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Encyclopedia > Gloster Meteor
Gloster Meteor
RDAF Gloster Meteor
Type Fighter
Manufacturer Gloster Aircraft Company
Armstrong-Whitworth
Designed by George Carter
Maiden flight 5 March 1943
Introduced 27 July 1944
Primary users Royal Air Force
Royal Australian Air Force
Belgian Air Force
Israeli Air Force
Number built ~3,900

The Gloster Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the Allies' first operational jet. Designed by George Carter, it first flew in 1943 and commenced operations on 27 July 1944 with 616 Squadron of the Royal Air Force (RAF). The Gloster Meteor was not an aerodynamically advanced aircraft, nor even the world's fastest aircraft on introduction, but George Carter and his design team at Gloster had succeeded in producing an effective jet fighter that served the RAF and other air forces for decades. Meteors saw action with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in the Korean War and remained in service with numerous air forces until the 1970s. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 796 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (800 × 603 pixels, file size: 104 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... An aerospace manufacturer is a company or individual involved in the various aspects of designing, building, testing, selling, and maintaining aircraft, aircraft parts, missiles, rockets, and/or spacecraft. ... The Gloster Aircraft Company was formed at Hucclecote ( Gloucester ) in 1915 as the Gloucestershire Aircraft Company. ... The Maiden flight of an aircraft is the first occasion on which an aircraft leaves the ground of its own accord. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... The Air Component, formerly the Belgian Air Force, is the air arm of the Belgian Armed Forces. ... The Israeli Air Force (IAF; Hebrew: זרוע האויר והחלל, Zroa HaAvir VeHaḤalal, Air and Space Division, commonly known as חיל האוויר Hel HaAvir) is the air force of the Israel Defense Forces. ... Jet aircraft are aircrafts with jet engines. ... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Allies. ... Jet aircraft are aircrafts with jet engines. ... Wilfred George Carter was the chief designer at Glosters from 1937, was awarded the C.B.E. in 1947 and was appointed Technical Director of Gloster Aircraft in 1948 remaining on the board of directors until 1954. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... The Gloster Aircraft Company was formed at Brockworth ( Gloucester ) in 1915 as the Gloucestershire Aircraft Company. ... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders...

Contents

Design and development

Gloster Meteor F 3
Gloster Meteor F 3

Following the invention of the turbojet by Sir Frank Whittle in 1929, development of a turbojet-powered fighter by Whittle's firm, Power Jets Ltd., and the Gloster Aircraft Company began in November 1940. The first British jet powered aircraft, the single-engined Gloster E28/39 prototype, had its maiden flight on 15 May 1941. The Air Ministry subsequently contracted for the development of a twin-engined jet fighter under Specification F9/40. Originally the aircraft was to have been named Thunderbolt, but to avoid confusion with the American Republic P-47 Thunderbolt the name was changed to Meteor. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 168 KB) Description: Gloster Meteor Mk III Expired Crown Copyright Image by Royal Air Force via the website/www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 168 KB) Description: Gloster Meteor Mk III Expired Crown Copyright Image by Royal Air Force via the website/www. ... Turbojets are the simplest and oldest kind of general purpose jet engines. ... Frank Whittle speaking to employees of the Flight Propulsion Research Laboratory (Now known as the NASA Glenn Research Center), USA, in 1946 Air Commodore Sir Frank Whittle, OM, KBE, FRS, Hon FRAeS (1 June 1907–9 August 1996) was an English Royal Air Force officer and is seen as the... Frank Whittle speaking to employees of the Flight Propulsion Research Laboratory (Now known as the NASA Glenn Research Center), USA, in 1946 Air Commodore Sir Frank Whittle, OM, KBE, FRS, Hon FRAeS (1 June 1907–9 August 1996) was an English Royal Air Force officer and is seen as the... The Gloster Aircraft Company was formed at Hucclecote ( Gloucester ) in 1915 as the Gloucestershire Aircraft Company. ... The Gloster E.28/39, (also referred to as the Gloster Whittle, Gloster Pioneer, or Gloster G.40) was the first jet engined aircraft to fly in the United Kingdom. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The Air Ministry was formerly a department of the United Kingdom Government, established in 1918 with the responsibility of managing the affairs of the (then newly formed) Royal Air Force. ... This is a partial list of the British Air Ministry specifications for aircraft. ... The American Republic P-47 Thunderbolt, also known as Jug, was the largest single-engined fighter of its day. ...


Designed by George Carter, its construction was all-metal with a tricycle undercarriage and conventional low, straight wings, featuring turbojets mid-mounted in the wings with a high-mounted tailplane to keep it clear of the jet exhaust. Eight prototypes were produced. The fifth, DG206, powered by two de Havilland Halford H.1 engines due to problems with the intended Whittle W.2 engines, was the first to become airborne on 5 March 1943 from RAF Cranwell, piloted by Michael Daunt[1] Development then moved to Newmarket Heath and, later, a Gloster-owned site at Moreton Valence. The first Whittle-engined aircraft, DG205/G, flew on 17 June 1943 (it crashed shortly after take-off on 27 April 1944) and was followed by DG202/G in July. DG202/G was later used for deck-handling tests aboard HMS Pretoria Castle. DG203/G made its first flight on 9 November 1943 but was soon relegated to a ground instructional role. DG204/G (powered by Metrovick F.2 engines) first flew on 13 November 1943 and crashed on 1 April 1944. DG208/G made its debut on 20 January 1944, by which time the majority of design problems had been identified and a production design approved. Tailplane or horizontal stabilizer of a Boeing 737 A tailplane, also known as horizontal stabilizer, is a small lifting surface located behind the main lifting surfaces of a fixed-wing aircraft as well as other non-fixed wing aircraft such as helicopters and gyroplanes. ... A serial number is a unique number that is one of a series assigned for identification which varies from its successor or predecessor by a fixed discrete integer value. ... Cutaway Goblin II A cutaway diagram of the internal workings of the de Havilland Goblin, as fitted to the Vampire. ... Frank Whittle speaking to employees of the Flight Propulsion Research Laboratory (Now known as the NASA Glenn Research Center), USA, in 1946 Air Commodore Sir Frank Whittle, OM, KBE, FRS, Hon FRAeS (1 June 1907–9 August 1996) was a Royal Air Force officer and was one of the inventors... This article is about the day. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... RAF Cranwell is a Royal Air Force station in Lincolnshire close to the village of Cranwell, near Sleaford. ... RAF Newmarket was an RAF station near Newmarket, Suffolk, England, near the border with Cambridgeshire. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... HMS Pretoria Castle was an armed merchant cruiser and escort aircraft carrier of the Royal Navy that saw service during World War II. She had previously been the ocean liner Pretoria Castle of the Union-Castle Line; built at Harland & Wolff shipyards in Belfast, Northern Ireland and launched in 1938. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Metrovick F.2 was one of the earliest jet engines, and the first British design to be based on an axial compressor. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The two remaining prototypes never flew. DG209/G was used as an engine test-bed by Rolls-Royce. DG207/G was intended to be the basis for the Meteor F2 with de Havilland engines, when the engines were diverted to the de Havilland Vampire the idea was quietly forgotten. Rolls-Royce Limited was a British car and aero-engine manufacturing company founded by Henry Royce and C.S. Rolls on 15 March 1906 and was the result of a partnership formed in 1904. ... For other uses, see De Havilland (disambiguation). ... The de Havilland DH.100 Vampire was the second jet-engined aircraft commissioned by the Royal Air Force during the Second World War (the first being the Gloster Meteor), although it did not see combat in that conflict. ...


On 12 January 1944, the first Meteor F1, serial EE210/G, took to the air from Moreton Valence. It was essentially identical to the F9/40 prototypes except for the addition of four nose-mounted 20 mm Hispano cannon and some tweaks to the canopy to improve all-round visibility. For the production Meteor F1, the engine was switched to the Whittle W.2 design, by then taken over by Rolls-Royce. The contemporary W.2B/23C turbojet engines produced 7.56 kN of thrust each, giving the aircraft a maximum speed of 417 mph (670 km/h) at 3,000 m and a range of 1,610 km. The Meteor Mk I was 12.5 m long with a span of 13.1 m, with an empty weight of 3,690 kg and a maximum takeoff weight of 6,260 kg. is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hispano-Suiza HS.404 20 mm autocannon was one of the most widely used aircraft weapons of the 20th century, used by British, American, French, and many other military services. ... Rolls-Royce Limited was a British car and aero-engine manufacturing company founded by Henry Royce and C.S. Rolls on 15 March 1906 and was the result of a partnership formed in 1904. ... The Welland was Englands first production jet engine. ...


Typical of early jet aircraft, the Meteor suffered from stability problems at high transonic speeds, experiencing large trim changes, high stick forces and self-sustained yaw instability (snaking) due to airflow separation over the thick tail surfaces [2]. Transonic is an aeronautics term referring to a range of velocities just below and above the speed of sound. ...


Operational service

Gloster Meteor F8
Gloster Meteor F8

The first 20 aircraft were delivered to the Royal Air Force on 1 June 1944 with one example also sent to the US in exchange for a Bell YP-59A Airacomet for comparative evaluation. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2580x1932, 506 KB) Description: Gloster Meteor F. MK. 8 Source: Stahlkocher File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Gloster Meteor ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2580x1932, 506 KB) Description: Gloster Meteor F. MK. 8 Source: Stahlkocher File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Gloster Meteor ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bell P-59A was a fighter aircraft built in the United States during World War II. The prototype XP-59A became the first jet-powered aircraft to fly in the US on 1 October 1942. ...


No. 616 Squadron RAF was the first to receive operational Meteors, 14 of them. The squadron was based at RAF Culmhead, Somerset and was previously equipped with the Spitfire VII. After a short conversion course at Farnborough for the six leading pilots, the first aircraft were delivered in July [1]. The squadron was soon moved to RAF Manston on the east Kent coast and, within a week, 30 pilots were deemed successfully converted. This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... There are several places named Farnborough: United Kingdom Farnborough in the London Borough of Bromley (prior to 1965 in Kent) Farnborough in Warwickshire Farnborough in Berkshire Farnborough in Hampshire Farnborough Airfield formerly the Royal Aircraft Establishment This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the... RAF Manston was a Royal Air Force station, now known as Kent International Airport. ...


The RAF initially reserved the aircraft to counter the V-1 flying bomb threat with No.616's Meteors seeing action for the first time on 27 July 1944 with three aircraft active over Kent. After some initial problems, especially with jamming guns, the first two V1 "kills" occurred on 4 August. In total, the Meteor accounted for 14 flying bombs. The anti-V1 missions of 27 July 1944 were the Meteor's (and the Royal Air Force's) first operational jet combat missions. The V-1 (German: Vergeltungswaffe 1) was the first guided missile used in war and the forerunner of todays cruise missile. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After the end of the V-1 threat, and the introduction of the supersonic V-2, the Meteor F1 was not deployed further in combat with the Luftwaffe. The RAF was at this time forbidden to fly Meteor missions over German-held territory for obvious intelligence security reasons. No. 616 Squadron briefly moved to RAF Debden to allow USAAF bomber crews to gain experience in facing jet-engine foes before moving to Colerne, Wiltshire. For other uses, see V2. ... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, literally Air Weapon, pronounced lufft-va-fa, IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ... RAF Debden (also known as Station 356 during WWII) is located approximately 1 mile north of the village of Debden, in Essex, England. ... USAAF recruitment poster. ...


No. 616 Squadron exchanged its F1s for the first Meteor F3s on 18 December 1944. This was a substantial improvement over the earlier mark, although the basic design still had still not reached its full potential. Wind tunnel and flight tests demonstrated that the original short nacelles, that extended just before and behind the wing, contributed heavily to compressibility buffeting at high speed. New, longer nacelles not only cured some of the compressibility problems but added 120 km/h (75 mph) at altitude, even without upgraded powerplants. The last batch of Meteor F3s featured the longer nacelles while other F3s were retrofitted in the field with the new nacelles. The F3 also had the new Rolls-Royce Derwent engines, increased fuel capacity, and a new larger, more strongly raked bubble canopy. is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rolls-Royce Derwent The Rolls-Royce Derwent is a 1940s British centrifugal compressor turbojet engine. ... Closeup of the front view of an F-16 Fighting Falcon showing the bubble canopy A bubble canopy is a canopy made like a soap bubble, which attempts to provide 360° vision to the pilot. ...


On 20 January 1945, four Meteors were moved to Melsbrook in Belgium. In March, the entire squadron was moved to Gilze-Rijen and, then in April, to Nijmegen. The Meteors flew armed reconnaissance and ground attack operations without encountering any German jet fighters. By late April, the squadron was based at Faßberg, Germany and suffered its first losses when two pilots collided in poor visibility. The war ended with the Meteors having destroyed 46 German aircraft through ground attack and having faced more problems through misidentification as the Me 262 by Allied aircraft and flak than from the Luftwaffe. is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Gilze en Rijen is a municipality in the southern Netherlands. ... Country Netherlands Province Gelderland Area (2006)  - Municipality 57. ... Faßberg is a village and a municipality in the district of Celle, in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... ... FLAK was a punk rock side project of members of the band Machinae Supremacy in 2001. ...


The next major change was the Meteor F4 that went into production in 1947, by which time there were 16 RAF squadrons equipped with Meteors. The first F4 prototype flew on 17 May 1945. The F4 had the Rolls-Royce Derwent 5 engines (a smaller version of the famous Nene), the wings were 86.4 cm shorter than the F3 and had blunter tips (derived from the world speed record prototypes), a stronger airframe, fully pressurized cockpit, lighter ailerons (to improve maneuverability) and rudder trim adjustments to reduce snaking. The F4 could also be fitted with a drop tank under each wing while experiments were performed with carriage of underwing stores and also in lengthened fuselage models. The F4 was 170 mph faster than the F1 at sea level (585 against 415), although the reduced wings impaired the rate of climb compared with the F3. is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Because of the increased demand, the production of the F4 was divided between Gloster and the Armstrong Whitworth factory at Bagington. The majority of early F4s did not go directly to the RAF, 100 were exported to Argentina (and saw action in the 1955 revolution, one being shot down on 16 September 1955 near Rio Santiago) while in 1947, only RAF Nos. 74 and 222 Squadrons were fully equipped with the F4. Nine further RAF squadrons were upgraded over 1948. From 1948, 38 F 4s were exported to the Dutch, equipping four squadrons (322, 323, 326 and 327) split between bases in Soesterberg and Leeuwarden until the mid-1950s. In 1949, only two RAF squadrons were converted to the F4, Belgium was sold 48 aircraft in the same year (going to 349 and 350 Squadrons at Beauvechain) and Denmark received 20 over 1949-50. In 1950, three more RAF squadrons were upgraded, including No. 616 and, in 1951, six more. In 1950, a single order of 20 F 4s was delivered to Egypt. Sir W G Armstrong Whitworth & Co Ltd was a major British manufacturing company of the early years of the 20th century. ... The Revolución Libertadora (Spanish, Liberating Revolution) was a military uprising that ended the second presidential term of Juan Domingo Perón in Argentina, in 1955. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...


A modified two-seater F4 for jet-conversion and advanced training was tested in 1949 as the T7. It was accepted by the RAF and the Fleet Air Arm and became a common addition to the various export packages (for example 43 to Belgium 1948-57, a similar number to the Netherlands over the same period, two to Syria in 1952, six to Israel in 1953, etc.). Despite its limitations - unpressurized cockpit, no armament, limited instructor instrumentation - over 650 T7s were manufactured. The Fleet Air Arm is the branch of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ...


As improved jet fighters began to emerge, Gloster decided to perform a significant redesign of the F4 to keep it up to date, while retaining as much of the manufacturing tooling of the F4 as possible. The result was the Meteor F8 (G-41K) which was to be the definitive production model, serving as a major Royal Air Force single seat fighter until the introduction of the Hawker Hunter and the Supermarine Swift. “RAF” redirects here. ... The Hawker Hunter was a British jet fighter aircraft of the 1950s and 1960s. ... The Supermarine Swift was a single-seat fighter-jet of the Royal Air Force (RAF), built by Supermarine. ...


The first prototype F8 was a modified F4, followed by a true prototype, VT150, that flew on 12 October 1948 [3]at Moreton Valence. Flight testing of the F8 prototype led to the discovery of an aerodynamic problem. When ammunition was expended, the aircraft became tail-heavy and unstable around the pitch axis due to the weight of fuel retained in fuselage tanks no longer being balanced by the ammunition. Gloster designers cleverly solved the problem by substituting the tail of the abortive "G 42" single-engine jet fighter. The F8 and other production variants were to successfully use the new tail design; the new tail gave the later Meteors a distinctive appearance, with taller straighter edges compared to the rounded tail of the F4s and earlier marks. is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The F8 also featured a fuselage stretch of 76 centimetres (30 inches), intended to shift the aircraft's centre of gravity and also eliminate the use of ballast that had been necessary in earlier marks. The F8 incorporated uprated engines, Derwent 8s, with 16 kN (1,633 kgp / 3,600 lbf) thrust each combined with structural strengthening, a Martin Baker ejection seat and a "blown" teardrop cockpit canopy that provided improved pilot visibility. Between 1950 and 1955, the Meteor F8 was the mainstay of RAF Fighter Command, and served with distinction in combat in Korea with the RAAF as well as operating with many air forces worldwide, although it was clear that the original design was obsolescent compared to contemporary swept-wing fighters such as the North American F-86 Sabre and the Soviet's MiG-15. In physics, the center of gravity (CoG) of an object is the average location of its weight. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... US Air Force F-15 Eagle ejection seat test using a mannequin. ... Fighter Command was one of three functional commands that dominated the public perception of the RAF for much of the mid-20th century. ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... The North American F-86 Sabre (sometimes called the Sabrejet) was a transonic combat aircraft developed for the US Air Force. ... The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 (NATO reporting name Fagot) was a jet fighter developed for the USSR. History Design began under the bureau designation I-310, which first flew in 1947. ...


Initial deliveries of the F8 to the RAF were in August 1949, with the first squadron receiving its fighters in late 1950. Like the F4, there were strong export sales of the F8. Belgium ordered 240 aircraft, the majority assembled in Belgium, the Netherlands had 160 F8s, equipping seven squadrons until 1955. Denmark had 20, ordered in 1951; they were to be the last F8s in front line service in Europe. The RAAF ordered 94 F8s, which served in Korea - see below. Despite arms embargoes, both Syria and Egypt received F8s from 1952, as did Israel (where they served until 1961). On 1 September 1954, two Israeli F8s shot down two Egyptian Vampires and in the 1956 Suez Crisis, F8s were employed by both Egypt and Israel in ground-attack roles. After the crisis, both Egypt and Syria disposed of their Meteors in favour of various MiG variants. In a later order, Brazil received around 60 ex-RAF F8s in 1963. is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The de Havilland DH.100 Vampire was the second jet-engined aircraft commissioned by the Royal Air Force during the Second World War (the first being the Gloster Meteor), although it did not see combat in that conflict. ... Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1...


In the 1950s, Meteors also were developed into effective photo-reconnaissance, training and night fighter versions. The fighter-reconnaissance (FR) versions were the first to be built, replacing the ageing Spitfires and Mosquitos then in use. Two FR5s were built on the F4 body, one was used for nose section camera tests, the other broke-up in mid-air while in testing over Moreton Valence. On 23 March 1950, the first FR9 flew. Based on the F8, it was 20 cm longer with a new nose incorporating a remote-control camera and window and was also fitted with additional external ventral and wing fuel tanks. Production of the FR9 began in July. No. 208 Squadron, then based at Fayid, Egypt was the first to be upgraded followed by the 2nd Tactical Air Force in West Germany, No. 2 Squadron RAF at Buckeburg and No. 79 Squadron RAF at RAF Gutersloh flew the FR 9 from 1951 until 1956. In Aden, No. 8 Squadron RAF was given the FR9 in November 1951 and used them until 1961. Ecuador (12), Israel (7) and Syria (2) were the only foreign customers for the FR9. Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ... A night fighter is a fighter aircraft adapted for use at night, or in other times of bad visibility. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... No. ... RAF Gütersloh was a Royal Air Force Germany air base, the nearest RAF air base to the East/West German border. ... No. ...


In addition to the armed, low-altitude operation, tactical FR9 variant, Gloster also developed the PR10 for high-altitude missions. The first prototype flew on 29 March 1950 and was actually converted into the first production aircraft. Based on the F4, it had the F4-style tail and the longer wings of the earlier variant. All the cannons were removed and a single camera placed in the nose with two more in the rear fuselage; the canopy was also changed. The PR10 was delivered to the RAF in December 1950 and were given to No.2 and No. 541 Squadrons in Germany and No. 13 Squadron RAF in Cyprus. The PR10 was rapidly phased out from 1956 with improving surface to air missile technology and newer, faster aircraft rendered it dangerously obsolete. is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... No. ... A surface-to-air missile (SAM) is a missile designed to be launched from the ground to destroy aircraft. ...


As a night-fighter, the Meteor again replaced the Mosquito, however, it was never more than an interim measure as development of specialised aircraft lagged. Gloster used the T7 as the base for the NF11 with the first prototype flying on 31 May 1950. The production models were built by Armstrong Whitworth and had a real mix of parts - the fuselage and tail of the F8, the longer wings of the F3, the double canopy of the T7 and a new extended nose to contain the air intercept radar. The 20 mm cannons were moved into the wings, outboard of the engines. Nos. 29, 141 and 85 Squadrons were given the NF11 in 1951 and the aircraft was rolled out across the RAF until the final deliveries in 1955. A "tropicalized" version of the NF 11 for Middle East service was developed; first flying on 23 December 1952 as the NF13. The aircraft equipped No. 219 Squadron RAF at Kabrit and No. 39 Squadron at Fayid, both in Egypt. The aircraft served during the Suez crisis and remained with No. 39 Squadron when they were withdrawn to Malta until 1958. The aircraft had a number of problems, notably the limited visibility through the T7 canopy made landings tricky and the external fuel tanks under the wings tended to break-up when the wing cannon were fired. Belgium (24), Denmark (20), Australia (one) and France (41) were the foreign customers for the NF11. Ex-RAF NF13s were sold to Syria (six), Egypt (six) and Israel (six). Some of the French aircraft remained in operation as test beds into the 1980s. is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RAF Kabrit was a Royal Air Force station in the Suez Canal Zone, Egypt. ...


As radar technology developed, a new Meteor night-fighter was developed to use the APS-21 system. The NF 12 first flew on 21 April 1953. It was similar to the NF11 but had a nose section 43.2 cm longer, this altered the centre of gravity and the tail-fin was enlarged to compensate. The NF12 also had the new Rolls-Royce Derwent 9 engines and the wings were reinforced to handle the new engine. The RAF operated the NF12 from August 1953 with seven squadrons equipped up to 1956 (No.s 85, 25, 152, 46, 72, 153 and 65); the aircraft was replaced over 1958-59. Because of the "sensitive" nature of the radar system, no NF 12s were offered for export. is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The final Meteor night-fighter was the NF14. First flown on 23 October 1953, the NF14 was based on the NF12 but had an even longer nose to accommodate new equipment pushing total length to 15.5 metres and a larger bubble canopy to replace the framed T7 version. Just 100 NF14s were built; they first entered service in February 1954 beginning with No. 25 Squadron and were being replaced as early as 1956 with the Gloster Javelin. Overseas, they remained in service a little longer, serving with No. 60 Squadron at Tengah, Singapore until 1961. As the NF14 was replaced, some 14 were converted to training aircraft as the NF(T)14 and given to No. 2 Air Navigation School on Thorney Island where they served until 1965. is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gloster Javelin was an interceptor aircraft that served with Britains Royal Air Force in the late 1950s and most of the 1960s. ... Tengah is Indonesian for Central. It can be found in topography, e. ...


Production of the Meteor continued until 1954 with almost 3,900 made, mainly the F8 variant. As the Meteor was progressively relegated to secondary duties in later years, target tug, drone and specialized test vehicles were added to the increasingly diverse roles that this first-generation jet fighter took on.


Service during the Korean War

No. 77 Squadron RAAF pilots and Meteor aircraft in Korea
No. 77 Squadron RAAF pilots and Meteor aircraft in Korea

The Royal Australian Air Force acquired 113 Meteors between 1946 and 1952, 94 of which were the F8 variant.[4] F8 Meteors saw extensive service during the Korean War with No. 77 Squadron RAAF, which was part of British Commonwealth Forces Korea, and had personnel from other Commonwealth air forces attached to it. The squadron arrived in Korea equipped with P-51D Mustangs. It did jet conversion training at Iwakuni, Japan, and returned to Korea in April 1951 with about 30 Meteor F8s and T7s. The squadron moved to Kimpo in June, and was declared combat-ready the following month. There was some apprehension, as the F8 was clearly inferior in most respects to the communist forces' MiG-15, and was superior to the F-86 Sabre only in rate-of-climb and acceleration. Image File history File linksMetadata 77_Sqn_(AWM_JK1025). ... Image File history File linksMetadata 77_Sqn_(AWM_JK1025). ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... No. ... British Commonwealth Forces Korea (BCFK) was the formal name, from 1952, of the Commonwealth army, naval and air units serving with the United Nations in the Korean War. ... The North American P-51 Mustang was a successful long range fighter aircraft which set new standards of excellence and performance when it entered service in the middle years of World War II and is still regarded as one of the very best piston-engined fighters ever made. ... Gimpo An alias for Alan Goodrick. ... The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 (NATO reporting name Fagot) was a jet fighter developed for the USSR. History Design began under the bureau designation I-310, which first flew in 1947. ... The North American F-86 Sabre (sometimes called the Sabrejet) was a transonic combat aircraft developed for the US Air Force. ...


No. 77 squadron first flew Meteors in a combat mission on 30 July 1951. The squadron had mainly been trained in the ground attack role, and had difficulties when assigned to bomber escort duty at sub-optimum altitudes. On 29 August 1951, eight Meteors were on escort duty in "MiG Alley" when they were engaged by six MiG-15s; one Meteor was lost and two damaged, and 77 Squadron did not officially destroy any enemy aircraft on this occasion [5] On 27 October, the squadron achieved its first probable followed by two probables six days later.[6] On 1 December, during a clash between 12 Meteors and some 40 MiG-15s, the squadron had its first two confirmed victories: F/O Bruce Gogerly made the first kill. However, this occurred at the cost of four Meteors destroyed. As a result, bomber escort was taken over by the USAF and 77 Squadron returned to ground-attack duties. The Meteor performed well but proved vulnerable to ground fire, as the rocket sights required a long level run to operate effectively. No. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Close air support (often abbreviated CAS) is the use of military aircraft in a ground attack role against targets in close proximity to friendly troops, in support of ground combat operations. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map showing the general location of MiG Alley. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


By the end of the conflict, the squadron had flown 4,836 missions, destroying six MiG-15s, over 3,500 structures and some 1,500 vehicles. About 30 Meteors were lost to enemy action in Korea — the vast majority of these were shot down by anti-aircraft fire while serving in a ground-attack capacity.[4]


Record setting

Late in 1945, two F Mk3 Meteors were modified for an attempt on the world air speed record. On 7 November 1945 at Herne Bay in Kent, UK, Group Captain H.J. (Willy) Wilson set the first air speed record by a jet aircraft of 606 mph (975 km/h) TAS. A small plaque commemorating this achievement can be found in Macari's Cafe, Herne Bay. Determining the fastest aircraft in the world is difficult, because of the wide variety of designs. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... , Herne Bay is a seaside town in Kent, South East England, with a population of 35,188. ... True airspeed (TAS) is the speed of an aircraft relative to the airmass in which it flies, i. ...


In 1946, Group Captain Teddy Donaldson broke this record with a speed of 616 mph (991 km/h) TAS, in EE549, a Meteor F4. Test pilot Roland Beamont had previously taken the same aircraft to its compressibility limit at 632 mph, but not under official record conditions, and outside its official safety limits. A Group Captains sleeve/shoulder insignia Group Captain (Gp Capt in the RAF, GPCAPT in the RNZAF and RAAF, G/C in the former RCAF) is a senior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... True airspeed (TAS) is the speed of an aircraft relative to the airmass in which it flies, i. ... Roland Beamont DSO OBE DFC, was a British fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. ...


In 1947, S/L Janusz Żurakowski was employed as an experimental pilot by Gloster Aircraft Company. In the following years, he became one of the world's most famous experimental and aerobatics pilots (he developed a new aerobatics maneuver, the "Żurabatic Cartwheel" which held the audience captivated as he suspended the Gloster Meteor G-7-1 prototype he was flying, in a vertical cartwheel at the 1951 Farnborough Air Show). Announcers shouted out, "Impossible!" Serving for a brief period as the chief test pilot, he tested the many experimental versions of the Gloster Meteor, Javelin and Gloster E.1/44 fighters. During the Gloster years, "Żura" as he came to be known, set an international speed record: London-Copenhagen-London, 4-5 April 1950 in a production standard F8 (VZ468). The Danes were suitably impressed and purchased the type soon after. [7] Janusz Å»urakowski, born September 12, 1914 in Ryzawka, Poland - died on February 9, 2004 in Barrys Bay, Ontario, Canada, was a renowned Polish fighter and experimental aircraft pilot. ... Farnborough 2006 Farnborough 2006 The Red Arrows in formation at Farnborough The Airbus A380, at Farnborough The Farnborough International Airshow is a seven-day international trade fair for the aerospace business which is held biannually in England. ... The Gloster E.1/44 was a single engined jet fighter design of the Second World War which came about because of low availability of jet engines but was not completed in prototype form until after the war and never entered production. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Variants

The sole Trent Meteor
The sole Trent Meteor

In 1945 a single Meteor I, EE227, (right) was fitted with two Rolls-Royce Trent turboprop engines as a flying testbed, making it the world's first turboprop-powered aircraft. Image File history File linksMetadata Gloster_Trent-Meteor_EE227. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Gloster_Trent-Meteor_EE227. ... The first Trent - a Rolls-Royce RB.50 Trent on a test rig at Hucknall, in March 1945 The Rolls-Royce Trent or RB.50 (for Rolls-Barnoldswick, after the Barnoldswick manufacturing plant) was the worlds first turboprop engine. ... A schematic diagram showing the operation of a turboprop engine. ...

Meteor F1
First production aircraft built between 1943 and 1944.
Meteor F2
Alternate engined version - only one built.
Meteor F3
Derwent I powered with sliding canopy.
Meteor F4
Derwent 5 powered with strengthened fuselage.
Meteor FR5
One-off fighter reconnaissance version of the F4.
Meteor T7
Two-seat trainer.
Meteor F8
Greatly improved from the F4. Longer fuselage, greater fuel capacity, standard ejection seat and modified tail (derived from the E.1/44). This variant was a prolific frontline fighter in RAF squadron service, 1950-54. One experimental Gloster Meteor F8 "Prone Pilot" conversion was modified by Armstrong Whitworth.
Meteor FR9
Fighter reconnaissance version of the F8.
Meteor PR10
Photo reconnaissance version of the F8.
Meteor NF11
Night Fighter variant with Airborne Intercept radar.
Meteor NF12
Longer nosed version of the NF11 with American radar.
Meteor NF13
Tropicalised version of the NF11 for overseas service.
Meteor NF14
NF.11 with new two-piece canopy.
Meteor U15
Drone conversion of the F4.
Meteor U16
Drone conversion of the F8.
Meteor TT20
High speed target towing conversion of the NF11.
Meteor U21
Drone conversion of the F8.

The Gloster E.1/44 was a single engined jet fighter design of the Second World War which came about because of low availability of jet engines but was not completed in prototype form until after the war and never entered production. ... A much modified Gloster Meteor F8 fighter, the prone position/prone pilot Meteor, was used to evaluate the advantages of coping with the effects of G forces while flying in a prone or lying down position. ...

Operators

Civilian operated Gloster Meteor NF.11 (Registered G-LOSM) painted as Royal Air Force Serial WM167 at Kemble, England, 2003
Civilian operated Gloster Meteor NF.11 (Registered G-LOSM) painted as Royal Air Force Serial WM167 at Kemble, England, 2003
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Privately-owned Gloster Meteor NF11 Night Fighter (WM167) at the Classic-Jet Air Show, Kemble, England, in June 2003. ... Privately-owned Gloster Meteor NF11 Night Fighter (WM167) at the Classic-Jet Air Show, Kemble, England, in June 2003. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... The Argentine Air Force (Fuerza Aérea Argentina or FAA) is the national aviation branch of the armed forces of Argentina. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... The Air Component, formerly the Belgian Air Force, is the air arm of the Belgian Armed Forces. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... The Brazilian Air Force (Portuguese: Força Aérea Brasileira, FAB) is the aerial warfare branch of the Brazilian armed forces and one of the three national uniformed services. ... Image File history File links Canadian_Red_Ensign_1921. ... “RCAF” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Danish Air Forces F-16 MLU at Radom Air Show 2005 History The Danish armed forces received 38 Supermarine Spitfire H. F. Mk. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ecuador. ... The Ecuadorian Air Force (Spanish: , FAE) is the Air arm of the Military of Ecuador which includes many fighter aircraft and is one of the most powerful air forces in South America with the Brazilian Air Force, Chilean Air Force, Peruvian Air Force and the Venezuela Air Force. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt_1922. ... The Egyptian Air Force, or EAF (Arabic: , ), is the aviation branch of the Egyptian armed forces. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The French Air Force is the air force branch of the French Armed Forces. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... The Israeli Air Force (IAF; Hebrew: זרוע האויר והחלל, Zroa HaAvir VeHaḤalal, Air and Space Division, commonly known as חיל האוויר Hel HaAvir) is the air force of the Israel Defense Forces. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Logo of the Royal Netherlands Air Force Roundel of the Royal Netherlands Air Force. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) is the air force arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Ranks Norwegian military ranks The Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) (Norwegian: Luftforsvaret) is the air force of Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa_1928-1994. ... The South African Air Force roundel The South African Air Force (SAAF) (Afrikaans: Suid-Afrikaanse Lugmag) is the air force of South Africa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Coat of arms of the Swedish Air Force. ... Image File history File links Syria-flag_1932-58_1961-63. ... The Syrian Air Force (Arabic: , Al Quwwat al-Jawwiya al Arabiya as-Souriya) is the Aviation branch of the Syrian armed forces. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... Image File history File links US_flag_48_stars. ... The United States Army Air Forces, or USAAF, was a part of the U.S. military during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ...

Survivors

Although many Gloster Meteors survive in museums and collections, only five remain airworthy, four in the United Kingdom and an F8 fighter (VH-MBX, Military S/N: VZ467) which was exported to Australia in 2001. The Temora Aviation Museum flies VH-MBX, currently in the colours of RAAF 77 Squadron as flown by Sgt. George Hale in Korea. A sixth airframe WA591 is under restoration to airworthiness by the UK based Meteor Flight at Yatesbury. No. ...


Two remain in service with Martin-Baker at Chalgrove Airfield as flying testbeds for the development of ejection seats. The company ran its first airborne ejection test using a F3 on 14 June 1946 and received three T7s in 1952 of which it retains WA638 and WL419. Martin-Baker Aircraft is a manufacturer of aircraft seats and is the oldest existing maker of ejector seats. ... Chalgrove Airfield (IATA: N/A, ICAO: EGLJ) is located 8 nautical miles (14. ... US Air Force F-15 Eagle ejection seat test using a mannequin. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Meteor F.4 EE531, Midland Air Museum, Coventry. Second oldest Meteor in existence The Sir Frank Whittle Jet Heritage Centre at the MAM The Midland Air Museum (MAM) is situated outside Coventry in Warwickshire, England. ...


Meteor F.8 VZ477, Midland Air Museum, Coventry. Cockpit section open for viewing The Sir Frank Whittle Jet Heritage Centre at the MAM The Midland Air Museum (MAM) is situated outside Coventry in Warwickshire, England. ...


Meteor NF.14 WS838 Midland Air Museum, Coventry. Manufactured under licence by Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft. On loan from RAF museum. The Sir Frank Whittle Jet Heritage Centre at the MAM The Midland Air Museum (MAM) is situated outside Coventry in Warwickshire, England. ...


Specifications (Meteor F8)

Data from The Great Book of Fighters[8] and Quest for Performance[2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 44 ft 7 in (13.59 m)
  • Wingspan: 37 ft 2 in (11.32 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 0 in (3.96 m)
  • Wing area: 350 ft² (32.52 m²)
  • Empty weight: 10,684 lb (4,846 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 15,700 lb (7,121 kg)
  • Powerplant:Rolls-Royce Derwent 8 turbojets, 3,500 lbf (15.6 kN) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: Mach 0.82, 600 mph at 10,000 ft (965 km/h at 3,050 m)
  • Range: 600 mi (965 km)
  • Service ceiling: 43,000 ft (13,100 m)
  • Rate of climb: 7,000 ft/min (35.6 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 44.9 lb/ft² (149 kg/m²)
  • Thrust/weight: 0.45
  • Time to altitude: 5.0 min to 30,000 ft (9,145 m)

Armament

  • 4 x 20 mm British Hispano cannons
  • Provision for up to sixteen "60lb" 3 in rockets under outer wings

The distance AB is the wing span of this Aer Lingus Airbus A320. ... Rolls-Royce Derwent The Rolls-Royce Derwent is a 1940s British centrifugal compressor turbojet engine. ... Turbojets are the simplest and oldest kind of general purpose jet engines. ... V speeds are speeds that define certain performance and limiting characteristics of an aircraft. ... The maximal total range is the distance an aircraft can fly between takeoff and landing, as limited by fuel capacity in powered aircraft, or cross-country speed and environmental conditions in unpowered aircraft. ... In aeronautics, the service ceiling is the maximum density altitude where the best rate of climb airspeed will produce a 100 feet per minute climb(twin engine) and 50 feet(single engine) at maximum weight while in a clean configuration with maximum continuous power. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... In aerodynamics, wing loading is the loaded weight of the aircraft divided by the area of the wing. ... Thrust-to-weight ratio (where weight means weight at the Earths surface) is a dimensionless parameter characteristic of rocket and jet engines, and of vehicles propelled by such engines (typically space launch vehicles and jet aircraft). ... The Hispano-Suiza HS.404 20 mm autocannon was one of the most widely used aircraft weapons of the 20th century, used by British, American, French, and many other military services. ... The RP-3 (for Rocket Projectile 3), was a British air to ground rocket used in the Second World War. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Mason, 1992, p. 339.
  2. ^ a b Loftin, L.K. Jr|. Quest for Performance: The Evolution of Modern Aircraft. NASA SP-468. [1] Access date: 24 April 2006.
  3. ^ Mason, 1992, p. 341.
  4. ^ a b ADF Aircraft Serial Numbers: RAAF A77 Gloster Meteor F8
  5. ^ According to anecdotal accounts, W/O Ron Guthrie did destroy a Mig-15 in this engagement. He was shot down during the same dogfight and captured by communist ground forces. It has been reported that, during interrogation, two Soviet pilots, through an interpreter, told Guthrie that he had downed a Mig-15. He survived internment and was released on 3 September 1953.[citation needed]
  6. ^ RAAF Airpower
  7. ^ Zuk 2004, p.145.
  8. ^ Green 2001
  • Ashley, Glenn. Meteor in Action. Carrollton, Texas: Squadron/Signal Publications Inc., 1995. ISBN 0-89747-332-9.
  • Bowyer, Chaz. Gloster Meteor. London: Ian Allen Ltd., 1985. ISBN 0-7110-1477-9.
  • Butler, Tony. Gloster Meteor. Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom: Hall Park Books Ltd., 2001. ISBN 1-85780-230-6.
  • Caruana, Richard J. and Franks, Richard A. The Gloster & AW Meteor. Kingsway, Bedford, United Kingdom: SAM Publications, 2004. ISBN 0-9533465-8-7.
  • Green, W. and Swanborough, G. The Great Book of Fighters. St. Paul, Minnesota: MBI Publishing, 2001. ISBN 0-7603-1194-3.
  • Jones, Barry. Gloster Meteor. Ramsbury, Marlborough, Wiltshire, United Kingdom: The Crowood Press Ltd., 1998. ISBN 1-86126-162-4.
  • Loftin, L.K.,Jr. Quest for Performance: The Evolution of Modern Aircraft. NASA SP-468. Access date: 22 April 2006.
  • Mason, Francis K. The British Fighter Since 1912. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  • Zuk, Bill. Janusz Zurakowski: Legends in the Sky. St. Catharine's, Ontario: Vanwell, 2004. ISBN 1-55125-083-7.

For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Related content

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Gloster Meteor

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Comparable aircraft

Designation sequence

Gauntlet - Gladiator - F.9/37- E.28/39 - Meteor - E.1/44 - Javelin The Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star was the first operational jet fighter used by the United States Army Air Forces and, as the F-80, saw extensive combat in Korea with the United States Air Force. ... The Messerschmitt Me 262 Schwalbe (German: Swallow) was the worlds first operational turbojet fighter aircraft. ... The Arado Ar 234 Blitz (Lightning) was the worlds first operational jet powered bomber, built by the Arado company in the closing stages of World War II. In the field it was used almost entirely in the reconnaissance role, but in its few uses as a bomber it proved... The de Havilland DH.100 Vampire was the second jet-engined aircraft commissioned by the Royal Air Force during the Second World War (the first being the Gloster Meteor), although it did not see combat in that conflict. ... The Nakajima Kikka (Japanese: 中島 橘花, Orange Blossom) was Japans first jet-powered aircraft. ... The Gloster Gauntlet was a single-seat, biplane fighter of the RAF. It was the last RAF fighter to have an open cockpit and the penultimate biplane. ... Gloster Gladiator photographed in England in 2002 The Gloster Gladiator was a biplane fighter, used by the Royal Air Force and the Royal Navy, as well as a number of other air forces, during World War II. The aircraft had a top speed of around 414 km/h. ... This twin-engined fighter was designed under the direction of W G Carter to Specification F.9/37 as a single-seater carry-ing an armament of four 0. ... The Gloster E.28/39, (also referred to as the Gloster Whittle, Gloster Pioneer, or Gloster G.40) was the first jet engined aircraft to fly in the United Kingdom. ... The Gloster E.1/44 was a single engined jet fighter design of the Second World War which came about because of low availability of jet engines but was not completed in prototype form until after the war and never entered production. ... The Gloster Javelin was an interceptor aircraft that served with Britains Royal Air Force in the late 1950s and most of the 1960s. ...

Related lists

See also

  • Gloster E.28/39 - the UK's first jet aircraft
  • Heinkel He 178 - the world's first jet aircraft

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Gloster Meteor (7242 words)
The Meteor I was fitted with four 20 millimeter Hispano Mark III cannon, though six had been specified in the original G.41 requirement, and in fact one of the prototypes had mounted six.
Meteor pilots were keen to test their aircraft against the Messerschmitt Me-262 jet fighter, but at least initially they had orders not to fly beyond enemy lines lest one of their aircraft be shot down and examined.
The RAAF began receiving Meteor F.8s at the end of 1949, most of which were modified to carry a radio compass, with the antenna in a small dome on the aircraft's spine.
Gloster Meteor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (966 words)
The Gloster Meteor was the first jet fighter aircraft of the British Royal Air Force, introduced into service only weeks after the Third Reich's Messerschmitt Me 262, in August 1944 during World War II.
The Meteor was also operated by the airforces of Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, France, Israel, Netherlands, New Zealand, Syria and Sweden.
Although many Gloster Meteors survive in Museums and collections only five remain airworthy, four in the United Kingdom and a F8 fighter which was exported to Australia in 2002.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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