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Encyclopedia > Glottal stop
This article is about the sound. For the letter, see glottal stop (letter).
IPA – number 113
IPA – text ʔ
IPA – image {{{imagesize}}}
Entity ʔ
X-SAMPA ?
Kirshenbaum ?
Sound sample 

The glottal stop or voiceless glottal plosive is a type of consonantal sound, used in many spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ʔ. The glottal stop is the sound made when the vocal cords are pressed together to stop the flow of air and then released; for example, the break separating the syllables of the interjection uh-oh. This article is about the Latin letter. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... IPA symbols, detail from Image:Ipa-chart-consonants-pulmonic. ... HTML has been in use since 1991 (note that the W3C international standard is now XHTML), but the first standardized version with a reasonably complete treatment of international characters was version 4. ... The Extended SAM Phonetic Alphabet (X-SAMPA) is a variant of SAMPA developed in 1995 by John C. Wells, professor of phonetics at the University of London. ... Kirshenbaum, sometimes called ASCII-IPA, is a system used to represent the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) in ASCII. It was developed for Usenet, notably the newsgroups sci. ... Image File history File links Glottal stop. ... Phoneticians define phonation as use of the laryngeal system to generate an audible source of acoustic energy, i. ... The vocal cords, also known as vocal folds, are composed of twin infoldings of mucous membrane stretched horizontally across the human larynx. ... A stop or plosive or occlusive is a consonant sound produced by stopping the airflow in the vocal tract. ... In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a sound in spoken language that is characterized by a closure or stricture of the vocal tract sufficient to cause audible turbulence. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Laryngoscopic view of the vocal folds. ... An interjection is a part of speech that usually has no grammatical connection to the rest of the sentence and simply expresses emotion on the part of the speaker, although most interjections have clear definitions. ...


Features

Features of the glottal stop:

In linguistics, manner of articulation describes how the tongue, lips, and other speech organs involved in making a sound make contact. ... A stop, plosive, or occlusive is a consonant sound produced by stopping the airflow in the vocal tract. ... Places of articulation (passive & active): 1. ... Glottal consonants are consonants articulated with the glottis. ... // Bold textItalic text The vocal folds, also known popularly as vocal cords, are composed of twin infoldings of mucous membrane stretched horizontally across the larynx. ... In phonetics, phonation is the use of the laryngeal system to generate an audible source of acoustic energy, i. ... An oral consonant is a consonant sound in speech that is made by allowing air to escape from the mouth. ... A central or medial consonant is a consonant sound that is produced when air flows across the center of the mouth over the tongue. ... Laterals are L-like consonants pronounced with an occlusion made somewhere along the axis of the tongue, while air from the lungs escapes at one side or both sides of the tongue. ... In phonetics, initiation is the action by which an air-flow is created through the vocal tract. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Human respiratory system Image:Heart-and-hullumgitwalitshnit shmulkelungs. ... The space between the vocal cords is called the glottis. ...

Occurrence

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Abkhaz аи [ʔaj] 'no' See Abkhaz phonology
Arabic ألله [ʔɑlˁlˁɑːh] 'God, 'Allah' See Arabic phonology
Bikol ba-go [ˈbaːʔgo] 'new' Certain dialects have bag-o
Burmese မ္ရစ္‌မ္ယား [mjiʔ mjà] 'rivers'
Cebuano bag-o [ˈbaːgʔo] 'new'
Chamorro halu'u [həluʔu] 'shark'
Czech používat [poʔuʒiːvat] 'to use' See Czech phonology
Danish hånd [hɞnʔ] 'hand' See Danish phonology
Dutch beamen [bəʔɑmən] 'to affirm' See Dutch phonology
English (dialectal) cat [kæʔ(t)] 'cat' Allophone of /t/. See glottalization and English phonology
Finnish linja-auto [ˈlinjɑʔˈɑuto] 'bus' See Finnish phonology
French les hérissons [le ʔeʁisɔ̃] 'the hedgehogs' See French phonology
German (northern dialects) Beamter [bəˈʔamtɐ] 'civil servant' See German phonology
Guaraní avañe [aʋaɲẽˈʔẽ] 'Guaraní' Occurs only between vowels
Hawaiian ʻeleʻele [ˡʔɛ.lɛˡʔɛ.lɛ] 'black' See Hawaiian phonology
Hebrew אָלֶף־בֵית [alefbet] 'alphabet' See Hebrew phonology
Indonesian bakso [ˌbaʔ.ˈso] 'green' Allophone of /k/ or /g/ in the syllable coda
Japanese もっと/motto [moʔto] 'more' See Japanese phonology
Kabardian Iэ [ʔɛ] 'to tell'
Maltese qattus [ˈʔattus] 'cat'
Persian معني [maʔni] 'meaning' See Persian phonology
Pirahã baíxi [màíʔì] 'parent'
Seri he [ʔɛ] 'I'
Spanish (Paraguayan) el débil es... [el deʋil ʔeh] 'the weak one is...' See Spanish phonology
Tagalog umaasa [ˌʔuː.ma.ʔáː.sah] 'hoping'
Tahitian puaʻa [puaʔa] 'pig'
Tongan tuʻu [tuʔu] 'stand'
Vietnamese [ʔɓɐ̤ː˧˩] 'lady' See Vietnamese phonology
Võro piniq [ˈpinʲiʔ] 'dogs'
Welayta [ʔirʈa] 'wet'

Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Abkhaz is a Northwest Caucasian language spoken mainly in Abkhazia[1] and Turkey. ... Abkhaz alphabet. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... The Arabic alphabet is the script used for writing languages such as Arabic, Persian, Urdu, and others. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... The Arabic language has a standard pronunciation, which is basically the one used to recite the Quran. ... Bicolano or Bikol is an Austronesian language used in the Philippines particularly on the Bicol Peninsula on the island of Luzon. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... This article or section uses Burmese characters which may be rendered incorrectly. ... Cebuano, also known as Sugboanon, is an Austronesian language spoken in the Philippines by about 20,000,000 people (according to Ethnologue). ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... Czech orthography is a system of rules for correct writing (orthography) in the Czech language. ... Czech phonology describes functions and pronunciation of individual phonemes used in the Czech language. ... The Danish and Norwegian alphabet consists of 29 letters: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z, Æ, Ø, Å The letter Å was introduced in Norwegian in 1917, replacing Aa. Similarly, Å was introduced in Danish... Main article: Danish language This is a guide to Danish phonology. ... Dutch orthography uses the Latin alphabet according to a system which has evolved to suit the needs of the Dutch language. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... English orthography (or spelling), has relatively complicated rules when compared to other orthographic systems written with alphabetic scripts and contains many inconsistencies between spelling and pronunciation, necessitating rote learning for most people learning to read or write English. ... See also Glottalic consonant Glottalization is the complete or partial closure of the glottis during the articulation of another sound. ... English phonology is the study of the phonology (ie the sound system) of the English language. ... The Finnish alphabet is based on the Latin alphabet, and especially its Swedish extension. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Guaraní (local name: avañeẽ ) is an Amerindian language of South America that belongs to the Tupí-Guaraní subfamily. ... The Guaraní alphabet (achegety) is a phonetic system used to write the Guaraní language, spoken mostly in Paraguay and nearby countries. ... The Hawaiian language is an Austronesian language that takes its name from that of the largest island in the tropical North Pacific archipelago where it developed. ... Hawaiian is the ancestral language of the indigenous people of the Hawaiian Islands, the Hawaiians, a Polynesian people. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji Hiragana ) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system, along with katakana and kanji; the Latin alphabet is also used in some cases. ... Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji The romanization of Japanese is the use of the Latin alphabet (called rōmaji )   in Japanese) to write the Japanese language, which is normally written in logographic characters borrowed from Chinese (kanji) and syllabic scripts... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The Kabardian language is closely related to the Adyghe language (see Adyghe), both members of the Northwest Caucasian language family, mainly spoken in Kabardino-Balkar Republic and Karachay-Cherkess Republic of Russia (the native territories) and in Turkey and the Middle East (the residence of the extensive post-war diaspora). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Maltese alphabet is based on the Latin alphabet with the addition of some letters with diacritic marks and digraphs. ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Perso-Arabic script. ... The Persian language has six vowels and twenty-three consonants, including one glide //, and two affricates // and //. Vowels Diachronically, Persian possessed a distinction of length in its underlying vowel inventory, contrasting the long vowels , , with the short vowels , , . In Modern Persian, this distinction of quantity is neutralized in most environments... The Pirahã language is a language spoken by Pirahã people of Brazil. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... Seri (referred to as cmiique iitom by the Seri people) is a language isolate spoken by the Seri people in two villages on the coast of Sonora, Mexico. ... Seri (referred to as cmiique iitom by the Seri people) is a language isolate spoken by the Seri people in two villages on the coast of Sonora, Mexico. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Tagalog (pronunciation: ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ... The Filipino alphabet (officially Makabagong alpabetong Filipino; English: Modern Filipino alphabet) is made up of 28 letters, which includes the entire 21-letter set of the Abakada (including ng) and 8 letters from the Spanish alphabet (namely C, F, J, Ñ, Q, V, X and Z). ... Tahitian, a Tahitic language, is one of the two official languages of French Polynesia (along with French). ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... The Vietnamese alphabet has the following 29 letters, in collating order: Vietnamese also uses the 10 digraphs and 1 trigraph below. ... It has been suggested that Vietnamese Tones be merged into this article or section. ... The Vyronian language (võro kiil) is a language belonging to the Baltic-Finnic branch of the Finno-Ugric languages. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... Welayta language (vars: Wolaita, Wolaita, etc. ...

See also

  Consonants (List, table) See also: IPA, Vowels  
Pulmonics Bilabial Lab'den. Dental Alveolar Postalv. Retroflex Palatal Velar Uvular Pharyn. Epiglottal Glottal Non-pulmonics and other symbols
Nasals m ɱ n ɳ ɲ ŋ ɴ Clicks  ʘ ǀ ǃ ǂ ǁ
Plosives p b t d ʈ ɖ c ɟ k ɡ q ɢ ʡ ʔ Implo­­sives  ɓ ɗ ʄ ɠ ʛ
Fricatives  ɸ β f v θ ð s z ʃ ʒ ʂ ʐ ç ʝ x ɣ χ ʁ ħ ʕ ʜ ʢ h ɦ Ejec­­tives 
Approximants  β̞ ʋ ð̞ ɹ ɻ j ɰ Other laterals  ɺ ɫ
Trills ʙ r ʀ Co-articulated approximants ʍ w ɥ
Flaps & Taps ѵ ɾ ɽ Co-articulated fricatives ɕ ʑ ɧ
Lat. Fricatives ɬ ɮ Affricates  ʦ ʣ ʧ ʤ
Lat. Appr'mants l ɭ ʎ ʟ Co-articulated stops  k͡p ɡ͡b ŋ͡m
This page contains phonetic information in IPA, which may not display correctly in some browsers. [Help]
Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a voiced consonant. Shaded areas denote pulmonic articulations judged impossible.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Glottal stop - definition of Glottal stop in Encyclopedia (406 words)
The glottal stop is the sound made when the vocal cords are pressed together, and is the sound in the middle of the interjection uh-oh.
In German and Dutch, glottal stop is not phonemic, but it is inserted in multi-morphemic words before morphemes that begin with a vowel, such as German Beamter ("civil servant") or Dutch beamen ("to endorse"), where the glottal stop is inserted after the prefix "be-".
Its manner of articulation is plosive or stop, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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