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Encyclopedia > Glastonbury
Glastonbury

Glastonbury shown within Somerset
Population 8,800
OS grid reference ST501390
District Mendip
Shire county Somerset
Region South West
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town GLASTONBURY
Postcode district BA6
Dialling code 01458
Police Avon and Somerset
Fire Devon and Somerset
Ambulance South Western
European Parliament South West England
UK Parliament Wells
List of places: UKEnglandSomerset

Coordinates: 51°08′55″N 2°42′50″W / 51.1485, -2.714 Glastonbury is a small town in Somerset, England. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Categories: Stub | Somerset ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the region. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The BA postcode area, also known as the Bath postcode area[1], is a group of postal districts around Bath, Bradford on Avon, Bruton, Castle Cary, Frome, Glastonbury, Radstock, Shepton Mallet, Street, Templecombe, Trowbridge, Warminster, Wells, Westbury, Wincanton and Yeovil in England. ... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Avon & Somerset Constabulary is a police force in England covering the county of Somerset and the districts of South Gloucestershire, Bristol, North Somerset and Bath and North East Somerset; these districts were the now defunct county of Avon hence the forces name. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service or FRS covering the counties of Somerset and Devon, including the unitary authorities of Plymouth and Torbay, in the south west of England Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service was founded on 1 April 2007... The South Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust (SWAST) is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in the counties of Devon, Cornwall, Somerset and Dorset. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... The constituency (first used 2004) within England; Gibraltar is in the inset. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Wells is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Glastonbury is a small town in Somerset, England, situated at a dry point on the Somerset Levels, 50km (31 miles) south of Bristol. The town has a population of 8,800 (2002 estimate). It is in the Mendip district. This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... In geography a dry point is an area of firm or flood-free ground in an area of wetland, marsh or flood plains. ... The view towards Brent Knoll from Glastonbury Tor. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... This article is about the English city. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Stub | Somerset ...


The town is known for its history, including Glastonbury Lake Village, Glastonbury Abbey and Glastonbury Tor, the many myths and legends associated with the town, and the Glastonbury Festival which takes place in the nearby village of Pilton. Glastonbury Lake Village was an iron age village on the Somerset Levels near Godney, some 3 miles (5 km) north west of Glastonbury. ... View from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. ... Glastonbury Tor is a teardrop-shaped hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, which features the roofless St. ... The Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts, commonly abbreviated to Glastonbury or Glasto, is the largest[1] greenfield music and performing arts festival in the world. ... Pilton is a village in Somerset, England, situated on the A361 road in the Mendip district, three miles south west of Shepton Mallet and six miles east of Glastonbury. ...


On 5 May 2003, Glastonbury was granted Fairtrade Town status. is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fairtrade Town is a status awarded by the Fairtrade Foundation in the United Kingdom and Channel Islands, describing an area which is committed to the promotion of Fairtrade-labelled goods. ...

Contents

History and mythology

The town of Glastonbury is particularly notable for the myths and legends surrounding a nearby hill, Glastonbury Tor, which rises up from the otherwise flat landscape of the Somerset Levels. These myths concern Joseph of Arimathea and the Holy Grail, and also King Arthur. Glastonbury is also said to be the centre of several ley lines. Glastonbury Tor is a teardrop-shaped hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, which features the roofless St. ... The view towards Brent Knoll from Glastonbury Tor. ... Joseph of Arimathea by Pietro Perugino. ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... Ley lines are alignments of a number of places of geographical interest, such as ancient megaliths. ...


The legend of Joseph of Arimathea was the result of a work of fiction by the french poet Robert de Boron in the 12th century. The original story was likely written after the monks of Glastonbury "discovered" the bodies of King Arthur and Guinevere, and is also known as Joseph d'Arimathe or Le Roman de I'Estoire dou Graal[1]. It is thought to be part of a trilogy but only fragments of the later books survive today. The author is best known for his Arthurian romances centred around the Holy Grail, and became the inspiration for the later Vulgate Cycle of Arthurian tales and the subsequent Matter of Britain. Joseph of Arimathea by Pietro Perugino. ... Robert de Boron (also spelled in the manuscripts Bouron, Beron) was a French poet of the late 12th and early 13th centuries, originally from the village of Boron, in the arrondissement of Montbéliard. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ...


The original story describes how Joseph captured Jesus' blood in a cup (the Holy Grail) and that subsequently he and his son brought it to somewhere in Britain, probably Avalon, where they were imprisoned by a pagan king. Later stories (the Vulgate Cycle) added new plots and scenes, which completely reworked Boron's original tale. Here, Joseph of Arimathea was no longer the chief character in the Grail origin. It was Joseph's son, Josephus, who took over his role of the Grail keeper [2]. The Lancelot-Grail, also known as the prose Lancelot, the Vulgate Cycle, or the Pseudo-Map Cycle, is a major source of Arthurian legend. ...


Today, Glastonbury Abbey presents itself as "traditionally the oldest above-ground Christian church in the World," which according to the legend was built at Joseph's behest to house the Holy Grail, 65 or so years after the death of Jesus. The legend also says that earlier Joseph had visited Glastonbury along with Jesus as a child. The legend probably was encouraged in the mediaeval period when religious relics and pilgrimages were profitable business for abbeys. However William Blake believed in this legend and wrote the poem that became the words to the patriotic English song, 'Jerusalem' (see And did those feet in ancient time). View from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... For other persons named William Blake, see William Blake (disambiguation). ... “Jerusalem (song)” redirects here. ...


Joseph is said to have arrived in Glastonbury by boat over the flooded Somerset Levels. On disembarking he stuck his staff into the ground, which flowered miraculously into the Glastonbury Thorn (or Holy Thorn). This is the explanation behind the existence of a hybrid hawthorn tree that only grows within a few miles of Glastonbury. Glastonbury Abbey in Glastonbury, Somerset, England, now presents itself as traditionally the oldest above-ground Christian church in the world situated in the mystical land of Avalon by dating the founding of the community of monks at 63 A.D., the legendary visit of Joseph of Arimathea who also brought... Species See text Crataegus (Hawthorn) is a large genus of in the family Rosaceae, native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Europe, Asia and North America. ...

Part of a series on
History of Christianity
in the British Isles
Early
Joseph of Arimathea
Legend of Christ in Britain
Christianity in Roman Britain
Post-Roman
Celtic Christianity
Anglo-Saxon Christianity
Medieval
England · Wales
Scotland · Ireland
Reformation
Wars of the Three Kingdoms
Dissolution of the Monasteries
Scottish Reformation
Post-Reformation
17th century (England)
English Civil War
18th century (England) ·
19th century (England)
Catholic Emancipation
1900-present (England)
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This hawthorn flowers twice annually, once in spring and again around Christmas time (depending on the weather). Each year a sprig of thorn is cut by the local Church of England priest and the eldest child from St Johns school, which is then sent to the Queen to feature on her Christmas table top. This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... Joseph of Arimathea by Pietro Perugino. ... For other uses, see Glastonbury (disambiguation). ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Celtic Christianity, or Insular Christianity (sometimes commonly called the Celtic Church) broadly refers to the Early Medieval Christian practice that developed around the Irish Sea in the fifth and sixth centuries: that is, among Celtic/British peoples such as the Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Cornish, Manx, Cumbrians (the inhabitants of the... The history of Christianity in England from the Roman departure to the Norman Conquest is often told as one of conflict between the Celtic Christianity spread by the Irish mission, and Roman Catholic Christianity brought across by Augustine of Canterbury. ... The crozier of Saint Finan, an early medieval staff-head used by Gaelic clergymen. ... The Wars of the Three Kingdoms were an intertwined series of conflicts that took place in Scotland, Ireland, and England between 1639 and 1651 at a time when these countries had come under the Personal Rule of the same monarch. ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... John Knox regarded as the leader of the Scottish Reformation The Scottish Reformation was Scotlands formal break with the papacy in 1560, and the events surrounding this. ... The specifically English church originates primarily from events in the late 6th century in the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Kent, and the mission of Saint Augustine. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The specifically English church originates primarily from events in the late 6th century in the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Kent, and the mission of Saint Augustine. ... The specifically English church originates primarily from events in the late 6th century in the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Kent, and the mission of Saint Augustine. ... Catholic Emancipation was a process in Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century which involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics which had been introduced by the Act of Uniformity, the Test Acts and the Penal Laws. ... The specifically English church originates primarily from events in the late 6th century in the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Kent, and the mission of Saint Augustine. ...


The original Holy Thorn was a centre of pilgrimage in the Middle Ages but was chopped down during the English Civil War (in legend the roundhead soldier who did it was blinded by a flying splinter). A replacement thorn was planted in the 20th century on Wearyall hill (originally in 1951 to mark the Festival of Britain; but the thorn had to be replanted the following year as the first attempt did not take); but many other examples of the thorn grow throughout Glastonbury including those in the grounds of Glastonbury Abbey, St Johns Church and Chalice Well. For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The Festival of Britain emblem, designed by Abram Games, from the cover of the South Bank Exhibition Guide, 1951 The Festival of Britain was a national exhibition which opened in London and around Britain in May 1951. ... Chalice Well is a holy well situated at the foot of Glastonbury Tor in the county of Somerset, England. ...

Holy Thorn, Summer 1984. Died in 1991.

In some versions of the Arthurian myth, Glastonbury is conceived of as the legendary island of Avalon. An early Welsh story links Arthur to the Tor in an account of a face-off between Arthur and the Celtic king, Melwas, who had apparently kidnapped Arthur's wife Queen Guinevere. Geoffrey of Monmouth first identified Glastonbury with Avalon in 1133. In 1191, monks at the Abbey claimed to have found the graves of Arthur and Guinevere to the south of the Lady Chapel of the Abbey church, which was visited by a number of contemporary historians including Giraldus Cambrensis. The remains were later moved, and lost during the Reformation. Many scholars suspect that this discovery was a pious forgery to substantiate the antiquity of Glastonbury's foundation, and increase its renown. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 562 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,878 × 1,319 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 562 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,878 × 1,319 pixels, file size: 3. ... For other uses, see Avalon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guinevere (disambiguation). ... Geoffrey of Monmouth (in Welsh: Gruffudd ap Arthur or Sieffre o Fynwy) (c. ... // Events May 12 - Richard I of England marries Berengaria of Navarre. ... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... Giraldus Cambrensis (c. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ...


Richard Whiting, the last Abbot of Glastonbury, was executed with two of his monks on 14 November, 1539 during the dissolution of the monasteries. View of Glastonbury Abbey from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. ...


Also, according to some versions of the Arthurian legend, it was Glastonbury Abbey to which Lancelot retreated in penance following the death of Arthur. For other uses, see Lancelot (disambiguation) and Sir Lancelot (disambiguation). ...


The town today

Glastonbury today is a centre for religious tourism and pilgrimage. Diverse strains of mysticism and paganism co-exist alongside the followers of its Catholic heritage. As with many towns of similar size, the centre is not as thriving as it once was but Glastonbury supports a remarkable number of alternative shops. The outskirts of the town include a DIY shop and the slow redevelopment of a former sheepskin and slipper factory site, once owned by Morlands. Although the redevelopment has been slow, clearance of the site has begun with a dramatic change to its appearance. This article is about the religious or spiritual journey. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... See also: DIY Network, a cable TV network. ... Sheepskin: slang term for a diploma. ... Morlands is a manufacturer of sheepskin jackets, boots and other footwear, based in Glastonbury in Somerset, England. ...

Glastonbury received national media coverage when, in 1999, cannabis plants were found in the town's floral displays. Image File history File links Glastonburyabbey. ... Image File history File links Glastonburyabbey. ... View from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... This article is about the plant genus Cannabis. ...


The ruins of the abbey are open to visitors; the abbey had a violent end during the Dissolution and the buildings were progressively destroyed as their stones were removed for use in local building work. The remains of the Abbot's Kitchen (a grade I listed building.[3]) and the Lady Chapel are particularly well-preserved. Not far away is situated the Somerset Rural Life Museum, which includes the restored Abbey Barn.[4] Other points of interest include St. John's Church, the Chalice Well, and the historic George and Pilgrims Inn,[5] built to accommodate visitors to the Abbey. View from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ... The Somerset Rural Life Museum is situated in Glastonbury, Somerset, UK. It is a museum of the social and agricultural history of Somerset, housed in buildings surrounding a 14th century barn once belonging to Glastonbury Abbey. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ... Chalice Well is a holy well situated at the foot of Glastonbury Tor in the county of Somerset, England. ...

Remains of St. Michael's Church at the summit of Glastonbury Tor.

The walk up the Tor to the distinctive tower at the summit (the partially restored remains of an old church) is rewarded by vistas of the Mid-Somerset area including the Levels, drained marshland. From there, 150m above sea level, it is easy to appreciate how Glastonbury was once an island and, in the winter, the surrounding moors are often flooded, giving that appearance once more. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2112x2816, 1208 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Glastonbury Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2112x2816, 1208 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Glastonbury Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Glastonbury Tor is a teardrop-shaped hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, which features the roofless St. ...



The local football side is Glastonbury F.C. Glastonbury F.C. is a football club based in Glastonbury, England. ...


Local people

For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guinevere (disambiguation). ... View from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. ... Gary Stringer is the lead singer of English band Reef. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... View of Glastonbury Abbey from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. ... For other uses, see Abbot (disambiguation). ... Violet Mary Firth Evans, born Violet Mary Firth (December 6, 1890[1] - 1946) and better known as Dion Fortune, was a British occultist and author[2]. Her pseudonym was inspired by her family motto Deo, non fortuna (Latin for God, not fate)[3]. // She was born at Bryn-y-Bia... Frederick Bligh Bond (30 June 1864 – 8 March 1945)[1] was an architect, archaeologist, and psychical researcher. ... Geoffrey Ashe is a writer of non-fiction books. ... Haggis McLeod is a juggler who has performed for years as half of the comedy street show duo Haggis and Charlie. ... For the mistress of James II of England, and sister of The Duke of Marlborough, see Arabella Churchill (royal mistress). ...

Transport

Glastonbury Tor from Street.

The Glastonbury Canal ran just over 14 miles through two locks from Glastonbury to Highbridge where it entered the Bristol Channel in the early 1800s, however this became uneconomic with the arrival of the railway. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1597x931, 323 KB)[edit] Summary Glastonbury, Somerset, UK seen from the nearby settlement of Street. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1597x931, 323 KB)[edit] Summary Glastonbury, Somerset, UK seen from the nearby settlement of Street. ... Map sources for Street at grid reference ST4836 Street is a town in the county of Somerset, England, situated on a dry spot in the Somerset Levels, at the end of the Polden Hills, two miles south west of Glastonbury. ... The Glastonbury Canal ran just over 14 miles through two locks from Glastonbury to Highbridge where it entered the Bristol channel. ... Canal locks in England. ... Map sources for Highbridge at grid reference ST3247 Highbridge is a Somerset market town situated on very edge of the Somerset Levels near the mouth of the River Brue. ... Satellite view of the Bristol Channel Map of the Bristol Channel The Bristol Channel (Welsh: ) is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from the West Country and extending from the lower estuary of the River Severn (Afon Hafren) to that part of the North...


Glastonbury and Street was the biggest station on the original Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway main line from Highbridge to Evercreech Junction until closed in 1966 under the Beeching axe. It was the junction for the short branch line to Wells which closed in 1951. Glastonbury and Street railway station was the biggest station on the original Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway main line from Highbridge to Evercreech Junction until closed in 1966 under the Beeching axe. ... The Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway (S&DJR) was an English railway company jointly owned by the Midland Railway and the London and South Western Railway. ... Evercreech Junction was a railway station on the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway. ... Many railway lines were closed as a result of the Beeching Axe The Beeching Axe is an informal name for the British Governments attempt in the 1960s to reduce the cost of running the British railway system. ... For other uses, see Wells (disambiguation). ...


References

  1. ^ [1]Project Gutenburg - french text of Le Roman de I'Estoire dou Graal
  2. ^ [2] Vulgate Cycle Arthurian Legends
  3. ^ Abbot's Kitchen, Glastonbury Abbey. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-11-11.
  4. ^ Abbey Tithe Barn. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-11-11.
  5. ^ George Hotel and Pilgrims' Inn. Images of England. Retrieved on 2006-11-11.
  • Geoffrey Ashe, King Arthur's Avalon: The Story of Glastonbury, 1957

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Geoffrey Ashe is a writer of non-fiction books. ...

See also

Glastonbury Tor is a teardrop-shaped hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, which features the roofless St. ... View from the former location of the North transept in East direction to the choir. ... A Glastonbury Romance is a novel by John Cowper Powys, published in 1932. ... John Cowper Powys (October 8, 1872 - June 17, 1963) was a British (English-Welsh) writer, lecturer, and philosopher. ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ...

External links

The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... Categories: Stub | Somerset ... Sedgemoor is a local government district of Somerset in England. ... Bath and North East Somerset (commonly referred to as BANES or B&NES) is a unitary authority that was created on 1 April 1996 following the abolition of the County of Avon. ... North Somerset is a unitary authority in England, historically part of the county of Somerset but now administered independently. ... South Somerset is a local government district in Somerset, England. ... Taunton Deane is a local government district with borough status in Somerset, England. ... West Somerset is a local government district in Somerset, England. ... Map sources for Axbridge at grid reference ST4354 Axbridge is a town in Somerset, England, situated in the Sedgemoor district on the River Axe, near the southern edge of the Mendip Hills. ... , Bath is a small city in Somerset, England most famous for its historic baths fed by three hot springs. ... , Bridgwater in Somerset, England, is a market town, the administrative centre of the Sedgemoor district, and the leading industrial town in the county. ... Burnham-on-Sea is a town in Somerset, England, at the mouth of the River Parrett. ... Map sources for Chard at grid reference ST3208 Chard is a town in the county of Somerset, England, situated on the A30 road near the Devon border, 15 miles south west of Yeovil. ... Map sources for Clevedon at grid reference ST3971 Clevedon Village - circa 1907 Clevedon seafront is extremely windswept, as witnessed by this tree. ... Crewkerne is a town in Somerset, England, situated nine miles south west of Yeovil and seven miles east of Chard in the South Somerset district. ... , Frome (pronounced ) is a medium-sized town in Somerset, England, near the Mendip Hills. ... Map sources for Highbridge at grid reference ST3247 Highbridge is a Somerset market town situated on very edge of the Somerset Levels near the mouth of the River Brue. ... Ilminster is a quiet country town in the countryside of south west Somerset, England, with a population of 4,781[1]. Bypassed a few years ago, the town now lies just east of the intersection of the A303 (London to Exeter) and the A358 (Taunton to Chard and Axminster). ... Keynsham (pronounced CANE-shm), is a town between Bristol and Bath in south west England. ... Midsomer Norton is a small town in Bath and North East Somerset, lying on the River Somer and the Fosseway Roman road. ... , Minehead is a coastal town in West Somerset, England with a population of around 10,000. ... Nailsea is a town in North Somerset, England, about 13 km to the South West of Bristol and about 23 km to the North East of the seaside resort of Weston-super-Mare. ... , North Petherton is a small town in Somerset, England, situated on the edge of the eastern foothills of the Quantocks, and close to the edge of the Somerset Levels. ... , Portishead (IPA: ) is a coastal town in North Somerset, England, with a population of 21,000 (Local council update 24/07/07). ... Norton Radstock, often known as Radstock, is a town in North East Somerset, England, near Midsomer Norton. ... , Shepton Mallet is a small rural town in Somerset, England. ... For the Australian town formerly called South Petherton, see Tungkillo, South Australia. ... Map sources for Street at grid reference ST4836 Street is a town in the county of Somerset, England, situated on a dry spot in the Somerset Levels, at the end of the Polden Hills, two miles south west of Glastonbury. ... For other uses, see Taunton (disambiguation). ... Statistics Population: Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: ST074431 Administration District: West Somerset Shire county: Somerset Region: South West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Somerset Historic county: Somerset Services Police force: Avon and Somerset Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Western Post office and... Map sources for Wellington, Somerset at grid reference ST1420 Wellington is a small industrial town in rural Somerset, England, situated seven miles south west of Taunton in the Taunton Deane district, near the border with Devon, which runs along the Blackdown Hills to the south of the town. ... For other uses, see Wells (disambiguation). ... Weston-super-Mare is an English seaside resort town in North Somerset, population 65,000 (1991 estimate). ... Wincanton is a town in south Somerset, southwest England. ... Wiveliscombe (Wivey) is a town and parish in Somerset, England, situated eleven miles north west of Taunton in the Taunton Deane district. ... , Yeovil (pronounced ) is a town in south Somerset, England, on the A30 and A37. ... . ... The Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge The River Avon is a river in the south west of England. ... The River Axe is a river in south west England. ... The River Barle runs from northern Exmoor, in Somerset, England to join the River Exe at Exebridge, Devon. ... River Brue originates in the parish of Brewham. ... Image:Cameley, Temple Cloud, Camerton, Dunkerton and Combe Hay. ... The River Cary is a river in Somerset Categories: UK geography stubs | Rivers in Somerset ... The River Chew is a small river in England. ... The River Yeo (often referred to as the Congresbury Yeo, after the village of Congresbury, through which it flows, to avoid confusion with other similarly-named rivers) is a river which flows through North Somerset, England. ... The River Exe rises on Exmoor in Devon, near the north (Bristol Channel) coast of the county, but flows more or less directly due south and reaches the sea at a substantial ria on the south (English Channel) coast. ... The River Frome is a river in Somerset. ... The River Hunstspill (or Huntspill River) is an aritificial river in the Somerset Levels in the Sedgemoor district of the United Kingdom. ... Aqudeuct of the Somerset Coal Canal over Midford Brook at Midford. ... The River Parrett has its source in the springs in the hills around Chedington in Dorset in England and flows west through the Somerset Levels to its mouth in the Bristol Channel at Burnham on Sea a town on the edge of Bridgwater Bay, an important Nature Reserve. ... The location of the Bristol Channel The Severn Bridge and Bristol Channel, looking northwestward from England towards Wales The Bristol Channel coast at Ilfracombe, North Devon, looking west towards Lee Bay The Bristol Channel is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from South West... River Somer at Midsomer Norton The River Somer is a small river in Somerset, England. ... River Tone is a river in Somerset, that flows through Taunton and joins the River Parret. ... Medieval Packhorse bridge at Wellow, Somerset. ... The geology of Somerset is very varied, and is reflected in an equally varied landscape. ... This page is about the county of Somerset in the United Kingdom. ... The Blackdown Hills are a range of hills along the Somerset-Devon border in south-western England. ... The Brendon Hills are comprised of a lofty ridge of hills in the west of Somerset, England. ... This article is about Chew Valley in Somerset. ... Dunkery Beacon, with heather in bloom Exmoor National Park is a national park situated on the Bristol Channel coast of Devon and Somerset in South West England. ... The Mendip Hills (commonly called The Mendips) are a range of limestone hills (karst) situated to the south of Bristol and Bath in north Somerset, England. ... The Polden Hills are a long, low ridge, extending for 20 miles, and separated from the Mendip Hills, to which they are nearly parallel, by a marshy tract, know as the Somerset Levels. ... The Quantock Hills are a range of hills west of Bridgwater in Somerset, England. ... The view towards Brent Knoll from Glastonbury Tor. ...

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Glastonbury Abbey (3323 words)
By January, 1539, Glastonbury was the only religious house left standing in all Somerset, and on 19 September, in the same year, the royal commissioners arrived without previous warning.
Meanwhile the commissioners, regarding Glastonbury as part of the royal possessions already in view of the intended attainder of the abbot, proceeded to "dispatch with the utmost celerity" both their business as spoilers and the monks themselves.
Possibly the truth may be that the Glastonbury thorn was originally an individual or "sport", and not a true variety; but if this is so it is certainly remarkable that for four hundred years the peculiarity of the tree has been preserved and transmitted to its progeny.
Glastonbury Tor, Chalice Hill, King Arthur, Giants - Crystalinks (3778 words)
Glastonbury is also believed to be the place known in Authurian lore as the Isle of Avalon.
Intertwining the myths and legends of Glastonbury Abbey's history, it is widely believed that finding The Holy Grail Joseph is said to have hidden was years later the purpose behind the quests of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.
The configuration of the Mary energy line, containing the phallus-like mediaeval tower of St.Michael, seems to portray a chalice or grail and is thus a potent symbol of the alchemical fusion of universal opposites.
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