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Encyclopedia > Glengarry Glen Ross (film)
Glengarry Glen Ross

theatrical poster
Directed by James Foley
Produced by Jerry Tokofsky
Stanley R. Zupnik
Written by David Mamet
Starring Jack Lemmon
Al Pacino
Ed Harris
Alan Arkin
Kevin Spacey
Alec Baldwin
Music by James Newton Howard
Cinematography Juan Ruiz Anchía
Editing by Howard E. Smith
Distributed by New Line Cinema
Release date(s) September 30, 1992
Running time 100 minutes
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Budget $12,500,000
Gross revenue $10,725,228 (USA)
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Glengarry Glen Ross is a 1992 independent film, based on the acclaimed 1984 Pulitzer Prize and Tony-winning play of the same name by David Mamet, who adapted it into a screenplay for the film. The title refers to Glengarry Highlands and Glen Ross Farms, two properties mentioned in the movie. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... James Foley (born December 23, 1957 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American film director and screenwriter. ... David Alan Mamet (born November 30, 1947) is an American author, essayist, playwright, screenwriter, and film director. ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is a renowned and influential Academy Award, four time Golden Globe, AFI, two time BAFTA, Emmy Award, and two time Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor who played such iconic roles as Michael Corleone in The Godfather Trilogy and Tony Montana... Edward Allen Harris (born November 28, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, known for his performances in The Rock, The Right Stuff, Apollo 13, Pollock, and The Truman Show, among many others. ... Alan Wolf Arkin (born March 26, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning American actor and director. ... Kevin Spacey (born July 26, 1959) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor (film and stage) and director. ... Alec Baldwin (born April 3, 1958) is an Emmy- and Academy Award-nominated, and Golden Globe Award-winning, American actor. ... This article is about James Howard, the composer. ... New Line Cinema, founded in 1967, is one of the major American film studios. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... An independent film, or indie film, is usually a low-budget film that is produced by a small movie studio. ... This article is about the year. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... This article is about the play by David Mamet. ... David Alan Mamet (born November 30, 1947) is an American author, essayist, playwright, screenwriter, and film director. ...


The film, like the play, is notorious for its use of profanity. The word "fuck" is used in the script a total of 138 times during the 100 minute long movie and the word "shit" is used 50 times, leading the cast to jokingly refer to the film as "Death of a Fucking Salesman," according to Ed Harris while being interviewed on Inside the Actors Studio. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... // This film, television, or video-related list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Edward Allen Harris (born November 28, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, known for his performances in The Rock, The Right Stuff, Apollo 13, Pollock, and The Truman Show, among many others. ... Inside the Actors Studio is the Emmy-nominated, longest-running original series on the Bravo cable television channel, hosted by James Lipton. ...


Al Pacino was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his work in the film. Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is a renowned and influential Academy Award, four time Golden Globe, AFI, two time BAFTA, Emmy Award, and two time Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor who played such iconic roles as Michael Corleone in The Godfather Trilogy and Tony Montana... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ...

Contents

Synopsis

See also: Glengarry Glen Ross

The film shows parts of two days in the lives of four real estate agents (Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon, Ed Harris and Alan Arkin). Richard Roma (Al Pacino) is a slick, highly successful, fast-talking salesman who excels at selling undesirable real estate; the other three are largely unsuccessful. They become desperate when the hardnosed corporate office ("downtown") sends Blake (Alec Baldwin) to announce that, in one week, all except the top two salesmen will be fired. This article is about the play by David Mamet. ... In the United States and parts of the Commonwealth (including Canada and Australia) as well as in many other countries, a real estate agent is a person who advises and represents others in transactions involving real estate. ... Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is a renowned and influential Academy Award, four time Golden Globe, AFI, two time BAFTA, Emmy Award, and two time Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor who played such iconic roles as Michael Corleone in The Godfather Trilogy and Tony Montana... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... Edward Allen Harris (born November 28, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, known for his performances in The Rock, The Right Stuff, Apollo 13, Pollock, and The Truman Show, among many others. ... Alan Wolf Arkin (born March 26, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning American actor and director. ... Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is a renowned and influential Academy Award, four time Golden Globe, AFI, two time BAFTA, Emmy Award, and two time Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor who played such iconic roles as Michael Corleone in The Godfather Trilogy and Tony Montana... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... Alec Baldwin (born April 3, 1958) is an Emmy- and Academy Award-nominated, and Golden Globe Award-winning, American actor. ...


Cast and characters

John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is a renowned and influential Academy Award, four time Golden Globe, AFI, two time BAFTA, Emmy Award, and two time Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor who played such iconic roles as Michael Corleone in The Godfather Trilogy and Tony Montana... Edward Allen Harris (born November 28, 1950) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, known for his performances in The Rock, The Right Stuff, Apollo 13, Pollock, and The Truman Show, among many others. ... Alan Wolf Arkin (born March 26, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning American actor and director. ... Kevin Spacey (born July 26, 1959) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor (film and stage) and director. ... Alec Baldwin (born April 3, 1958) is an Emmy- and Academy Award-nominated, and Golden Globe Award-winning, American actor. ... Jonathan Pryce (born June 1, 1947) is a Welsh film, television, and stage actor who has starred in such Hollywood films include Brazil, Pirates of the Caribbean, Tomorrow Never Dies and The New World. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Differences between the film and the play

The most important way in which the film differs from the play is the addition of a famous scene known as "Coffee's For Closers" written by Mamet involving a character named Blake, written specifically for Alec Baldwin. Blake gives the main characters a more immediate motivation for selling real estate — namely that their jobs are on the line. Coffees for closers is a famous and frequently performed monologue in both screenacting and theatre acting auditions and competitions. ...


The scenes that show Shelley going to visit an uninterested potential client were added for the film. Some of his phone conversations are added as well. The additions add an even deeper sense of sad desperation for Lemmon's character than appeared in the original play.


The film also differs in geographic location. While the play's original references to the Chicago area remain intact throughout, the film credits list it as having been filmed "on location" in New York City. As such, there are some scenes which do refer to New York, such as the opening scene, in which the pay phone Shelley Levene (Lemmon) uses clearly reads "New York." Also, George Aaronow (Arkin) comments to Shelley, "I had a woman in White Plains on the hook ...," an obvious reference to White Plains, New York. The final scene also features a subway car with "Sheepshead Bay" (as in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn) as the destination. The scene in which Pacino's character arrives at the office clearly shows an NYPD squad car. However, when Shelley engages in conversation in one scene he twice says "Kenilworth" — which is the name of both an affluent Chicago suburb on the north shore of Lake Michigan and a middle class New York City suburb in Union County, New Jersey. Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... White Plains (New York) White Plains is a city in south-central Westchester County, New York, about 4 miles (6 km) east of the Hudson River and 2. ... Sheepshead Bay is a bay separating the mainland of Brooklyn, New York City from the eastern portion of Coney Island, the latter originally a barrier island but now effectively an extension of the mainland with peninsulas both east and west. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) , the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... Kenilworth refers to several things. ... Union County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ...


David Mamet also altered the original ending of the movie. In the play, Roma flatters Shelley and suggests that the two work together. Then, when Shelley leaves the room, Roma turns on Shelley and reveals that his flattery was only a con to get a share of Shelley's sales. In the movie, this last-second turn is omitted, and Roma's flattery is assumed to be sincere.


Production

David Mamet's play was first performed in 1983 at the National Theater of London and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1984. That same year, the play made its U.S. debut in Chicago before moving to Broadway. Producer Jerry Tokofsky read David Mamet’s play on a trip to New York City in 1985 at the suggestion of director Irvin Kershner who wanted to make it into a movie.[1] Tokofsky saw the play on Broadway and contacted Mamet. Stanley R. Zupnik was a Washington D.C.-based producer of B-movies looking for A-title material. Tokofsky had co-produced two previous Zupnik films. In 1986, he told Zupnik about Mamet’s play and he saw it on Broadway but found the plot confusing. Mamet wanted $500,000 for the movie rights and another $500,000 to write the screenplay. Zupnik agreed to pay Mamet’s $1 million asking price, figuring that they could cut a deal with a cable company to bankroll the movie. Because of the uncompromising subject matter and abrasive language, no major studio wanted to finance it, even with movie stars attached. Financing came from cable and video companies, a German television station, an Australian movie theater chain, several banks, and New Line Cinema over the course of four years.[1] Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... This article is about the year. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article is about the year. ... Irvin Kershner (born April 29, 1923) is an American film director born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...

Kevin Spacey as John Williamson and Jack Lemmon as Shelley Levene

Al Pacino originally wanted to do the play on Broadway but was doing another Mamet production, American Buffalo, in London at the time. He expressed interest in appearing in the film adaptation. In 1989, Tokofsky asked Jack Lemmon to act in the movie.[2] During this time, Kershner dropped out to make another movie as did Pacino. Alec Baldwin, who also attached, left the project over a contract disagreement. James Foley’s agent sent the film director Mamet’s screenplay in early 1991 but he was hesitant to direct because “I wanted great actors, people with movie charisma, to give it watchability, especially since the locations were so restricted.”[3] Foley took the screenplay to Pacino with whom he had been trying to work with on a film for years.[4] Foley was hired to direct only to leave the production as well. By March 1991, Tokofsky contacted Baldwin and begged him to reconsider doing the film. The producer remembers, “Alec said: ‘I’ve read 25 scripts and nothing is as good as this. O.K. If you make it, I’ll do it.”[1] The two men arranged an informal reading with Lemmon in Los Angeles. Subsequently, the three men organized readings with several other actors as Lemmon remembers, "Some of the best damn actors you're ever going to see came in and read and I'm talking about names."[4] Tokofsky’s lawyer, Jake Bloom, called a meeting at the Creative Artists Agency who represented many of the actors involved and asked for their help. CAA showed little interest, but two of their clients – Ed Harris and Kevin Spacey – soon joined the cast. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kevin Spacey (born July 26, 1959) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor (film and stage) and director. ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... Binomial name Bison bison Linnaeus, 1758 The American Bison (Bison bison), also called Buffalo, is a bovine mammal that is the largest terrestrial mammal in North America. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Creative Artists Agency (CAA) is a talent and literary agency which represents a vast array of actors, musicians, writers, directors, and athletes, as well as a variety of companies and their products. ...


Because of the film’s modest budget, many of the actors took significant pay cuts. For example, Pacino cut his per-movie price from $6 million to $1.5 million, Lemmon was paid $1 million, Baldwin received $250,000, and so on.[1] This didn’t stop other actors, like Robert De Niro, Bruce Willis,[1] Joe Mantegna and Richard Gere[2] from expressing interest in the film. Robert De Niro in 1988 Robert De Niro (born August 17, 1943) is a two-time Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American film actor, director, and producer. ... Walter Bruce Willis (born March 19, 1955 in Idar-Oberstein, Germany) is an American actor and singer. ... Joe Mantegna as Detective Will Girardi in Joan of Arcadia Joe Mantegnas character, Fat Tony in The Simpsons Joseph Anthony Mantegna, Jr. ... Richard Tiffany Gere[1] (born August 31, 1949) is an American actor. ...


Once the cast was assembled, they spent three weeks in rehearsals. With a budget set at $12.5 million, filming began in August 1991 at the Kaufman Astoria Soundstage in Queens, New York and on location in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn over 39 days. Harris remembers, "There were five and six-page scenes we would shoot all at once. It was more like doing a play at times [when] you'd get the continuity going."[4] Alan Arkin said of the script, "What made it [challenging] was the language and the rhythms, which are enormously difficult to absorb."[4] During filming, members of the cast who were not required to be on the set certain days would show up anyway to watch the other actors' performances.[5] 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ...


The film's director of photography, Juan Ruiz Anchía relied on low lighting and shadows with a blues, greens and reds color scheme for the first part of the film. For the second half, he adhered to a monochromatic blue-grey color scheme.


During the production, Tokofsky and Zupnik had a falling out over money and credit for the film. Tokofsky sued to strip Zupnik of his producer’s credit and share of the producer’s fee.[6] Zupnik claimed that he personally put up $2 million of the film’s budget and countersued, claiming that Tokofsky was fired for embezzlement.[6]


Soundtrack

Glengarry Glen Ross (Music From & Inspired by the Motion Picture Soundtrack)
Soundtrack by Various artists
Released September 15, 1992
Genre Soundtrack
Length 57:12
Label Elektra Records
Producer James Newton Howard

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... The term Various Artists is used in the record industry when numerous singers and musicians collaborate on a song or collection of songs. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Elektra Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, and today operates under Atlantic Records Group. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... This article is about James Howard, the composer. ...

Track listing

  1. Wayne Shorter - "Main Title" 4:59
  2. Wayne Shorter - "You Met My Wife" 2:09
  3. Wayne Shorter - "Plot" 2:55
  4. Little Jimmy Scott - "Street of Dreams" 3:33
  5. Shirley Horn - "You'd Better Go Now" 4:08
  6. Take 6 - "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows" 2:40
  7. Bill Holman Big Band - "Prelude to a Kiss" 4:21
  8. Georgie Fame - "Easy Street" 3:18
  9. David Sanborn - "Day Dream" 4:22
  10. Joe Roccisano Orchestra - "Tear Filled Skies" 5:11
  11. Al Jarreau - "Blue Skies" 2:51
  12. Joe Roccisano Orchestra - "Blue Lou" 7:00
  13. Wayne Shorter - "In the Car" 2:21
  14. Wayne Shorter - "Don't Sell to Doctors" 2:23
  15. Dr. John - "Blue Skies" 4:01
  16. Wayne Shorter - "Nyborgs" 1:00

Wayne Shorter (born August 25, 1933) is an American jazz composer and saxophonist. ... Little Jimmy Scott (July 17, 1925 in Cleveland) is an American jazz vocalist. ... Shirley Horn (May 1, 1934 – October 20, 2005) was an American jazz singer and pianist. ... Take 6 is an American a cappella gospel music sextet formed in 1985 on the campus of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Georgie Fame is a British R&B singer whose real name is Clive Powell. ... For other persons named David Sanborn, see David Sanborn (disambiguation). ... Alwyn Lopez Al Jarreau (born March 12, 1940) is an American singer. ... Dr. John is the stage name of Malcolm John Rebennack Jr. ...

Reception

Opening in 416 theaters, the film grossed $2,104,402 in its opening weekend. As of April 17, 2007, it has grossed $10,725,228 in North America.[7] Reviews were highly positive. As of April 17, 2007, it was given a rating of 98% on Rotten Tomatoes and a 7.8 rating at the Internet Movie Database. The film is often lauded for its stellar ensemble cast, with Jack Lemmon describing it as the best cast of which he had ever been a part. is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... An ensemble cast is a cast in which the principal performers are assigned roughly equal amounts of importance in a dramatic production. ...


Owen Gleiberman gave the film an A rating in his review for Entertainment Weekly magazine, praising Lemmon's performance as "a revelation" and describing his character as "the weaselly soul of Glengarry Glen Ross-Willy Loman turned into a one-liner."[8] Peter Travers gave the film his highest rating in Rolling Stone magazine and wrote, "The pleasure of this unique film comes in watching superb actors dine on Mamet's pungent language like the feast it is."[9] Roger Ebert's review in the Chicago Sun-Times wrote, "Mamet's dialogue has a kind of logic, a cadence, that allows people to arrive in triumph at the ends of sentences we could not possibly have imagined. There is great energy in it. You can see the joy with which these actors get their teeth into these great lines, after living through movies in which flat dialogue serves only to advance the story."[10] Vincent Canby praised "the utterly demonic skill with which these foulmouthed characters carve one another up in futile attempts to stave off disaster. It's also because of the breathtaking wizardry with which Mr. Mamet and Mr. Foley have made a vivid, living film that preserves the claustrophobic nature of the original stage work," in his review for the New York Times.[11] Owen Gleiberman (born 24 February 1959) is a film critic for Entertainment Weekly, a position he has held since the magazines launch in 1990. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Peter Travers is the film critic for Rolling Stone magazine. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... Vincent Canby (July 27, 1924 – September 15, 2000) was an American film critic. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

In his review for Variety magazine, Todd McCarthy praised Mamet's writing and the performances of the cast but felt that while "Juan-Ruiz Anchia's lighting is enormously inventive and colorful, there are a few too many camera moves, unnecessarily elaborate setups and attention-getting cutting tricks."[12] Desson Howe's review in the Washington Post criticized Foley's direction, writing that it "doesn't add much more than the street between. If his intention is to create a sense of claustrophobia, he also creates the (presumably) unwanted effect of a soundstage. There is no evidence of life outside the immediate world of the movie."[13] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Alec Baldwin (born April 3, 1958) is an Emmy- and Academy Award-nominated, and Golden Globe Award-winning, American actor. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... ...


Pacino was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role for his portrayal of salesman Ricky Roma. This was the same year (1992) in which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role for his portrayal of Lt. Col. Frank Slade in Scent of a Woman. Scent of a Woman is a 1992 film which tells the story of a preparatory school student who takes a job as an assistant to an irascible blind, medically retired Army officer. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e Weinraub, Bernard. "The Glengarry Math: Add Money and Stars, then Subtract Ego", New York Times, October 12, 1992. 
  2. ^ a b Blanchard, Jayne M. "Glengarry Hits the Screen with the Joys of Male Angst", Washington Times, September 27, 1992. 
  3. ^ Hartl, John. "Director is Happy to put Big Stars in Film Version of Mamet Play", Seattle Times, September 28, 1992. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Glengarry Glen Ross Production Notes", New Line Cinema Press Kit, 1992. 
  5. ^ Berardinelli, James. "Glengarry Glen Ross", ReelViews, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-09-23. 
  6. ^ a b Powers, William F. "Pacino, Mamet and...Zupnik; Who? The Local Real Estate Mogul Behind Glengarry", Washington Post, October 4, 1992. 
  7. ^ "Glengarry Glen Ross", Box Office Mojo, April 17, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-17. 
  8. ^ Gleiberman, Owen. "Pros and Cons", Entertainment Weekly, October 9, 1992. Retrieved on 2007-04-17. 
  9. ^ Travers, Peter. "Glengarry Glen Ross", Rolling Stone, December 8, 2000. Retrieved on 2007-04-17. 
  10. ^ Ebert, Roger. "Glengarry Glen Ross", Chicago Sun-Times, October 2, 1992. Retrieved on 2007-04-17. 
  11. ^ Canby, Vincent. "Mamet's Real Estate Sharks and Their Prey", New York Times, September 30, 1992. Retrieved on 2007-04-17. 
  12. ^ McCarthy, Todd. "Glengarry Glen Ross", Variety, August 31, 1992. Retrieved on 2007-04-17. 
  13. ^ Howe, Desson. "Glengarry Glen Ross", Washington Post, October 2, 1992. Retrieved on 2007-04-17. 

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Washington Times is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1982 as a conservative alternative to the Washington Post by members of the controversial Unification Church. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The daily Seattle Times is the leading newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... New Line Cinema, founded in 1967, is one of the major American film studios. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the magazine. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Glengarry Glen Ross (film)

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Glengarry Glen Ross - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (664 words)
Glengarry Glen Ross is the title of a 1984 Pulitzer Prize and Tony-winning play by David Mamet.
Glengarry Glen Ross was first presented at the Cottlesloe Theatre of the Royal National Theatre in London on September 21, 1983.
In 2005, Glengarry Glen Ross was revived on Broadway, opening on May 1, 2005 at the Bernard B Jacobs Theatre (formerly the Royale Theatre), in a production directed by Joe Mantello.
Glengarry Glen Ross (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (732 words)
Glengarry Glen Ross is the title of a 1992 movie, based on the 1984 Pulitzer Prize and Tony-winning play of the same name by David Mamet, who adapted it into a screenplay for the film.
The film shows parts of two days in the lives of four desperate real estate agents who are prepared to engage in any number of unethical and/or illegal acts (from lies and flattery to bribery, threats and intimidation to burglary) in order to sell undesirable real estate to unwilling prospective buyers ("leads").
During filming, the movie was jokingly referred to by the actors as "Death of a Fucking Salesman," owing to its salty language.
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