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Encyclopedia > Glastonbury Tor
Glastonbury Tor

Elevation 518 feet (158 m)
Location Somerset, England
Prominence 476 feet (145 m)
Topo map OS Landrangers 182, 183
OS grid reference ST512386
Listing Sub-Marilyn

Glastonbury Tor is a teardrop-shaped hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, which features the roofless St. Michael's Tower. The site is managed by the National Trust. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 335 KB) Glastonbury Tor, England. ... A topographical summit is a point on a surface which is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... In topography, prominence, also known as autonomous height, relative height or shoulder drop (in America) or prime factor (in Europe), is a concept used in the categorization of hills and mountains, also known as peaks. ... // Topographic maps are a variety of maps characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines in modern mapping, but historically using a variety of methods. ... Part of an Ordnance Survey map at 1 inch to the mile scale from 1945 Ordnance Survey (OS) is an executive agency of the United Kingdom government. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... There are many notable lists of mountains around the world. ... For other uses, see Glastonbury (disambiguation). ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ...


Tor is a local word of Celtic origin meaning 'conical hill'. The Tor has a striking location in the middle of a plain called the Summerland Meadows, part of the Somerset Levels. The plain is actually reclaimed fenland out of which the Tor rose like an island, but now, with the surrounding flats, is a peninsula washed on three sides by the River Brue. The remains of Glastonbury Lake Village were identified in 1892, showing that there was a Celtic settlement about 300–200 BC on what was an easily defended island in the fens.[1][2] Earthworks and Roman remains prove later occupation. The spot seems to have been called Ynys yr Afalon by the Britons, and it is believed to be the Avalon of Arthurian legend. Hawks Tor, on Bodmin Moor Tor redirects here. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, a branch of the greater Indo-European language family. ... The view towards Brent Knoll from Glastonbury Tor. ... A fen is a sere, a phase in the natural ecological succession from the open water of a lake to (for example) woodland. ... A peninsula in Croatia A peninsula is a piece of land that is bordered on three or more sides by water. ... River Brue originates in the parish of Brewham. ... Glastonbury Lake Village was an iron age village on the Somerset Levels near Godney, some 3 miles (5 km) north west of Glastonbury. ... In civil engineering, earthworks are engineering works created through the moving of massive quantities of soil or unformed stone. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... This article is about the modern people. ... For other uses, see Avalon (disambiguation). ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ...


The slopes of the Tor appear to be quite regularly terraced. Some believe that this formation is the remains of an ancient, perhaps Neolithic, sacred labyrinth.[3] Others attribute the terraces to natural ruts formed everywhere on grassy slopes by generations of grazing animals, which are slow to disappear if the grass cover is left undisturbed. The generally accepted explanation is terracing for farming, possibly by medieval monks.[4] Even after the wetlands were drained by the Monks of Glastonbury Abbey via their vast network of drainage canals, the risk of flooding on the plain meant that farm land was at a premium for anything other than grazing cattle. Terraced vineyards near Lausanne The Incan terraces at Písac are still used today. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... This article is about the mazelike structure from Greek mythology. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... A subtropical wetland in Florida, USA, with an endangered American Crocodile. ... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ... View from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

Ruin of St Michael's Church.
Plaque inside the tower.

Some Neolithic flint tools recovered from the top of the Tor show that the site has been visited and perhaps occupied throughout human prehistory. Excavations on Glastonbury Tor, undertaken by a team led by Philip Rahtz between 1964 and 1966, revealed evidence of Dark Age occupation around the later medieval church of St. Michael: postholes, two hearths including a metalworker's forge, two burials oriented north-south (thus unlikely to be Christian), fragments of 6th century Mediterranean amphorae (for wine or oil), and a worn hollow bronze head which may have topped a Saxon staff.[5] Image File history File links Glastor. ... Image File history File links Glastor. ... This article is about the sedimentary rock. ... The term archaeological excavation has a double meaning. ... Philip Rahtz was born in Bristol in 1921 and after leaving Bristol Grammar School served with the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. ... The Dark Ages (or Dark Age) is a metaphor with multiple meanings and connotations. ... For finery forges (making iron), see finery forge. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... The Mediterranean region is one of the most important in world history and it is the origin point of Western Civilization. ... Amphoræ on display in Bodrum Castle, Turkey An amphora is a type of ceramic vase with two handles, used for the transportation and storage of perishable goods and more rarely as containers for the ashes of the dead or as prize awards. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with vegetable oil. ... This article is about the metal alloy. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ...


The Celtic name of the Tor was "Ynys Witrin," or sometimes "Ynys Gutrin," meaning "Isle of Glass". At this time the plain was flooded, the isle becoming a peninsula at low tide. A peninsula in Croatia A peninsula is a piece of land that is bordered on three or more sides by water. ... This article is about tides in the Earths oceans. ...


Remains of a 5th century fort have been found on the Tor. This was replaced by the medieval St. Michael's church that remained until 1275. According to the British Geological Survey's, an earthquake was recorded on 11 September 1275 which was felt in London, Canterbury and Wales and this quake was what destroyed the church of St. Michael, Glastonbury Tor.[6] The quake is reported to have destroyed many houses and churches in England. It is suggested that the quake had a magnitude of well over 7 MSK and it is possible that the epicentre of the quake was in the area around Portsmouth or Chichester, South England. Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... The British Geological Survey is a publicly-funded body which aims to advance geoscientific knowledge of the United Kingdom landmass and its continental shelf by means of systematic surveying, monitoring and research. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // April 22 - The first of the Statutes of Westminster are passed by the English parliament, establishing a series of laws in its 51 clauses, including equal treatment of rich and poor, free and fair elections, and definition of bailable and non-bailable offenses. ... The Medvedev-Sponheuer-Karnik scale (MSK-64) is a macroseismic intensity scale used to measure the effects of earthquakes on humans, objects of nature, and structures. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... For the larger local government district, see Chichester (district). ...


A second church, built in the 1360s, survived until the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1539 when the Tor was the place of execution where Richard Whyting the last Abbot of Glastonbury Abbey was hanged, drawn and quartered along with two of his monks. The remains of St. Michael's Tower were restored in modern times. It is a grade I listed building and is managed by the National Trust.[7] For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... Death Penalty World Map Color Key: Blue: Abolished for all crimes Green: Abolished for crimes not committed in exceptional circumstances (such as crimes committed in time of war) Orange: Abolished in Practice Red: Legal Form of Punishment Execution of a soldier of the 8th Infantry at Prescott, Arizona, 1877 Execution... View of Glastonbury Abbey from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. ... For other uses, see Abbot (disambiguation). ... View from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. ... To be hanged, drawn and quartered was the penalty once ordained in England for treason. ... The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ...


The site of the fair held at the foot of the Tor is embodied in the traditional name of "Fair Field" given to an agricultural enclosure, the enclosures in the local landscape dating from the 18th century. Roundabouts (or carousels) are traditional attractions, often seen at fairs. ...


Mythology

The Tor has been associated with the name Avalon, and identified, since the alleged discovery of King Arthur and Queen Guinevere's neatly labelled coffins in 1191, with the legendary hero King Arthur. Modern archaeology has revealed a fort, dated to the 5th century. For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ...


With the 19th-century resurgence of interest in Celtic mythology, the Tor became associated with Gwyn ap Nudd, who was first Lord of the Underworld, and later King of the Fairies. The Tor came to be represented as an entrance to Annwn or Avalon, the land of the fairies.[3] Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism, apparently the religion of the Iron Age Celts. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwyn or Gwynn ap Nudd was the ruler of Annwn (the Underworld). ... by Sophie Anderson For other uses, see Fairy (disambiguation). ... Annwn or Annwfn (Middle Welsh Annwvn, sometimes inaccurately written Annwyn, Annwyfn or Annwfyn) was the Otherworld in Welsh mythology. ... For other uses, see Avalon (disambiguation). ...


A persistent myth of more modern origin is that of the Glastonbury Zodiac, an astrological zodiac of gargantuan proportions said to have been carved into the land along ancient hedgerows and trackways. The theory was first put forward in 1927 by Katherine Maltwood, an artist with an interest in the occult, who thought the zodiac was constructed approximately 5,000 years ago. The vast majority of the land said to be covered by the zodiac was, at the proposed time of its construction, under several feet of water. The Temple of the Stars is an alleged ancient temple thought to be situated around Glastonbury in Somerset, England. ... The term zodiac denotes an annual cycle of twelve stations along the ecliptic, the apparent path of the sun across the heavens through the constellations that divide the ecliptic into twelve equal zones of celestial longitude. ... A clipped beech hedge in Germany, allowed to grow as high as a house in order to serve as a windbreak A hedge is a line of closely spaced shrubs and bushes, planted and trained in such a way as to form a barrier or to mark the boundary of...


Christopher Hodapp asserts in his book The Templar Code For Dummies that Glastonbury Tor is one of the possible locations of the Holy Grail. This is because it is the location of the monastery that housed the Nanteos Cup.[8] For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ... The Nanteos Cup is an olive wood bowl, held for many years at Nanteos Mansion, Rhydyfelin, near Aberystwyth, and claimed to be the Holy Grail. ...


Another speculation is that the Tor was reshaped into a spiral maze for use in religious ritual, incorporating the myth that the Tor was the location of the underworld king's spiral castle.[3]

Glastonbury Tor, c. 1907
View from Glastonbury Tor.

Glastonbury Tor - Somerset - Project Gutenberg eBook 12287 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Glastonbury Tor - Somerset - Project Gutenberg eBook 12287 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x712, 231 KB) Photographer:Srsteel. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x712, 231 KB) Photographer:Srsteel. ...

Terraces

The seven deep, roughly symmetrical terraces are one of the Tor's enduring mysteries. A number of possible explanations for them have been put forward:

  • Agriculture — many cultures, not least the British farmers of the Middle Ages have terraced hills to make ploughing for crops easier. Mann, however, observes that if agriculture had been the reason for the creation of the terraces, it would be expected that the effort would be concentrated on the south side, where the sunny conditions would provide a good yield, however it may be seen that the terraces are equally deep on the north, where there would be little benefit. Additionally, none of the other slopes of the island have been terraced, even though the more sheltered locations would provide a greater return on the labour involved.
  • Cattle grazing — over long periods of time, cattle grazing can cause terraces to develop, but these are usually of a much smaller size than those observed at Glastonbury and also tend to run parallel to the contours of the hill. In some places, the terraces of Glastonbury are quite steep and it is difficult to point to other hills with comparable patterns of livestock-induced erosion.
  • Defensive ramparts — Other Iron Age hill forts in the area show evidence of extensive fortification of the slopes of hills, (for example, South Cadbury Castle). However, the normal form of these ramparts is that of a bank and ditch and on the Tor, there is no evidence of this arrangement. Additionally, South Cadbury, as one of the most extensively fortified places in early Britain had three concentric rings of banks and ditches supporting an 18 hectare enclosure. By contrast, the Tor has seven rings and very little space on top for the safekeeping of a community, making it a strange thing indeed to have spent so much effort to have gained so little.
  • Labyrinth — Professor Rahtz felt that the theory that the Tor terraces formed the remains of a three dimensional labyrinth was "well worth consideration" (in Mann, 1993). The theory, first put forward by Geoffrey Russell in 1968, states that the 'classical labyrinth', a design found all over the Neolithic world, can be easily transposed onto the Tor so that by walking around the terraces one eventually reaches the top in the same pattern. Evaluating this hypothesis is not easy. A Labyrinth would very likely place the terraces in the Neolithic era (Rahtz, in Mann, 1993), but given the amount of occupation since then, there may have been substantial modifications by farmer and/or monks and conclusive excavations have not been carried out.

Terraced vineyards near Lausanne The Incan terraces at Písac are still used today. ... The hill from Corton ridge Cadbury Castle is a hill fort near the village of South Cadbury in Somerset, England, five miles north west of Yeovil at grid reference ST62862512. ... This article is about the mazelike structure from Greek mythology. ...

Geology

The Tor consists of layers of clay and blue lias strata (Jurassic sandstone) with a cap of hard midford sandstone, whose resistance to erosion compared to the lower layers is responsible for its height. The iron-rich waters of Chalice Well, a spring, have been flowing out as an artesian well for millions of years, impregnating the sandstone round it with iron oxides that have reinforced it. Iron-rich but oxygen-poor water in the aquifer carries dissolved Iron (II) "ferrous" iron, but as the water surfaces and its oxygen content rises, the oxidized Iron (III) "ferric" iron drops out as insoluble "rusty" oxides that bind to the surrounding stone, hardening it. As the surrounding soft sandstone has eroded away, Glastonbury Tor has slowly been revealed. Blue Lias is a form of limestone, laid down in Jurassic times. ... Red sandstone interior of Lower Antelope Canyon, Arizona, worn smooth due to erosion by flash flooding over millions of years Sandstone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-size mineral or rock grains. ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... Chalice Well is a holy well situated at the foot of Glastonbury Tor in the county of Somerset, England. ... A natural spring on Mackinac Island in Michigan. ... Iron oxide pigment There are a number of iron oxides: Iron oxides Iron(II) oxide or ferrous oxide (FeO) The black-coloured powder in particular can cause explosions as it readily ignites. ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ...


Popular culture

Glastonbury Tor has been used in various fictional works. Some examples are given below:

  • In the science fiction television series Stargate SG-1, hidden beneath Glastonbury Tor is a secret chamber of King Arthur and Merlin; Merlin, according to the show, was actually a member of a race known as the Ancients (or the Alterans) ("Avalon").
  • In Camelot 3000 Arthur is buried (and resurrected) in a tomb found in the tower. In a later issue, the knights revisit the place to claim the Holy Grail from the Fisher King
  • Conquests of Camelot, a 1989 computer game released by Sierra On-Line based on the Arthurian Legends about the Holy Grail, features Glastonbury Tor as one of the possible locations of the Grail.
  • In the science fiction novel series Area 51, this is the site of the Hall of Records for the Watchers, who monitor the war between the Arlia.
  • The third instalment of the Broken Sword series of computer games sees Glastonbury Tor as the centre of the Earth's ley lines and site of the emergence of an evil power. It is also the scene for the end battle between George and a dragon.
  • In the second and third deliveries of the trilogy by Marion Zimmer Bradley, Lady of Avalon and The Mists of Avalon, Glastonbury of the Monks is the area where the Isle of Avalon is located, separated from the real world by magical mists, and governed by priestesses that descend from a royal line of ancients. In Avalon, instead of a church, at the top of the Tor there is an ancient stone circle, probably similar to the one in Avebury or Stanton Drew.
  • It was featured on the 2005 TV programme Seven Natural Wonders as one of the wonders of the West Country.
  • In Bernard Cornwell's Warlord trilogy, Glastonbury Tor (called Ynys Wydryn) is the home and fortress of the Druid Merlin. The protagonist, Derfel Cadarn, was raised on the Tor. In The Winter King the Tor is raided and sacked by Gundleus, the warlord of Siluria, while Merlin is away.
  • In the popular teenage fiction series Ally's World by author Karen McCombie, the titular character's younger brother is named Tor after Glastonbury Tor, where his parents visited whilst his mum was pregnant.

Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Stargate SG-1 (often abbreviated as SG-1) is a science fiction television series, part of the Stargate franchise. ... The Ancients, also known as the Alterans and Lanteans, sometimes calling themselves Anqueetas in their language, are a humanoid race in the fictional Stargate universe. ... Avalon (Parts 1 to 2 of 3) are the season 9 premiere episodes of the science fiction television series Stargate SG-1. ... Camelot 3000 is a comic book maxi-series written by Mike Barr and penciled by Brian Bolland and published by DC Comics from 1982-1985 as one of its first Direct Market projects. ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Fisher King from Arthurian legend. ... Conquests of Camelot (full official title: Conquests of Camelot I: King Arthur, Quest for the Grail) is a graphic adventure game released in 1989 by Sierra. ... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... Sierra Entertainment was a computer game developer and publisher. ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... The Area 51 novels are a series of science fiction novels by American author Robert Doherty. ... The header for Broken Sword: The Angel of Death For other uses, see Broken Sword (disambiguation). ... Ley lines are alignments of a number of places of geographical interest, such as ancient megaliths. ... Marion Eleanor Zimmer Bradley (June 3, 1930 – September 25, 1999) was an American author of fantasy novels such as The Mists of Avalon and the Darkover series, often with a feminist outlook. ... Avebury Henge and Village Avebury is the site of a large henge and several stone circles in the English county of Wiltshire at grid reference SU103699, surrounding the village of Avebury (its geographical location is 51°25′43″N, 1°51′15″W). ... The Stanton Drew stone circles are at grid reference ST600633 just outside the village of Stanton Drew, Somerset. ... Seven Natural Wonders is a television programme that aired on BBC Two from 3 May to 20 June 2005. ... Bernard Cornwell OBE (born February 23, 1944) is a prolific and popular English historical novelist. ... Merlin dictating his poems, as illustrated in a French book from the 13th century For other uses, see Merlin (disambiguation). ... The Silures were a powerful and warlike tribe of ancient Britain, occupying approximately the counties of Monmouth, Brecon and Glamorgan. ... Allys World is a series of books written for young adults by Karen McCombie. ...

See also

Drumlin in Cato, New York Drowned drumlin in Clew Bay Drumlin at Withrow Moraine and Jameson Lake Drumlin Field National Natural Landmark A drumlin (Irish droimnín, a little hill ridge) is an elongated whale-shaped hill formed by glacial action. ... Development of the European Megalithic Culture The European Megalithic Culture was a prehistoric (and preliterate) civilisation based primarily in Western Europe, that has left a legacy of large stone monuments, or megaliths, scattered widely across the continent. ...

References

  1. ^ Glastonbury Lake Village. Somerset Historic Environment Record. Retrieved on 2007-11-18.
  2. ^ Adkins, Lesley; Roy Adkins (1992). A field guide to Somerset archeology. Wimborne: Dovecote Press. ISBN 0946159947. 
  3. ^ a b c Introducing Glastonbury Tor. Glastonbury Tor. Retrieved on 2007-12-25.
  4. ^ Glastonbury Travel Information. Britain Express. Retrieved on 2007-12-25.
  5. ^ The Glastonbury Tor Maze. About Glastonbury Tor. Retrieved on 2007-12-25.
  6. ^ Historical Earthquake Listing. British Geological Survey. Retrieved on 2007-12-25.
  7. ^ St Michael's Church Tower. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-11-11.
  8. ^ The Templar Code for Dummies (with Alice Von Kannon) ISBN 0-470-12765-1
  • "Glastonbury: Alternative Histories", in Ronald Hutton, Witches, Druids and King Arthur
  • 'Glastonbury Tor — A guide to the history and legends', Mann, Nicholas R., 1993, Triskele publications, Butleigh, Somerset. ISBN 0-9510682-1-0
  • 'Glastonbury', Philip Rahtz, English Heritage/Batsford 1993, ISBN 0-7134-68661

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ronald Hutton is Professor of History at the University of Bristol and is an occasional commentator on British television and radio on the history of paganism in the British Isles. ...

External links

Coordinates: 51°8′36″N 2°41′57″W / 51.14333, -2.69917 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Glastonbury - Britannia's Magical History Tour (769 words)
Apart from the Arthurian legends, Glastonbury Abbey was, for centuries,an important center for scholarly and religious pursuit.
It was called the "holiest earth in all England", and, as such, was an object of veneration and pilgrimage.The discovery of the grave of King Arthur by the Glastonbury monks in 1190 did much to enhance the attraction value of the abbey.
To accommodate middle class pilgrims to the abbey, a hostel was built in the latter half of the fifteenth century, adjacent to the abbey grounds.
Glastonbury Tor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (974 words)
Glastonbury Tor is a teardrop-shaped hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, with its only standing architectural feature the roofless St Michael's Tower of the former church.
The Tor came to be represented as an entrance to Annwn or Avalon, the land of the fairies.
Another speculation is that the Tor was reshaped into a spiral maze for use in religious ritual, identifying the terraces circling the Tor as manmade, rather than as grazing patterns, and incorporating the myth that the Tor was the location of the underworld king's spiral castle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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