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Encyclopedia > Glasnevin
Glasnevin
Glas Naíon
Location
WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates:
53°22′19″N 6°16′03″W / 53.371859, -6.267357
Irish Grid Reference
O158368
Statistics
Province: Leinster
County: County Dublin
Population ()

Glasnevin (Glas Naíon, Glas Na’on - Stream of the Infants; also known as Glas Naedhe - O'Naeidhe’s Stream (after an ancient Chieftain) - in Irish) is a largely residential neighbourhood of Dublin, Ireland. Bullet for locations in Ireland, displays location and not area. ... Image File history File links Ireland_map_County_Dublin_City_Magnified. ... The Global Positioning System (GPS) is currently the only fully functional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). ... The Irish national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Ireland. ... During late Gaelic and early historic times Ireland was divided into provinces to replace the earlier system of the tuatha. ... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist. ... The Spire at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: 01, +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ...

Contents

Geography

A mainly residential neighbourhood, it is located on the Northside of the city of Dublin (about two miles north of Dublin City). It was originally established on the northern bank of the River Tolka. It is bordered to the northwest by Ballygall, northeast by Ballymun, Whitehall to the east, Phibsboro and Drumcondra to the south and Cabra to the west. Traffic passing the Independent Bridge at Drumcondra The harbour at Howth The Northside (Taobh Ó Thuaidh in Irish) is the area in Dublin City, Ireland bounded to the south by the River Liffey, to the east by Dublin Bay and to the north and west by the M50 motorway. ... The Spire at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: 01, +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... The River Tolka (Irish: Tulcha) is a river which flows through Dublin, Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County: County Dublin Population () Ballygall (Baile na nGall - Town of the Strangers) was settled by the Vikings in the 11th century. ... Ballymun (Irish:Baile Munna), nicknamed The Mun, is an area on Dublins Northside close to Dublin Airport. ... Whitehall is a suburb of Dublin City in the Republic of Ireland. ... Phibsborough, (Baile Phib, Phibsboro), is a neighborhood of Dublin, Ireland. ... Drumcondra (Irish: Droim Conrach) is a fashionable residential area on the Northside of Dublin, Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ...


History

Foundation

Glasnevin seems to have been founded by Saint Mobhi (sometimes known as St Berchan) in the sixth (or perhaps fifth) century as a monastery. His monastery continued to be used for many years afterwards - St. Colman is recorded as having paid homage to its founder when he returned from abroad to visit Ireland a century after St Mobhi's death in 544. St. Columba of Iona is thought to have studied under St. Mobhi, but left Glasnevin following and outbreak of plague and journeyed north to open the House at Derry. There is a long street (Iona Road) in Glasnevin named in his honour. The church on Iona Road is called Saint Columba's. Events Belisarius is sent back to Italy to once more fight the Ostrogoths who have been making reconquests in the area. ... A separate article is titled Columba (constellation). ... Iona is a small island, in the Inner Hebrides, Scotland. ...


Middle Ages

A settlement grew up around this monastery, which survived until the Viking invasions in the eighth century. After raids on monasteries at Glendalough and Clondalkin, the monasteries at Glasnevin and Finglas were attacked and destroyed. Ancient church at Glendalough monastic site Glendalough is a village located at the site of an ancient monastery located in County Wicklow, Ireland. ... Clondalkin (Cluain Dolcáin in Irish, meaning Dolcans meadow) is a town/suburb and parish 10 km west of Dublin City, Ireland, situated in South County Dublin. ... Finglas is a residential suburb on the North side of Dublin City, Ireland. ...


By 822 Glasnevin had become the farm for Christ Church Cathedral and it seems to have maintained this connection up to the time of the Reformation. Events Abd-ar-rahman II becomes ruler of Umayyad Spain. ... Christ Church Cathedral (exterior) Christ Church Cathedral (The Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity) in Dublin is the elder of the citys two mediæval cathedrals, the other being St. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ...


The Danish raids of the 8th Century taught Ireland a hard lesson, and by the time the next wave of raiders arrived, some unity had been found under the High King (Ardrí), Brian Boru. The Battle of Clontarf was fought on the banks of the River Tolka in 1014 (a field called the bloody acre is supposed to be part of the site). The Irish defeated the Danes in a battle, in which 7,000 Danes and 4,000 Irish died. A much later engraving of Brian Boru Brian Bóruma mac Cennétig (926 or 941[1] – 23 April 1014) (known as Brian Boru in English) was High King of Ireland from 1002 to 1014. ... Combatants Irish of Munster Irish of Leinster and Dublin Vikings Commanders Brian Boru† Máelmorda mac Murchada, Sigtrygg Strength ca. ... Events February 14 - Pope Benedict VIII recognizes Henry of Bavaria as King of Germany July 29 - Battle of Kleidion: Basil II inflicts not only a decisive defeat on the Bulgarian army, but his subsequent savage treatment of 15,000 prisoners reportedly causes Tsar Samuil of Bulgaria to die of shock...


Th 12th century saw the Normans (who had conquered Great Britain in the eleventh century) set their sights on Ireland. As Ireland's rulers continued fighting amongst themselves the Norman King of England Henry II was invited to intervene. He arrived in 1171 and seized all land and then parcelled it out amongst his supporters. Glasnevin ended up under the jurisdiction of Finglas Abbey. Laurence O'Toole, Archbishop, took responsibility for Glasnevin. It became the property the Holy Trinity (Christ Church Cathedral) and Monks were given the land of Glasnevin. Norman conquests in red. ... Rulers with the title Henry II include: Henry II of Castile Henry II of England Henry II of France Henry II of Germany, also Holy Roman Emperor Henry II of Navarre Henry II, Duke of Saxony Henry II of Jerusalem (also Henry II of Cyprus) Henry II, Duke of Bavaria... Events Saladin abolishes the Fatimid caliphate, restoring Sunni rule in Egypt. ... Lorcán Ua Tuathail, also known as St Laurence OToole, was born at Castledermot, Kildare, Ireland, 1128, died at Eu, Normandy, France, on November 14, 1180, and was canonized in 1225 by Pope Honorius III. // Early life He was one of four sons of an OByrne princess and...


In 1240 a church and tower was reconstructed on the site of the Church of St. Mobhi in the monastery. The returns of the church for 1326 stated that 28 tenants resided in Glasnevin. The church was enlarged in 1346, along with a small hall known as the Manor Hall. Events Batu Khan and the Golden Horde sack the Ruthenian city of Kyiv Births Pope Benedict XI Deaths April 11 - Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, also known as Llywelyn The Great Prince of Gwynedd Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Osman I (1299-1326) to Orhan I (1326-1359) Aradia de Toscano, is initiated into a Dianic cult of Italian Witchcraft (Stregheria), and discovers through a vision that she is the human incarnation of the goddess Aradia. ... // Events Serbian Empire was proclaimed in Skopje by Dusan Silni, occupying much of the South-Eastern Europe Foundation of the University of Valladolid Foundation of Pembroke College, University of Cambridge August 26 Battle of Crecy after which Edward the Black Prince honored the bravery of John I, Count of Luxemburg...


Late Middle Ages

When Henry VIII broke from Rome an era of religious repression began. All Catholic church property and land was appropriated to the new Church, and monasteries (including the one at Glasnevin) were forcibly closed and fell into ruin. Glasnevin had at this stage developed as a village, with its principal landmark and focal point being its "bull-ring" noted in 1542. Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ...


By 1667 Glasnevin had expanded - but not by very much; it is recorded as containing 24 houses. The development of the village was given a fresh impetus when Sir John Rogerson built his country residence, "The Glen" or "Glasnevin House" outside the village. // Events January 20 - Poland cedes Kyiv, Smolensk, and eastern Ukraine to Russia in the Treaty of Andrusovo that put a final end to the Deluge, and Poland lost its status as a Central European power. ... Sir John Rogerson, a wealthy merchant and property developer, was elected Lord Mayor of Dublin in 1693-94, and also represented the city in the Irish Parliament. ...


A Protestant church, St. Mobhi's, was built in the mid 17th century and most of it was rebuilt in the mid 18th century. It was part of a site where the ancient monastery of St. Mobhi once stood. It is said that Robert Emmet is buried there. This claim is made because once somebody working in the graveyard there dug up a headless body. Robert Emmet Robert Emmet (4 March 1780 - 20 September 1803) was an Irish nationalist rebel leader. ...


Early modern times

The plantations of Ireland saw the settlement of Protestant English families on land previously held by Catholics. Lands at Glasnevin were leased to such families and a Protestant church was erected there in 1707. It was built on the site of the old Catholic Church and was named after St. Mobhi. The attached churchyard became a graveyard for both Protestants and Catholics. Plantations in 16th and 17th century Ireland involved the seizure of land owned by the native Irish and granting of it to colonists (planters) from Britain. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ...


By now Glasnevin was an area for families of distinction - in spite of a comment attributed to the Protestant Archbishop King of Dublin that "when any couple had a mind to be wicked, they would retire to Glasnevin". In a letter, dated 1725 he described Glasnevin as "the receptacle for thieves and rogues. The first search when anything was stolen, was there, and when any couple had a mind to retire to be wicked there was their harbour. But since the church was built, and service regularly settled, all these evils are banished. Good houses are built in it, and the place civilised."[1] Events February 8 - Catherine I became empress of Russia February 20 - The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans takes place in New Hampshire colony. ...


19th and 20th Centuries

Glasnevin became a township in 1878 and became part of the City of Dublin in 1900. 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ...


The parish population was recorded as 1,001, of whom 559 resided in the village. Glasnevin was described as a parish in the barony of Coolock, pleasantly situated and the residence of many families of distinction.[2] Coolock (An Chúlóg in Irish, The Little Corner) is a large suburban area on Dublin citys Northside in Ireland. ...


When Drumcondra began to rapidly expand in the 1870’s, the residents of Glasnevin sought to protect their district and opposed being merged with the neighbouring suburb. One of the objectors was the property-owner, Dr Gogarty, the father of the Irish poet, Oliver St. John Gogarty (18781957). 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...


On 1st June 1832, Charles Lindsay, Lord Bishop of Kildare and the William John released their holdings of Sir John Rogerson’s lands at Glasnevin, (including Glasnevin House) to George Hayward Lindsay. This transfer included the sum of 1,500 Pounds Sterling. Although this does not specifically cite the marriage of George Hayward Lindsay to Lady Mary Catherine Gore, George Lindsay almost certainly came into the lands at Glasnevin as a result of his marriage. Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ...


George Hayward Lindsay’s eldest son, Lieutenant Colonel Henry Gore Lindsay, was in possession of his father’s lands at Glasnevin when the area began to be developed at the beginning of the twentieth-century. The development of his lands after 1903/04 marked the start of the gradual development of the area.


Glasnevin remained relatively undeveloped until the opening up of the Carroll Estate in 1914, which saw the creation of the redbrick residential roads running down towards Drumcondra. The process was accelerated by Dublin Corporation in the 1920's and the present shape of the suburb was firmly in place by 1930. Nevertheless, until comparatively recent years, a short stroll up the Old Finglas Road brought you rapidly into open countryside. Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The start of the 20th Century also saw the opening of a short lived railway station on the Drumcondra and North Dublin Link Railway line from Glasnevin Junction to Connolly Station (then Amiens Street). It opened in 1906 and closed at the end of 1907. Connolly Station is one of the main railway stations in Dublin, Ireland, and is a focal point in the Irish route network. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Village of Glasnevin

The village has changed a lot over the years, and is now part of Dublin City. Some of its old charm remains, and can be readily seen in the area's old-world gardens, with their wealth of flowering shrubs and climbing plants. Glasnevin has a vibrant community, largely comprising of a mix of young families and their more senior counterparts from the middle of the last century, as well as students attending the University.


As well as the amenities of the Botanic Gardens and local parks, the national meteorological office Met Éireann, the Fisheries Board, the National Standards Authority of Ireland, Sustainable Energy Ireland, the Department of Defence and the national enterprise and trade board Enterprise Ireland are all located in the area. Met Éireann is the national meteorological service in the Republic of Ireland, part of the Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government. ... The National Standards Authority of Ireland, or NSAI, is the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) member body for the Republic of Ireland. ... The Department of Defence (An Roinn Cosanta) is the department of the Irish government that is responsible for preserving peace and security in Ireland and abroad. ... Enterprise Ireland is the Irish state economic development agency focused on helping Irish-owned business transform itelf both with respect to geographical spread and value added. ...


Botanic Gardens

Teeling's Tenement was an important residence in the area. Initially the property of the poet Thomas Tickell, in 1790 the house and lands were sold to the Irish Parliament and given to the Royal Dublin Society for them to establish Ireland's first Botanic Gardens. The gardens had been especially bought for the medical profession who appreciated the curative properties of herbs and plants. They were eventually put under government care in 1879. Thomas Tickell (1686 - April 23, 1740) was an English poet and man of letters. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Royal Dublin Society (RDS) was founded in 1731 by members of the Dublin Philosophical Society in their Trinity College Dublin rooms as the Dublin Society. ... The Irish National Botanic Gardens are located in Glasnevin, 5 km north-west of Dublin city centre, Ireland. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


The 27 acres which border the River Tolka adjoin the Prospect Cemetery - or Glasnevin Cemetery as it is widely known.


Prospect Cemetery

Prospect Cemetery is located in Glasnevin, although better known as Glasnevin Cemetery, the most historically notable burial place in the country and the last resting place, among a host of historical figures, of Michael Collins and Charles Stewart Parnell. This graveyard led to Glasnevin being known as "the dead centre of Dublin". It opened in 1832 and is the final resting place for thousands of ordinary citizens, as well as many Irish patriots. Glasnevin Cemetery The round tower (centre) stands over the tomb of Daniel OConnell Glasnevin gravestones Glasnevin Cemetery, also known as Prospect Cemetery, is the main Catholic cemetery in Dublin, the capital of Ireland. ... Michael Collins is the name of: Michael Collins (Irish leader), the Irish patriot and revolutionary of the 20th century Michael Collins (Limerick politician), a modern-day Irish politician Michael Collins (astronaut), the American astronaut Michael Collins (footballer), an Irish footballer currently playing for Huddersfield Town Michael P. Collins, a Canadian... Charles Stewart Parnell, the uncrowned King of Ireland Charles Stewart Parnell[1] (27 June 1846 – 6 October 1891) was an Irish political leader and one of the most important figures in 19th century Ireland and the United Kingdom; William Ewart Gladstone described him as the most remarkable person he had... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


DCU, Albert College and The Helix

Albert College, dating from 1851, is the oldest buildings in Dublin City University, one of the most significant features of Glasnevin, with approximately 6,000 full time undergraduate students. Glasnevin is home to The Helix arts centre within the DCU complex - which includes Ireland's largest theatre, the Mahony Hall. Albert College is the oldest building on the campus of Dublin City University and contains the offices of the university president and other executive offices of the university; the building dates from 1851. ... Dublin City University (DCU) is a university situated between Glasnevin and Whitehall on the Northside of Dublin in Ireland. ... The Helix (Side View) The Helix is a building on the Dublin City University campus at Whitehall on Dublins Northside originally to be called the Aula Maxima. ...


Hart's Corner

Approaching Glasnevin via Phibsboro is what is known as Hart's Corner but which about a 200 years ago was called Glasmanogue, and was then a well-known stage on the way to Finglas. At an earlier date the name possessed a wider signification and was applied to a considerable portion of the adjoining district. Phibsborough, (Baile Phib, Phibsboro), is a neighborhood of Dublin, Ireland. ... Several well-known junctions in Dublin city still carry the name of the pub or business which used to occupy the corner. ...


Delville

At the start of the 18th century a large house, called Delville - known at first as The Glen - was built on the site of the present Bons Secours hospital. Its name was an amalgamation of the surnames of two of its tenants, Dr. Helsam and Dr. Patrick Delany (as Heldeville), both Fellows of Trinity College).


When Delany married his first wife he acquired sole ownership, but it became famous as the home of Delany and his second wife - Mary Pendarves. She was a widow whom Delany married in 1743, and was an accomplished letter writer. // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ...


They couple were friends of Dean Jonathan Swift and, through him, of Alexander Pope. Pope encouraged the Delaneys to develop a garden in a style then becoming popular in England - moving away from the very formal, geometric layout that was common. He redesigned the house in the style of a villa and had the gardens laid out in the latest Dutch fashion creating what was almost certainly Ireland's first naturalistic garden. Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and...


The house was, under Mrs Delany, a centre of Dublin's intellectual life. Swift is said to have composed many of his campaigning pamphlets while staying there. He and his life - long companion Stella were both in the habit of visiting, and Swift satirised the grounds which he considered too small for the size of the house. Through her correspondence with her sister, Mrs Dewes, Mary wrote of Swift in 1733: "he calls himself my master and corrects me when I speak bad English or do not pronounce my words distinctly". Events February 12 - British colonist James Oglethorpe founds Savannah, Georgia. ...


Patrick Delany died in 1768 at the age of 82, prompting his widow to sell Delville and return to her native England until her death twenty years later. 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


The Pyramid Church

A timber church, which originally stood on Berkeley Road, was moved to a riverside site on Botanic Avenue early in the twentieth century, and served as the parish church until it was replaced, in 1972, by a pyramidal structure. The previous church was known locally as "the woodener" and the new building is still known to older residents as "the new woodener". Its official name is Our Lady of Dolours. Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Met Éireann

In 1975 the new headquarters of Met Éireann, the Irish Meteorological Office, opened just off Glasnevin Hill. It, too, was built in a somewhat pyramidal shape and is recognised as one of the most significant, smaller commercial buildings, to be erected in Dublin in the 1970's. Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Met Éireann is the national meteorological service in the Republic of Ireland, part of the Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government. ...


Community and sport

The Gaelic Games of Gaelic football, hurling, camogie and Gaelic handball are all organised locally by Na Fianna CLG, while soccer thrives through the local clubs of Iona F.C., Tolka Rovers and Home Farm F.C.. Basketball is organised by Tolka Rovers. Gaelic games are the native sports of Ireland: principally Hurling, Gaelic Football and Camogie. ... Gaelic football (Irish: Peil or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, Gaelic or GAA (gah), is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... Camogie (in Irish, camógaíocht) is a Celtic team sport, the womens variant of hurling. ... Gaelic handball (Irish: Liathróid Láimhe) (also known as handball, Irish handball, court handball or wall handball) is a sport similar to racquetball and squash it is one of the four Gaelic Games organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... Senior Club Championships Cumann Lúthchleas Gael Na Fianna in Irish or Na Fianna GAA Club. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Home Farm Football Club is an amateur football club based in Whitehall, Dublin, in Ireland. ... Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10-foot high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ...


Glasnevin is the site of an Educate Together national school.


Notable natives

Paul David Hewson (born 10 May 1960), known as Bono (IPA: ), is the lead singer and principal lyricist of the Irish rock band U2. ... Saint Canice, also Saint Kenny or Saint Kenneth, was born in 515 or 516, at Glengiven, in what is now County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. ... Saint Comgall was the founder and abbot of the great Irish monastery at Bangor ( located in present day Northern Ireland ), who flourished in the sixth century. ... Patrick Denis ODonnell, (January 9, 1922–January 1, 2005), was a well-known Irish military historian, writer, former UN peace-keeper, and retired Commandant of the Irish Defence Forces. ... Michael ORiordan (November 11, 1917 – May 18, 2006) was the founder of the Communist Party of Ireland (3rd) and also fought with the Connolly Column in the International Brigades during the Spanish Civil War. ... John J. OKelly was an Irish politician. ... David P. Tyndall (May 17, 1890 - January 6, 1970) was a leading Irish businessman in the 20th century, and played the major role in helping modernize the wholesale and retail grocery trade, consolidate it, and enable the family grocery shop owner adapt to the advent of supermarkets. ... Sr. ... Q102 is a commercial radio station in Dublin, owned by UTV Radio. ... Thomas Tickell (1686 - April 23, 1740) was an English poet and man of letters. ... Francis M. ODonnell (UN Photo) Francis Martin ODonnell is the Resident Coordinator of the United Nations system in Ukraine, having arrived on 30 September 2004. ... Celia Lynch, née Quinn (6 May 1908 – 16 June 1989) was an Irish Fianna Fáil Party politician, and TD for 23 years. ... Michael James OHehir (2 June 1920–24 November 1996) was an Irish sports commentator and journalist. ... Margaret Buckley was President of Sinn Féin from 1937 to 1950, and honorary vice-president from then until her death in 1962. ... John OConnell (born January 30, 1930), was a senior Irish politician. ... Robbie Kelleher is a former all-Ireland winning Gaelic footballer for Dublin. ... Richard Brinsley Sheridan Richard Brinsley Sheridan (October 30, 1751 – July 7, 1816) was an Irish playwright and Whig statesman. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and...

References

  • Weston St. John Joyce, "The Neighbourhood of Dublin" (third and enlarged edition 1920). CHAPTER XXVI, "Glasnevin, Finglas and the adjacent district" (scanned in by Ken Finlay).

Finglas is a residential suburb on the North side of Dublin City, Ireland. ...

External links

Coordinates: 53°23′N, 6°16′W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin (882 words)
The National Botanic Gardens at Glasnevin Ireland's premier botanical and horticultural establishment, is a rewarding and attractive garden for gar deners and non-gardeners alike.
The soil of the Glasnevin Botanic Gardens is heavy alkaline boulder clay, which confines the growing of calcifuge plants such as rhododendrons and ericas to specially prepared peat beds.
Glasnevin also houses a large rockery, a bog garden, a wild garden and a double, curving herbaceous border which is a marvellous sight in summer.
Glasnevin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (741 words)
Glasnevin is a residential neighbourhood on the Northside of the city of Dublin and south of the Ballymun area.
Adjoining Glasnevin are the Irish National Botanic Gardens where stood the residence of Tickell, the poet and literary executor of Addison who came to Ireland as secretary to the Earl of Wharton in 1709.
Nowadays, Glasnevin is a vibrant community, largely comprising of a mix of young families and their more senior counterparts from the middle of the last century.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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