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Encyclopedia > Gloucester
Gloucester

Gloucester shown within Gloucestershire
Population 123,205
OS grid reference SO832186
 - London 113m
District Gloucester
Shire county Gloucestershire
Ceremonial county Gloucestershire
Region South West
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town GLOUCESTER
Postcode district GL1-4
Dialling code 01452
Police Gloucestershire
Fire Gloucestershire
Ambulance Great Western
UK Parliament Gloucester
European Parliament South West England
List of places: UKEnglandGloucestershireGloucestershire

Coordinates: 51°51′58″N 2°14′35″W / 51.866, -2.243 Gloucester is the name of many places; the original is Gloucester, England. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 504 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 714 pixel, file size: 398 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South West England is one of the regions of England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The GL postcode area, also known as the Gloucester postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Badminton, Berkeley, Blakeney, Cheltenham, Chipping Campden, Cinderford, Cirencester, Coleford, Drybrook, Dursley, Dymock, Fairford, Gloucester, Lechlade, Longhope, Lydbrook, Lydney, Mitcheldean, Moreton-in-Marsh, Newent, Newnham, Ruardean, Stonehouse, Stroud, Tetbury, Tewkesbury, Westbury-on... +44 redirects here. ... Gloucestershire Constabulary is the police force covering the non-metropolitan county of Gloucestershire in England. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The Gloucestershire Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory emergency fire and rescue service for the county of Gloucestershire, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Great Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust provides services in Bath and North East Somerset, Bristol, Gloucestershire, North Somerset, South Gloucestershire, Swindon and Wiltshire in the South West England region. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Gloucester is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... The constituency (first used 2004) within England; Gibraltar is in the inset. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the county of Gloucestershire, England. ... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the county of Gloucestershire, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Gloucester (pronounced IPA: /ˈglɒstə(r)/) is a city and district in the English county of Gloucestershire, close to the Welsh border, and on the River Severn. Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... This article is about the country. ... “Severn” redirects here. ...

Contents

Character

Gloucester is the county town of Gloucestershire, and is the 46th largest settlement in England. In 2001 the city proper had a population of 123,205. However the built-up area extends beyond the city boundary. The 2001 census gave the population of the whole "Gloucester Urban Area" as 136,203. A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ...


It is located on the eastern bank of the River Severn, at grid reference SO832186, 114 miles west-north-west of London. It is sheltered by the Cotswolds to the east, while the Forest of Dean and the Malvern Hills rise prominently to the west and north-west, respectively. “Severn” redirects here. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Cotswolds is the name given to a range of hills in central England, sometimes called the Heart of England, a hilly area reaching over 300 m or 1000 feet. ... The Forest of Dean is a geographical, historical and cultural region in the county of Gloucestershire, England. ... Malvern Hills in June, looking north. ...


Gloucester is a port, linked via the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal to the Severn Estuary, allowing larger ships to reach the docks than would be possible on the tidal reaches of the river itself. The wharfs, warehouses and the docks themselves fell into considerable disrepair until their renovation in the 1980s. They now form a public open space. Some warehouses now house the National Waterways Museum, others were converted into luxury residential apartments, shops and bars. Additionally, the Soldiers of Gloucestershire Museum is located in the Custom House. The port still houses the most inland RNLI Lifeboat in the UK. For other uses, see Harbor (disambiguation). ... The Gloucester and Sharpness Canal is a canal in the south west of England, between Gloucester and Sharpness. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Britain National Waterways Museum is housed in a Victorian warehouse at Gloucester Docks in the city of Gloucester in South West England. ... RNLI Lifeboat at Calshot Spit The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity dedicated to saving lives at sea around the coasts of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. ... For the 1944 movie, see Lifeboat (film). ...


Places of interest

Gloucester Cathedral

Gloucester Cathedral
Gloucester Cathedral
Main article: Gloucester Cathedral

Gloucester Cathedral, in the north of the city near the river, originates in the foundation of an abbey dedicated to Saint Peter in 681. It is the burial place of King Edward II of England, Walter de Lacy and was recently used in scenes for the Harry Potter films. Attached to the deanery is the Norman prior's chapel. In St Mary's Square outside the Abbey gate, Bishop Hooper suffered martyrdom under Queen Mary I in 1555. Download high resolution version (1099x1255, 288 KB)Gloucester Cathedral Photo by & copyright Tagishsimon - 2004-11-02 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1099x1255, 288 KB)Gloucester Cathedral Photo by & copyright Tagishsimon - 2004-11-02 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Gloucester Cathedral from the north east in 1828. ... Gloucester Cathedral from the north east in 1828. ... “St Peter” redirects here. ... Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – October, 1327), of Caernarvon, was king of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Norman conquests in red. ... Gabriel delivering the Annunciation to Mary. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ...


Medieval and Tudor buildings

Many gabled and timbered houses survive from earlier periods of Gloucester's amazing history. At the point where the four principal streets intersected stood the Tolsey (town hall), which was replaced by a modern building in 1894. None of the old public buildings are left except for the New Inn in Northgate Street. It is a timbered house, with strong, massive external galleries and courtyards. It was built in 1450 for the pilgrims to Edward II's shrine, by Abbot Sebroke.


Churches

There may be many churches now, but in the past there were also many dissenting chapels. It may have been the old proverb "as sure as God's in Gloucester" that provoked Oliver Cromwell to declare that the city had "more churches than godliness." Gloucester was the host of the first Sunday school in England; this was founded by Robert Raikes in 1780. Four of the churches that are of special interest are

  • St Mary de Lode - with a Norman tower and chancel, and a monument of Bishop Hooper. It was built on the site of an ancient Roman temple which became the first Christian church in Britain
  • St Mary de Crypt - with a cruciform structure of the 12th century. It has later additions, such as the beautiful and lofty tower
  • The St Michael church - said to have been connected with the St Peter ancient abbey
  • The St Nicholas church - founded by the Normans but with many additions since then.

In the neighbourhood around St Mary de Crypt there are slight remains of Greyfriars and Blackfriars monasteries, and also of the city wall. Under the Fleece and Saracen's Head inns early vaulted cellars still remain.


During the construction of the Boots store on the corner of Brunswick Road and Eastgate Street in 1974, Roman remains were found. You can see these through a glass case as you walk past on the street; you may also listen to the 'talking bollard' to get a better idea of what life was like in Roman times. At the back of the Gloucester Furniture Exhibition Centre you can see parts of the city's south gate.


Schools

There are three endowed schools: The King's School, refounded by Henry VIII of England as part of the cathedral establishment; the school of St Mary de Crypt, founded by Dame Joan Cooke in the same reign (1539); and Sir Thomas Rich's Blue Coat Hospital for boys (1666). The Kings School, Gloucester is an independent school in the United Kingdom, taking students from the ages of 3-18, with around 500 students. ... The Crypt School is a grammar school for boys with a mixed Sixth Form, located in the city of Gloucester, England, founded in 1539 by John and Joan Cooke. ... Sir Thomas Richs School is a grammar school for boys (aged 11–18) and girls (aged 16–18, in the sixth form) in Longlevens Gloucester. ...


Modern buildings

Noteworthy modern buildings include the museum and school of art and science, the county gaol (on the site of a Saxon and Norman castle), the Shire Hall and the Whitefield memorial church. A park in the south of the city contains a spa, a chalybeate spring having been discovered in 1814. West of this, across the canal, are the remains (a gateway and some walls) of Llanthony Secunda Priory, a cell of the mother abbey in the Vale of Ewyas, Monmouthshire, which in the reign of Edward IV became the secondary establishment. The Calybeate Spring Tunbridge Wells Chalybeate water was early in the 17th century said to have health-giving properties and many people have promoted their qualities. ... Llanthony Secunda Priory is a ruined former Augustinian priory in Hempsted, Gloucester. ... The Vale of Ewyas is the steeply-sided and secluded valley of the Afon Honddu, in the Black Mountains of South Wales and within the Brecon Beacons National Park. ...


King's Square is at the heart of the city centre and occupies what was once a cattle market and bus station. Officially opened in 1972, it was the centrepiece of a radical redesign of the city, The Jellicoe Plan, which was first proposed in 1961. Many of the features of the redevelopment have since been dismantled; the brutalist concrete fountains in the middle of the square have gone and the overhead roadways which linked three multi storey car parks around the centre have been either closed or dismantled. The present main bus station received a Civic Trust Award in 1963 but is now tatty and unwelcoming. An indoor market opened in Eastgate Street in 1968, followed shortly afterwards by the Eastgate Shopping Centre. Gloucester Leisure Centre opened on the corner of Eastgate Street and Bruton Way in September 1974 and was redeveloped around 2003. A new railway station opened in Bruton Way in 1977, replacing one which had stood on another site further east along the same road. The main shopping streets were pedestrianised in the late 1980s. Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ...


There are few tall buildings in Gloucester, the Cathedral being the most obvious. The tower of Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, constructed during the years 1970-1975, can be seen from miles around. In Brunswick Road, a brown concrete tower, which housed classrooms at the Gloucestershire College of Arts and Technology (now moved to a site near Llanthony Bridge). The tower was added incongruously to the existing 1930s Technical College buildings in 1971. Clapham Court, a tall block of flats, stands in Columbia Close, between London Road and Kingsholm Road. It was built in 1972 and stands on what was once Columbia Street in a small district formerly known as Clapham. An NHS district general hospital in Great Western Road, Gloucester, England. ... Gloucestershire College (also Gloucestershire College of Arts and Technology, abbreviated GLOSCAT) is a large college based in Gloucestershire. ...


History

Roman times

Main article: Glevum
Kip's West prospect of Gloucester, c. 1725, emphasizes the causeway and bridges traversing the water meadows of the floodplain
Kip's West prospect of Gloucester, c. 1725, emphasizes the causeway and bridges traversing the water meadows of the floodplain

The traditional existence of a British settlement at Gloucester (Caer Glow, Gleawecastre, Gleucestre) is not confirmed by any direct evidence, but Gloucester was the Roman municipality of Colonia Nervia Glevensium, or Glevum, founded in the reign of Nerva. Parts of the walls can be traced, and many remains and coins have been found, though inscriptions are scarce. Evidence for some civic life after the end of Roman Britain includes the mention in the Historia Brittonum that Vortigern's grandfather ruled Gloucester, and that the Battle of Deorham in 577 resulted in Wessex controlling Gloucester. Gloucester (pronounced ) is a city in south-west England, close to the Welsh border. ... Download high resolution version (1065x865, 285 KB)West prospect of Gloucester by Johannes Kip c. ... Download high resolution version (1065x865, 285 KB)West prospect of Gloucester by Johannes Kip c. ... Hampton Court, from Kip and Knyffs Britannia illustrata, 1708 The inexorably linked careers of Jan Kip and Leonard Knyff trace a specialty of engraved views of English country houses, represented in minute detail from the birds-eye view that was a long-established pictorial convention for topography. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nerva (disambiguation). ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... The Historia Britonum, or The History of the Britons, is a historical work that was first written sometime shortly after AD 820, and exists in several recensions of varying difference. ... Vortigern (also spelled Vortiger and Vortigen, and in Welsh Gwrtheyrn), was a 5th century warlord in Britain, a leading ruler among the Britons (Brythons). ... The Battle of Deorham occurred in 577 between the West Saxons and the Britons. ... Events The Anglo-Saxons under Ceawlin of Wessex defeat the British (Welsh) at the Battle of Deorham. ... For the helicopter, see Westland Wessex. ...


Saxon times

Gloucester may mean fort (Old English ceaster 'fort') on the glowing river. (Glowancestre, 1282). In Welsh, the city is known as Caerloyw, Caer = Castle, and loyw from gloyw = glowing/bright. Its situation on a navigable river, and the foundation in 681 of the abbey of St Peter by Æthelred, favoured the growth of the town; and before the Norman Conquest of England, Gloucester was a borough governed by a portreeve, with a castle which was frequently a royal residence, and a mint. Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Old Welsh (Hen Gymraeg) is the label attached to the Welsh language from the time it developed from the Brythonic language, generally thought to be in the period between the middle of the 6th century and the middle of the 7th century, until the early 12th century when it developed... // Events August 9 - The Bulgars win the war with the Byzantine Empire; the latter signs a peace treaty, which is considered as the birth-date of Bulgaria Wilfrid of York is expelled from Northumbria by Ecgfrith and retires into Sussex Births Deaths January 10 - Pope Agatho Ebroin, Mayor of the... For the later earl, see Earl Aethelred of Mercia. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The current core street layout dates back to Ethelfleda in late Saxon times. Ethelfleda (alternative spelling Aethelfled, Æthelfleda or Æthelflæd) (872/879?-918) was the eldest daughter of King Alfred the Great of Wessex and his wife Ealhswith. ...


Medieval times

Gloucester in 1805
Gloucester in 1805

The first overlord, Earl Godwine, was succeeded nearly a century later by Robert of Gloucester. King Henry II granted the first charter in 1155, which gave the burgesses the same liberties as the citizens of London and Winchester, and a second charter of Henry II gave them freedom of passage on the Severn. The first charter was confirmed in 1194 by Richard I of England. The privileges of the borough were greatly extended by the charter of King John (1200), which gave freedom from toll throughout the kingdom and from pleading outside the borough. Download high resolution version (535x703, 94 KB)Map of Gloucester in 1805 engraved by J.Roper from a drawing by G.Cole. ... Download high resolution version (535x703, 94 KB)Map of Gloucester in 1805 engraved by J.Roper from a drawing by G.Cole. ... Godwin (sometimes Godwine) (c. ... Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (c. ... Henry II of England 5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... Events Frederick I Barbarossa crowned Holy Roman Emperor. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 to 6 April 1199. ... This article is about the King of England. ...


Tudor and Stuart times

Subsequent charters were numerous. Gloucester was incorporated by King Richard III in 1483, the town being made a county in itself. This charter was confirmed in 1489 and 1510, and other charters of incorporation were received by Gloucester from Queen Elizabeth I and King James I. Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death. ... Events The São Tomé settlement is founded. ... A county corporate or corporate county was a form of local government in England and Wales. ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary...


Gloucester was the site of the execution by burning of John Hooper, Bishop of Gloucester in the time of Queen Mary and martyred by her in 1555. John Hooper (died February 9, 1555) was an English churchman, Bishop of Gloucester and Worcester and a Marian martyr. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ...


The Siege of Gloucester in 1643 was an important battle of the English Civil War in which the besieged parliamentarians emerged victorious. Combatants Royalists Parliamentarians Commanders Charles I, Prince Rupert Colonel Edward Massey Strength about 35,000 1,500 regular troops unknown local militia Casualties exact number unknown, believed to be several thousand 50 The Siege of Gloucester took place took place between the 3rd of August and 5th of September, between... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ...


Modern notoriety

In 1991 Gloucester City Council worker Anna McGurk was murdered by a man whilst he was an inmate at a bail hostel in Ryecroft within the city. The murder led to changes in the law affecting those held on bail for serious offences. Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Anna McGurk (died 1991) was a Gloucester council worker who was raped and murdered by a man on bail. ... The word bail as a legal term means: Security, usually a sum of money, exchanged for the release of an arrested person as a guarantee of that persons appearance for trial. ...


1994 saw the arrest of Fred West and his wife Rose West for the abduction and murder of more than a dozen young women between 1967 and 1987, including one of their daughters. Their home, 25 Cromwell Street, where the remains of many of the victims were buried, was later demolished and a public walkway laid in its place. To deter souvenir-hunters, the rubble was reduced to dust before disposal. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Frederick Walter Stephen West (September 29, 1941 – January 1, 1995) was a British serial killer. ... Rosemary West (née Rosemary Letts) (born 1953) is a British serial killer. ... Fred and Rosemary West Frederick Walter Stephen West (September 29, 1941 - January 1, 1995) was an English serial killer who, together with his wife Rosemary West, was responsible for the murder of at least twelve young women, many at the couples home in Gloucester, England. ...


In July 2007 Gloucester was hit badly by a flood that struck Gloucestershire and many surrounding areas, causing hundreds of people to be evacuated, power-cuts and the loss of running water, but some people were lucky and kept there water, electricity, and didn't have to evacuate. Two kayakers make their way through a street in Yorkshire. ...


Transport

Gloucester is linked to the Severn Estuary by the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal, which is navigable by small coasters. The city is linked to the River Avon and Stourport-on-Severn by the navigable part of the River Severn, which is navigable by river craft of a few hundred tonnes' displacement. The location of the Bristol Channel The Severn Bridge and Bristol Channel, looking northwestward from England towards Wales The Bristol Channel coast at Ilfracombe, North Devon, looking west towards Lee Bay The Bristol Channel is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from South West... The Gloucester and Sharpness Canal is a canal in the south west of England, between Gloucester and Sharpness. ... Coastal trading vessels, also known as coasters, are shallow-hulled ships used for trade between locations on the same island or continent. ... The River Avon or Avon is a river in or adjoining the counties of Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Warwickshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire in the midlands of England. ... , Stourport Basin Stourport-on-Severn, often shortened to Stourport, is a town in Worcestershire, England, a few miles to the south of Kidderminster. ... “Severn” redirects here. ... A hull is the body or frame of a ship or boat. ...


Public transport in the city is run by Stagecoach, operating from its depot on London Road. The regional office for Stagecoach is also in the city at 65 London Road. Stagecoach Group plc (LSE: SGC) is a leading international transport group operating bus, train, tram, express coach and ferry operations. ...


Gloucester was formerly linked to Ledbury and Hereford by the Herefordshire and Gloucestershire Canal. This canal is now being restored, and the restored canal basin in the Gloucester suburb of Over is already a local attraction. Location within the British Isles Ledbury (known locally as jippo)is a town in Herefordshire, England. ... For other uses, see Hereford (disambiguation). ... The Herefordshire and Gloucestershire Canal (sometimes known as the Hereford and Gloucester Canal) is a canal in the south west of England, passing through Herefordshire and Gloucestershire. ...


Until the construction of the Severn Bridge in 1966, Gloucester was the lowest bridging point on the river and hence was an important settlement on the route between London and South Wales. The Severn is split into two branches at this point, so the road crosses first onto Alney Island and then onto the western bank. A road bridge on this western side at Over, built by Thomas Telford in 1829, still stands, notable for its very flat arch construction, but its fragility and narrow width means it is no longer used for traffic, and since 1974 has been paralleled by a modern road bridge. There is a rail crossing, also across Alney Island, which was the lowest on the river until the opening of the Severn Tunnel in 1886. For the Ontario community, see Severn Bridge, Ontario. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Approximate extent of South East Wales. ... Alney Island is an island in the River Severn near Gloucester. ... Over Bridge is a single arch stone bridge spanning the West Channel of the River Severn near Gloucester. ... Thomas Telford (August 9, 1757 - September 2, 1834) was born in Westerkirk, Scotland. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... The approach to the tunnel. ...


The city is served by Gloucester railway station. Gloucester railway station (formerly known as Gloucester Central station) serves the city of Gloucester. ...


Gloucester was the site of the Gloucester Railway Carriage and Wagon Company railway works, which have now closed. Gloucester Railway Carriage and Wagon Company (GRCW) was a railway manufacturer based at Gloucester. ...


Business & Industry

Aerospace

Gloucester has a long history in the aerospace business. In 1926 the Gloucestershire Aircraft Company at Brockworth decided to change its name to the Gloster Aircraft Company because international customers claimed that the name "Gloucestershire" was too difficult to spell. Messier-Dowty's landing gear plant and Smiths Aerospace Dowty Propellers plant are located on the outskirts of the city. A sculpture in the city centre celebrates Gloucester's aviation history and its involvement in the jet engine, and The Whittle pub at Gloucester Business Park is named after jet pioneer Frank Whittle. Look up aerospace in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Brockworth, in Gloucestershire, England is situated on the old Roman road that connects the City of Gloucester with Barnwood, Hucclecote and Cirencester. ... The Gloster Aircraft Company was formed at Hucclecote ( Gloucester ) in 1915 as the Gloucestershire Aircraft Company. ... Messier-Dowty is a world leader in the development and manufacture of aircraft landing gear. ... Luftwaffe Junkers Ju 87s, with fixed conventional landing gear. ... Smiths Aerospace is the largest European based aerospace equipment company with its businesses and sales revenues split between Europe and North America. ... Dowty Rotol is the final incarnation of three major British aviation supply firms, Dowty Equipment, Rotol Airscrews and British Messier, which merged in 1960. ... A Pratt and Whitney turbofan engine for the F-15 Eagle is tested at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, USA. The tunnel behind the engine muffles noise and allows exhaust to escape. ... Frank Whittle speaking to employees of the Flight Propulsion Research Laboratory (Now known as the NASA Glenn Research Center), USA, in 1946 Air Commodore Sir Frank Whittle, OM, KBE, FRS, Hon FRAeS (1 June 1907–9 August 1996) was an English Royal Air Force officer and is seen as the...


Financial Services

Gloucester is home to the headquarters of Cheltenham and Gloucester at Barnwood, third largest mortgage lender in the UK, and now a subsidiary of Lloyds TSB. Cheltenham and Gloucester Cheltenham and Gloucester (C&G) is a commercial bank in the United Kingdom, a subsidiary of Lloyds-TSB Bank plc. ... Barnwood, in Gloucestershire, England is situated on the old Roman road that connects the City of Gloucester with Hucclecote, Brockworth and Cirencester. ... Lloyds TSB Group plc is a group of financial services companies, based in the United Kingdom, which was created in 1995 following the merger of the TSB Group and the Lloyds Bank Group. ...


Other Industry

Gloucester was the home of Priday, Metford and Company Limited, a family milling firm which survived for over one hundred years. Priday, Metford and Company Limited was a company that produced flour at the City Flour Mills, Gloucester, England for over a century. ...


Sport and leisure

  • Kingsholm is the home of Gloucester RFC, the best rugby club in the world, founded in 1873. Which is one of England's top rugby union clubs.
  • Meadow Park is the home of Gloucester City A.F.C. ("The Tigers") of the Southern League Premier Division.
  • Public sports facilities are focused on the GL1 leisure centre, a large modern sports centre with several swimming pools, a sports hall and indoor bowls room. There is also a new Esporta being built in Brockworth, which could soon be the main Sport facility in Gloucester.

Official website www. ... Gloucester City AFC are a semi-professional football club based in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, currently playing in the Southern League. ...

Culture

The annual Three Choirs Festival, originating in the eighteenth century and one of the oldest music festivals in Europe, is held in Gloucester every third year, the other venues being Hereford and Worcester. The Three Choirs Festival is a British music festival, held each August alternately at the cathedrals of Hereford, Gloucester and Worcester and originally featuring their three choirs, which remain central to the week-long programme. ... For other uses, see Hereford (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Worcester in England. ...


The city's main theatre and cultural venue is the Guildhall [1].


The annual Gloucester International Rhythm & Blues Festival takes place at the end of July and early August each year. [2]


Notable citizens

Robert Raikes the Elder (baptised 22 April 1690, Hessle; died 7 September 1757, Gloucester) was a British printer and newspaper proprietor. ... George Whitefield was a minister in the Church of England and one of the leaders of the Methodist movement. ... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Robert Raikes (1725-1811) was an English philanthropist. ... Thomas Raikes (the Elder) (1741 -1813 ), Esquire, was a merchant and a banker in London at number 10, New Bond Street and Governor of the Bank of England during the crisis of 1797 when war had so diminished gold reserves that the government prohibited the Bank of England (national bank... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Headquarters Coordinates , , Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... One pound coin (obverse, Rank-Broadley head) The circulating British one pound (£1) coin is minted from a nickel-brass alloy of approximately 70% copper, 24. ... // Obverse of the commemorative £2 coin The British commemorative two pound (£2) coin was minted from the same composition as the £1 coin, i. ... Sterling banknotes are the banknotes of the United Kingdom and British Islands, denominated in pounds sterling (GBP). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... John Clarke Whitfield (December 13, 1770 - February 22, 1836), English organist and composer, was born at Gloucester, and educated at Oxford under Dr Philip Hayes. ... Charles Wheatstone Sir Charles Wheatstone (February 6, 1802 - October 19, 1875) was the British inventor of many innovations including the English concertina the Stereoscope an early form of microphone the Playfair cipher (named for Lord Playfair, the person who publicized it) He was a major figure in the development of... William Ernest Henley (August 23, 1849 - July 11, 1903) was a British poet, critic and editor. ... Hubert Cecil Booth was born in Gloucester, England on the 4th of July 1871 and died at Purley, Surrey, England on the 18th of January 1955. ... Regular canister vacuum cleaner for home use. ... Ivor Gurney (August 28, 1890 - December 26, 1937) was an English composer and poet. ... Tom Goddard (October 1, 1900, Gloucester, England - May 22, 1966, Gloucester, England; in full Thomas William John Goddard or simply Thomas William Goddard) was the fifth highest wicket taker in first class cricket. ... Frederick Walter Stephen West (September 29, 1941 – January 1, 1995) was a British serial killer. ... Michael dAbo (born 1 March 1944 in Betchworth, Surrey) is an English singer and songwriter, best known as the former lead vocalist of Manfred Mann. ... Rosemary Pauline West (born November 29, 1953 as Rosemary Letts) is an English serial killer, now an inmate at HMP Bronzefield, Ashford, Middlesex. ... Former England flanker/number 8 who played in the 1991 World Cup final. ... Tina May (b. ... Simon John Pegg (born 14 February 1970 in Gloucester) is an English comedian, writer and film and television actor. ... Andy Hazell (born 25 April 1978) is a rugby union player who plays at Flanker for Gloucester and England. ... For the former NHL goalie, see Wayne Thomas (hockey). ... Alastair Cook should not be confused with Alistair Cooke, journalist and broadcaster. ... Stuart Fleetwood (born 23 April 1986 in Gloucester) is a Welsh footballer who currently plays for Hereford United as a striker. ...

Twin cities

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) Cathedral St. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Trier (French: ; Luxembourgish Tréier) is a city in Germany on the banks of the Moselle River. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Jamaica. ... Saint Ann, Jamaica (2001 population 168,726), is a parish located in the northern part of Jamaica and is north west of Kingston. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Goudas 15th Century Town Hall Flag of Gouda Goudas Cheese Market Gouda (population 71,797 in 2004) is a city in the western Netherlands, in the province of South Holland. ...

See also

Gloucestershire County Cricket Club is an English domestic first-class cricket club based at County Cricket Ground, Bristol. ...

Other Places Called Gloucester

This article is about Gloucester, Massachusetts, U.S.A.; there are other places called Gloucester Location in Essex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Settled 1623 Incorporated 1642 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor John Bell Area  - Total 41. ... Gloucester was a city in eastern Ontario, Canada on the Ottawa River and is now a suburb of the City of Ottawa. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1651 Seat Gloucester Area  - Total  - Water 746 km² (288 mi²) 185 km² (71 mi²) 24. ... Gloucester Township highlighted in Camden County Gloucester Township is a Township located in Camden County, New Jersey. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
City of Gloucester, MA (213 words)
Those seeking spectacular natural beauty, an energetic and picturesque working port, a diverse population who continue to honor their cultural traditions, a variety of recreational activities, and one of the premier art colonies of our country, enjoy visiting this historic city.
Conveniently located less than one hour from Boston, Gloucester is a place of welcome for a visit, to live, or to build a successful business.
This web site is provided by the City of Gloucester and Mayor John Bell to offer a window of information on a unique and wonderful place.
Gloucester - definition of Gloucester in Encyclopedia (1088 words)
Gloucester Cathedral, in the north of the city near the river, originates in the foundation of an abbey dedicated to St Peter in 681.
Its situation on a navigable river, and the foundation in 681 of the abbey of St Peter by Æthelred favoured the growth of the town; and before the Norman Conquest of England, Gloucester was a borough governed by a portreeve, with a castle which was frequently a royal residence, and a mint.
Gloucester was incorporated by King Richard III in 1483, the town being made a county in itself.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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