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Encyclopedia > Glorfindel
Character from Tolkien's Legendarium
Name Glorfindel
Titles Lord of the House of the Golden Flower
Race Elves
Culture Noldor
Realm Beleriand, Valinor, Eriador
Book(s) The Silmarillion,
The Fellowship of the Ring

In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Glorfindel is an Elf, a Noldor who appears in the tales of Middle-earth. John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The phrase, Tolkiens legendarium, is commonly used among individuals who study J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Eä as a reference to the many works related to the universe and its legends. ... (In the context of property law, title refers to ownership or documents of ownership; see title (property). ... Here is a complete bestiary of the People, Creatures and Mystical Beings of Middle-earth as written about in the mythology of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Celeborn (portrayed by Marton Csokas), an Elf in Peter Jacksons adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring. ... Culture (from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate), generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Noldor (meaning those with knowledge) are of the second clan of the Elves who came to Aman, the Tatyar. ... This is a list of the known realms of Arda in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Beleriand was the region of northwestern Middle-earth during the First Age. ... A fan-created map of Aman and Valinor. ... Eriador (the Lone Lands) is a large region in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J.R.R. Tolkien. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... Celeborn (portrayed by Marton Csokas), an Elf in Peter Jacksons adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Noldor (meaning those with knowledge) are of the second clan of the Elves who came to Aman, the Tatyar. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ...


The character and his name (Glor + findel "golden-haired") are among the oldest in the legendarium, going back to the original version of the Fall of Gondolin of 1916-17. A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... In the writings of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Fall of Gondolin is the name of one of the original Lost Tales which formed the basis for a section in his later work, The Silmarillion. ...


Glorfindel was blond, as his very name says. Blond hair was also found in the Noldor royal family (House of Finwë), among the descendants of Indis the Vanya, second wife of their High King Finwë — namely in the Golden House of Finarfin, his third son, which included Galadriel. Otherwise, somewhere in Glorfindel's family line there is Vanyarin blood, such as possibly through his mother (which would account for him being blond and still be counted among the Noldor). Both the Vanyar and the Noldor kindreds lived in the fair city of Tirion upon the hill of Túna in Valinor for a time, and in other parts of the royal family tree it has been shown that other Vanyar married in, so it is conceivable that the two sects mingled in more than just the royal line. Naturally blond hair. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, Indis was the second wife of Finwë. She had two sons, Fingolfin and Finarfin, and two daughters, Findis and Irimë. She was also the stepmother to Fëanor. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Vanyar are the fairest and most noble of the High Elves. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Finwë, sometimes surnamed Noldóran, is a fictional character who was the first High King of the Elven Noldor to led his people on the journey from Middle-earth to Valinor in the blessed realm of Aman. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Finarfin was the third son and youngest child of Finwë. Finarfins mother was Indis. ... Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Tirion upon Túna was the city of the Ñoldor in Valinor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Tirion upon Túna was the city of the Ñoldor in Valinor. ... A fan-created map of Aman and Valinor. ...


Glorfindel also may have been a member of the royal house which somehow Tolkien never accounted for, related through maybe Irimë (daughter of Finwë and Indis), Fingolfin's wife Anairë, Turgon's wife Elenwë, or a combination. The main part of this article relates to the last versions of Middle-earths history, and as such may controvert parts of The Silmarillion. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Anairë is the wife of Fingolfin. ... Elenwë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ...

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details about The Silmarillion follow.

Contents

The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ...

Hero of the First Age

Glorfindel first comes into the legendarium during the Fall of Gondolin and is especially prominent in the account of the escape of Tuor, Idril, Eärendil and many others from the destruction of that city in the First Age. He is Lord of the House of the Golden Flower, known as one of King Turgon's chief lieutenants and one of the most beloved Elves in all Gondolin. When Morgoth's forces first invade his home, Glorfindel leads his men out to flank the enemy and cut through their ranks. When they themselves are flanked, his men suffer heavy losses. Sending for help, Turgon orders Talagand to take the House of the Harp and assist Glorfindel. Talagand, being in allegiance with Maeglin the Traitor, does not relay the message and instead directs his men to the other side of the city and to safety. Thus Glorfindel has few men left of his house when he meets up with the princess, her husband, and their half-elven child. The survivors escape through the Encircling Mountains above Gondolin, and make it to the Eagles' Cleft. When the escapees are ambushed by a company of Orcs led by a terrible Balrog, Glorfindel leaps at the demon with all his might and battles him atop a rocky pinnacle. The duel rages as the rest can only watch in horror. Fiercely defending the women and children who are being led out of the hills, Glorfindel drives the Balrog back, hewing off its whip-wielding arm at the elbow. Just when it seems the struggle is about to be won, the beast grabs Glorfindel's golden hair from under his helm, and both fall off the peak. As they plummet, Glorfindel strikes a final blow by stabbing the demon in its stomach with a knife. The great Eagles see what is happening now in the Cleft near their eyries and come to the aid of their Elven friends, swooping down on the Orcs and making it possible for the refugees to escape. Glorfindel's body is recovered from the crags by none other than Thorondor, Lord of Eagles himself, and the Elves lay the lord to rest in a mound of stones, where afterwards green grass and yellow Elanor flowers appear. Ever after, when a battle of surpassing skill and courage was witnessed, Elves were heard to say "Ai! 'Tis Glorfindel and the Balrog!" in remembrance of his heroism. A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Gondolin is a hidden city of the Elves founded by Turgon in the First Age. ... Tuor is a fictional character of J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Idril Celebrindal is the daughter of Turgon and Elenwë, wife of Tuor, and the mother of Eärendil the Mariner. ... For the Anglo-Saxon name, see Earendel. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the First Age began with the awakening of the Elves, and ended with the final overthrow of Morgoth by the combined armies of Valinor and Beleriand. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Turgon the Wise is an Elven king of the Noldor, second son of Fingolfin, brother to Fingon, Aredhel and Argon, and ruler of the hidden city of Gondolin. ... Morgoth Bauglir (originally known as Melkor) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Maeglin (Y.S. 320 – 510) was an Elf, the son of Eöl the Dark Elf and Aredhel daughter of Fingolfin. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Echoriath or Encircling Mountains were a mountain range in the north of Beleriand. ... Orcs in Moria, from the 1978 animated film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings. ... A Balrog fighting Gandalf, as depicted by Ted Nasmith. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the eagles were immense flying birds that were sentient, and could speak. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth universe Thorondor was the greatest of the Eagles of Manwë. Spoiler warning: Thorondor (Quenya, Sorontar, both of which mean King of Eagles) was sent by Manwë, king of the Valar, to watch over the Ñoldor after they arrived in Beleriand. ... Elanor, in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, is a small star-shaped yellow flower whose name means sun-star. ...


Resurrection and return

Re-embodied in Valinor, Glorfindel spends hundreds of years there and finally wishes to return to Middle-earth. He is granted permission by the Valar for his self-sacrifice in order to keep Eärendil alive and for helping to fulfill the designs of the Powers. Glorfindel departs the Undying Lands sometime in the middle of the Second Age (circa 1600, when Barad-dûr was completed and Sauron forged the One Ring, and while Númenor was still friendly with the Elves under Tar-Minastir) and sails back by Númenórean ship. Some people beleive that Gil-Galad was one of the most powerful elves that ever lived. . The Valar hope that, with the powers he has gained through his self-sacrifice, re-embodiment, and divine tutelage, he can help Gil-galad and Elrond oppose the new Dark Lord. Only afterwards do the Valar realize that it is necessary to send their own kind in the guise of wizards to repel this threat (although some evidence exists that Glorfindel and the Blue Wizards may have come to Middle-earth together, see below). .Though none of this was told within the published narratives, it appears in essay form in Tolkien's posthumous works (cf. The Peoples of Middle-earth, ed. Christopher Tolkien). A fan-created map of Aman and Valinor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens mythology, the Valar (singular Vala) are the Powers of Arda, or direct representatives of Eru Ilúvatar (God). ... For the Anglo-Saxon name, see Earendel. ... In the fictional writings of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Undying Lands are a realm inhabited by immortal beings. ... The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Eye of Sauron. ... The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, the Great Ring of Power, The Ring, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Tar-Minastir (1474 - 1873 S.A., r. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Ereinion Gil-galad was the son of Orodreth,[1] and his mother was a Sindarin Elf. ... Spoiler warning: Elrond the Half-elven (F.A. 525 – ?) is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by fantasy author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Blue Wizards (or the Ithryn Luin) are two notoriously mysterious characters of Middle-earth. ... The Peoples of Middle-earth is the 12th and final volume of The History of Middle-earth, edited by Christopher Tolkien from the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ...


Hero of the Third Age

Glorfindel reappears during the Third Age, leading the Elvish forces of Rivendell, the Grey Havens, and Lothlórien at the Battle of Fornost. There he fights alongside Eärnur, leading the Gondorian troops and the remnants of the Arnorians. When the Witch-king, Lord of the Nazgûl rides out to defend his ruling seat at the captured Fornost, his presence spooks Eärnur's horse and sends the prince backwards, and the Lord of the Nazgûl mocks him for this. Glorfindel returns the favour by confronting the Witch-king, who sees the mighty Elf-lord and flees into the night. Eärnur wishes to pursue the Morgul Lord, but Glorfindel bids him not go after the enemy and speaks his prophecy. For other uses, see The Third Age. ... Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Grey Havens in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy Location of the Grey Havens in Middle-earth marked in red The elven ports of Mithlond or the Grey Havens was an Elvish port on the Gulf of Lune in the northwest of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional... location of Lórien in Middle-earth marked in red This article is about the Lórien of J. R. R. Tolkiens works. ... Combatants Army of Gondor under Eärnur, Dúnedain of Arnor, Men of Rhovanion, Elves of Lindon, and (according to Hobbit lore) a company of Hobbit archers from The Shire. ... Flag of Gondor under the rule of the Kings; under the Ruling Stewards, the crown and seven stars were removed Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as Lord of the Nazgûl or the Black Captain, is a fictional character in the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Nazgûl (from Black Speech Nazg (ring) and Gûl (wraith, spirit); Ringwraiths, sometimes written Ring-wraiths), also known as the Nine Riders or Black or Dark Riders (or simply the Nine), are evil servants of Sauron. ...


Later he is sent by Elrond to help Frodo reach Rivendell, as told in The Fellowship of the Ring. He sets Frodo on his horse, Asfaloth, and Frodo rides ahead to the other side of the Ford of Bruinen, where he defies his Nazgûl pursuers. He is nearly captured, but Glorfindel, Strider and the other hobbits come up from behind and drive the Black Riders into the water, where they are swept away by a wave of water resembling charging horses (an enchantment of Elrond and Gandalf's). Strider and the hobbits bear torches, but Glorfindel reveals himself as a mighty Elf-lord terrible in his wrath; Frodo sees him as a shining figure. Later, when Frodo asks about the safety of Imladris from Sauron's forces, Gandalf explains: Spoiler warning: Elrond the Half-elven (F.A. 525 – ?) is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by fantasy author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Frodo Baggins is one of the most significant characters in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings. ... Asfaloth is a fictional horse in The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Aragorn (II., son of Arathorn II.) is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ...

In Rivendell there live still some of his chief foes: the Elven-wise, lords of the Eldar from beyond the furthest seas. They do not fear the Ringwraiths, for those who have dwelt in the Blessed Realm live at once in both worlds, and against both the Seen and the Unseen they have great power.

Gandalf points to Glorfindel as one of these, saying he is "one of the mighty of the Firstborn," "an Elf-lord of a house of princes." While enjoying the hospitality of the Elves, Frodo enters the Hall of Fire and finds that his Wizard friend spoke true:

Frodo looked at them in wonder, for he had never before seen Elrond, of whom so many tales spoke; and as they sat upon his right hand and his left, Glorfindel, and even Gandalf, whom he thought he knew so well, were revealed as lords of dignity and power... Glorfindel was tall and straight; his hair was of shining gold, his face fair and young and fearless and full of joy; his eyes were bright and keen, and his voice like music; on his brow sat wisdom, and in his hand was strength.

Original plans

In the very first draft of the Council of Elrond, there was a crucial difference in the members of the Fellowship. The Nine Walkers were to comprise Frodo, Gandalf, Trotter (later Strider/Aragorn), Glorfindel, Durin son of Balin (who became Gimli son of Glóin), Sam, Merry, and earlier versions of Pippin and Fatty. Boromir and Legolas did not come in till much later (cf. The Return of the Shadow, ed. Christopher Tolkien). For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... Trotter can mean a number of things: A trotter is a standardbred horse which races in a gait called the trot. ... Aragorn (II., son of Arathorn II.) is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... Durin is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, Balin was a Dwarf leader, the son of Fundin and elder brother of Dwalin. ... Gimli is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Glóin is the name of two fictional characters of J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character who was Frodo Bagginss servant, and proves, by virtue of his accompanying his master to the Crack of Doom, to be the most loyal of... Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–?), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth; a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ... Fredegar Fatty Bolger is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. ... Boromir is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Legolas is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... The History of The Lord of the Rings is a 4-volume work by Christopher Tolkien that documents the process of J. R. R. Tolkiens writing of his masterwork The Lord of the Rings (LotR). ...


Legolas replaced the Elf-lord as the representation of the Elven people in later drafts, but this did not take away from the power that Tolkien attributed to Glorfindel. He sits in honour next to Elrond and Gandalf in the Hall of Fire in Rivendell, and is one of the few Elves of Imladris who was known to be strong enough to stand against the Ringwraiths and be sent out to guide Frodo to safety from them. Glorfindel is the strongest of these few, as he is sent in the direction that the Nazgûl are most likely to come from, and even holds the Bridge of Mitheithel against some of the Nazgûl single-handedly. Lord Glorfindel is noted for his great power and strength, so much so that Gandalf refers to him in relation to the difficulty of the task of destroying the Ring, though in a rather unusual way. When Elrond seeks to fill the last two spots in the Fellowship with folk of his own house, Gandalf supports Merry Brandybuck and Pippin Took by saying: In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Nazgûl (Black Speech: Ringwraiths, sometimes written Ring-wraiths), also known as the Nine Riders or Black Riders (or simply the Nine), are evil servants of Sauron in Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the river Mitheithel or Hoarwell was a great river of Eriador. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Nazgûl (from Black Speech Nazg (ring) and Gûl (wraith, spirit); Ringwraiths, sometimes written Ring-wraiths), also known as the Nine Riders or Black or Dark Riders (or simply the Nine), are evil servants of Sauron. ...

I think, Elrond, that in this matter it would be well to trust rather to their friendship than to great wisdom. Even if you chose for us an elf-lord, such as Glorfindel, he could not storm the Dark Tower, nor open the road to the Fire by the power that is in him. (Fellowship of the Ring)

Glorfindel's prophecy

Glorfindel was the one who made the prophecy about the Witch-king, stating that "Far off yet is his doom, and not by the hand of man will he fall." Made at the Battle of Fornost in the year 1975 of the Third Age, it was fulfilled in the year 3019, when Meriadoc Brandybuck (a Hobbit) helped Éowyn (a woman) kill the Morgul Lord at the Battle of Pelennor Fields. Merry was male, but he was a Hobbit (though Tolkien does say that Hobbits were strictly a sub-group of Men rather than a distinct species or race), and Éowyn is a woman, not a man. Prior to this event, the prophecy had been interpreted to mean mankind in general, not a man in the sense of individual. This article or section seems to describe future events as if they have already occurred. ... The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as Lord of the Nazgûl or the Black Captain, is a fictional character in the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Éowyn (T.A. 2995–F.A. ?), a shieldmaiden of Rohan, is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth who appears in his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... The Battle of the Pelennor Fields was a battle for the city of Minas Tirith in J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, a Hobbit is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ...


And the two became one

It is highly unusual (though not impossible) for an Elf to return from the Halls of Mandos to Middle-earth, and in the case of Glorfindel it seems to possibly have been unintentional. In Return of the Shadow, Christopher Tolkien states that some time after the publication of The Lord of the Rings, his father "gave a great deal of thought to the matter of Glorfindel" (p. 214), and decided that it was a "somewhat random use" of a name from The Silmarillion that would probably have been changed, had it been noticed sooner. Mandos is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... The History of The Lord of the Rings is a 4-volume work by Christopher Tolkien that documents the process of J. R. R. Tolkiens writing of his masterwork The Lord of the Rings (LotR). ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the British academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ...


Tolkien had a well-documented (and confusing) habit of inventing and changing character names while writing drafts, so this is not too surprising. On the other hand, early notes for the Council of Elrond state "Glorfindel tells of his ancestry in Gondolin", indicating that the character was early on already intended to be the same elf. This may be reconciled by the fact that Tolkien was known for being unorganized, misplacing his notes and having to work from memory alone on several occasions. Nevertheless, seeing that the reintroduction of the name had been made, and that it would require some explanation, Tolkien devised a solution. He would, at the end of his life, devote his last writings to the issue of Glorfindel and some related topics, eventually rectifying the loose-ends as included in the synopsis above, as detailed in The Peoples of Middle-earth. Glorfindel was sent back to Middle-earth by the Valar during the Second Age as a kind of predecessor to the Istari, or in a different version, together with the Blue Wizards. At one point he was even considered as a possibility for the identity of one of them, though this was immediately rejected since the Eldar were not initially conceived as possibilities for the Wizards, and he had come to the conclusion that they were only Maiar. Tolkien developed the Blue Wizards in a story told in Unfinished Tales, where he identifies them as Maiar of Oromë and names them Alatar/Morinehtar and Pallando/Roméstamó. In The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, the Council of Elrond is a fictional secret council called by Elrond in Rivendell in order to decide what should be done with the One Ring. ... The History of Middle-earth is a 12-volume series of books published from 1983-1996, that collect and analyse material relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens mythology, the Valar (singular Vala) are the Powers of Arda, or direct representatives of Eru Ilúvatar (God). ... The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Wizards of Middle-earth are a small group of beings outwardly resembling Men but possessing much greater physical and mental power. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Blue Wizards (or the Ithryn Luin) are two notoriously mysterious characters of Middle-earth. ... Unfinished Tales (full title Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth) is a collection of stories by J. R. R. Tolkien that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Blue Wizards (or the Ithryn Luin) are two notoriously mysterious characters of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Blue Wizards (or the Ithryn Luin) are two notoriously mysterious characters of Middle-earth. ...


Conceivably the problem of Glorfindel's resurrection could easily have been resolved by changing the name of Glorfindel of Gondolin to another name, but Tolkien was unwilling to do this, as he now associated the name with the character.


In adaptations

Glorfindel is not prominently featured in film versions of The Lord of the Rings.


In Ralph Bakshi's 1978 animated version, his role and lines are given to Legolas, who is apparently not a Wood-elf here. J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is the title of an animated film produced and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and released to theaters in 1978. ... Legolas is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ...


In Peter Jackson's live-action The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), his role is given to Arwen, who even takes Frodo to the Ford herself and summons the horses of water through an incantation, which is not present in the book. However, in The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), there are some blond Elf background extras present at Aragorn's coronation at Minas Tirith. One of them is identified in promotional material as Glorfindel; he is played by Jarl Benzon [1]. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is a film, released on Wednesday, December 19, 2001, directed by Peter Jackson with a runtime of 178 minutes (2 hours, 58 minutes). ... Arwen Undómiel is a character from the fictional Middle-earth universe created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Other media

Glorfindel, as depicted by Benzon, appears in the flesh in The Lord of the Rings Trading Card Game, based on the Jackson films. The Lord of the Rings Trading Card Game (a. ...


He also is a playable hero unit in the real-time strategy game, The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II, also based on the Jackson films, where his hair is silver (as opposed to his eponymous colour blond) (see image). There he is depicted as one of the heroes available on the Elvish faction and is able to mount his steed Asfaloth. Image File history File links BfmeIIbox. ...


The game explains Arwen's pre-empting of Glorfindel's role in the Jackson films by having him away fighting in the northern front of the War of the Ring at the time — namely, in the Misty Mountains. Glorfindel and Glóin fight Drogoth the Dragon Lord (an invented character) and his forces.


In the popular mod The Last Days for the independent game Mount and Blade, Glorfindel is the most powerful recruitable hero from Lothlórien, who is available to the player only after having accumulated a great amount of influence. The Last Days is an Academy Award winning documentary, directed by James Moll and produced by June Beallor and Ken Lipper in 1998. ... Mount&Blade is a 3D, open-ended, single-player, third- or first-person, computer role-playing game in beta stage of development, created and distributed by the Turkish development house TaleWorlds. ...


A device dubbed the "Glorfindel Box" was employed by Mike Oldfield in the recording of his debut album Tubular Bells. It was a highly unreliable device made from a wooden box filled with transistors and covered with knobs that sometimes worked and sometimes didn't. However unreliable it may have been it helped to shape Mike's guitar tone on the breakthrough album. Michael Gordon Oldfield (born May 15, 1953 in Reading, England) is a multi-instrumentalist musician and composer, working a style that blends progressive rock, folk, ethnic or world music, classical music, electronic music and more recently dance. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia of Arda: Glorfindel (735 words)
Tolkien was far from happy with this state of affairs, however, and it seems that he intended to reconcile the problem by uniting the two strands of the story.
Despite this, the Glorfindel notes lead many to see his re-embodiment and return to Middle-earth as 'fact' (and not a few have e-mailed us to remind us of this!) The purpose of this rather lengthy aside, though, is to show that we cannot view these 'events' in such concrete terms.
The Noldor were normally dark-haired, but the golden hair of the Vanyar was introduced through Indis, a Vanyarin Elf-maiden; hence the descendants of her sons Fingolfin and Finarfin sometimes had golden hair, suggesting that Glorfindel may have come from this noble line.
Glorfindel (294 words)
Tolkien, Glorfindel is an Elf, a minor character that appears on a pair of occasions in the tales of Middle-earth.
Glorfindel first comes in as a Noldor in the account of the escape of Tuor[?], Idril, Eärendil and many others from the fall of Gondolin in the First Age.
Glorfindel reappears at the end of the Third Age as an Elf-lord sent by Elrond to help the wounded Frodo reach Rivendell, as told in The Fellowship of the Ring.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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