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Encyclopedia > Gloucester, Massachusetts
This article is about Gloucester, Massachusetts, U.S.A.; there are other places called Gloucester
Gloucester, Massachusetts
Gloucester City Hall on Dale Avenue. Built in 1871.

Seal
Location in Essex County in Massachusetts
Coordinates: 42°36′57″N 70°39′45″W / 42.61583, -70.6625
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Essex
Settled 1623
Incorporated 1642
Government
 - Type Mayor-council city
 - Mayor Carolyn Kirk
Area
 - Total 41.5 sq mi (107.5 km²)
 - Land 26.0 sq mi (67.2 km²)
 - Water 15.5 sq mi (40.2 km²)
Elevation 50 ft (15 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 30,273
 - Density 1,166.0/sq mi (450.2/km²)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 01930
Area code(s) 351 / 978
FIPS code 25-26150
GNIS feature ID 0615084
Website: http://www.ci.gloucester.ma.us/

Gloucester (pronounced /ˈglɒstɚ/ listen ) is a city on Cape Ann in Essex County, Massachusetts, in the United States. It is part of Boston's North Shore. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 30,273. An important center of the fishing industry and a popular summer resort, Gloucester consists of an urban core on the north side of the harbor and the outlying neighborhoods of Annisquam, Bay View, Lanesville, Folly Cove, Magnolia, Riverdale, East Gloucester and West Gloucester. It is bounded by Rockport to the east, Ipswich Bay to the north, Essex and Manchester to the west and Massachusetts Bay to the south. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Gloucester is the name of many places; the original is Gloucester, England. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (960x1280, 542 KB) Summary I took this photo in June 2005. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Gloucester_ma_highlight. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Massachusetts counties This is a list of Massachusetts counties, consisting of the 14 Massachusetts counties currently in existence. ... Essex County is a county located in the northeastern part of the state of Massachusetts. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Area codes 351 and 978 are Commonwealth of Massachusetts area codes serving the communities of Fitchburg and Peabody as well as northeastern Massachusetts. ... Area code 978 is a Commonwealth of Massachusetts area code serving the communities of Lawrence, Lowell and Peabody as well as northeastern Massachusetts. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Cape Ann, Massachusetts Landsat satellite photo of Cape Ann Cape Ann is a rocky peninsula located in northeastern Massachusetts on the Atlantic Ocean. ... Essex County is a county located in the northeastern part of the state of Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The North Shore is a region north of Boston, consisting chiefly of urban suburban communities of Essex County along Massachusetts Bay. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Salmon for sale at a marketplace The Fishing industry is the commercial activity of fishing and producing fish and other seafood products. ... Annisquam is a small village on the northern coast of Massachusetts. ... Rockport is a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, USA. The population was 7,767 at the 2000 census. ... Seal of Essex, MA Essex is a town located in Essex County, Massachusetts, 26 miles north of Boston. ... Manchester-by-the-Sea (also called just Manchester) is a town located in Essex County, Massachusetts. ... Map of Massachusetts Bay. ...


Bus transit throughout the area is provided by the Cape Ann Transportation Authority. The Cape Ann Transportation Authority (CATA) provides mass transit bus service within the Gloucester and Rockport, Massachusetts area. ...

Contents

History

The boundaries of Gloucester originally included the town of Rockport, in an area dubbed "Sandy Bay." That village separated formally on February 27, 1840. In 1873, Gloucester was reincorporated as a city. Rockport is a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, USA. The population was 7,767 at the 2000 census. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ...


Early Gloucester

Gloucester was founded at Cape Ann by an expedition called the "Dorchester Company" of men from Dorchester (in the county of Dorset, England) chartered by James I in 1623. This date allows Gloucester to boast the first settlement in what would become the Massachusetts Bay Colony, as this town's first settlement predates both Salem, Massachusetts in 1626, and Boston in 1630. This first company of pioneers made landing at Half Moon Beach, and settled nearby, setting up fishing stages in a field in what is now Stage Fort Park. This settlement's existence is proclaimed today by a memorial tablet, afixed to a 50' boulder in that park. Cape Ann, Massachusetts Landsat satellite photo of Cape Ann Cape Ann is a rocky peninsula located in northeastern Massachusetts on the Atlantic Ocean. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... The main road through Dorchester Dorchester is a market town in south west Dorset, England, situated on the River Frome and A35 road 20 miles west of Poole and five miles north of Weymouth. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dÉ”.sÉ™t], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... Year 1623 (MDCXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... Nickname: Location in Essex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Settled 1626 Incorporated 1626 A City 1836 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kimberley Driscoll Area  - Total 18. ... Events September 30 - Nurhaci, chieftain of the Jurchens and founder of the Qing Dynasty dies and is succeeded by his son Hong Taiji. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Events February 22 - Native American Quadequine introduces Popcorn to English colonists. ... A family of Russian settlers in the Caucasus region, ca. ...


The life of this first settlement was as harsh as it was short-lived. Around 1626 the place was abandoned, and the people removed themselves to Naumkeag (what is now called Salem, Massachusetts), where more fertile soil for planting was to be found. The meetinghouse was even disassembled and relocated to the new place of settlement. At some point in the following years - though no record exists - the area was slowly resettled. The town was formally incorporated in 1642. It is at this time that the name "Gloucester" first appears on tax rolls, although in various spellings. The town took its name from the great Cathedral City in South-West England, where it is assumed many of its new occupants originated. Nickname: Location in Essex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Settled 1626 Incorporated 1626 A City 1836 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kimberley Driscoll Area  - Total 18. ... Events January 4 - Charles I attempts to arrest five leading members of the Long Parliament, but they escape. ...


This new permanent settlement focused on the Town Green area, an inlet in the marshes at a bend in the Annisquam River. This area is now the site of Grant Circle, a large traffic-rotary at which MA Route 128 mingles with a major city street (Washington Street/ Rt 127). Here the first permanent settlers built a meeting house and therefore focused the nexus of their settlement on the 'Island' for nearly 100 years. Unlike other ancient coastal towns in New England, development in Gloucester was not focused around the harbor as it is today, rather it was inland that people settled first. This is evidenced by the placement of the Town Green nearly two miles from the harbor-front. Annisquam River and environs The Annisquam River is a tidal, salt-water estuary in Annisquam and Gloucester, Massachusetts, connecting Annisquam Harbor on the north to Gloucester Harbor on the south. ... Route 128, also known as the Yankee Division Highway (for the U.S. 26th Infantry Division), and originally the Circumferential Highway, is a partial beltway around Boston, Massachusetts, United States. ... Route 127 is a north-south Massachusetts state route that runs from Beverly to Gloucester. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...


The Town Green is also where the settlers built the first school. By Massachusetts Bay Colony Law, any town boasting 100 families or more had to provide a public schoolhouse. This requirement was met in 1698, with Thomas Riggs standing as the town's first School-Master. A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on...


Early industry included subsistence farming and logging. Because of the poor soil and rocky hills, Cape Ann was not well suited for farming on a large scale. Small family farms and livestock provided the bulk of the sustinence to the population. Fishing, for which the town is known today, was limited to close-to-shore, with families subsisting on small catches as opposed to the great bounties yielded in later years. The fisherman of Gloucester did not yet command the Grand Banks until the mid-18th Century. Map showing the Grand Banks Historic map of the Grand Banks. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


Early Gloucestermen cleared great swaths of the forest of Cape Ann for farm and pasture land, using the timber to build structures as far away as Boston. The rocky moors of Gloucester remained clear for two centuries until the forest reclaimed the land in the 20th Century. The inland part of the island became known as the 'Commons' the 'Common Village' or "Dogtown". Here small dwellings lay scattered amongst the boulders and swamps, along roads that meandered through the hills. These dwellings were at times little more than shanties, only one was even two-stories tall. Despite their size, several generations of families were raised in such houses. One feature of the construction of these houses was that under one side of the floor was dug a cellar hole (for the keeping of food), supported by a foundation of laid-stone (without mortar). These cellar holes are still visible today along the trails throughout the inland part of Gloucester; they, and some walls, are all that remain of the village there. Dogtown ( also Dogtown Commons or Dogtown Common or Dogtown Village) is an abandoned inland settlement on Cape Ann in Massachusetts. ...


Growth

Harbor View & Ten Pound Island Light in c. 1915
Harbor View & Ten Pound Island Light in c. 1915

The town grew, and eventually colonists lived on the opposite side of the Annisquam River. This, in a time of legally mandated church attendance, was a long way to walk - or row - on a Sunday morning. In 1718 the settlers on the opposite shore of the river split off from the First Parish community at the Green and formed 'Second Parish.' While still part of the Town of Gloucester, the people of Second, or 'West', Parish now constructed their own Meetinghouse and designated their own place of burial, both of which were in the hills near the marshes behind Wingaersheek Beach. The Meeting house is gone now, but deep in the woods on the Second Parish Road trail one can still find the scattered stones of the abandoned Burial Ground. Image File history File links Harbor_View_&_Ten_Pound_Island_Light. ... Image File history File links Harbor_View_&_Ten_Pound_Island_Light. ...


Other parts of town later followed suit. Third Parish, in Northern Gloucester, was founded in 1728. Fourth Parish split off from First Parish in 1742. Finally, in 1754, the people of Sandy Bay (what would later be called Rockport) split off from First Parish to found Fifth Parish. The Sandy Bay church founding was the last religious re-ordering of the Colonial Period. All of these congregations still exist in some form with the exception of Fourth Parish, the site of whose meeting house is now a highway.


At one time, there was a thriving granite industry in Gloucester.


Politics

Gloucester is a City, with a Strong-Mayor-Council System. The Mayor is also reserved a seat on the School Committee. City offices are elected every two years (those ending with odd numbers). Interestingly, in 2007 over 40 people ran for the 15 elected seats in the city's government. A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... A school committee is an elected or appointed body responsible for the administration, maintenance, care, staffing, and supplying of one or more schools. ...


The city is divided into five Wards, each split into two precincts:

  • Ward 1 - East Gloucester - includes Eastern Point and Rocky Neck
  • Ward 2 - Downtown and the Harbor area
  • Ward 3 - The Western edge of the 'island' from Stacy Boulevard to Wheeler's Point
  • Ward 4 - North Gloucester - includes Riverdale, Annisquam and Lanesville.
  • Ward 5 - The entirety of West Gloucester west of the Annisquam River to Essex - includes the Wingaersheek area and Village of Magnolia.

As late as the mid 20th Century Gloucester had as many as eight wards, but they have been since reorganized into current number.


On November 7, 2005, incumbent Mayor John Bell was re-elected to a third term in office. He stated his intention not to run for reelection and stepped down in January 2008.


On November 6, 2007 Carolyn Kirk was elected as the Mayor of Gloucester.


Gloucester and the Sea

The town was an important shipbuilding center, and the first schooner was reputedly built there in 1713. The community developed into an important fishing port, largely due to its proximity to Georges Bank and other fishing banks off the east coast of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Gloucester's most famous (and nationally recognized) seafood business was founded in 1849 -- John Pew & Sons. It became Gorton-Pew Fisheries in 1906, and in 1957 changed its name to Gorton's of Gloucester. The iconic image of the "Gorton's Fisherman", and the products he represents, are known throughout the country and beyond. Besides catching and processing seafood, Gloucester is also a center for fish research. Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... Georges Bank is a large elevated area of the sea floor which separates the Gulf of Maine from the Atlantic Ocean and is situated between Cape Cod, Massachusetts and Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Gortons of Gloucester is a subsidiary of the Japanese seafood conglomerate Nippon Suisan Kaisha, Ltd. ... The Savior Not Made By Hands (1410s, by Andrei Rublev) An icon (from Greek εικων, eikon, image) is an artistic visual representation or symbol of anything considered holy and divine, such as God, saints or deities. ... Gortons of Gloucester is a subsidiary of the Japanese seafood conglomerate Nippon Suisan Kaisha, Ltd. ...


In the late 19th century, a large number of Portuguese immigrants, mainly from the Azores, came to Gloucester to work in the fishing industry. Many of their descendents still are fisherman today, although many live in Gloucester and have entered other areas of work.


Seafaring and fishing have been, and still are, a very dangerous undertaking. In its over 350-year history, Gloucester has lost over 10,000 men to the Atlantic Ocean. The names of all the lost that are known are painted on a huge mural in the main staircase at City Hall, and also on a new memorial cenotaph on Stacy Boulevard. The list has continued to lengthen despite increased safety requirements.


Arts

Painting and printmaking

Eastern Point Breakwater & Lighthouse in c. 1915
Eastern Point Breakwater & Lighthouse in c. 1915

Gloucester's scenic beauty, active fishing industry, and renowned arts community have attracted and inspired painters since the early 19th century, as they do today. The first Gloucester painter of note was native-born Fitz Henry Lane, whose home still exists on the waterfront. The premier collection of his works is in the Cape Ann Historical Museum, which holds 40 of his paintings and 100 of his drawings. Other painters subsequently attracted to Gloucester include William Morris Hunt, Winslow Homer, Childe Hassam, John Twachtman, Frederick Mulhaupt, Frank Duveneck, Cecilia Beaux, Jane Peterson, Gordon Grant, Emile Gruppe, Stuart Davis, Mark Rothko, Milton Avery, Barnett Newman, William Meyerowitz, Theresa Bernstein, and Marsden Hartley and artists from the Ashcan School such as Edward Hopper, John Sloan, Robert Henri, William Glackens, and Maurice Prendergast. Image File history File links Breakwater_&_Lighthouse,_Gloucester,_MA.jpg Summary Breakwater & Eastern Point Lighthouse, Gloucester, MA; from a c. ... Image File history File links Breakwater_&_Lighthouse,_Gloucester,_MA.jpg Summary Breakwater & Eastern Point Lighthouse, Gloucester, MA; from a c. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stage Rocks and Western Shore of Gloucester Outer Harbor (1857) Fitz Henry Lane (born Nathaniel Rogers Lane, also known as Fitz Hugh Lane) (19 December 1804 – 14 August 1865) was an American painter and printmaker of a style that would later be called Luminism, for its use of pervasive light. ... William Morris Hunt (March 31, 1824 - September 8, 1879), American painter, was born at Brattleboro, Vermont. ... Winslow Homer Winslow Homer (February 24, 1836 – September 29, 1910) was an North American landscape painter and printmaker, most famous for his marine subjects. ... Frederick Childe Hassam (October 17, 1859 - August 27, 1935) was an American Impressionist painter. ... The White Bridge, ca. ... Frank Duveneck (1848-1919) was an American figure and portrait painter born at Covington, Kentucky on 9 October 1848. ... Cecilia Beaux is an American society portraitist, in the nature of John Singer Sargent. ... Jane Peterson (1876 - 1965) was an American artist. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Photograph of Stuart Davis, 1940 Stuart Davis (December 7, 1894 - June 24, 1964), American painter, was born in Philadelphia to Edward Wyatt Davies and Helen Stuart Davies. ... Mark Rothkos painting 1957 # 20 (1957) Mark Rothko born Marcus Rothkowitz (September 25, 1903–February 25, 1970) was a Russian-born American painter and printmaker who is classified as an abstract expressionist, although he rejected not only the label but even being an abstract painter. ... Milton Avery (March 7, 1885 – January 3, 1965) was an American modern painter. ... Barnett Newman (January 29, 1905 – July 4, 1970) was an American artist. ... Marsden Hartley (January 4, 1877 - September 2, 1943) was an American painter and poet in the early 20th century. ... The Ash Can Painters were remembered on this USPS stamp. ... Nighthawks. ... Sixth Avenue Elevated at Third Street (New York City) by John Sloan. ... Robert Henri, by Gertrude Kasebier (1900) Snow in New York 1902, oil on canvas National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC Robert Henri (June 25, 1865 - July 12, 1929) was an American painter notable for his teaching and leadership of the Ashcan School movement in art. ... William James Glackens (born March 13, 1870, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; died May 22, 1938, in Westport, Connecticut) was a U.S. painter. ... Splash of Sunshine and Rain, Watercolor, 1899. ...


Smith Cove is home to the Rocky Neck Art Colony, the oldest art colony in the country. Folly Cove was the home of the Folly Cove Designers, influential to this day in print design and technique. The Folly Cove Designers were a group of artists block printing on Cape Ann, Massachusetts, United States, in mid 20th century. ...


Sculpture

Several important sculptors have lived and worked in East Gloucester, Annisquam, Lanesville and Folly Cove. They include George Aarons, Anna Hyatt Huntington, Charles Grafly, Paul Manship and his wife Margaret Manship, Walker Hancock, and George Demetrios. In addition, Aristides Demetrios grew up in Folly Cove. Annisquam is a small village on the northern coast of Massachusetts. ... Anna Vaughn Hyatt Huntington (American sculptor, 1876 - 1973) was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Charles Grafly (December 3, 1862 _ 1929), American sculptor, was born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Paul Howard Manship (December 24, 1885 - January 28, 1966) was a prominent American sculptor of the early 20th century. ... Walker Kirkland Hancock (born June 28, 1901, St. ... Aristides Burton Demetrios (born 1931) is an American Modernist sculptor specializing in large metal works. ...


Literature

The city was appropriately used as the on-location setting for the adaptation of the book The Perfect Storm. Perhaps the most famous story based in Gloucester is Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling, written in 1897, and made into a movie starring Spencer Tracy in 1937. The Perfect Storm is a 2000 film adapted from the book of the same title by Sebastian Junger. ... Captains Courageous is an 1897 novel, by Rudyard Kipling, that follows the adventures of fifteen year old Harvey Cheyne Jr. ... This article is about the British author. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Charles Olson (1910-1970) a poet and teacher at Black Mountain College, composed a 635 page poem known as "The Maximus Poems" which centered around the city of Gloucester. Charles Olson (27 December 1910 – 10 January 1970) was an important 2nd generation American modernist poet who was a crucial link between earlier figures like Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams and the New American poets, a rubric which includes the New York School, the Black Mountain School, the Beat... This article is in need of attention. ... Charles Olson (27 December 1910 – 10 January 1970) was an important 2nd generation American modernist poet who was a crucial link between earlier figures like Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams and the New American poets, a rubric which includes the New York School, the Black Mountain School, the Beat...


Gloucester is also often referred to in the works of horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. This article is about the author. ...


Gloucester and its Coast Guard station are the center of the land actions in Michael J. Tougias' 2005 book Ten Hours Until Dawn, recounting the loss of the pilot boat Can Do and its crew during the Blizzard of February 1978.[1] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...


Film

Captains Courageous is an 1897 novel, by Rudyard Kipling, that follows the adventures of fifteen year old Harvey Cheyne Jr. ... The Perfect Storm is a 2000 film adapted from the book of the same title by Sebastian Junger. ... Moonlight Mile is a 2002 movie written and directed by Brad Silberling. ... Stuck On You is a 2003 Farrelly brothers comedy film starring Matt Damon and Greg Kinnear. ... The Good Son is a film from 1993 directed by Joseph Ruben and written by Ian McEwan. ... Cape Ann, Massachusetts Landsat satellite photo of Cape Ann Cape Ann is a rocky peninsula located in northeastern Massachusetts on the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming is a 1966 American comedy film. ... Mermaids is a 1986 novel written by author Patty Dann. ... Author! Author! is a 1982 film directed by Arthur Hiller, written by Israel Horowitz and starring Al Pacino, Dyan Cannon and Tuesday Weld. ...

Points of interest

The entrance to Dogtown Commons, on Cherry Street
The entrance to Dogtown Commons, on Cherry Street

Gloucester's most noted landmark is the harborside "Man at the Wheel" statue (also known as the "Fishermen's Memorial Cenotaph"), dedicated to "They that go down to the sea in ships," which is a quote from Psalm 107:23-32. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 1280 pixel, file size: 590 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) By shotinthedark I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 1280 pixel, file size: 590 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) By shotinthedark I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU... Dogtown ( also Dogtown Commons or Dogtown Common or Dogtown Village) is an abandoned inland settlement on Cape Ann in Massachusetts. ... Dogtown ( also Dogtown Commons or Dogtown Common or Dogtown Village) is an abandoned inland settlement on Cape Ann in Massachusetts. ... Ravenswood Park is a nature reserve in the western section of Gloucester, Massachusetts. ... Annisquam is a small village on the northern coast of Massachusetts. ... The Cenotaph, London A ceremony at the Cenotaph, London, on Sunday 12th June 2005, remembering Irish war dead Memorial Cenotaph, Hiroshima, Japan A cenotaph is a tomb or a monument erected in honor of a person or group of persons whose remains are elsewhere. ...


Gloucester has a professional theatre company known as Gloucester Stage Company, which stages five to eight plays each season, primarily in the summer months. Located in East Gloucester, the theatre sits at water's edge overlooking Smith's Cove. It was founded in 1979 by local arts and business leaders to encourage playwrights and their new works. Israel Horovitz is the GSC's artistic director, and has been since he helped found it, though he is retiring after the 2006 season. Over the years, plays developed at Gloucester Stage Company have gone on to critical acclaim and popular success, on and off Broadway, nationally and internationally. The group draws theatre-goers from Gloucester, neighboring North Shore districts, greater Boston area, as well as seasonal residents and tourists. Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... Israel Horovitz (born March 31, 1939 in Wakefield, Massachusetts) is an American playwright and screenwriter. ... Broadway theatre is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... The North Shore is a region north of Boston, consisting chiefly of urban suburban communities of Essex County along Massachusetts Bay. ...

Man at the Wheel, Fisherman's Memorial Cenotaph
Man at the Wheel, Fisherman's Memorial Cenotaph

Gloucester's largest annual event is St. Peter's Fiesta, sponsored by the local Italian-American community. It is held the weekend closest to the saint's feast day. Highlights include the blessing of the fleet, and the greasy pole contest. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 652 KB) Summary The iconic Man at the Wheel/Fishermans Memorial Statue in Gloucester, Massachusetts. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 652 KB) Summary The iconic Man at the Wheel/Fishermans Memorial Statue in Gloucester, Massachusetts. ... Language(s) American English, Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, other (predominantly southern) Italian dialects and languages of Italian historical minorities Religion(s) Roman Catholic An Italian American is an American of Italian descent. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... Look up blessing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A fishing fleet is an aggregate of commercial fishing vessels. ... The Greasy Pole Contest takes place every year during St. ... Pole carrying telephone, electricity and Cable TV equipment. ...


The city has much significant architecture, from pre-revolutionary houses to the hilltop 1870 City Hall, which dominates the town and harbor. It also has exotic waterfront homes now converted to museums, including Beauport, built 1907-1934 by designer Henry Davis Sleeper in collaboration with local architect Halfdan Hanson, said to raise eclecticism to the level of genius. In addition, it has Hammond Castle, built 1926-1929 by inventor John Hays Hammond, Jr. as a setting for his collection of Roman, Medieval and Renaissance artifacts. Gloucester was also the home of feminist writer Judith Sargent Murray, wife of John Murray, the founder of the first Universalist Church in America. Their house still exists as the Sargent House Museum. Many museums are located in the main downtown area, such as the Cape Ann Historical Association, and the Gloucester Maritime Heritage Center. This article is about building architecture. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Beauport, a historic house in Gloucester, Massachusetts, was built starting in 1907 as the summer home of interior decorator and antique collector Henry Davis Sleeper. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Eclecticism is a kind of mixed style in the fine arts, in which features are borrowed from various sources and styles. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Hays Hammond, Jr. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... In archaeology, an artifact or artefact is any object made or modified by a human culture, and often one later recovered by some archaeological endeavor. ... She was on the equality of the sexists. ... The Universalist Church of America was a free association of Universalist congregations in the United States (plus four congregations in Canada) until 1961, when it merged with the American Unitarian Association to form the Unitarian Universalist Association. ...


Notable residents

This is an incomplete list of one-time residents of Gloucester, Massachusetts

For other uses, see CHUD. C.H.U.D. was a 1984 B horror movie (with elements of a Slasher and nod to golden age Creature Features) produced by Andrew Bonime, and directed by Douglas Cheek with Peter Stein as the director of photography. ... Willie Alexander & The Confessiones, LP, Somor Music 1982. ... This article is about the rock band. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Ash Can Painters were remembered on this USPS stamp. ... Robert Henri, by Gertrude Kasebier (1900) Snow in New York 1902, oil on canvas National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC Robert Henri (June 25, 1865 - July 12, 1929) was an American painter notable for his teaching and leadership of the Ashcan School movement in art. ... Sixth Avenue Elevated at Third Street (New York City) by John Sloan. ... Nighthawks. ... William James Glackens (born March 13, 1870, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; died May 22, 1938, in Westport, Connecticut) was a U.S. painter. ... Roger Ward Babson (July 6, 1875 - March 5, 1967), was a fucking asshole. ... Babson College, located in Wellesley, Massachusetts (zoned as Babson Park, ZIP code 02457),[1] is a private business school which grants all undergraduates a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. ... National Prohibition Convention, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1892. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cecilia Beaux is an American society portraitist, in the nature of John Singer Sargent. ... Howard Blackburn (1859-1932) was a Gloucester, Massachusetts fisherman, born in Nova Scotia. ... Birdseyes double belt freezer (US Patent #1,773,079) Clarence Birdseye (December 9, 1886 - October 7, 1956) was an American inventor who is considered the founder of the modern frozen food industry. ... Frozen food is food preserved by the process of freezing. ... Whoopi Goldberg (born November 13, 1955) is an American actress, comedian, radio presenter, host, and author. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... John Hays Hammond, Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Walker Kirkland Hancock (born June 28, 1901, St. ... Not to be confused with Adam Horowitz. ... The Beastie Boys are a hip hop musical group from New York City consisting of Michael Mike D Diamond, Adam MCA Yauch, Adam Ad-Rock Horovitz. ... Cape Ann, Massachusetts Landsat satellite photo of Cape Ann Cape Ann is a rocky peninsula located in northeastern Massachusetts on the Atlantic Ocean. ... WEEI is a sports radio station in Boston, Massachusetts that broadcasts on 850 kHz from a transmitter in Needham, Massachusetts. ... Alfred Centennial Johnson (1846–1927) was a Danish-born fisherman from Gloucester, Massachusetts. ... Stage Rocks and Western Shore of Gloucester Outer Harbor (1857) Fitz Henry Lane (born Nathaniel Rogers Lane, also known as Fitz Hugh Lane) (19 December 1804 – 14 August 1865) was an American painter and printmaker of a style that would later be called Luminism, for its use of pervasive light. ... Luminism is an American landscape painting style of the 1850s – 1870s, characterized by effects of light in landscapes, through the use of aerial perspective, and the hiding of visible brushstrokes. ... Tony Millionaires (1956 - ) Maakies is one of the most popular alternative newspaper comic strips in the world. ... Maakies is a syndicated weekly comic strip by Tony Millionaire. ... Sun Myung Moon (born January 6, 1920) is the founder of the Unification Church (established on May 1, 1954, in Seoul, South Korea). ... The Unification Church is a new religious movement started by Sun Myung Moon in Korea in the 1940s. ... She was on the equality of the sexists. ... Charles Olson (27 December 1910 – 10 January 1970) was an important 2nd generation American modernist poet who was a crucial link between earlier figures like Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams and the New American poets, a rubric which includes the New York School, the Black Mountain School, the Beat... This article is in need of attention. ... Herb Pomeroy (b. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Benjamin Atwood Smith II (March 16, 1916 - September 6, 1991) was a United States Senator from the U.S. State of Massachusetts. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... William Stacy (1734–1802) was an officer of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War and a pioneer to the Ohio Country. ... Capt. ...

Geography

Gloucester is located at 42°37′26″N, 70°40′32″W (42.624015, -70.675521).[3]


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 41.5 square miles (107.5 km²), of which, 26.0 square miles (67.2 km²) of it is land and 15.5 square miles (40.2 km²) of it (37.42%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...


Demographics

Fish Dressing Wharf in c. 1908
Fish Dressing Wharf in c. 1908

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 30,273 people, 12,592 households, and 7,895 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,166.0 people per square mile (450.2/km²). There were 13,958 housing units at an average density of 537.6/sq mi (207.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.99% White, 0.72% Asian, 0.61% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 1.03% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.48% of the population. 22.6% were of Italian, 16.2% Irish, 11.1% English, 8.5% Portuguese and 7.1% American ancestry according to Census 2000. Image File history File links Fish_Dressing_Wharf,_Gloucester,_MA.jpg Fish Dressing Wharf in c. ... Image File history File links Fish_Dressing_Wharf,_Gloucester,_MA.jpg Fish Dressing Wharf in c. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The United States 2000 Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


There were 12,592 households out of which 27.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.3% were non-families. 30.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.00. Matrimony redirects here. ...

Drying Fish in c. 1915
Drying Fish in c. 1915

In the city the population was spread out with 22.0% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 29.9% from 25 to 44, 26.1% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.8 males. Image File history File links Drying_Fish,_Gloucester,_MA.jpg Summary Drying fish, Gloucester, MA; from a c. ... Image File history File links Drying_Fish,_Gloucester,_MA.jpg Summary Drying fish, Gloucester, MA; from a c. ...


The median income for a household in the city was $47,722, and the median income for a family was $58,459. Males had a median income of $41,465 versus $30,566 for females. The per capita income for the city was $25,595. About 7.1% of families and 8.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.8% of those under age 18 and 11.2% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.michaeltougias.com
  2. ^ Lemonds, Leo L.: Col. William Stacy – Revolutionary War Hero, Cornhusker Press, Hastings, Nebraska (1993) p. 13, 15, 61.
  3. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Gloucester, Massachusetts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2139 words)
Gloucester is a city in Essex County, Massachusetts, in The United States.
Gloucester was founded at Cape Ann by an expedition called the "The Dorchester Company," of men from Dorchester, England, chartered by King James I in 1623.
Gloucester's most noted landmark is the harborside "Man at the Wheel" statue (also known as the "Fishermen's Memorial Cenotaph"), dedicated to "They that go down to the sea in ships," which is a quote from Psalm 107.
Gloucester Massachusetts, 1890 (1346 words)
Its boundaries are Annisquam Harbor and the ocean on the north, Rockport and the ocean on the east, Massachusetts Bay upon the south, and Manchester and Essex on the west.
On the western side of Squam River, near the centre of the township, is West Gloucester village, with its craggy hills of sienite, and charming vales between, marked with salt inlets and sparkling brooks.
From the elevation between East Gloucester village and Bass Rocks there is a fine view of the city proper and the harbor, and of the granite hills and dense woods of the interior, with here and there a green field to brighten the picture.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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