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Encyclopedia > Glaucus
Greek deities
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Primordial deities
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In Greek mythology, Glaucus ("shiny," "bright" or "bluish-green") was the name of several different figures, including one God. These figures are sometimes referred to as Glaukos or Glacus. The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the telling of stories created by the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek , plural ) were greater even than the gods. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think, from which mind and mental are also derived[1]) are fifty goddesses or spiritual guides who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... This article is about the Greek god. ... In the Greek and Roman world-view, Oceanus (Greek , Okeanos), was the world-ocean, which they believed to be an enormous river encircling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Ceto, or Keto (Greek: Κητος, Ketos, sea monster) was a hideous aquatic monster, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus. ... Nereus: in Greek Mythology, eldest son of Pontus and Gaia, the Sea and the Earth. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Poseidon and Amphitrite In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite (not to be confused with Aphrodite) was a sea-goddess. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... Triton is a Greek god, the messenger of the deep. ... In Greek mythology, Ophion (serpent), also called Ophioneus ruled the world with Eurynome before the two of them were cast down by Cronus and Rhea, according to some sources. ... This article is about Proteus in Greek mythology. ... Phorcys and Ceto, Mosaic, Late Roman, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia In Greek mythology, Phorcys, or Phorkys was one of the names of the Old One of the Sea, the primeval sea god, who, according to Hesiod, was the son of Pontus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Pontus (or Pontos, sea) was an ancient, pre-Olympian sea-god, son of Gaia and Aether, the Earth and the Air. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are blue-haired sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... Naiad by John William Waterhouse, 1893 In Greek mythology, the Naiads (from the Greek νάειν, to flow, and νἃμα, running water) were a type of nymph who presided over fountains, wells, springs, streams, and brooks, as river gods embodied rivers, and some very... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the telling of stories created by the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ... God, as a male deity, contrasts with female deities, or goddesses. While the term goddess specifically refers to a female deity, words like gods and deities can be applied to all gods collectively, regardless of gender. ... In Greek mythology, Glaucus (shiny or bright or bluish-green) referred to several different people. ... In Greek mythology, Glaucus (shiny or bright or bluish-green) referred to several different people. ...

Contents

Glaucus, the sea-God

Glaucus was a Greek sea-god, son of Anthedon and Alcyone. Sea as seen from jetty in Frankston, Australia Look up maritime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In Greek mythology, Anthedon was, with Alcyone, the father of Glaucus. ... Alcyone was a Greek demi-goddess, sometimes regarded as one of the Pleiades. ...


Origins

According to Ovid, Glaucus began life as a mortal fisherman living in the Boeotian city of Anthedon. He discovered by accident a magical herb which could bring the fish he caught back to life, and decided to try eating it. The herb made him immortal, but also caused him to grow fins instead of arms and a fish's tail instead of legs, forcing him to dwell forever in the sea. Glaucus was initially upset by this side-effect, but Oceanus and Tethys received him well and he was quickly accepted among the deities of the sea, learning from them the art of prophecy. Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC – Tomis, now Constanţa AD 17), a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... A fisherman in central Chile A Long Island fisherman cleans his nets A fisherman (in recent years sometimes called a fisher to be non-gender specific), is a person who engages in the activity of fishing. ... Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... In the Greek and Roman world-view, Oceanus (Greek , Okeanos), was the world-ocean, which they believed to be an enormous river encircling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... Prophecy in a broad sense, is the prediction of future events or the speaking of divine words (divine Revelation) through chosen human messengers (prophets). ...


Glaucus fell in love with the beautiful nymph Scylla, but she was appalled by his fish-like features and fled onto land when he tried to approach her. He asked the witch Circe for a potion to make Scylla fall in love with him, but Circe fell in love with him. She tried to win his heart with her most passionate and loving words, telling him to scorn Scylla and stay with her. But he replied that trees would grow on the ocean floor and seaweed would grow on the highest mountain before he would stop loving Scylla. In her anger, Circe poisoned the pool where Scylla bathed, transforming her into a terrible monster with twelve feet and six heads. In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... Greek mythology, Scylla, or Skylla (Greek Σκύλλα) was a name shared by two characters, a female sea monster and a princess. ... Circe, a painting by John William Waterhouse. ...


In Euripides' play Orestes, Glaucus was a son of Nereus and says that he assisted Menelaus on his homeward journey with good advice. He also helped the Argonauts. It was believed that he commonly came to the rescue of sailors in storms, having once been one himself. A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ... Nereus: in Greek Mythology, eldest son of Pontus and Gaia, the Sea and the Earth. ... Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ... The Argo, by Lorenzo Costa In Greek mythology, the Argonauts (Ancient Greek: ) were a band of heroes who, in the years before the Trojan War, accompanied Jason to Colchis in his quest for the Golden Fleece. ...


The sea-God in art

A statue of Glaucus was installed in 1911 in the middle of the Fontana delle Naiadi, Mario Rutelli's fountain of four naked bronze nymphs, located in the Piazza Repubblica, Rome. The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Fontana delle Naiadi (English: Fountain of the Naiads) is a fountain in the Piazza della Repubblica, Rome. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban...


Other figures named Glaucus

Glaucus, King of Corinth

Glaucus, usually surnamed Potnieus, from Potniae near Thebes, was a Corinthian king, son of Merope and Sisyphus. He angered Aphrodite, and she angered his horses during the funeral games of King Pelias. In the end, the horses literally tore Glaucus' body apart (ref.: Virgil, Georgics, Hyginus ). His ghost supposedly was a taraxippus ("terrifier of horses") during the Isthmian Games (ref: Pausanias ). He was also the father of Bellerophon. Thebes (in Demotic Greek: Θήβα — Thíva, Katharevousa: — ThÄ“bai or Thíve) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... Temple of Apollo at Corinth Corinth, or Korinth (Κόρινθος) is a Greek city, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the original isthmus, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... In Greek mythology, several unrelated women went by the name Merope (bee-mask later reinterpreted as honey-like or eloquent), which may, therefore, have denoted a position in the cult of the Great Mother rather than a mere individuals name: Merope, one of the Heliades Merope, foster mother of... Sisyphus (Greek Σίσυφος; transliteration: Sísuphos; IPA: ), in Greek mythology, was a sinner punished in the underworld by being set to roll a huge rock up a hill throughout eternity. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Αφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (IPA: English: , Ancient Greek: , Modern Greek: ) is the classical Greek goddess of love, lust, and beauty. ... King Pelias was the father of Acastus, Pisidice, Alcestis in Greek mythology. ... A bust of Virgil, from the entrance to his tomb in Naples, Italy. ... Hyginus can refer to: Gaius Julius Hyginus (c. ... A ghostly woman coming down the stairs. ... (Pausanias. ... The Isthmian Games were one of the Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece, and were held at Corinth every two years. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... Bellerophon on Pegasus spears the Chimaera, on an Attic red-figure epinetron — 425–420 BC Bellerophon or Bellerophontes (perhaps bearing darts[1]) was a hero of Greek mythology, the greatest hero and slayer of monsters, alongside of Kadmos and Perseus, before the days of Heracles[2]—whose greatest feat was...


Glaucus, the soldier

Glaucos and Diomedes Exchange Armour pélikè attique du Peintre de Hasselmann, v. 420 av. J.-C.
Glaucos and Diomedes Exchange Armour pélikè attique du Peintre de Hasselmann, v. 420 av. J.-C.

Glaukos was a son of Hippolochus and a grandson of Bellerophon. He was a captain in the Lycian army under the command of his close friend and cousin Sarpedon. The Lycians in the Trojan War were allies of Troy. During the war Glaukos fought valiantly. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 630 × 599 pixels Full resolution (1940 × 1845 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 630 × 599 pixels Full resolution (1940 × 1845 pixel, file size: 2. ... In classical architecture, the term attic refers to a story or low wall above the cornice of a classical façade. ... Hippolochus was an ancient Greek writer, a student of Theophrastus, who addressed to his fellow-student Lynceus of Samos a description of a wedding feast in Macedon in the early 3rd century BC. The bridegroom was a certain Caranus, probably a relative of the Caranus who had been a companion... Bellerophon on Pegasus spears the Chimaera, on an Attic red-figure epinetron — 425–420 BC Bellerophon or Bellerophontes (perhaps bearing darts[1]) was a hero of Greek mythology, the greatest hero and slayer of monsters, alongside of Kadmos and Perseus, before the days of Heracles[2]—whose greatest feat was... The word Lycian can mean: The Lycian language From or related to Lycia This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... In Greek mythology, Sarpedon referred to several different people. ... The fall of Troy by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769) From the collections of the granddukes of Baden, Karlsruhe The Trojan War was waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor, by the armies of the Achaeans (Mycenaean Greeks), after Paris of Troy stole Helen from... Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ...


In the Iliad he met Diomedes in the field of battle in face to face combat. In response to Diomedes' challenge to him, Glaukos said that as a grandson of Bellerophon he would fight anybody. On learning of Glaukos' ancestry Diomedes planted his spear in the ground and told of how his grandfather Oeneus was a close friend of Bellerophon, and declared that the two of them despite being on opposing sides should continue the friendship. As a sign of friendship Diomedes took off his bronze armor and gave it to Glaukos. Glaukos then had his wits taken by Zeus and gave Diomedes his gold armour. It has been suggested that Deception of Zeus be merged into this article or section. ... Diomêdês (Gk:Διομήδης - God-like cunning) is a hero in Greek mythology, mostly known for his participation in the Trojan War. ... Bellerophon on Pegasus spears the Chimaera, on an Attic red-figure epinetron — 425–420 BC Bellerophon or Bellerophontes (perhaps bearing darts[1]) was a hero of Greek mythology, the greatest hero and slayer of monsters, alongside of Kadmos and Perseus, before the days of Heracles[2]—whose greatest feat was... In Greek mythology, Oeneus, or Oineus was a Calydonian king, son of Porthaon, husband of Althaea and father of Deianira, Meleager and Melanippe. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is...


Glaukos was in the division of Sarpedon and Asteropaios when the Trojans assaulted the Greek wall. Their division fought valiantly, allowing Hector to break through the wall. During this assault Teucer shot Glaukos with an arrow, wounding him and forcing him to withdraw from combat. Later, upon seeing Sarpedon mortally wounded, Glaukos prayed to Apollo, asking him to help him to rescue the body of his dying friend. Apollo cured his wound, allowing Glaukos to rally the Trojans around the body of Sarpedon until the gods carried the body away. In the Iliad Asteropaios (Latin: Asteropaeus) was the leader of the Paionians along with Pyraichmes. ... In Greek mythology Teucer, also Teucrus or Teucris from Greek Τεύκρος, was the son of King Telamon of Salamis and his second wife Hesione, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy. ... Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or , Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros (a beardless youth), was the archer-god of medicine and healing, light, truth, archery and also a...


Later in the war, when the fighting over Achilles' corpse took place, Glaukos was killed by Ajax. His body however, was rescued by Aeneas and was then taken by Apollo to Lycia for funeral rites. The Wrath of Achilles, by François-Léon Benouville (1821–1859) (Musée Fabre) In Greek mythology, Achilles (also Akhilleus or Achilleus) (Ancient Greek: ) was a hero of the Trojan War, the central character and greatest warrior of Homers Iliad, which takes for its theme, not the War... Ajax Ajax or Aias (ancient Greek: ) was a mythological Greek hero, the son of Telamon and Periboea and king of Salamis. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ...


There is also an asteroid, 1870 Glaukos, named after the Lycian hero. 253 Mathilde, a C-type asteroid. ...


See: Iliad 2.876; 6.199. It has been suggested that Deception of Zeus be merged into this article or section. ...


Glaucus, the child

Glaucus or Glaukos was a son of Minos and Pasiphaë. Front face of the MINOS far detector. ... In Greek mythology, Pasiphaë (Eng. ...


One day, Glaucus was playing with a ball or mouse and suddenly disappeared. His parents went to the Oracle at Delphi who told them "A marvelous creature has been born amongst you: whoever finds the true likeness for this creature will also find the child." Feral mouse A mouse (plural mice) is a rodent that belongs to one of numerous species of small mammals. ... Consulting the Oracle by John William Waterhouse, showing eight priestesses in a temple of prophecy An oracle is a person or persons considered to be the source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ... Delphi (Greek Δελφοί, [ðe̞lˈfi]) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece on the south-western spur of Mount Parnassus in a valley of Phocis. ...


They interpreted this to refer to a newborn calf in Minos' herd. Three times a day, the calf changed color from white to red to black. Polyidus observed the similarity to the ripening of the fruit of the mulberry (or possibly the blackberry) plant, and Minos sent him to find Glaucus. In Greek mythology, Polyidus was the wisest man in Lycia. ... Species See text Mulberry (Morus) is a genus of 10–16 species of deciduous trees native to warm temperate and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa and North America, with the majority of the species native to Asia. ... The BlackBerry is a wireless handheld device introduced in 1999 which supports push e-mail, mobile telephone, text messaging, internet faxing, web browsing and other wireless information services. ...


Searching for the boy, Polyidus saw an owl driving bees away from a wine-cellar in Minos' palace. Inside the wine-cellar was a cask of honey, with Glaucus dead inside. Minos demanded Glaucus be brought back to life, though Polyidus objected. Minos was justified in his insistence, as the Delphic Oracle had said that the seer would restore the child alive. Minos shut Polyidus up in the wine-cellar with a sword. When a snake appeared nearby, Polyidus killed it with the sword. Another snake came for the first, and after seeing its mate dead, the second serpent left and brought back an herb which then brought the first snake back to life. Following this example, Polyidus used the same herb to resurrect Glaucus. Families Strigidae Tytonidae Ogygoptyngidae (fossil) Palaeoglaucidae (fossil) Protostrigidae (fossil) Sophiornithidae (fossil) Synonyms Strigidae sensu Sibley & Ahlquist Owls are a group of birds of prey. ... Families Andrenidae Apidae Colletidae Halictidae Megachilidae Melittidae Stenotritidae Bees are flying insects, closely related to wasps and ants. ... blue: sea snakes, black: land snakes Superfamilies and Families Henophidia Aniliidae Anomochilidae Boidae Bolyeriidae Cylindrophiidae Loxocemidae Pythonidae Tropidophiidae Uropeltidae Xenopeltidae Typhlopoidea Anomalepididae Leptotyphlopidae Typhlopidae Xenophidia Acrochordidae Atractaspididae Colubridae Elapidae Hydrophiidae Viperidae For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ... dvdsvdxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Herbs: basil Herbs (IPA: hə()b, or əb; see pronunciation differences) are plants grown for any purpose other than food, wood or beauty. ...


Minos refused to let Polyidus leave Crete until he taught Glaucus the art of divination. Polyidus did so, but then, at the last second before leaving, he asked Glaucus to spit in his mouth. Glaucus did so and forgot everything he had been taught. For the famous World War II battle, see: Battle of Crete For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... This article is about the religious practice of divination. ...


The story of Polyidus and Glaucus was the subject of a lost play attributed to Euripides. A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ...


Glaucus later led an army that attacked Italy, introducing to them the military girdle and shield. This was the source of his Italian name, Labicus, meaning "girdled".


Glaucus, the welder

According to Herodotus, Alyattes, the Lydian King and father of Croesus, gave a salver of welded iron to the Oracle of Delphi. This salver, "the most remarkable of all the offerings at Delphi," was the work of Glaucus of Chios, "the inventor of the art of welding."[1] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Alyattes can refer to: Alyattes I, king of Lydia (ca. ... Lydian was an Indo-European language, one of the Anatolian languages, that was spoken in the city-state of Lydia in Anatolia, present day Turkey. ... Croesus Croesus (IPA pronunciation: , CREE-sus) was the king of Lydia from 560/561 BC until his defeat by the Persians in about 547 BC. The English name Croesus come from the Latin transliteration of the Greek , in Arabic and Persian قارون, Qârun. ... Some 1730s to 1740s sterling silver salvers A salver is a flat tray of silver or other metal used for carrying or serving glasses, cups and dishes at table or for the presenting of a letter or card by a servant. ... Welding is a joining process that produces coalescence of materials (typically metals or thermoplastics) by heating them to welding temperature, with or without the application of pressure or by the application of pressure alone, and with or without the use of filler material. ... General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... The word Sibyl comes (via Latin) from the ancient Greek word sibylla, meaning prophetess. ... Chios (Greek: , alternative transliterations Khios and Hios, see also List of traditional Greek place names; Ottoman Turkish: صاقيز Sakız; Genoese: Scio) is a Greek island in the Aegean Sea five miles off the Turkish coasts. ...


Publications:

Glaucus is the title of the journal of the British Marine Life Study Society.[citation needed]


References

  1. ^ Herodotus, The Histories, Penguin Classics, 1996, page 11
  • Sea-god Glaucus references in source Greek and Latin texts

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Glaucus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (938 words)
Glaucus was a Greek sea-god, the son of Anthedon and Alcyone.
Glaucus was initially upset by this side-effect, but Oceanus and Tethys received him well and he was quickly accepted among the deities of the sea, learning the art of prophecy at which they were skilled.
Glaucus or Glaukos was a son of Minos and Pasiphae.
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