File links Gloucester Cathedral from the South West. ... Norman may refer to: The Norman language The Norman people Norman architecture, the Romanesque architecture erected by the Normans. ... Notre-Dame Cathedral seen from the River Seine. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Crypt is also a commonly used name of water trumpets, aquatic plants. ... A chapter house is a building or room attached to a cathedral or collegiate church in which meetings are held. ... An apsidal is a semicircular recess with an arched or domed roof in a building, especial at the end of a choir in a church. ... A plan of Worcester Cathedral made in 1836. ... Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close Winchester Cathedral in Winchester, Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England. ... Canterbury Cathedral, N.W., ca. ...


The south porch is in the Perpendicular style, with fan-tracery roof, as also is the north transept, the south being transitional Decorated Gothic. The choir has Perpendicular tracery over Norman work, with an apsidal chapel on each side. The choir-vaulting is particularly rich. The late Decorated east window is partly filled with surviving medieval glass. Between the apsidal chapels is a cross Lady chapel, and north of the nave are the cloisters, with very early example of fan-tracery, the carols or stalls for the monks' study and writing lying to the south. Perpendicular is a geometric term that may be used as a noun or adjective. ... Full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A cloister (from latin claustrum) is part of cathedrals and abbeys architecture. ...

The eastern end of the cathedral.
Enlarge
The eastern end of the cathedral.

The finest monument is the canopied shrine of King Edward II of England who was murdered at nearby Berkeley Castle. By the visits of pilgrims to this the building and sanctuary were enriched. In a side-chapel, too, is a monument in coloured bog oak of Robert Curthose, eldest son of William the Conqueror and a great benefactor of the abbey, who was interred there; and those of Bishop Warburton and Dr Edward Jenner are also worthy of special mention. Download high resolution version (1099x1255, 288 KB)Gloucester Cathedral Photo by & copyright Tagishsimon - 2004-11-02 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1099x1255, 288 KB)Gloucester Cathedral Photo by & copyright Tagishsimon - 2004-11-02 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – October, 1327), of Caernarvon, was king of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... Berkeley Castle is a castle in the town of Berkeley, Gloucestershire, UK, constructed from 1117 on the orders of Henry II with the aim of defending the Severn estuary and the Welsh border. ... Robert (called Curthose for his short squat appearance) (c. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... William Warburton (December 24, 1698 _ June 7, 1779), was an English critic and churchman, Bishop of Gloucester from 1759. ... Edward Jenner Sculpture of Edward Jenner on the grounds of the Tokyo National Museum Edward Jenner (May 17, 1749 - January 26, 1823) was an English country doctor practicing in Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England, famous for his work introducing the Smallpox vaccine. ...


A musical festival (the Three Choirs Festival) is held annually in this cathedral and those of Worcester and Hereford in turn. The Three Choirs Festival is a British music festival, held alternately at the cathedrals of Hereford, Gloucester and Worcester. ... The city of Worcester (pronounced Wuh-ster) is the county town of Worcestershire in England; the river Severn runs through the middle, with the citys large Worcester Cathedral overlooking the river. ... The current Hereford Cathedral, located at Hereford in England, United Kingdom, dates from 1079. ...

A view from the south east c.1920.
A view from the south east c.1920.

Between 1873 and 1890 and in 1897 the cathedral was extensively restored by Sir George Gilbert Scott. Download high resolution version (1000x820, 83 KB)Gloucester Cathedral ca. ... Download high resolution version (1000x820, 83 KB)Gloucester Cathedral ca. ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 - March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches and cathedrals. ...


The Cathedral has been used from 2000 as a location for filming the first two Harry Potter films, which has generated revenue and publicity, but caused some controversy amongst those who suggest that the theme of the films was unsuitable for a church. It is also used during school term-time as the venue for school assemblies and events by The King's School, Gloucester. This article is about the year 2000. ... Cover of the original novel in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. ... // The Kings School Gloucester The Kings School, Gloucester is an independent school, taking students from the ages of 3-18, with around 800 students. ...


External links

  • Official website
  • Website of The King's School, Gloucester

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gloucester Cathedral - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (502 words)
Gloucester Cathedral from the north east in 1828.
Gloucester Cathedral, in Gloucester, England, stands in the north of the city near the river.
The Cathedral has been used from 2000 as a location for filming the first two Harry Potter films, which has generated revenue and publicity, but caused some controversy amongst those who suggest that the theme of the films was unsuitable for a church.
Gloucester - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1181 words)
Gloucester (pronounced [ˈglɒstə]) is a city and district in south-west England, close to the Welsh border.
Gloucester Cathedral, in the north of the city near the river, originates in the foundation of an abbey dedicated to Saint Peter in 681.
Gloucester was incorporated by King Richard III in 1483, the town being made a county in itself.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m