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Encyclopedia > Glasgow
City of Glasgow
Scottish Gaelic: Glaschu
Scots: Glesca, Glesga


View over Glasgow City Chambers The name Glasgow is the name of several towns and cities around the world, principally Scotlands largest city. ... Glasgow patter or Glaswegian is a dialect shouted in and around Glasgow, Scotland. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ...


City of Glasgow shown within Scotland
Area[1]  67.76 sq mi (175.5 km²)
Population 580,690 (August 2007)[2]
 - Density 8,541.8/sq mi (3,298/km²)
Urban[2] 1,750,500
Metro 2.3 million
Language English
OS grid reference NS590655
Council area Glasgow City Council
Lieutenancy area Glasgow
Constituent country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town GLASGOW
Postcode district G1–G80
Dialling code 0141
Police Strathclyde
Fire Strathclyde
Ambulance Scottish
European Parliament Scotland
UK Parliament Glasgow Central
Glasgow East
Glasgow North
Glasgow North East
Glasgow North West
Glasgow South
Glasgow South West
Scottish Parliament Glasgow
Glasgow Anniesland
Glasgow Baillieston
Glasgow Cathcart
Glasgow Govan
Glasgow Kelvin
Glasgow Maryhill
Glasgow Pollok
Glasgow Rutherglen
Glasgow Shettleston
Website: www.glasgow.gov.uk
List of places: UKScotlandGlasgow

Coordinates: 55°51′29″N 4°15′32″W / 55.858, -4.259 Image File history File links Size of this preview: 451 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1154 × 1535 pixel, file size: 661 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... Politics in Glasgow, Scotland, are evident in the deliberations and decisions of the city council of Glasgow (Glaschu in Gaelic), in elections to the council, and in elections to the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) and the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (Westminster). ... The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for the ceremonial lords-lieutenant, the monarchs representatives, in Scotland. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... This article is about the country. ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The G postcode area, also known as the Glasgow postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Alexandria, Clydebank, Dumbarton, Glasgow and Helensburgh in Scotland. ... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Strathclyde Police is the police force for the Scottish council areas of Argyll and Bute, City of Glasgow, East Ayrshire, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Inverclyde, North Ayrshire North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Ayrshire, South Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Strathclyde Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Strathclyde, Scotland, it is the largest fire and rescue service in the Scotland, and one of the largest in Europe. ... Two Mercedes-Benz Sprinter-based ambulances of the Scottish Ambulance Service The Scottish Ambulance Service serves all of Scotland and is a special health board funded directly by the health department of the Scottish Executive. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Glasgow Central is a constituency of the House of Commons of the UK Parliament. ... Glasgow East is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Glasgow North is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Glasgow North East is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Glasgow North West is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Glasgow South is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Glasgow South West is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Glasgow is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ... Glasgow Anniesland is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament. ... Glasgow Baillieston is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament since 1999. ... Glasgow Cathcart is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament. ... Glasgow Govan is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... Glasgow Kelvin is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament. ... Maryhill is a area in Glasgow situated in the North of the City. ... Glasgow Pollok is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament since 1999. ... Glasgow Rutherglen is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament since 1999. ... Glasgow Shettleston is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... List of burghs in Scotland List of cities in the United Kingdom Lists of places within Scottish regions List of places in Orkney List of places in Shetland List of places in the Borders region of Scotland List of places in the Central region of Scotland List of places in... Glasgow is split into several different places, council wards and constituencies for the UK and Scottish parliaments, representing Glasgow, Scotland. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Glasgow (pronounced /ˈglæzgoʊ/) is the largest city in Scotland and third most populous in the United Kingdom. Fully named as the City of Glasgow, it is the most populous of Scotland's 32 unitary authority areas. The city is situated on the River Clyde in the country's west central lowlands. A person from Glasgow is known as a Glaswegian, which is also the name of the local dialect. This article is about the country. ... This is a list of the largest cities and towns of the United Kingdom ordered by population. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... For other rivers, see Clyde River (disambiguation) , The River Clyde (Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh, pronounced ) is a major river in Scotland. ... Lowland-Highland divide The Scottish Lowlands (a Ghalldachd, meaning roughly the non-Gaelic region, in Gaelic), although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands (or Gàidhealtachd), that is, everywhere due... For dialects of programming languages, see Programming language dialect. ...


Glasgow grew from the medieval Bishopric of Glasgow and the later establishment of the University of Glasgow, which contributed to the Scottish Enlightenment. From the 18th century the city became one of Europe's main hubs of transatlantic trade with the Americas. With the Industrial Revolution, the city and surrounding region grew to become one of the world's pre-eminent centres of engineering and shipbuilding,[3] constructing many revolutionary and famous vessels. Glasgow was known as the "Second City of the British Empire" in the Victorian era.[4][5][6] Today it is one of Europe's top twenty financial centres and is home to many of Scotland's leading businesses.[7] The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Archbishop of Glasgow is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Metropolitan Archdiocese of Glasgow. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... The Scottish Enlightenment was a period of intellectual ferment in Scotland, running from approximately 1740 to 1800. ... For other uses, see Transatlantic (disambiguation). ... This article is about economic exchange. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... For the North American comedy troupe, see The Second City. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ...


In the late 19th and early 20th centuries Glasgow grew to a population of over one million,[8] and was the fourth-largest city in Europe, after London, Paris and Berlin[9] In the 1960s, large-scale relocation to new towns and peripheral suburbs, followed by successive boundary changes, have reduced the current population of the City of Glasgow unitary authority area to 580,690.[2] 1,750,500[2] people live in the Greater Glasgow Urban Area based on the 2007 population Estimate.[2] The entire region surrounding the conurbation covers approximately 2.3 million people, 41% of Scotland's population.[10] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... A New town or planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Greater Glasgow is the conurbation that includes and surrounds the city of Glasgow in the west of Scotland. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... A conurbation is an urban area comprising a number of cities, towns and villages which, through population growth and expansion, have physically merged to form one continuous built up area. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Glasgow
Recent years have seen a regeneration of the River Clyde's banks. Salmon and other marine life have now returned to the Clyde, which was heavily polluted for decades.
Recent years have seen a regeneration of the River Clyde's banks. Salmon and other marine life have now returned to the Clyde, which was heavily polluted for decades.

The present site of Glasgow has been used since prehistoric times for settlement due to it being the forded point of the River Clyde furthest downstream, which also provided a natural area for salmon fishing. The origins of Glasgow as an established city derive ultimately from its medieval position as Scotland's second largest bishopric. Glasgow increased in importance during the tenth and 11th centuries as the site of this bishopric, reorganised by King David I of Scotland and John, Bishop of Glasgow. There had been an earlier religious site established by Saint Mungo in the 6th century. The bishopric became one of the largest and wealthiest in the Kingdom of Scotland, bringing wealth and status to the town. Between 1175 and 1178 this position was strengthened even further when Bishop Jocelin obtained for the episcopal settlement the status of burgh from King William I of Scotland, allowing the settlement to expand with the benefits of trading monopolies and other legal guarantees. Sometime between 1189 and 1195 this status was supplemented by an annual fair, which survives to this day as the Glasgow Fair. This article deals with the history of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 368 KB)Personal photograph liecenced to Wikipedia File links The following pages link to this file: Glasgow Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 368 KB)Personal photograph liecenced to Wikipedia File links The following pages link to this file: Glasgow Categories: GFDL images ... For other rivers, see Clyde River (disambiguation) , The River Clyde (Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh, pronounced ) is a major river in Scotland. ... For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ... A ford, with pedestrian footbridge, on a minor road near Weimar bei Kassel in Germany The ford at Brockenhurst, leading into the village centre, following heavy rain. ... For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ... ( 9th century - 10th century - 11th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Linguistic division in early twelfth century Scotland. ... John († 1147) was an early 12th century tironensian cleric. ... The Archbishop of Glasgow is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Metropolitan Archdiocese of Glasgow. ... Saint Mungo, also known as Saint Kentigern, is by tradition an apostle to the Kingdom of Strathclyde, Scotland, and patron saint and legendary founder of the city of Glasgow. ... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... Jocelin or Jocelyn (died 1199) was a 12th-century Cistercian monk and cleric who became the fourth Abbot of Melrose before becoming Bishop of Glasgow, Scotland. ... A sign in Linlithgow, Scotland. ... William I the Lion ( known in Gaelic as Uilliam Garm1 or William the Rough), (1142/1143 - December 4, 1214) reigned as King of Scots from 1165 to 1214. ... A holiday during the 3rd and 4th weeks of July in Glasgow, Scotland. ...


Glasgow grew over the following centuries, and the founding of the University of Glasgow in 1451 and elevation of the bishopric to an archbishopric in 1492 increased the town's religious and educational status. Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ...


After the Acts of Union in 1707, Scotland gained trading access to the vast markets of the British Empire and Glasgow became prominent in international commerce as a hub of trade to the Americas, especially in the movement of tobacco, cotton and sugar into the deep water port that had been created by city merchants at Port Glasgow.[11] The Acts of Union were a pair of Acts of Parliament passed in 1706 and 1707 (taking effect on 1 May 1707) by, respectively, the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... The Tobacco Lords (or “Virginia Dons”) were Glasgow merchants who, in the 18th Century made enormous fortunes by trading in tobacco from Britains American Colonies. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely-traded commodity. ... Port Glasgow is a burgh in Inverclyde, Scotland on the River Clyde. ...


Daniel Defoe visited the city in the early 18th century and famously opined in his book A tour thro' the Whole Island of Great Britain, that Glasgow was "the cleanest and beautifullest, and best built city in Britain, London excepted."[12] At that time, the city's population numbered approximately 12,000, and was yet to undergo the massive changes to the city's economy and urban fabric, brought about by the influences of the Scottish Enlightenment and Industrial Revolution. Daniel Defoe (1659/1661 [?] â€“ April 24 [?], 1731)[1] was a British writer, journalist, and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... A tour thro the Whole Island of Great Britain by Daniel Defoe, 1724-27 A non-fiction work that gives a matter-of-fact account of Defoes visits to various places, at a time when there were no ready reference works. ... The Scottish Enlightenment was a period of intellectual ferment in Scotland, running from approximately 1740 to 1800. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ...


In its subsequent industrial era, Glasgow produced textiles, engineered goods and steel, which were exported. The opening of the Monkland Canal in 1791, facilitated access to the Iron-ore and Coal mines in Lanarkshire. After extensive engineering projects to dredge and deepen the Clyde, Shipbuilding became a major industry on the upper stretches of the river, building many famous ships (although many were actually built in Clydebank). Glasgow's population had surpassed that of Edinburgh by 1821. By the end of the 19th century the city was known as the "Second City of the Empire" and was producing most of the ships and locomotives in the world. During this period, the construction of many of the city's greatest architectural masterpieces and most ambitious civic projects, like the Loch Katrine aqueduct and Subway, were being funded by its wealth. This article is about the type of fabric. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... The Monkland Canal used to run for 12 miles from Port Dundas (at the end of the Glasgow branch of the Forth and Clyde Canal) to Woodhall (near Airdrie). ... This heap of iron ore pellets will be used in steel production. ... Surface coal mining in Wyoming in the United States of America. ... Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig in Gaelic) is a traditional county of Scotland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... Clydebank (Bruach Chluaidh in Gaelic) is a town in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland, lying on the north bank of the river Clyde. ... Great Western Railway No. ... Loch Katrine is a freshwater loch in the district of Stirling, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Aqueduct (disambiguation). ... An Inner Circle train arrives at West Street station. ...


From the late 1840s onwards, vast numbers of Irish Catholics settled in Glasgow. Originally forced to flee Ireland due to the Great Famine in that country, the Irish continued to immigrate into the City of Glasgow in huge numbers for the rest of the nineteenth- and twentieth-centuries, driven to the city by economic stagnation at home. This Irish immigration has given Glasgow a large Catholic population. Great Famine can refer to multiple historical events that refer to themselves as the Great Famine. Great Famine of 1315-1317 - Northern European famine of the 14th century. ...


The 20th century witnessed both decline and renewal in the city. After World War I, the city suffered from the impact of the Post-World War I recession and from the later Great Depression, this also led to a rise of radical socialism and the "Red Clydeside" movement. The city had recovered by the outbreak of the Second World War and grew through the post-war boom that lasted through the 1950s. However by the 1960s, a lack of investment and innovation led to growing overseas competition in countries like Japan and Germany which weakened the once pre-eminent position of many of the city's industries. As a result of this, Glasgow entered a long running period of relative economic decline, leading to high unemployment, urban decay, population decline, welfare dependency and poor health for the city's inhabitants. There were active attempts at regeneration of the city, when the Glasgow Corporation published its controversial Bruce Report, which set out a comprehensive series of initiatives aimed at turning round the decline of the city. There are also accusations that the Scottish Office had deliberately attempted to undermine Glasgow's economic and political influence in post-war Scotland by preventing the creation of new industries and creating the new towns of Cumbernauld, Glenrothes, Irvine, Livingston and East Kilbride, dispersed across the Scottish Lowlands, in order to halve the city's population base.[13] “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The post-WWI recession was an economic recession that hit much of the world after the First World War. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Red Clydeside is a term used to describe the era of political radicalism that characterised the city of Glasgow in Scotland, United Kingdom, and urban areas around the city on the banks of the River Clyde. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... CIA figures for world unemployment rates, 2006 Unemployment is the state in which a person is without work, available to work, and is currently seeking work. ... Urban decay and renewal in Cincinnati Urban decay is the popular term for both the physical and social degeneration of cities and large towns. ... Depopulation is a term used to describe any great reduction in a human population. ... The welfare trap is a name for a situation in which taxation and welfare systems create strong incentives for people to stay on social welfare payments. ... The Bruce Report is the commonly given name to two reports of the Glasgow Corporation (the former local authority area for the Scottish city), the First Planning Report, which was published in the closing stages of the Second World War in March, 1945 and the Clyde Valley Regional Plan. ... Categories: Stub | Scotland | Departments of the United Kingdom Government ... This article should be transwikied to wiktionary The term post-war is generally used for the period after the end of World War II, i. ... A New town or planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ... , Cumbernauld (Gaelic: Comar nan Allt) is a new town in North Lanarkshire, Scotland, created in 1956 as a population overflow for Glasgow. ... For other uses, see Glenrothes (disambiguation). ... , For the river of the same name see River Irvine. ... , Livingston is the fourth post-war new town to be built in Scotland, designated in 1962. ... East Kilbride (Cille Bhrìghde an Ear in Scottish Gaelic) is a large town in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... Lowland-Highland divide The Scottish Lowlands (a Ghalldachd, meaning roughly the non-Gaelic region, in Gaelic), although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands (or Gàidhealtachd), that is, everywhere due...


However, by the 1990s, there had been a significant resurgence in Glasgow's economic fortunes; the city found a new role as a European centre for business services and finance and benefited from an increase in tourism and inward investment. The latter is largely due to the legacy of the city's status as European City of Culture in 1990, and attempts to diversify the city's economy.[14] This economic revival has continued and the ongoing regeneration of inner-city areas has led to more affluent people moving back to live in the centre of Glasgow, fuelling allegations of gentrification. The European Capital of Culture is a city designated by the European Union for a period of one year during which it is given a chance to showcase its cultural life and cultural development. ... Urban Renewal redirects here. ... The term inner-city is often applied to the poorer parts at the centre of a major city. ... In San Francisco, during the mid-1960s, the bohemian center of the city shifted from the old Beat enclave of North Beach to Haight-Ashbury (pictured) as a response to gentrification. ...


In June 2007, Glasgow International Airport was subject to terrorist attack. Glasgow Airport redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Mohammed Asha be merged into this article or section. ...

A panoramic view of Glasgow City Centre from the top of The Lighthouse
A panoramic view of Glasgow City Centre from the top of The Lighthouse

The Lighthouse, Charles Mackintoshs Glasgow Herald building The Lighthouse in Glasgow, is Scotlands Centre for Architecture, Design and the City. ...

Toponymy

It is common to derive the name Glasgow from the older Cumbric glas cau or a Middle Gaelic cognate, which would have meant green hollow. The settlement probably had an earlier Cumbric name, Cathures; the modern name appears for the first time in the Gaelic period (1116), as Glasgu. However, it is also recorded that the King of Strathclyde, Rhydderch Hael, welcomed Saint Kentigern (also known as Saint Mungo), and procured his consecration as bishop about 540. For some thirteen years Kentigern laboured in the region, building his church at the Molendinar Burn, and making many converts. A large community developed around him and became known as Glasgu (meaning the dear Green or the dear green place). Cumbric was the Brythonic Celtic language spoken in England in Cumbria, Lancashire, some parts of Northumbria and Yorkshire and in southern Lowland Scotland, i. ... Middle Irish is the name given by historical philologists to the form of the Irish language from the 10th to 16th centuries; it is therefore a contemporary of Middle English. ... “Gael” redirects here. ... Strathclyde (Welsh: Ystrad Clud) was one of the kingdoms of ancient Scotland in the post-Roman period. ... Riderch I of Alt Clut, (fl. ... Saint Mungo, also known as Saint Kentigern, is by tradition an apostle to the Kingdom of Strathclyde, Scotland, and patron saint and legendary founder of the city of Glasgow. ... The Molendinar Burn was the site of the settlement that grew to become Glasgow, and where St Mungo founded his church in the 6th century. ...


Heraldry

The coat of arms of the City of Glasgow as granted in 1866.
The coat of arms of the City of Glasgow as granted in 1866.

The coat of arms of the City of Glasgow, as granted to the royal burgh by the Lord Lyon on 25 October 1866.[15] It incorporates a number of symbols and emblems associated with the life of Glasgow's patron saint, Mungo, which had been used on official seals prior to that date. The emblems represent miracles supposed to have been performed by Mungo and are listed in the traditional rhyme: Image File history File links Size of this preview: 447 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (500 × 670 pixel, file size: 610 KB, MIME type: image/png) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 447 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (500 × 670 pixel, file size: 610 KB, MIME type: image/png) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Arms of the Office of the Lord Lyon The Lord Lyon King of Arms, the head of Lyon Court, is the Scottish official with responsibility for regulating heraldry in that kingdom, issuing new grants of arms, and serving as the judge of the oldest Heraldic court in the world that... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Saint Mungo, also known as Saint Kentigern, is by tradition an apostle to the Kingdom of Strathclyde, Scotland, and patron saint and legendary founder of the city of Glasgow. ...

Here's the bird that never flew
Here's the tree that never grew
Here's the bell that never rang
Here's the fish that never swam

Mungo is also said to have preached a sermon containing the words Lord, Let Glasgow flourish by the preaching of the word and the praising of thy name. This was abbreviated to "Let Glasgow Flourish" and adopted as the city's motto. The motto was more recently commemorated in a song called "Mother Glasgow", which was written by Dundonian singer/songwriter Michael Marra, but popularised by Hue and Cry. Michael Marra is a Dundee-born musician. ... Hue and Cry is a Scottish band, popular in the 1980s. ...


In 1450, John Stewart, the first Lord Provost of Glasgow, left an endowment so that a "St Mungo's Bell" could be made and tolled throughout the city so that the citizens would pray for his soul. A new bell was purchased by the magistrates in 1641 and that bell is still on display in the People's Palace Museum, near Glasgow Green. A Lord Provost is the Scottish equivalent of a Lord Mayor. ... The Peoples Palace and Winter Gardens in Glasgow, Scotland are a museum and glasshouse situated near Glasgow Green, and were opened on 22 January 1898 by the Earl of Rosebery. ... McLennan Arch at the north-west entrance to Glasgow Green Glasgow Green situated in the east end of the city on the north bank of the River Clyde, is the oldest park in Glasgow dating back to the 15th century. ...


The supporters are two salmon bearing rings, and the crest is a half length figure of Saint Mungo. He wears a bishop's mitre and liturgical vestments and has his hand raised in "the act of benediction". The original 1866 grant placed the crest atop a helm, but this was removed in subsequent grants. The current version (1996) has a gold mural crown between the shield and the crest. This form of coronet, resembling an embattled city wall, was allowed to the four area councils with city status. The Coat of Arms of Prince Edward Island uses two foxes as supporters. ... Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican Churches. ... For other uses, see Benediction (disambiguation). ... A person wearing a helmet. ... First version of the Coat of Arms of Italy. ...


The arms were rematriculated by the City of Glasgow District Council on 6 February 1975, and by the present area council on 25 March 1996. The only change made on each occasion was in the type of coronet over the arms.[16][17]
is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


Governance

See also: Politics of Glasgow
A view over Glasgow City Chambers

Since the Representation of the People Act 1918, Glasgow has increasingly supported Left-wing ideas and politics. The city council has been controlled by the Labour Party for 30 years, since the decline of the Progressives. The left-wing support emanates from the city's legacy as an industrial powerhouse, and the relative poverty of many Glaswegian constituencies and wards. In the aftermath of the Russian Revolution of 1917 and German Revolution, the city's frequent strikes and Militant organisations caused serious alarm at Westminster, with one uprising in January 1919 prompting the Prime Minister, David Lloyd George to deploy 10,000 troops and tanks onto the city's streets. A huge demonstration in the city's George Square on 31 January ended in violence after the Riot Act was read. Politics in Glasgow, Scotland, are evident in the deliberations and decisions of the city council of Glasgow (Glaschu in Gaelic), in elections to the council, and in elections to the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) and the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (Westminster). ... The front of the City Chambers, from George Square. ... The Representation of the People Act 1918 widened suffrage by abolishing practically all property qualifications for men and by enfranchising women over 30 who met minimum property qualifications. ... Left wing redirects here. ... Politics in Glasgow, Scotland, are evident in the deliberations and decisions of the city council of Glasgow (Glaschu in Gaelic), in elections to the council, and in elections to the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) and the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (Westminster). ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Progressive Party was a municipal party for the London County Council based around the Liberal Party. ... In the United Kingdom each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elects one or more members to a parliament or assembly. ... A ward in the United Kingdom is an electoral district represented by one or more councillors. ... The Russian Revolution of 1917 was a series of political and social upheavals in Russia, involving first the overthrow of the tsarist autocracy, and then the overthrow of the liberal and moderate-socialist Provisional Government, resulting in the establishment of Soviet power under the control of the Bolshevik party. ... “November Revolution” redirects here. ... The word militant has come to refer to any individual or party engaged in aggressive physical or verbal combat, normally for a cause. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... For other uses, see Bloody Friday. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who was Prime Minister throughout the latter half of World War I and the first four years of the subsequent peace. ... George Square and Glasgow City Chambers George Square is the central square in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the album by Pearl Jam see Riot Act (album). ...


Industrial action at the shipyards gave rise to the "Red Clydeside" epithet. During the 1930s, Glasgow was the main base of the Independent Labour Party. Towards the end of the 20th century it became a centre of the struggle against the poll tax, and then the main base of the Scottish Socialist Party, a far left party in Scotland. Industrial action (UK) or job action (US) refers collectively to any measure taken by trade unions or other organised labour meant to reduce productivity in a workplace. ... Red Clydeside is a term used to describe the era of political radicalism that characterised the city of Glasgow in Scotland, United Kingdom, and urban areas around the city on the banks of the River Clyde. ... The Independent Labour Party (ILP) was a former political party in the United Kingdom. ... A poll tax, head tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ... The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a radical left-wing Scottish political party which campaigns on a socialist economic platform and for Scottish independence. ...


Scottish Parliament region

See also: Glasgow Scottish Parliament region

The Glasgow electoral region of the Scottish Parliament covers the Glasgow City council area, the Rutherglen area of the South Lanarkshire and a small eastern portion of Renfrewshire. It elects ten of the parliament's 73 first past the post constituency members and seven of the 56 additional members. Both kinds of member are known as Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs). The system of election is designed to produce a form of proportional representation. Glasgow is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood), which were created in 1999. ... Glasgow is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ... Rutherglen (An Ruadh Ghleann in Scottish Gaelic) is a town bordering on the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... South Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig a Deas in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, covering the southern part of the traditional county of Lanarkshire. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... The plurality voting system, also known as first past the post, is a voting system used to elect a single winner in a given election. ... Ballot for electoral district 252, Würzburg, for the 2005 German federal election. ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ...


The first past the post seats were created in 1999 with the names and boundaries of then existing Westminster (House of Commons) constituencies. In 2005, however, the number of Westminster Members of Parliament (MPs) representing Scotland was cut to 59, with new constituencies being formed, while the existing number of MSPs was retained at Holyrood. “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ...


The ten Scottish Parliament constituencies in the Glasgow electoral region are:-

Glasgow Anniesland is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament. ... Glasgow Baillieston is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament since 1999. ... Glasgow Cathcart is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament. ... Glasgow Govan is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... Glasgow Kelvin is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament. ... Maryhill is a area in Glasgow situated in the North of the City. ... Glasgow Pollok is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament since 1999. ... Glasgow Rutherglen is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament since 1999. ... Glasgow Shettleston is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... Glasgow Springburn is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ...

United Kingdom Parliament constituencies

See also: United Kingdom constituencies

Following reform of constituencies of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom Parliament (Westminster) in 2005, which reduced the number of Scottish Members of Parliament (MPs), the current Westminster constituencies representing Glasgow are:- In the United Kingdom each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elects one or more members to a parliament or assembly. ... The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Clock Tower and New Palace Yard from the west The Palace of Westminster, on the banks of the River Thames in Westminster, London, is the home of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, which form the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...

Glasgow Central is a constituency of the House of Commons of the UK Parliament. ... Glasgow East is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Glasgow North is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Glasgow North East is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Glasgow North West is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Glasgow South is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Glasgow South West is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...

Geography

Main article: Geography of Glasgow

Glasgow is located on the banks of the River Clyde, in West Central Scotland. Its second most important river is the Kelvin whose name was used for creating the title of Baron Kelvin and thereby ended up as the scientific unit of temperature. Geography of Glasgow, relates to the geography, climate and demographics of Glasgow, Scotland Glasgow is located on the banks of the River Clyde, in West Central Scotland. ... For other rivers, see Clyde River (disambiguation) , The River Clyde (Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh, pronounced ) is a major river in Scotland. ... Strathclyde (Srath Chluaidh in Gaelic) was one of the regional council areas of Scotland from 1975 to 1996. ... This article is about the country. ... The Kelvin is Glasgows second river after the River Clyde. ... For other persons named William Thomson, see William Thomson (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Kelvin (disambiguation). ...


Climate

Rain at Glasgow Necropolis.
Rain at Glasgow Necropolis.

Weather in Glasgow is not typical of the weather in the rest of the UK for several reasons. Glasgow benefits from a mild south western position; the Gulf Stream currents flow up the Clyde estuary from the Atlantic warming the area. The city is also sheltered by the surrounding Clyde Valley hills keeping the city fairly humid throughout the year.[citation needed] The temperature is often milder than the rest of the country. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 387 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 387 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For the album by Ocean Colour Scene, see North Atlantic Drift (album) The Gulf Stream is orange and yellow in this representation of water temperatures of the Atlantic. ... For other rivers, see Clyde River (disambiguation) , The River Clyde (Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh, pronounced ) is a major river in Scotland. ... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ...


The spring months (March to May) are mild and cool. Many of Glasgow's trees and plants begin to flower at this time of the year and parks and gardens are filled with spring colours. The summer months (May to September) can vary considerably between mild and wet weather or warm and sunny. The winds are generally westerly, due to the warm Gulf Stream. The warmest month is usually July, the daily high averaging 20 °C (68 °F). (Highest recorded temperature 31.2 °C/88 °F 4 August 1975.) Despite some infrequent clear or dry days, winters in Glasgow are normally damp and cold. (Lowest recorded temperature −17 °C/1 °F 29 December 1995[citation needed]). However, the Gulf Stream ensures that Glasgow stays warmer than other cities at the same latitude such as Moscow[citation needed]. Winds and rainfall are often fairly chilling and strong, like the rest of western Scotland. Severe snowfalls melt within days and rarely lie in the city centre. December, January and February are the wettest months of the year, but can often be sunny and clear.[citation needed] For the album by Ocean Colour Scene, see North Atlantic Drift (album) The Gulf Stream is orange and yellow in this representation of water temperatures of the Atlantic. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ...

Weather averages for Glasgow, United Kingdom
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 13 (56) 12 (55) 15 (59) 23 (75) 27 (81) 29 (85) 30 (86) 31 (88) 25 (78) 21 (70) 15 (59) 13 (57) 31 (88)
Average high °C (°F) 6 (43) 6 (44) 8 (47) 11 (52) 15 (59) 17 (63) 18 (66) 18 (65) 15 (60) 12 (54) 8 (48) 6 (44) 12 (54)
Average low °C (°F) 1 (34) 1 (34) 2 (36) 3 (38) 4 (43) 8 (48) 11 (52) 10 (51) 8 (47) 5 (42) 2 (37) 1 (35) 5 (41)
Record low °C (°F) -17 (1) -12 (9) -8 (16) -4 (24) -3 (25) 3 (38) 1 (35) -2 (27) -7 (19) -10 (14) -17 (1) -17 (1)
Precipitation cm (inches) 8.69 (3.42) 7.9 (3.11) 7.44 (2.93) 4.65 (1.83) 3.35 (1.32) 3.86 (1.52) 4.95 (1.95) 5.26 (2.07) 5.66 (2.23) 8.48 (3.34) 8.48 (2.62) 7.49 (2.95) 6.35 (2.44)
Source: Weatherbook[18] May 2008

Demography

Main article: Geography of Glasgow#Demographics

The population of the Glasgow City Council area peaked in the 1950s at 1,200,000 people and before that for 80 years was over 1 million. During this period, Glasgow was one of the most densely populated cities in the world. After the 1960s, clearings of poverty-stricken inner city areas like the Gorbals and relocation to 'new towns' such as East Kilbride and Cumbernauld led to population decline. In addition, the boundaries of the city were changed twice during the late 20th century, making direct comparisons difficult. The city continues to expand beyond the official city council boundaries into surrounding suburban areas, encompassing around 400 square miles (1,000 km²) if all adjoining suburbs, commuter towns and villages are included. Geography of Glasgow, relates to the geography, climate and demographics of Glasgow, Scotland Glasgow is located on the banks of the River Clyde, in West Central Scotland. ... The Gorbals (Gort a Bhaile in Gaelic) is a predominantly working-class area on the south bank of the river Clyde in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... See New Town for places with that name. ... East Kilbride (Cille Bhrìghde an Ear in Scottish Gaelic) is a large town in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... , Cumbernauld (Gaelic: Comar nan Allt) is a new town in North Lanarkshire, Scotland, created in 1956 as a population overflow for Glasgow. ...


There are two distinct definitions for the population of Glasgow; the Glasgow City Council Area (which lost the districts of Rutherglen and Cambuslang to South Lanarkshire in 1996) and the Greater Glasgow Urban Area which includes the conurbation around the city. Rutherglen (said: Rhu-ther-glehn) comes from the Gaelic An Ruadh Ghleann - the red valley. Rutherglen is a town located within the south-eastern suburbs of the city of Glasgow, Scotland near the town of Cambuslang. ... Cambuslang (Scottish Gaelic: Camas Long) is a suburban town on the south-eastern outskirts of Glasgow, Scotland located within the local authority area of South Lanarkshire. ... South Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig a Deas in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, covering the southern part of the traditional county of Lanarkshire. ...


Since the 1840s to present day, massive numbers of Irish immigrants have settled and contributed immensely in the city. Numerous Scottish Highlanders also migrated to the city as a result of the Highland Clearances. The Irish, and to a lesser extent Highlanders, contributed to the explosive growth of Roman Catholicism in the city.[19][20] Irish-Scots are people who emigrated to Scotland from Ireland, mostly in the 19th and 20th centuries, and their descendants. ... The Gàidhealtachd, sometimes known as A Ghàidhealtachd (the Gàidhealtachd), usually refers to the Scottish Highlands in Scottish Gaelic. ... The Highland Clearances (Scottish Gaelic: Fuadaich nan Gàidheal, the expulsion of the Gael) is a name given to the forced displacement of the population of the Scottish Highlands from their ancient ways of warrior clan subsistence farming, leading to mass emigration. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


In the early 20th century, many Lithuanian asylum seekers began to settle in Glasgow and at its height in the 1950s there were around 10,000 in the Glasgow area.[21] Many Italian-Scots also settled in Glasgow, originating from areas like Frosinone and Lucca at this time, many originally working as "Hokey Pokey" men.[22] In the 1960s and '70s, many Asian-Scots also settled in Glasgow, mainly in the Pollokshields area as well as Cantonese immigrants, many of whom settled in the Garnethill area of the city.[citation needed] Since 2000, the UK government has pursued a policy of dispersal of asylum seekers to ease pressure on social housing in the London area. Glasgow has seen waves of new arrivals because of this policy, though not always smoothly in some districts.[citation needed][neutrality disputed] Italian-Scots, or Scots-Italian, designates an ethnic minority of Scottish and Italian descent. ... Frosinone is the capital of Frosinone Province in Italy. ... For the Chrono Trigger character, see Lucca (Chrono Trigger). ... Hokey pokey is a flavour of ice cream sold in New Zealand; according to the New Zealand Ice Cream Manufacturers Association [1], it is the nations second most popular ice cream flavour, after vanilla. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... , Pollokshields is an area of the Southside of Glasgow. ... Cantonese people (Traditional Chinese: 廣東人; Simplified Chinese: 广东人; Pinyin: Guǎngdōng rén; Jyutping: gwong2 dung1 yan4), broadly speaking, are persons originating from the present-day Guangdong province in southern China. ... Garnethill is a residential area of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

Location Population Area Density
Glasgow City Council[23] 578,790 67.76 sq mi (175 km²) 8,541.8/sq mi (3,298/km²)
Greater Glasgow Urban Area[24] 1,168,270 142.27 sq mi (368 km²) 8,212.9/sq mi (3,171/km²)
Source: Scotland's Census Results Online[25]

Since the 2001 census the population decline has stabilised. The 2004 population of the city council area was 685,090 and the population of both the City of Glasgow Council area and Greater Glasgow are forecast to grow in the near future. Around 2,300,000 people live in the Glasgow travel to work area.[10] This area is defined as having 10% and over of residents travelling into Glasgow to work, and has no fixed boundaries.[26] In 2001 censuses were conducted in Canada: Canada 2001 Census Nepal: Demographics of Nepal Portugal Slovakia: Demographics of Slovakia United Kingdom: United Kingdom Census 2001 Categories: Demographics ...


Compared to Inner London, which has 23,441 inhabitants per square mile (9,051/km²).,[27] Scotland's major city has less than half the current population density of the English capital—8,603 inhabitants per square mile (3,322/km²) However, in 1931 the population density was 16,166 inhabitants per square mile (6,242/km²), highlighting the subsequent 'clearances' to the suburbs and new towns that were built to empty one of Europe's most densely populated cities.[28] Inner London is the name for the group of London boroughs which form the central part of Greater London and are surrounded by Outer London. ...


Economy

HMS Daring was built in Glasgow and launched in 2006. Although diminished from its early 20th century heights, Glasgow remains the hub of the UK's Shipbuilding industry.
HMS Daring was built in Glasgow and launched in 2006. Although diminished from its early 20th century heights, Glasgow remains the hub of the UK's Shipbuilding industry.

Glasgow has the largest economy in Scotland and is at the hub of the metropolitan area of West Central Scotland. The city also has the third largest GDP Per Capita in the UK, after London and Edinburgh.[29] The city itself sustains more than 410,000 jobs in over 12,000 companies. Over 153,000 jobs have been created in the city since 2000 - a growth rate of 32%.[30] Glasgow's annual economic growth rate of 4.4% is now second only to that of London. In 2005 alone over 17,000 new jobs were created, and 2006 saw private-sector investment in the city reaching £4.2 billion pounds, an increase of 22% in a single year.[31] 55% of the residents in the Greater Glasgow area commute to the city every day. Once dominant manufacturing industries such as shipbuilding and heavy engineering have been gradually replaced in importance by a diversified economy.[32] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3003x1477, 1433 KB) Summary HMS Daring under construction. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3003x1477, 1433 KB) Summary HMS Daring under construction. ... For other ships to have carried the name, see HMS Daring. ... Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... The headquarters of the Bank of Scotland, located on the Mound in Edinburgh. ... Greater Glasgow refers to the Greater Glasgow Health Board area, and the Greater Glasgow Metropolitan Settlement Area (created in the 2001 census) in Scotland. ... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Greater Glasgow is the conurbation that includes and surrounds the city of Glasgow in the west of Scotland. ...


Glasgow's economy has seen significant growth of tertiary sector industries such as financial and business services, communications, biosciences, creative industries, healthcare, higher education, retail and tourism. Between 1998 and 2001, the city's financial services sector grew at a rate of 30%, making considerable gains on Edinburgh, which has historically been the centre of the Scottish financial sector.[33][34] Glasgow is the second most popular foreign tourist destination[citation needed] in Scotland and its largest retail centre. Glasgow is also one of Europe's sixteen largest financial centres.[citation needed] The tertiary sector of industry (also known as the service sector or the service industry) is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing), and primary industry (extraction such as mining, agriculture and fishing). ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ...


The city retains a strong link to the manufacturing sector which accounts for well over 60% of Scotland's manufactured exports,[citation needed] with particular strengths in shipbuilding, engineering, food and drink, printing, publishing, chemicals and textiles as well as new growth sectors such as optoelectronics, software development and biotechnology. Glasgow forms the western part of the Silicon Glen high tech sector of Scotland. A growing number of Blue chip financial sector companies have significant operations or headquarters in the city. Optoelectronics is the study and application of electronic devices that interact with light, and thus is usually considered a sub-field of photonics. ... “Software development” redirects here. ... Insulin crystals Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... Silicon Glen is a nickname for the high tech sector of Scotland. ... A blue chip stock is the stock of a well-established company having stable earnings and no extensive liabilities. ...


However, large-scale social deprivation remains a problem. A report published in 2007 stated that the gap between prosperous and deprived areas of the city is wide and appears to have been growing.[35] In 2006, 47% of Glasgow's population lived in the most deprived 15% of areas in Scotland,,[35] while 29.4% of the city's working-age residents are defined as "economically inactive".[36] There are estimated to be over 170 gangs in Glasgow—a similar number to London, which is over 6 times bigger.[36]


Architecture

The western façade of Templeton's Carpet Factory.
The western façade of Templeton's Carpet Factory.

Very little of medieval Glasgow remains, the two main landmarks from this period being the 14th century Provand's Lordship and St. Mungo's Cathedral. The vast majority of the city as seen today dates from the 19th century. As a result, Glasgow has an impressive heritage of Victorian architecture - the Glasgow City Chambers, the main building of the University of Glasgow, designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott and the Glasgow School of Art, designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh are outstanding examples. A hidden gem of Glasgow, also designed by Mackintosh is the Queen's Cross Church, the only church by the renowned artist to be built.[37] Download high resolution version (480x640, 46 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (480x640, 46 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Provands Lordship located in Glasgow, Scotland today stand as a museum located at the top of Castle Street in the shadow of the Glasgow Cathedral and the Royal Infirmary. ... The front of Glasgow Cathedral, from Cathedral Square Glasgow Cathedral and Glasgow Royal Infirmary viewed from Glasgow Necropolis Painting of David Robert shows St. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... The front of the City Chambers, from George Square. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ... Glasgow School of Art is one of four independent art schools in Scotland, situated in the Garnethill area of Glasgow. ... Charles Mackintosh redirects here. ... The Church of Scotland parish church Glasgow: Queens Cross, also known as The Mackintosh Church, is the only church designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. ...

The main building of the University of Glasgow, designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott.
The main building of the University of Glasgow, designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott.

Glasgow's impressive historical and modern architectural traditions were celebrated in 1999 when the city was designated UK City of Architecture and Design,[38] winning the accolade over Liverpool and Edinburgh.[39] Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ...


Another architect who had an enduring impact on the city's appearance was Alexander Thomson, who produced a distinctive architecture based on fundamentalist classicism that gave him the nickname "Greek". Examples of Thomson's work can be found over the city.[40] Alexander Thomson, c. ...


The buildings reflect the wealth and self confidence of the residents of the "Second City of the Empire". Glasgow generated immense wealth from trade and the industries that developed from the Industrial Revolution. The shipyards, marine engineering, steel making, and heavy industry all contributed to the growth of the city. At one time the expression "Clydebuilt" was synonymous with quality and engineering excellence.[41] The Templeton's carpet factory on Glasgow Green was designed to resemble the Doge's Palace in Venice. A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Small shipyard in Klaksvík (Faroe Islands), reparing fishing vessels Fish ladder and shipyard in Grave, the Netherlands Construction hall of Schichau Seebeck Shipyard, Bremerhaven Gdynia Shipyard Shipyards and dockyards are places which repair and build ships. ... The Engine room of Argonaute, a French supply vessel. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... Heavy industry does not have a single fixed meaning compared to light industry. ... McLennan Arch at the north-west entrance to Glasgow Green Glasgow Green situated in the east end of the city on the north bank of the River Clyde, is the oldest park in Glasgow dating back to the 15th century. ... Doges Palace with Bridge of Sighs to the right Carved marble façade inside courtyard The Doges Palace is a gothic palace in Venice. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ...

Many of the city's most impressive buildings were built with red or blond sandstone, but during the industrial era those colours disappeared under a pervasive black layer of soot and pollutants from the furnaces, until the Clean Air Act was introduced in 1956. In recent years many of these buildings have been cleaned and restored to their original appearance. Charles Mackintosh redirects here. ... Glasgow School of Art is one of four independent art schools in Scotland, situated in the Garnethill area of Glasgow. ... This article is about the geological formation. ... A furnace is a device for heating air or any other fluid. ... Smog over Shanghai. ...

Typical red sandstone Glasgow south side tenement (Shawlands).

Perhaps more than any other city Glasgow is known for its tenements.[42] These were the most popular form of housing in 19th and 20th century Glasgow and remain the most common form of dwelling in Glasgow today. Tenements are commonly bought by a wide range of social types and are favoured for their large rooms, high ceilings and original period features.[43] The Hyndland area of Glasgow is the only tenement conservation area in the UK,[44] and includes some tenement houses with as many as six bedrooms, often valued at over £500,000. Shawlands is an area of Glasgow, in Scotland. ... An apartment building, block of flats or tenement is a multi-unit dwelling made up of several (generally four or more) apartments (US) or flats (UK). ... A Hyndland Townhouse. ...


Like many cities in the UK, Glasgow witnessed the construction of a large concentration of high-rise housing in tower blocks in the 1960s.[45] These were built to replace the decaying tenement buildings originally built for workers who migrated from the surrounding countryside, the Highlands, and the rest of the United Kingdom, particularly Ireland, in order to feed the local demand for labour.[46] The massive demand outstripped new building and many, orginally fine, tenements often became overcrowded and unsanitary. [47] Many developed into the infamous Glasgow slums, such as the Gorbals. The Corporation made many efforts to improve the situation, most successfully with the City Improvement Trust, which cleared the slums of the old town, replacing them with what they thought of as a traditional High Street, which remains an imposing townscape. (The City Halls and the Cleland Testimonial were part of this scheme). National government help was acquired following World War I when various Housing Acts sought to provide "homes fit for heroes". Garden suburb areas, based on English models, such as Knightswood were set up. These proved too expensive, so a modern tenement, three stories high, slate roofed and built of reconstituted stone, was re-introduced and a slum clearance programme initiated to clear areas such as the Calton and the Garngad. Post second World War II, more ambitious plans were made for the complete evacuation of slums to New Towns but the Corporation was not keen to lose population, so this plan - the Bruce Plan - was modified [48] to establish quasi-new towns built on the outer fringes of the city.[49] Again, economic considerations meant that many of the planned "New Town" amenities were never built in these areas. These housing estates, known as "schemes", came therefore to be widely regarded as unsuccessful; many, such as Castlemilk, were just dormitories well away from the centre of the city with no amenities, such as shops and public houses (deserts with windows, as Billy Connolly once put it). High rise living too started off with bright ambition - the Moss Heights are still very desireable - (1950 - 54) but fell prey to later economic pressure. Many of the later tower blocks were poorly designed and cheaply built and their anonymity caused some social problems. Many of these are now being demolished - among them award-winning buildings designed by Basil Spence. A tower block, block of flats, or apartment block, is a multi-unit high-rise apartment building. ... Categories: Stub | House types ... Slums in Delhi, India. ... The Gorbals (Gort a Bhaile in Gaelic) is a predominantly working-class area on the south bank of the river Clyde in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Knightswood is a large district in West Glasgow containing 4 areas: Knightswood North or High Knightswood, Knightswood South or Low Knightswood, Knightswood Park and Blairdardie. ... Calton is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... See New Town for places with that name. ... Castlemilk (Caisteal Mheilc in Gaelic) is a huge district of Glasgow, Scotland. ... A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the Great Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other countries influenced by British cultural heritage. ... Dr William Billy Connolly, CBE, (born 24 November 1942) is a Scottish comedian, musician, presenter, and actor. ... Sir Basil Urwin Spence, OM, OBE, RA, (13 August 1907 – 19 November 1976) was a Scottish architect, most notably associated with Coventry Cathedral and the Beehive, but also responsible for numerous other buildings in the Modernist/Brutalist style. ...


In 1970 a team from Strathclyde University demonstrated that the old tenements had been basically sound, and could be given new life with replumbing with kitchens and bathroom. [50] The Corporation acted on this principle for the first time in 1973 at the Old Swan Corner, Pollokshaws. Thereafter, Housing Action Areas were set up to renovate so-called slums. Later, privately owned tenements benefited from government help in "stone cleaning", revealing a honey-coloured sandstone behind the presumed "grey" tenemental facades. The policy of tenement demolition is now considered to have been short-sighted, wasteful and largely unsuccessful. Many of Glasgow's worst tenements were refurbished into desirable accommodation in the 1970s and 1980s[51] and the policy of demolition is considered to have destroyed many fine examples of a "universally admired architectural" style.[52] The Glasgow Housing Association took ownership of the housing stock from the city council on 7 March 2003, and has begun a £96 million clearance and demolition programme to clear and demolish most of the high-rise flats.[53] The University of Strathclyde in Scotland is a top research-led British University which originated as Andersons Institution in 1796. ... Pollokshaws is a suburb on the southside of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... // Introduction Glasgow Housing Association (GHA) is a private not-for-profit company created by the British Government for the purpose of owning and managing Glasgows social housing stock. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Modern buildings in Glasgow include the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, and along the banks of the Clyde are the Glasgow Science Centre and the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre, whose Clyde Auditorium was designed by Sir Norman Foster, and is affectionately known as the "Armadillo". Zaha Hadid won a competition to design the new Museum of Transport, which will move to the waterfront.[54] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2181x1500, 277 KB) The glasgow science centre in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2181x1500, 277 KB) The glasgow science centre in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Glasgow Science Centre and the Glasgow Tower The Glasgow Science Centre is a major science and technology museum located in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Glasgow Royal Concert Hall is a music auditorium in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Glasgow Science Centre and the Glasgow Tower The Glasgow Science Centre is a major science and technology museum located in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The front of the SECC The Clyde Auditorium with the main SECC building behind it The Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre (SECC), located on the north bank of the River Clyde in Glasgow, is Scotlands national venue for public events. ... The Clyde Auditorium viewed from across the Clyde. ... The restored Reichstag in Berlin, housing the German parliament. ... For other uses, see Armadillo (disambiguation). ... Interior of Phaeno Science Center in Wolfsburg, Germany Bergisel Ski Jump, Innsbruck BMW Central Building, Leipzig Vitra fire station, Weil am Rhein, Germany Maggies Centre, Kirkcaldy Zaha Hadid (Arabic: زها حديد) CBE (born October 31, 1950, Baghdad, Iraq) is a notable Iraqi-British deconstructivist architect. ... The Glasgow Museum of Transport is located in the Kelvin Hall in Glasgow, Scotland. ...


The 39-storey Elphinstone Place mixed-use skyscraper in Charing Cross will be the tallest building in Scotland, and was scheduled to begin construction in mid 2006.[55] Much development is taking place along the banks of the Clyde. Glasgow Harbour, which neighbours Partick, is one of the largest residential developments. This article, image, template or category should belong in one or more categories. ... Charing Cross is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Glasgow Harbour is an urban regeneration scheme at Partick in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Bilingual sign in Gaelic and English at Partick railway station, Glasgow. ...


Districts and suburbs

Glasgow was historically based around Glasgow Cathedral, the old High Street and down to the River Clyde via Glasgow Cross. Glasgow Cathedral Glasgow Cathedral is a Church of Scotland cathedral in Glasgow. ... High Street in Glasgow, Scotland is the citys oldest and one of its most historically significant streets. ... For other rivers, see Clyde River (disambiguation) , The River Clyde (Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh, pronounced ) is a major river in Scotland. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ...


City centre

The city centre is bounded by the High Street to the east, the River Clyde to the south and the M8 motorway to the west and north which was built through the Townhead, Charing Cross and Anderston areas in the 1960s. The Central Business District of Sydney, Australia. ... For other rivers, see Clyde River (disambiguation) , The River Clyde (Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh, pronounced ) is a major river in Scotland. ... Kingston Bridge M8 running alongside the Clyde This Stub in the Tradeston area, popularly known as the ski-ramp, is the abandoned interchange for the southern flank of the Glasgow Inner Ring Road For the highway connecting Moscow to Arkhangelsk, see M8 motorway (Russia). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Charing Cross is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Anderston is a well-known district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ...

Buchanan Street at night, looking southward behind the Donald Dewar statue.
Buchanan Street at night, looking southward behind the Donald Dewar statue.

Buchanan Street looking southward. ... For the Canadian politician, see Donald Dewar (Canadian politician). ...

Retail and theatre district

The city centre is based on a grid system of streets, similar to that of Barcelona or American cities, on the north bank of the River Clyde. The heart of the city is George Square, site of many of Glasgow's public statues and the elaborate Victorian Glasgow City Chambers, headquarters of Glasgow City Council. To the south and west are the shopping precincts of Argyle, Sauchiehall and Buchanan Streets, the latter featuring more upmarket retailers and winner of the Academy of Urbanism 'Great Street Award' 2008.[56] A simple grid plan road map (Windermere, Florida). ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... George Square and Glasgow City Chambers George Square is the central square in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Glasgows public statues display its wealth and history as much as its architecture. ... The front of the City Chambers, from George Square. ... Politics in Glasgow, Scotland, are evident in the deliberations and decisions of the city council of Glasgow (Glaschu in Gaelic), in elections to the council, and in elections to the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) and the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (Westminster). ... Buchanan Street looking southward. ...

Buchanan Street at night.
Buchanan Street at night.

The main shopping centres are Buchanan Galleries and the St. Enoch Centre, with the up-market Princes Square and the Italian Centre specialising in designer labels. The London-based department store Selfridges has purchased a potential development site in the city and another upmarket retail chain Harvey Nichols is also thought to be planning a store in the city, further strengthening Glasgow's retail portfolio, which forms the UK's second largest and most economically important retail sector after Central London.[57][58] The layout of the approximately two and a half mile long retail district of Buchanan Street, Sauchiehall Street and Argyle Street has been termed the "Golden Z". Buchanan Street looking southward. ... The Buchanan Galleries is a shopping mall located in the central area of Glasgow, the largest city in Scotland. ... St Enoch Square and the St Enoch shopping centre The St. ... Selfridges in Birmingham. ... Harvey Nichols at the corner of Knightsbridge and Sloane Street in London A Harvey Nichols advertisement encourages women to buy an expensive pair of shoes that they are unable to afford and eat beans on toast every day until the next time they are paid A branch store in Central... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Sauchiehall Street is one of the main shopping/business streets in Glasgow city centre. ...


The city centre is home to most of Glasgow's main cultural venues: The Theatre Royal (home of Scottish Opera and Scottish Ballet), The Pavilion, The King's Theatre, Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow Film Theatre, RSAMD, Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA), Mitchell Library, the Centre for Contemporary Arts, McLellan Galleries and The Lighthouse Museum of Architecture, Design and the City. The world's tallest cinema, the eighteen-screen Cineworld is sited on Renfrew Street. The city centre is also home to four of Glasgow's higher education institutions: The University of Strathclyde, The Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama, Glasgow School of Art and Glasgow Caledonian University. The Theatre Royal in located in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Scottish Opera was founded in 1962 and is based in Glasgow. ... Scottish Ballet is Scotlands national ballet company, based in Glasgow. ... // Pavilion Theatre History One of Glasgows oldest theatres, the Pavilion opened its doors on 29 February 1904 as a music hall theatre. ... The Kings Theatre in Glasgow is one of Scotlands most historic and significant theatres. ... The Glasgow Royal Concert Hall is a music auditorium in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Glasgow Film Theatre or GFT is an independent, specialist cinema in Rose Street, (by Sauchiehall Street), Glasgow. ... The Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama or RSAMD is a music and drama school in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) is the City of Glasgows main gallery of contemporary art. ... : See State Library of New South Wales for its Mitchell Library section of Australiana. ... The McLellan Galleries are an exhibition space in the city of Glasgow. ... The Lighthouse, Charles Mackintoshs Glasgow Herald building The Lighthouse in Glasgow, is Scotlands Centre for Architecture, Design and the City. ... Cineworld Cinemas is a multiplex cinema chain in the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Jersey. ... The University of Strathclyde (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a university in Glasgow, Scotland. ... RSAMD The Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (RSAMD), founded in 1845 by the Glasgow Educational Association, is a university of music and drama in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow School of Art is one of four independent art schools in Scotland, situated in the Garnethill area of Glasgow. ... Glasgow Caledonian University is a university in Glasgow, Scotland. ...




Merchant City

The Tolbooth Steeple dominates Glasgow Cross.
The Tolbooth Steeple dominates Glasgow Cross.

To the east is the commercial and residential district of Merchant City, which was formerly the residential district of the wealthy city merchants in the 18th and early 19th centuries. As the Industrial Revolution and the wealth it brought to the city resulted in the expansion of Glasgow's central area westward, the original medieval centre was left behind. Glasgow Cross, situated at the junction of High Street, Gallowgate, Trongate and Saltmarket was the original centre of the city, symbolised by its Mercat cross. Glasgow Cross encompasses the Tolbooth Clock Tower; all that remains of the original City Chambers, which was destroyed by fire in 1926. Moving northward up High Street towards Rottenrow and Townhead lies the 15th century Glasgow Cathedral and the Provand's Lordship. Due to growing industrial pollution levels in the mid to late 19th century, the area fell out of favour with residents.[citation needed] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 355 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 355 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Merchant City, is a district of Glasgow, Scotland. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... High Street in Glasgow, Scotland is the citys oldest and one of its most historically significant streets. ... Trongate is one of the oldest streets in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... The mercat cross in Cockburnspath A mercat cross is a market cross found in Scottish cities and towns where trade and commerce was a part of economic life. ... Tolbooth or tollbooth may mean several things: Historical Scottish terms for prisons. ... Rottenrow Gardens. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Glasgow Cathedral Glasgow Cathedral is a Church of Scotland cathedral in Glasgow. ... The Provands Lordship located in Glasgow, Scotland today stand as a museum located at the top of Castle Street in the shadow of the Glasgow Cathedral and the Royal Infirmary. ...

Royal Exchange Square at night (Merchant City)
Royal Exchange Square at night (Merchant City)

From the late 1980s onwards, the area has been rejuvenated with luxury city centre apartments and warehouse conversions. Many new cafés and restaurants have opened. The area also contains the Tron Theatre, the Old Fruitmarket, the Trades Hall, and the City Halls. There are also a number of high end boutique style shops in the area and it has now become home to some of Glasgow's most upmarket stores. The Merchant City, is a district of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Look up Loft in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Tron Theatre is located in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgows City Halls and Fruitmarket is a concert hall and old fruitmarket in Glasgow, Scotland. ...


The area is also home to Glasgow's growing 'Arts Quarter', based around King Street, the Saltmarket and Trongate, and at the heart of the annual Merchant City Festival. There are many art galleries here. Trongate is one of the oldest streets in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Merchant City Festival is a major cultural festival taking place in Glasgows Merchant City area. ...


A large part of Glasgow's LGBT scene is located within the Merchant City. This includes many clubs, and the UK gay chain store Clone Zone, along with a couple of saunas. Recently the city council defined (and perhaps expanded) the area known as Merchant City as far west as Buchanan Street, marking these boundaries with new, highly stylised metal signage.[citation needed] LGBT (also GLBT) is an acronym referring collectively to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender/transsexual people. ... Buchanan Street looking southward. ...


Financial district

To the western edge of the city centre, occupying the areas of Blythswood Hill and Anderston, lies Glasgow's financial district, known officially as the International Financial Services District (IFSD), although often irreverently nicknamed by the contemporary press as the "square kilometre" or "Wall Street on Clyde".[citation needed] Since the late 1980s the construction of many modern office blocks, a trend which continues into the 21st century with a new wave of high rise developments currently on the drawing board, has enabled the IFSD to become the third largest financial quarter[citation needed] in the UK after the City of London and Edinburgh. With a reputation as an established financial services centre, coupled with comprehensive support services, Glasgow continues to attract and grow new business. Of the 10 largest general insurance companies in the UK, 8 have a base or head office in Glasgow - including Direct Line, AXA and Norwich Union. Key banking sector companies have also relocated some of their services to commercial property in Glasgow - Resolution, JPMorgan, Abbey, HBOS, Barclays Wealth, Morgan Stanley, Lloyds TSB, Clydesdale Bank, BNP Paribas and the Royal Bank of Scotland. The Ministry of Defence have several departments and Clydeport, the Glasgow Stock Exchange, Student Loans Company, Scottish Executive Enterprise, Transport and Lifelong Learning Department, Scottish Qualifications Authority and Scottish Enterprise also have their headquarters based in the district. The Clyde Arc is a road bridge spanning the River Clyde in west central Scotland, connecting Finnieston, near the Clyde Auditorium and SECC with Pacific Quay and Glasgow Science Centre in Govan. ... Blythswood Hill is an area of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Anderston is a well-known district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Direct Line is a division of the Royal Bank of Scotland that specialises in selling insurance and other financial services over the phone and internet. ... For other uses, see Axa (disambiguation). ... Norwich Union is an insurance company in the UK. It is the biggest life-insurer in the UK, and has a strong position in motor insurance. ... Resolution plc (LSE: RSL) is a UK insurance company headquartered in the City of London. ... J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. ... Abbey Head office. ... Group headquarters on The Mound, Edinburgh HBOS Office at Trinity Road, Halifax HBOS plc (LSE: HBOS) is a banking and insurance group in the United Kingdom, the holding company for Bank of Scotland plc, which operates the Bank of Scotland and Halifax brands; HBOS Australia, owner of BankWest; and HBOS... Barclays Bank is the fourth largest bank in the United Kingdom. ... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is one of the largest and the most reputed investment banks headquartered in New York City. ... Lloyds TSB Group plc is a group of financial services companies, based in the United Kingdom, which was created in 1995 following the merger of the TSB Group and the Lloyds Bank Group. ... The Clydesdale Bank PLC (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a commercial bank in the United Kingdom, a subsidiary of the nab Group. ... BNP Paribas (Euronext: BNP, TYO: 8665) is one of the main banks in Europe. ... The Royal Bank of Scotland Plc (Scottish Gaelic: [1]) is one of the retail banking subsidiaries of Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc, which together with NatWest, provides branch banking facilities in the United Kingdom. ... The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and is the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ... The Peel Group is a collection of property and transport companies based in the United Kingdom. ... The Glasgow Stock Exchange is a prominent building and financial institution in the centre of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Student Loans Company Limited is a non-departmental public body in the United Kingdom responsible for the provision of financial support to students attending university. ... The Enterprise, Transport and Lifelong Learning Department (ETLLD) is the Scottish Executive department responsible for economic and industrial development, further and higher education, skills, lifelong learning, energy, transport and digital connectivity. ... The Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) is an Executive Agency of the Scottish Executive responsible for the development, accreditation, assessment and certification of qualifications, other than academic degrees, in Scotland. ... Scottish Enterprise is the main national economic development agency of Scotland. ...

West End

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is Glasgow's premier museum and art gallery, housing one of Europe's great civic art collections.
Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is Glasgow's premier museum and art gallery, housing one of Europe's great civic art collections.
Popular with students and professionals alike is Ashton Lane with its many pubs and bars.
Popular with students and professionals alike is Ashton Lane with its many pubs and bars.

Glasgow's West End refers to the bohemian district of cafés, tea rooms, bars, boutiques, upmarket hotels, clubs and restaurants in the hinterland of Kelvingrove Park, the University of Glasgow, Glasgow Botanic Gardens and the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre. The area's main thoroughfare is Byres Road and one of its most popular destinations is Ashton Lane. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3264x2448, 3619 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Glasgow Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3264x2448, 3619 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Glasgow Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is Glasgows premier museum and art gallery and has one of Europes great civic art collections. ... Ashton Lane. ... For other uses, see Bohemian (disambiguation). ... Kelvingrove Park is one of the most popular parks in the city of Glasgow. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... Main Range of glasshouses Set in the West End of Glasgow, Scotland, the Glasgow Botanic Gardens is a large public park with several glasshouses, the most notable of which is the Kibble Palace. ... The front of the SECC The Clyde Auditorium with the main SECC building behind it The Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre (SECC), located on the north bank of the River Clyde in Glasgow, is Scotlands national venue for public events. ... Byres Road is situated in the West End of Glasgow. ... Ashton Lane. ...


The West End is home to some of the wealthiest addresses in Scotland, and includes the upmarket residential areas of Hillhead, Dowanhill, Kelvingrove, Kelvinside, Hyndland, and, to an increasing extent, Partick. However, the name is increasingly being used to refer to any area to the west of Charing Cross. This includes areas such as Scotstoun, Jordanhill, Kelvindale and Anniesland. Lilybank Gardens, a typical Hillhead terrace Hillhead is a residential and commercial area of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Dowanhill is an neighbourood situated in the West End of Glasgow. ... Kelvingrove can refer to: Glasgow Kelvingrove (UK Parliament constituency) Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow Kelvingrove Hotel, Glasgow Kelvingrove Park, Glasgow This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Kelvinside is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... A Hyndland Townhouse. ... Bilingual sign in Gaelic and English at Partick railway station, Glasgow. ... Charing Cross is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Scotstoun is a district of Glasgow, Scotland, west of Glasgow City Centre. ... A sign at Jordanhill railway station. ... Kelvindale is a district in the west of the city of Glasgow in Scotland. ... Anniesland is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ...


The West End is bisected by the River Kelvin which flows from the Kilsyth Hills in the North and empties into the River Clyde at Yorkhill Basin. The Kelvin is Glasgows second river after the River Clyde. ...


The spire of Sir George Gilbert Scott's Glasgow University main building (the second largest Gothic Revival building in Britain) is a major local landmark, and can be seen from miles around, sitting atop Gilmorehill. The university itself is the fourth oldest in the English-speaking world. Much of the city's student population is based in the West End, adding to its cultural vibrancy. The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


The area is also home to the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Hunterian Museum, Kelvin Hall International Sports Arena, Henry Wood Hall (home of the Royal Scottish National Orchestra) and the Museum of Transport, which is to be rebuilt on a former dockland site at Glasgow Harbour to a design by Zaha Hadid. The West End Festival, one of Glasgow's largest festivals, is held annually in June. Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is Glasgows premier museum and art gallery and has one of Europes great civic art collections. ... The University of Glasgows Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery is the oldest public museum in Scotland. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... The Royal Scottish National Orchestra is Scotlands national symphony orchestra. ... The Glasgow Museum of Transport is located in the Kelvin Hall in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow Harbour is an urban regeneration scheme at Partick in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Interior of Phaeno Science Center in Wolfsburg, Germany Bergisel Ski Jump, Innsbruck BMW Central Building, Leipzig Vitra fire station, Weil am Rhein, Germany Maggies Centre, Kirkcaldy Zaha Hadid (Arabic: زها حديد) CBE (born October 31, 1950, Baghdad, Iraq) is a notable Iraqi-British deconstructivist architect. ... Samba Ya Bamba brass section at the 2005 Opening Parade. ...


Glasgow is the home of the SECC, the United Kingdom's largest exhibition and conference centre.[59][60] A major expansion of the SECC facilities at the former Queen's Dock by Foster and Partners is currently planned, including a 12,000 seat arena, and a 5 star hotel and entertainments complex. The front of the SECC The Clyde Auditorium with the main SECC building behind it The Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre (SECC), located on the north bank of the River Clyde in Glasgow, is Scotlands national venue for public events. ... 30 St Mary Axe, one of Londons most popular new buildings, towers above its neighbours. ...


East End

The East End extends from Glasgow Cross in the City Centre to the boundary with North and South Lanarkshire. It is home to the famous Glasgow Barrowland Market, popularly known as 'The Barras',[61] Barrowland Ballroom, Glasgow Green, and Celtic Park, home of Celtic F.C.. Many of the original sandstone tenements remain in this district. The East End in contrast to the West End, includes some of the most deprived areas in the UK. However, many areas of the district are not deprived in any way. In particular, parts of the Dennistoun area have become increasingly fashionable and expensive. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 780 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Glasgow Peoples Palace Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/Glasgow Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 780 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Glasgow Peoples Palace Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/Glasgow Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... The Peoples Palace and Winter Gardens in Glasgow, Scotland are a museum and glasshouse situated near Glasgow Green, and were opened on 22 January 1898 by the Earl of Rosebery. ... McLennan Arch at the north-west entrance to Glasgow Green Glasgow Green situated in the east end of the city on the north bank of the River Clyde, is the oldest park in Glasgow dating back to the 15th century. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 19th  - Total 470 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Motherwell ISO 3166-2 GB-NLK ONS code 00QZ Demographics Population Ranked 4th  - Total (2006) 323,800  - Density 689 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics North Lanarkshire Council http://www. ... South Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig a Deas in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, covering the southern part of the traditional county of Lanarkshire. ... Barrowland Ballroom The Barras (more properly The Barrowland Market) is a major street and indoor weekend market in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Barrowland Ballroom The Barrowlands (more properly The Barrowland Ballroom) is a major dance hall and concert venue in Glasgow, Scotland. ... McLennan Arch at the north-west entrance to Glasgow Green Glasgow Green situated in the east end of the city on the north bank of the River Clyde, is the oldest park in Glasgow dating back to the 15th century. ... This page is about the soccer stadium in Glasgow. ... Celtic Football Club is a Scottish football club based in Glasgow, which currently plays in the Scottish Premier League. ... An apartment building, block of flats or tenement is a multi-unit dwelling made up of several (generally four or more) apartments (US) or flats (UK). ... Dennistoun is a large district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ...


The Glasgow Necropolis Cemetery was created on a hill above the Cathedral of Saint Mungo in 1831. Routes curve through the landscape uphill to the 62-metre (203 ft) high statue of John Knox at the summit. Monuments on the summit of the Glasgow Necropolis hill The Glasgow Necropolis is a Victorian cemetery in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow Cathedral Glasgow Cathedral is a Church of Scotland cathedral in Glasgow. ... Saint Mungo, also known as Saint Kentigern, is by tradition an apostle to the Kingdom of Strathclyde, Scotland, and patron saint and legendary founder of the city of Glasgow. ... For other persons named John Knox, see John Knox (disambiguation). ...


There are two late 18th century tenements in Gallowgate. Dating from 1771 and 1780, both have been well restored. The construction of Charlotte Street was financed by David Dale, whose former pretensions can be gauged by the one remaining house, now run by the National Trust for Scotland. Further along Charlotte Street there stands a modern Gillespie, Kidd & Coia building of some note. Once a school, it has been converted into offices. Surrounding these buildings are a series of innovative housing developments conceived as 'Homes for the Future', part of a project during the city's year as UK City of Architecture and Design in 1999.[62] David Dale, (1739 - 1806) is a remarkable example of the fluidity of Scottish society in the 18th century. ... The standard of the NTS The National Trust for Scotland, or NTS, describes itself as The conservation charity that protects and promotes Scotlands natural and cultural heritage for present and future generations to enjoy. ... Gillespie, Kidd & Coia were a Scottish architectural firm famous for their application of modernism in churches and universities, as well as at St Peters Seminary in Cardross. ...


East of Glasgow Cross is the Saint Andrew's Church, built in 1746 and displaying a Presbyterian grandeur befitting the church of the city's wealthy tobacco merchants. Also close by is the more modest Episcopalian Saint Andrew's-by-the-Green, the oldest post-Reformation church in Scotland. Logo of the Scottish Episcopal Church with the motto: Evangelical truth and Apostolic order. ...

The Doulton Fountain in Glasgow Green.
The Doulton Fountain in Glasgow Green.

Overlooking Glasgow Green is the façade of Templeton's carpet factory, featuring vibrant polychromatic brickwork intended to evoke the Doge's Palace in Venice.[63] McLennan Arch at the north-west entrance to Glasgow Green Glasgow Green situated in the east end of the city on the north bank of the River Clyde, is the oldest park in Glasgow dating back to the 15th century. ... McLennan Arch at the north-west entrance to Glasgow Green Glasgow Green situated in the east end of the city on the north bank of the River Clyde, is the oldest park in Glasgow dating back to the 15th century. ... Polychrome is one of the terms used to describe the use of multiple colors in one entity. ... Doges Palace with Bridge of Sighs to the right Carved marble façade inside courtyard The Doges Palace is a gothic palace in Venice. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ...


The extensive Tollcross Park was originally developed from the estate of James Dunlop, the owner of a local steelworks. His large baronial mansion was built in 1848 by David Bryce, which later housed the city's Children's Museum until the 1980s. Today, the mansion is a sheltered housing complex. Tollcross is an suburb north of the River Clyde in Glasgow and has a popular park which is famed for its international rose trials. ... Greenock Sheriff Court displays crow-stepped gables and corbelled corner turrets. ... David Bryce (1803-1876) was a Scottish architect. ...


The new Scottish National Indoor Sports Arena, a modern replacement for the Kelvin Hall, is planned for Dalmarnock. The area will also be the site of the Athletes' Village for the 2014 Commonwealth Games, located adjacent to the new indoor sports arena. The Kelvin Hall in Glasgow, Scotland is a mixed-use arts and sports venue that opened as an exhibition centre in 1927. ... Dalmarnock is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... The 20th Commonwealth Games in 2014 will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. ...


To the north of the East End lie the two massive gasometers of Provan Gas Works, which stand overlooking Alexandra Park and a major interchange between the M8 and M80 motorways. Often used for displaying large city advertising slogans, the towers have become an unofficial portal into the city for road users arriving from the north and east. Gasometer at West Ham. ... Provan Gas Works is an industrial gas holding plant in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Alexandra Park is located in Dennistoun, 3 miles east of Glasgow city centre. ... Kingston Bridge M8 running alongside the Clyde This Stub in the Tradeston area, popularly known as the ski-ramp, is the abandoned interchange for the southern flank of the Glasgow Inner Ring Road For the highway connecting Moscow to Arkhangelsk, see M8 motorway (Russia). ... The M80 motorway is a major motorway in central Scotland. ...


South Side

House for an Art Lover is situated in Bellahouston Park, Glasgow.
House for an Art Lover is situated in Bellahouston Park, Glasgow.

Glasgow's South Side sprawls out south of the Clyde, covering areas including the Gorbals, Shawlands, Simshill, Strathbungo, Cardonald, Mount Florida, Pollokshaws, Nitshill, Pollokshields, Govanhill, Crosshill, Ibrox, Cessnock, Mosspark, Kinning Park, Govan, Mansewood, Arden, Darnley, Newlands, Deaconsbank, Pollok, Croftfoot, King's Park, Cathcart, Muirend and Barrhead, Busby, Clarkston, Giffnock, Thornliebank, Netherlee, and Newton Mearns in the East Renfrewshire council area, as well as Cambuslang, East Kilbride, and Rutherglen in the South Lanarkshire council area. Competition entry drawing of the house from the north west. ... Bellahouston Park is a park in south west Glasgow, Scotland (Grid reference NS550636), between the areas of Mosspark, Craigton, Ibrox, and Dumbreck covering an area of 71 Hectares (175 Acres). ... The Gorbals (Gort a Bhaile in Gaelic) is a predominantly working-class area on the south bank of the river Clyde in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Shawlands is an area of Glasgow, in Scotland. ... Simshill is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Strathbungo grew up as a small village built along the Pollokshaws Road, one of the main arteries leading southwards from the centre of Glasgow. ... Cardonald is a suburb of the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Originally named Mount Floridon, Mount Florida is an area in the southeastern corner of the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Pollokshaws is a suburb on the southside of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Nitshill is a suburb on the south side of Glasgow. ... , Pollokshields is an area of the Southside of Glasgow. ... Calder Street in Govanhill Govanhill is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Crosshill is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Ibrox is a district of the city of Glasgow in western Scotland. ... Cessnock can refer to: Cessnock, New South Wales Cessnock, Glasgow This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Mosspark is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Kinning Park is a southern suburb of Glasgow, Scotland. ... , Govan (Baile a Ghobhainn in Gaelic) is a district and former burgh in the southwestern part of the City of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Mansewood is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Arden is the location of a medium sized housing estate south west of Glasgow city centre and on the very edge of the city. ... Darnley is an area in south-west Glasgow, Scotland located on the A727 just west of Arden. ... Newlands is the name of many places. ... , Deaconsbank is a housing estate of around 639 homes on the Southside of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Pollok is a large district on the south-western side of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Croftfoot is a residential suburb on the southeastern side of the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Kings Park is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Cathcart (Coille Chart in Gaelic) is an area of Glasgow between Mount Florida, Kings Park, Muirend and Newlands. ... Muirend is an area on the Southside of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Barrhead (Ceann a Bhàirr in Scottish Gaelic although Gaelic is not spoken by natives of this part of Scotland] or Baurheid by some locals) is a town in East Renfrewshire, Scotland, 8 miles southwest of Glasgow on the edge of the Gleniffer Braes. ... Busby is a former village, now an outer suburb of Glasgow in Scotland, although it is administratively outwith the city in East Renfrewshire. ... Clarkston is the name of a mainly residential area in East Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... , Giffnock is an area within East Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... Thornliebank is a small suburb in East Renfrewshire, Scotland, 6 miles south of Glasgow. ... Netherlee is a small, affluent residential area (population 4,740) in Greater Glasgow, and admistratively part of East Renfrewshire Council. ... , Newton Mearns is a small suburban town 7 miles southwest of Glasgow, Scotland on the main road to Ayrshire. ... Cambuslang (Scottish Gaelic: Camas Long) is a suburban town on the south-eastern outskirts of Glasgow, Scotland located within the local authority area of South Lanarkshire. ... East Kilbride (Cille Bhrìghde an Ear in Scottish Gaelic) is a large town in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... Rutherglen (said: Rhu-ther-glehn) comes from the Gaelic An Ruadh Ghleann - the red valley. Rutherglen is a town located within the south-eastern suburbs of the city of Glasgow, Scotland near the town of Cambuslang. ...


Although predominantly residential, the area does have several notable public buildings. Charles Rennie Mackintosh's Scotland Street School Museum and House for an Art Lover; the world famous Burrell Collection in Pollok Country Park; the National Football Stadium Hampden Park in Mount Florida, (home of Queens Park F.C.) and Ibrox Stadium, (home of Rangers F.C.). Charles Mackintosh redirects here. ... Scotland Street School Museum is located in Glasgow, Scotland is the only one of its kind in the world. ... Competition entry drawing of the house from the north west. ... The buildings that house the Burrell Collection The Burrell Collection is an art collection in the city of Glasgow, in Scotland. ... Pollok Park The White Cart River running through the park Pollok Country Park is a large country park located in Pollok, south Glasgow. ... For other uses, see Hampden Park (disambiguation). ... Originally named Mount Floridon, Mount Florida is an area in the southeastern corner of the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Queens Park F.C. is a Scottish football team with much history and tradition, today it remains as the only amateur club in the Scottish League. ... Ibrox Stadium, originally Ibrox Park, is the stadium of Rangers F.C. It is located on the south side of the River Clyde in the Ibrox district of Glasgow, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Rangers F.C. (disambiguation). ...

Queen's Park, Glasgow. Looking towards Queen's Park Baptist Church in winter.
Queen's Park, Glasgow. Looking towards Queen's Park Baptist Church in winter.

The former docklands site at Pacific Quay on the south bank of the River Clyde, opposite the SECC, is the site of the Glasgow Science Centre and the new headquarters for BBC Scotland and SMG plc (owner of STV) which have relocated there to a new purpose built digital media campus. Situated on the south side of the city of Glasgow, in Scotland, Queens Park lies approximately two miles from the city centre, and can refer both to the park itself, the adjacent residential district, or the football team Queens Park F.C. The park was developed in the... Pacific Quay is a development in Glasgow, Scotland situated next to the River Clyde at the former Princes Dock Basin. ... The Glasgow Science Centre and the Glasgow Tower The Glasgow Science Centre is a major science and technology museum located in Glasgow, Scotland. ... BBC Scotland (BBC Alba in Gaelic) is a constituent part of the British Broadcasting Corporation, the publicly-funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... SMG plc (formerly Scottish Media Group) is a Scottish media company. ... This article is about the Scottish television network. ...


In addition, several new bridges spanning the River Clyde have been built or are currently planned, including the Clyde Arc at Pacific Quay and others at Tradeston and Springfield Quay. The Clyde Arc is a road bridge spanning the River Clyde in west central Scotland, connecting Finnieston, near the Clyde Auditorium and SECC with Pacific Quay and Glasgow Science Centre in Govan. ... Pacific Quay is a development in Glasgow, Scotland situated next to the River Clyde at the former Princes Dock Basin. ... Tradeston is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ...


The South Side also includes many great parks, including Linn Park, Queen's Park, Bellahouston Park and Rouken Glen Park, and several golf clubs, including the championship course at Haggs Castle. The South Side is also home to Pollok Country Park, which was awarded the accolade of Europe's Best Park 2008.[64] Pollok Park is Glasgow’s largest park and the only country park within the city boundaries. It is also home to Pollok Cricket Club. Situated on the south side of the city of Glasgow, in Scotland, Queens Park lies approximately two miles from the city centre, and can refer both to the park itself, the adjacent residential district, or the football team Queens Park F.C. The park was developed in the... Bellahouston Park is a park in south west Glasgow, Scotland (Grid reference NS550636), between the areas of Mosspark, Craigton, Ibrox, and Dumbreck covering an area of 71 Hectares (175 Acres). ... Rouken Glen is a park in East Renfrewshire to the south-west of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Haggs Castle is a castle in the neighbourhood of Pollokshaws, in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Pollok Park The White Cart River running through the park Pollok Country Park is a large country park located in Pollok, south Glasgow. ...


Govan is a district and former burgh in the south-western part of the city. It is situated on the south bank of the River Clyde, opposite Partick. It was an administratively independent Police Burgh from 1864 until it was incorporated into the expanding city of Glasgow in 1912. Govan has a legacy as an engineering and shipbuilding centre of international repute and is home to one of two BAE Systems shipyards on the River Clyde and the precision engineering firm, Thales Optronics. It is also home to the Southern General Hospital, one of the largest teaching hospitals in the country, and the maintenance depot for the Glasgow Subway system. , Govan (Baile a Ghobhainn in Gaelic) is a district and former burgh in the southwestern part of the City of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Bilingual sign in Gaelic and English at Partick railway station, Glasgow. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... Launch of HMS Daring from BAEs Scotstoun Shipyard. ... For other rivers, see Clyde River (disambiguation) , The River Clyde (Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh, pronounced ) is a major river in Scotland. ... Thales Optronics is a major unit of Thales Group and has three main subsidiaries: Thales Optronics Ltd. ... A teaching hospital is a hospital which provides medical training to medical students and residents. ... An Inner Circle train arrives at West Street station. ...


North Glasgow

North Glasgow extends out from the north of the city centre towards the affluent suburbs of Bearsden, Milngavie and Bishopbriggs in East Dunbartonshire and Clydebank in West Dunbartonshire. However, the area also contains some of the city's poorest residential areas. Possilpark is one such area, where levels of unemployment and drug abuse continue to be above the national average. Much of the housing in areas such as Possilpark and Hamiltonhill had fallen into a state of disrepair in recent years. This has led to large scale redevelopment of much of the poorer housing stock in north Glasgow, and the wider regeneration of many areas, such as Ruchill, which have been transformed; many run-down tenements have now been refurbished or replaced by modern housing estates. Much of the housing stock in north Glasgow is rented social housing, with a high proportion of high-rise tower blocks, managed by the Glasgow Housing Association. , Bearsden is a suburb located in the northwestern outskirts of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... , Milngavie, (pronounced /mÉ™lÉ¡aɪ/, Mull-guy or Mill-guy, Scottish Gaelic: Muileann Dhaibhidh) is a town on the northwestern outskirts of Glasgow, Scotland. ... , Bishopbriggs is an affluent commuter suburb in the northern outskirts of Glasgow, Scotland. ... East Dunbartonshire (Siorrachd Dhùn Bhreatainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland. ... Clydebank (Bruach Chluaidh in Gaelic) is a town in West Dunbartonshire, Scotland, lying on the north bank of the river Clyde. ... West Dunbartonshire (Siorrachd Dhùn Bhreatainn an Iar in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority areas in Scotland. ... Possilpark is a district in Possil in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Possilpark is a district in Possil in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Hamiltonhill is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Ruchill (pronounced ruck hill) is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... A housing estate is a medium-to-low density residential area, usually part of a suburb of a town or city in a developed country. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... // Introduction Glasgow Housing Association (GHA) is a private not-for-profit company created by the British Government for the purpose of owning and managing Glasgows social housing stock. ...

The Forth and Clyde Canal at the north Glasgow district of Ruchill.
The Forth and Clyde Canal at the north Glasgow district of Ruchill.

Not all areas of north Glasgow are of this nature however. Maryhill for example, consists of well maintained traditional sandstone tenements. Although historically a working class area, its borders with the upmarket West End of the city mean that it is relatively wealthy compared to the rest of the north of the city, containing affluent areas such as Maryhill Park and North Kelvinside. Maryhill is also home to Firhill Stadium, home of Partick Thistle FC since 1909, and briefly the professional Rugby Union team, Glasgow Warriors. The junior team, Maryhill F.C. are also located in this part of north Glasgow. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1903x1410, 279 KB) Summary Summary Ruchill Church, Glasgow, seen from the Forth and Clyde Canal. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1903x1410, 279 KB) Summary Summary Ruchill Church, Glasgow, seen from the Forth and Clyde Canal. ... Maryhill is a residential district in the northwest of the City of Glasgow. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... Maryhill Park is an area of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... North Kelvinside (also referred to as North Kelvin) is a middle-class residential district of the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Firhill Stadium is the home ground of the Scottish football club, Partick Thistle F.C.. Also in December 2005 Firhill became the temporary home of Glasgows professional Rugby Union team, Glasgow Warriors, when they moved from their previous base at Hughenden. ... Partick Thistle Football Club is a Scottish football club from the city of Glasgow. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Official website www. ... The Scottish Junior Football Association (SJFA) is the organising body for the junior grade of football (soccer) in Scotland. ... Maryhill Football Club is a football (soccer) team based in the Maryhill area of Glasgow, Scotland. ...


The Forth and Clyde Canal passes through this part of the city, and at one stage formed a vital part of the local economy. It was for many years polluted and largely unused after the decline of heavy industry, but recent efforts to regenerate and re-open the canal to navigation have seen it rejuvenated. The Forth and Clyde Canal is a canal in Scotland. ...


Sighthill is home to Scotland’s largest asylum seeker community, many of whom live in extreme poverty. Sighthill is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Power lines leading to a trash dump hover just overhead in El Carpio, a Nicaraguan refugee camp in Costa Rica Under international law, a refugee is a person who is outside his/her country of nationality or habitual residence; has a well-founded fear of persecution because of his/her... A boy from Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ...


A huge part of the economic life of Glasgow was once located in Springburn, where the engineering works of firms like Charles Tennant and locomotive workshops employed many Glaswegians. Indeed, Glasgow dominated this type of manufacturing, with 25% of all the world’s locomotives being built in the area at one stage. It was home to the headquarters of the North British Locomotive Company. Today the French engineering group Alstom's railway maintenance facility in the area is all that is left of the industry in Springburn. Charles Tennant Charles Tennant (May 3, 1768 - October 1, 1838) Scottish chemist and industrialist. ... The North British Locomotive Company (NBL) was created in 1903 through the merger of three Glasgow companies; Sharp Stewart, Neilson Reid and Dübs and Company creating the largest locomotive building company in Europe. ... Alstom (formerly GEC-Alsthom) (Euronext: ALO) is a large French company whose businesses are power generation, railway signalling; and manufacturing trains (e. ...


Culture

See also: Culture in Glasgow
Established by wealthy tobacco merchant Stephen Mitchell, the Mitchell Library is now one of the largest public reference libraries in Europe.
Established by wealthy tobacco merchant Stephen Mitchell, the Mitchell Library is now one of the largest public reference libraries in Europe.
GoMA is the second most visited contemporary art gallery in the United Kingdom outside London.
GoMA is the second most visited contemporary art gallery in the United Kingdom outside London.[65]

The city has many amenities for a wide range of cultural activities, from curling to opera, ballet and from football to art appreciation; it also has a large selection of museums that include those devoted to transport, religion, and modern art. Many of the city's cultural sites were celebrated in 1990 when Glasgow was designated European City of Culture.[66] The city of Glasgow, Scotland, has many amenities for a wide range of cultural activities, from curling to opera and from football to art appreciation; it also has a large selection of museums that include those devoted to transport, religion, and modern art. ... : See State Library of New South Wales for its Mitchell Library section of Australiana. ... Alternative meanings: Library (computer science), Library (biology) Modern-style library In its traditional sense, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1543x1807, 438 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Glasgow Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1543x1807, 438 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Glasgow Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... The Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) is the City of Glasgows main gallery of contemporary art. ... Contemporary art can be defined variously as art produced at this present point in time or art produced since World War II. The definition of the word contemporary would support the first view, but museums of contemporary art commonly define their collections as consisting of art produced since World War... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Curling (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... Soccer redirects here. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... The European Capital of Culture is a city designated by the European Union for a period of one year during which it is given a chance to showcase its cultural life and cultural development. ...


The city's principal library, the Mitchell Library, has grown into one of Europe's largest public reference libraries in Europe, currently housing some 1.3 million books, a extensive collection of newspapers and thousands of photographs and maps.[67] : See State Library of New South Wales for its Mitchell Library section of Australiana. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Reading the newspaper: Brookgreen Gardens in Pawleys Island, South Carolina. ... A photograph (often just called a photo) is an image (or a representation of that on e. ... See map for the navigational aid The acronym MAPS could refer to: Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies Mail Abuse Prevention System Multi-jurisdictional Automated Preclearance System Mid-Atlantic Percussion Society Medical Advanced Pain Specialists Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship Multidisciplinary Academic PerspectiveS Metropolitan Area ProjectS Category: ...


Most of Scotland's national arts organisations are based in Glasgow, including Scottish Opera, Scottish Ballet, The National Theatre of Scotland, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and Scottish Youth Theatre. Scottish Opera was founded in 1962 and is based in Glasgow. ... Scottish Ballet is Scotlands national ballet company, based in Glasgow. ... The National Theatre of Scotland was set up in 2004 and launched in February 2006. ... The Royal Scottish National Orchestra is Scotlands national symphony orchestra. ... The BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra is the BBCs classical music ensemble in Scotland. ... Scottish Youth Theatre is Scotlands national youth theatre company for ages 3-25. ...


Glasgow has its own "Poet Laureate", a post created in 1999 for Edwin Morgan[68] and as of 2007 occupied by Liz Lochhead. A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for State occasions and other government events. ... Edwin Morgan (born April 27, 1920) is a Scottish poet and translator who is associated with the British Poetry Revival. ... Liz Lochhead (born December 26, 1947) is a Scottish poet and dramatist, originally from Motherwell. ...


Recreation

See also: Glasgow Festivals

Glasgow is home to a variety of theatres including The King's Theatre, Theatre Royal and the Citizens' Theatre and is home to many municipal museums and art galleries, the most famous being the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, the Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) and the Burrell Collection. Most of the museums in Glasgow are publicly owned and free to enter. Glasgow Festivals include festivals for art, film, comedy, folk music and jazz. ... The Kings Theatre in Glasgow is one of Scotlands most historic and significant theatres. ... The Theatre Royal in located in Glasgow, Scotland. ... A theatre that belonged to the people of Glasgow, separate and distinct from the London repertory companies, and one made accessible and affordable to all audiences. ... Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is Glasgows premier museum and art gallery and has one of Europes great civic art collections. ... The Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) is the City of Glasgows main gallery of contemporary art. ... The buildings that house the Burrell Collection The Burrell Collection is an art collection in the city of Glasgow, in Scotland. ...


The city has hosted many exhibitions over the years, including being the UK City of Architecture 1999, European Capital of Culture 1990, National City of Sport 1995–1999 and European Capital of Sport 2003. The European Capital of Culture is a city designated by the European Union for a period of one year during which it is given a chance to showcase its cultural life and cultural development. ...


In addition, unlike the older and larger Edinburgh Festival (where all Edinburgh's main festivals occur in the last three weeks of August), Glasgow's festivals fill the calendar. Festivals include the Glasgow Comedy Festival, Glasgow Jazz Festival, Celtic Connections, Glasgow Film Festival, West End Festival, Merchant City Festival, Glasgay, and the World Pipe Band Championships. There is no one Edinburgh Festival but those using the term are usually referring to the collection of various festivals in August and early September of each year in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Glasgow International Comedy Festival is a comedy festival in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow International Jazz Festival is a jazz festival in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Celtic Connections festival started in 1994 in Glasgow, Scotland, and has since been held every January. ... Glasgow Film Festival is a film festival in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Samba Ya Bamba brass section at the 2005 Opening Parade. ... The Merchant City Festival is a major cultural festival taking place in Glasgows Merchant City area. ... Glasgows queer arts festival, held annually in November Glasgay! Festival is a gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender arts festival in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Clan Gregor Society Pipe Band marches onto the field during the 2005 World Championships The World Pipe Band Championships is a pipe band competition held in Glasgow, Scotland every August. ...


Music scene

Glasgow has many live music pubs, clubs and venues. Some of the city's main venues include the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, the SECC and King Tut's Wah Wah Hut (where Oasis were spotted and signed by Glaswegian record mogul Alan McGee), the Queen Margaret Union and the Barrowland, a historic ballroom, converted into a live music venue. More recent mid-sized venues include ABC and the Carling Academy, which play host to a similar range of acts. This list contains famous or notable musicians, singers, composers and bands who have either originated or are based in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Glasgow Royal Concert Hall is a music auditorium in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... The front of the SECC The Clyde Auditorium with the main SECC building behind it The Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre (SECC), located on the north bank of the River Clyde in Glasgow, is Scotlands national venue for public events. ... King Tuts Wah Wah Hut is a live music venue in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ... Alan McGee is a British music industry mogul and musician famed for founding the independent Creation Records label which ran from 1983 to 2000. ... The Queen Margaret Union (QMU) is one of two students unions at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Barrowland Ballroom The Barrowlands (more properly The Barrowland Ballroom) is a major dance hall and concert venue in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The ABC is a music venue in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Music venue in Glasgow. ...


Glasgow is also home to an electronic music scene, with a strong reputation for techno and house music.[citation needed] Venues like the Arches, the Sub Club and record labels such as Soma and Chemikal Underground have supported this strong underground movement for the past two decades in the city.[citation needed] The Arches is a bar, arts venue, theatre, live music venue and nightclub in Glasgow, Scotland, which first opened in 1991. ... Chemikal Underground is an independent record label set up in 1994 by Glasgow, Scotland rock band The Delgados. ...


In recent years, the success of bands such as Franz Ferdinand, Belle and Sebastian and Mogwai has significantly boosted the profile of the Glasgow music scene, prompting Time Magazine to liken Glasgow to Detroit during its 1960s Motown heyday.[69] Franz Ferdinand are an award winning rock band, from Glasgow, Scotland. ... Belle and Sebastian (sometimes written as Belle & Sebastian) are a Scottish paper pop band formed in Glasgow in January 1996. ... For the Swiss progressive house producer who releases under the name Moogwai, see Chab. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Motown Records, Inc. ...


Media

Main article: Media in Glasgow
BBC Scotland's headquarters in Glasgow's Pacific Quay

Glasgow is home to the Scottish national media. It is home to the headquarters of BBC Scotland as well as STV (formerly Scottish Television). The Scottish press publishes various newspapers in the city such as the Evening Times, The Herald, The Sunday Herald, the Sunday Mail and the Daily Record. Scottish editions of Trinity Mirror and News International titles are printed in the city. SMG plc is a Glasgow-based media conglomerate with interests in television, radio and publishing. SMG owns and operates both Scottish ITV franchises (Central Scotland and Grampian), both now branded STV, Virgin Radio and Pearl & Dean. This article deals with the Media in Glasgow. ... Pacific Quay is a development in Glasgow, Scotland situated next to the River Clyde at the former Princes Dock Basin. ... BBC Scotland (BBC Alba in Gaelic) is a constituent part of the British Broadcasting Corporation, the publicly-funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the Scottish television network. ... Scottish Television (now legally known as STV Central Ltd and referred to on-air as STV) is Scotlands largest ITV franchisee, and has held the ITV franchise for Central Scotland since August 31, 1957. ... The Evening Times, is an evening tabloid newspaper published Monday to Saturday in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Charles Mackintoshs Glasgow Herald building, now The Lighthouse The Herald is a national broadsheet newspaper published Monday to Saturday in Glasgow, Scotland, with an audited circulation of 71,000, making it the best-selling national Scottish broadsheet newspaper. ... Herald is a common name for newspapers throughout the English-speaking world, and the Sunday editions are often called Sunday Herald. ... The Sunday Mail is a Scottish tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ... Daily Record building at Central Quay, Glasgow The Daily Record is a Scottish tabloid newspaper, based in Glasgow. ... Trinity Mirror is a large United Kingdom newspaper and magazine publisher. ... News International is a British newspaper publisher owned by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... SMG plc (formerly Scottish Media Group) is a Scottish media company. ... This article is about the Scottish television network. ... For the French radio station, see Virgin Radio (France). ... Pearl & Dean is primarily known as a British cinema advertising company. ...


Various radio stations are also located in Glasgow. Emap plc (formerly Scottish Radio Holdings) owns the principal commercial radio stations in Glasgow; Clyde 1 and Clyde 2, which can reach over 2.3 million listeners.[70] In 2004, SMG plc sold its 27.8% stake in Scottish Radio Holdings to the broadcasting group EMAP for £90.5 m. Other stations include Smooth Radio 105.2, Real Radio and 96.3 Rock Radio, which are all owned by GMG Radio. There are also a number of community broadcasters in the area, such as Sunny Govan Radio. EMAP plc is a British media company, specialising in the production of magazines, and the organization of business events and conferences. ... Clyde 1 Categories: United Kingdom broadcasting stubs | Radio stations in the United Kingdom ... 1152 Clyde 2 is a UK radio station that broadcasts to Glasgow and West Central Scotland. ... SMG plc (formerly Scottish Media Group) is a Scottish media company. ... Scottish Radio Holdings (SRH) is a Scottish media company that owns 22 radio stations, and around 30 local newspapers in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. ... EMAP plc (LSE: EMA) is a British media company, specialising in the production of magazines, and the organization of business events and conferences. ... Real Radio is a brand of regional radio stations in the United Kingdom owned by GMG Radio. ... From 8th Jan 2007, 96. ... GMG Radio is the radio division of the Guardian Media Group. ...


Religion

See also: Sectarianism in Glasgow
Glasgow Cathedral marks the site where St. Mungo built his church and established Glasgow
Glasgow Cathedral marks the site where St. Mungo built his church and established Glasgow

Glasgow is a city of significant religious diversity. The Church of Scotland and the Roman Catholic Church are the two largest Christian denominations in the city. There are 150 congregations in the Church of Scotland's Presbytery of Glasgow (of which 106 are within the city boundaries, the other 44 being in adjacent areas such as Giffnock).[71] The city boasts four Christian cathedrals: Glasgow Cathedral, of the Church of Scotland; St Andrew's Cathedral, of the Roman Catholic Church; St Mary's Cathedral, of the Scottish Episcopal Church, and St Luke's Cathedral, of the Greek Orthodox Church. Sectarianism in Glasgow takes the form of religious and political sectarian rivalry between Roman Catholics and Protestants. ... Saint Mungo, also known as Saint Kentigern, is by tradition an apostle to Strathclyde and patron saint and legendary founder of the city of Glasgow. ... The Church of Scotland (CofS; Scottish Gaelic: ), known informally by its pre-Union Scots name, The Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. ... Many denominations in Great Britian (including most Protestants) consider themselves to be part of the worldwide Catholic Church. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... , Giffnock is an area within East Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Glasgow Cathedral Glasgow Cathedral is a Church of Scotland cathedral in Glasgow. ... St. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... St. ... Logo of the Scottish Episcopal Church with the motto: Evangelical truth and Apostolic order. ... St. ... Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: Hellēnorthódoxē Ekklēsía) can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches. ...


The presence of large Protestant and Catholic communities has at times caused the city to experience sectarian tensions. This has tended to be most visible in the rivalry between the supporters of the city's two major professional football clubs, Celtic F.C. and Rangers F.C.. Rangers has traditionally drawn its support from the city's Protestant community, while the Roman Catholic population has traditionally supported Celtic.[72] Sectarianism is an adherence to a particular sect or party or denomination, it also usually involves a rejection of those not a member of ones sect. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Celtic Football Club is a Scottish football club based in Glasgow, which currently plays in the Scottish Premier League. ... For other uses, see Rangers F.C. (disambiguation). ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


Glasgow Central Mosque in the Gorbals district is the largest mosque in Scotland and, along with twelve other mosques in the city, caters for the city's estimated 33,000 Muslim population.[73] Glasgow also has a Hindu Mandir, and a planning permission for a new Sikh Temple was submitted in June 2007. This new Temple will complement the existing four Sikh Temples (Gurdwaras) in Glasgow with two in the West End (Central Gurdwara Singh Sabha in Finnieston and Guru Nanak Sikh Temple in Kelvinbridge) and two in the Southside area of Pollokshields (Guru Granth Sahib Gurdwara and Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur Gurdwara). There are approximately 10,000 Sikhs in Scotland with the vast majority in Glasgow.[74] Glasgow Central Mosque is one of the biggest Sunni mosques in Glasgow, and one of the largest in Glasgow // At present there are three Imams: Maulana Abdul-Ghafoor Esfandarani, Maulana Habib-ur-Rahman mousavi and Maulana Umar. ... The Gorbals (Gort a Bhaile in Gaelic) is a predominantly working-class area on the south bank of the river Clyde in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... This article is about the country. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The Gopuram of temples, in south India, are adorned with colourful icons depicting a particular story surrounding the temples deity. ... Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha, Southall, UK. A Gurdwara (Punjabi: ਗੁਰਦੁਆਰਾ or ਗੁਰਦਵਾਰਾ, often incorrectly called a Gurudwara), meaning the doorway to God, is the Sikh place of worship and may be referred to as a Sikh Temple. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... Finnieston is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Kelvinbridge is a bridge that crosses the River Kelvin in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... , Pollokshields is an area of the Southside of Glasgow. ... This article is about the country. ...


Glasgow has seven synagogues with the seventh largest Jewish population in the United Kingdom after London, Manchester, Leeds, Gateshead, Brighton and Bournemouth, but once had a Jewish population second only to London, estimated at 20,000 in the Gorbals alone.[75] The synagogue Scolanova Trani in Italy. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... This article is about Gateshead, England. ... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... , Bournemouth ( ) is a large town and tourist resort, situated on the south coast of England. ... The Gorbals (Gort a Bhaile in Gaelic) is a predominantly working-class area on the south bank of the river Clyde in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ...


In 1993, the St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art opened in Glasgow. It is believed to be the only public museum to examine all the world's major religious faiths.[76][77] St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art is located in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Religious is a term with both a technical definition and folk use. ...


Dialect

See also: Glasgow Patter

Glaswegian, otherwise known as The Glasgow Patter is a local, anglicised variety of Scots. Glasgow patter or Glaswegian is a dialect shouted in and around Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow patter or Glaswegian is a dialect shouted in and around Glasgow, Scotland. ... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ...


Glaswegian is a dialect, more than an alternative pronunciation; words also change their meaning as all over in Scotland, e.g. "away" can mean "leaving" as in A'm away, an instruction to stop being a nuisance as in away wi ye, or "drunk" or "demented" as in he's away wi it. Pieces refers to "sandwiches". Ginger is a term for the Glasgow based carbonated soft drink "Irn Bru" or any other carbonated soft drink (A bottle o ginger IPA[ə ˈboʔl ə ˈdʒɪndʒər]). Then there are words whose meaning has no obvious relationship to that in standard English: coupon means "face", via "to punch a ticket coupon". A headbutt is known in many parts of Britain as a "Glasgow kiss". Irn-Bru (pronounced iron brew, IPA: ) is a popular carbonated soft drink produced in Scotland. ... The top combatant can attack with headbutts while being held in the bottom combatants guard. ...


A speaker of Glaswegian might refer to those originating from the Scottish Highlands and the Western Isles as teuchters, while they would reciprocate by referring to Glaswegians as keelies and those from the East of Scotland refer to Glaswegians as Weegies (or Weedgies). Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... The Western Isles are an archipelago in Scotland. ... Teuchter ( pronounced chew-ch-ter with the middle ch sounding as the scottish word loch) is a Lowland Scots word used mainly for Northern or Highland Scots, although sometimes to any rural Scots, by urban Scots. ... Weedgie is a noun and adjective denoting Glasgow origins. ...


The long-running TV drama Taggart and the comedies; Empty, Chewin' the Fat, Rab C. Nesbitt and Still Game capture the essence of the Glaswegian patois, while Craig Ferguson and Billy Connolly have made Glaswegian humour known to the rest of the world. Taggart is a long-running Scottish detective television programme, created by Glenn Chandler (who has written many of the episodes), and made by SMG Productions (STV) for the ITV network. ... For other uses, see Emptiness (disambiguation). ... Chewin the Fat is a Scottish comedy sketch show, starring Ford Kiernan, Greg Hemphill and Karen Dunbar. ... Rab C. Nesbitt was a Scottish sitcom that ran from 1988 to 1999. ... Still Game is a Scottish sitcom, a spin-off from the sketch show series Chewin the Fat. ... Patois, although without a formal definition in linguistics, can be used to describe a language considered as nonstandard. ... Craig Ferguson (born May 17, 1962) is a Scottish-American comedian, television host, actor, and writer. ... Dr William Billy Connolly, CBE, (born 24 November 1942) is a Scottish comedian, musician, presenter, and actor. ...


Education

See also: University of Glasgow, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow Caledonian University, and University of Paisley
The University of Glasgow is one of the oldest and largest educational institutions in the UK.
The University of Glasgow is one of the oldest and largest educational institutions in the UK.

Glasgow is also a major education centre with four universities within 10 miles (16 km) of the city centre: Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... The University of Strathclyde (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a university in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow Caledonian University is a university in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The University of Paisley operates across three campus sites in the west and south-west of Scotland: Paisley, Ayr and Dumfries. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

There are also teacher training colleges, teaching hospitals such as the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama, Glasgow School of Art, and ten other further education colleges. Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... The University of Strathclyde (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a university in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow Caledonian University is a university in Glasgow, Scotland. ... It is proposed to create The University of The West of Scotland by a merger of the University of Paisley and Bell College in Autumn (fall) 2008. ... The front of Glasgow Royal Infirmary The rear of Glasgow Royal Infirmary, viewed from the Glasgow Necropolis The Glasgow Royal Infirmary is a hospital situated on the north-eastern edge of the city centre of Glasgow, Scotland. ... RSAMD The Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (RSAMD), founded in 1845 by the Glasgow Educational Association, is a university of music and drama in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow School of Art is one of four independent art schools in Scotland, situated in the Garnethill area of Glasgow. ...


Glasgow is home to a student population in excess of 168,000, the largest in Scotland and second largest in the United Kingdom, with the majority of those, living away from home, being found in Shawlands, Dennistoun and the West End of the city.[78] Shawlands is an area of Glasgow, in Scotland. ... Dennistoun is a large district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ...


Scotland's sole Gaelic-only medium secondary school is located in Glasgow. This combined with a strong Gaelic medium primary school presence enables parents to educate their children entirely through the medium of Gaelic. // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ...

Sport

See also: Sport in Glasgow

Glasgow, Scotland has a long sporting history, with the worlds first international football match held in 1872 at the West of Scotland Cricket Clubs Hamilton Crescent ground in the Partick area of Glasgow. ...

Football

The world's first international football match was held in 1872 at the West of Scotland Cricket Club's Hamilton Crescent ground in the Partick area of the city. The match, between Scotland and England finished 0–0. Soccer redirects here. ... The West of Scotland Cricket Club is a large cricket club based in Glasgow. ... Hamilton Crescent is a cricket ground located in the Partick area of Glasgow. ... Bilingual sign in Gaelic and English at Partick railway station, Glasgow. ... First international Scotland 0–0 England  (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Scotland 11–0 Ireland  (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 February 1901) Biggest defeat  Uruguay 7–0 Scotland (Basel, Switzerland; 19 June 1954) World Cup Appearances 8 (First in 1954) Best result Round 1, all European Championship Appearances 2 (First... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in...


Glasgow is one of only three cities (along with Liverpool in 1985 and Madrid in 1986) to have had two football teams in European finals in the same season: in 1967 Celtic F.C. competed in the European Cup final defeating Inter Milan to become the first Scottish and British football club to win the trophy, with Rangers F.C. competing unsuccessfully in the now defunct Cup Winners' Cup final. For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Celtic Football Club is a Scottish football club based in Glasgow, which currently plays in the Scottish Premier League. ... Champions League Logo The UEFA Champions League is an annual international inter-club football competition between Europes most successful clubs, regarded as the most prestigious club trophy in the sport. ... Football Club Internazionale Milano (commonly, but incorrectly, known as Inter Milan) is an Italian football club, playing in the Serie A (first division). ... For other uses, see Rangers F.C. (disambiguation). ... The Cup Winners Cup was a football club competition between the winners of the European domestic cup competitions. ...


The city is home to Scotland's only two UEFA 5 star rated stadia which allows them to host UEFA Champions League or UEFA Cup finals Ibrox Stadium (51,082 seats) and Hampden Park (52,670 seats), meaning that they are eligible to host the final of the UEFA Champions' League. Hampden Park has hosted the final on three occasions, most recently in 2002 and hosted the UEFA Cup Final in 2007. Ibrox Stadium, originally Ibrox Park, is the stadium of Rangers F.C. It is located on the south side of the River Clyde in the Ibrox district of Glasgow, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Hampden Park (disambiguation). ... The UEFA Champions League (which used to be named and is often called the European Cup) is an annual club football competition organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) for the most successful football clubs in Europe. ... The UEFA Cup (also known as European Cup 3, CE3 or C3) is a football competition for European club teams, organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). ...


Hampden Park, which is Scotland's national football stadium, holds the European record for attendance at a football match: 149,547[79] saw Scotland beat England 3-1 in 1937, in the days before British stadia became all-seated. Celtic Park (60,832 seats) is also located in the east end of Glasgow. All-seater is a terminology applied to sports stadiums in which every spectator must be seated. ... This page is about the soccer stadium in Glasgow. ...

Glasgow has three professional football clubs: Celtic F.C. and Rangers F.C., together known by some as the Old Firm, and Partick Thistle F.C.. A fourth club, Queen's Park F.C., is an amateur club that plays in the Scottish professional league system. Prior to this, Glasgow had five other professional clubs: Clyde FC, which moved to Cumbernauld, plus Third Lanark A.C., Cambuslang F.C, Cowlairs F.C. and Clydesdale F.C., who all went bankrupt. There are a number of Scottish Junior Football Association clubs within the city as well, such as Pollok F.C., Maryhill F.C., Ashfield F.C. and Petershill F.C., as well as countless numbers of amateur teams. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 187 pixels Full resolution (1200 × 280 pixel, file size: 645 KB, MIME type: image/png) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 187 pixels Full resolution (1200 × 280 pixel, file size: 645 KB, MIME type: image/png) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free... For other uses, see Hampden Park (disambiguation). ... Celtic Football Club is a Scottish football club based in Glasgow, which currently plays in the Scottish Premier League. ... For other uses, see Rangers F.C. (disambiguation). ... Crowd at football match between Celtic F.C. and Rangers F.C. at Celtic Park. ... Partick Thistle Football Club is a Scottish professional football club from the city of Glasgow. ... Queens Park Football Club is a famous Scottish football team, and is the oldest football club in Scotland[1], founded in 1867. ... Clyde F.C. are a Scottish football team currently playing in the First Division of the Scottish Football League. ... , Cumbernauld (Gaelic: Comar nan Allt) is a new town in North Lanarkshire, Scotland, created in 1956 as a population overflow for Glasgow. ... Third Lanark Athletic Club was a Scottish football team that existed from 1872 to 1967 and were based in Glasgow. ... Camubuslang Football Club was a former Scottish football team, based in the Cambuslang region of Glasgow, which went into liquidation. ... Cowlairs Football Club was a 19th century football club from Glasgow, Scotland. ... Clydesdale F. C. were a nineteenth-century Glasgow-based soccer club, who were attached to Clydesdale Cricket Club during the 1870s. ... The Scottish Junior Football Association (SJFA) is the organising body for the junior grade of football (soccer) in Scotland. ... Pollok Football Club are a Scottish football (soccer) club based in Pollokshaws in the southside of the city of Glasgow. ... Maryhill Football Club is a football (soccer) team based in the Maryhill area of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Ashfield Football Club are a Scottish football (soccer) club from Possilpark in the North of Glasgow. ... Petershill Football Club are a Scottish football club from Springburn in the north of Glasgow. ...


The history of football in the city, as well as the status of the Old Firm, attracts many visitors to football matches in the city throughout the season. The Scottish Football Association, the national governing body, and the Scottish Football Museum are based in Glasgow, as are the Scottish Football League, Scottish Premier League, Scottish Junior Football Association and Scottish Amateur Football Association. The Glasgow Cup was a once popular tournament, were all professional teams from the city would compete, however, now only Junior teams do. Crowd at football match between Celtic F.C. and Rangers F.C. at Celtic Park. ... The Scottish Football Association (SFA) is the governing body for the sport of football in Scotland. ... The Scottish Football Museum is the Scottish Football Associations National Museum of Football, located in Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Scottish Football League is a league of football teams in Scotland. ... The Scottish Premier League, currently known as the Clydesdale Bank Premier League for sponsorship reasons and often known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system — above the Scottish Football... The Scottish Junior Football Association (SJFA) is the organising body for the junior grade of football (soccer) in Scotland. ... The Scottish Amateur Football Association (SAFA) is the organising body for amateur football across Scotland. ... The Glasgow Cup was a football tournament open to teams fom Glasgow. ...

Club League Venue Capacity
Rangers F.C. Scottish Premier League Ibrox Stadium 51,082
Partick Thistle F.C. Scottish Football League Firhill Stadium 10,887
Queen's Park F.C. Scottish Football League Hampden Park 52,670
Celtic F.C. Scottish Premier League Celtic Park 60,832

For other uses, see Rangers F.C. (disambiguation). ... Ibrox Stadium, originally Ibrox Park, is the stadium of Rangers F.C. It is located on the south side of the River Clyde in the Ibrox district of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Partick Thistle Football Club is a Scottish professional football club from the city of Glasgow. ... The Scottish Football League is a league of football teams in Scotland. ... Firhill Stadium is the home ground of the Scottish football club, Partick Thistle F.C.. Also in December 2005 Firhill became the temporary home of Glasgows professional Rugby Union team, Glasgow Warriors, when they moved from their previous base at Hughenden. ... Queens Park Football Club is a famous Scottish football team, and is the oldest football club in Scotland[1], founded in 1867. ... For other uses, see Hampden Park (disambiguation). ... Celtic Football Club is a Scottish football club based in Glasgow, which currently plays in the Scottish Premier League. ... The Scottish Premier League, currently known as the Clydesdale Bank Premier League for sponsorship reasons and often known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system — above the Scottish Football... This page is about the soccer stadium in Glasgow. ...

Rugby

Glasgow has a professional rugby union club, the Glasgow Warriors, which plays in the Magners League alongside teams from Scotland, Ireland and Wales. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Official website www. ... The Celtic League, currently known as the Magners League for sponsorship reasons, is an annual rugby union competition involving regional sides from Ireland, Scotland and Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ...


In the Scottish League, Glasgow Hawks was formed in 1997 by the merger of two of Glasgow's oldest clubs: Glasgow Academicals and Glasgow High Kelvinside (GHK). Despite the merger, the second division teams of Glasgow Academicals and Glasgow High Kelvinside re-entered the Scottish rugby league in 1998. Glasgow Hawks are an amateur rugby union team in Glasgow, Scotland. ...


Other sports

Major international sporting arenas include the Kelvin Hall and Scotstoun Sports Centre. In 2003 the National Academy for Badminton was completed in Scotstoun. In 2003, Glasgow was also given the title of European Capital of Sport.[80] The Kelvin Hall in Glasgow, Scotland is a mixed-use arts and sports venue that opened as an exhibition centre in 1927. ... Scotstoun is a district of Glasgow, Scotland, west of Glasgow City Centre. ... This article is about the sport. ...


The Braehead Arena is home to leading professional basketball team, the Scottish Rocks, who compete in the British Basketball League. The arena was also host to the 2000 Ford World Curling Championships. The Braehead Arena is a 5,300-seat multi-purpose arena in Renfrewshire, Scotland. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Scottish Rocks, officially the Scottish Phoenix Honda Rocks by sponsorship, is a basketball team which plays in the British Basketball League. ... “BBL” redirects here. ... The 2000 Ford World Curling Championships was held at the Braehead Arena in Glasgow, Scotland from April 1 to April 9. ...


Glasgow is also host to many cricket clubs including Clydesdale Cricket Club who have been title winners for the Scottish Cup many times. This club also hosted the friendly One Day International match for India and Pakistan in 2007, but due to bad weather was called off. This article is about the sport. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A One-day International (ODI) cricket match is a one-day cricket match played between two international teams each representing a particular country. ...


Smaller sporting facilities include an abundance of outdoor playing fields, as well as golf clubs such as Hagg's Castle and artificial ski slopes. Between 1998 and 2004, the Scottish Claymores American football team played some or all of their home games each season at Hampden Park and the venue also hosted World Bowl XI. A playing field is a field used for playing sports or games. ... Year Founded 1995 Year Retired 2004 City Glasgow and Edinburgh, Scotland Team Colors Navy Blue, Royal Blue, Silver, and White Franchise W-L-T Record Regular Season: 43-57-0 Postseason: 1-1 Championships World Bowls (1) World Bowl IV (1996) The Scottish Claymores (Scotland in box scores) were an... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The World Bowl is the American football Championship game of the NFL Europe, similar to the Super Bowl of the NFL. When the NFL Europe was founded in 1991 as World League of American Football (WLAF), with teams in North America and Europe as well as expansion plans for Asia...


Motorcycle speedway racing was first introduced to Glasgow in 1928 and is currently staged at Saracen Park in the North of the city. Motorcycle speedway, normally referred to as Speedway, is a motorcycle sport that involves usually 4 and sometimes up to 6 riders competing over 4 laps of an oval circuit. ...

See also: Glasgow Tigers (speedway)

Befitting its strong Highland connections as the City of the Gael Baile Mòr nan Gàidheal, Glasgow is also one of five places in Scotland which hosts the final of the Scottish Cup of Shinty, better known as the Camanachd Cup. This is usually held at Old Anniesland. Once home to numerous Shinty clubs, there is now only one senior club in Glasgow, Glasgow Mid-Argyll, as well as two university sides from Strathclyde University and Glasgow University. The Glasgow Tigers are a motorcycle speedway from Glasgow, Scotland. ... // A shinty game in progress Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. ... The Camanachd Association Challenge Cup or the Camanachd Cup or Scottish Cup as it is known is the premier prize in the sport of shinty. ... The University of Strathclyde in Scotland is a top research-led British University which originated as Andersons Institution in 1796. ... The University of Glasgow is the largest of the three universities in Glasgow, Scotland. ...


2014 Commonwealth Games

See also: 2014 Commonwealth Games

On 9 November 2007, Glasgow was selected as the host city of the 2014 Commonwealth Games. It will be based around a number of existing and newly constructed sporting venues across the city, including a refurbished Hampden Park, Kelvingrove Park, the Kelvin Hall, and the planned Scottish National Arena at the SECC. Plans have already been drawn up for a Commonwealth Games campus in the East End of the city, which will include a new indoor arena, velodrome and accommodation facilities in Dalmarnock and Parkhead, with an upgraded Aquatics Centre at nearby Tollcross Park. It is the third time the Games have been held in Scotland.[81] The 20th Commonwealth Games in 2014 will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Current flag of the Commonwealth Games Federation Locations of the games, and participating countries Commonwealth Games Federation seal, adopted in 2001 The Commonwealth Games is a multinational, multi-sport event. ... For other uses, see Hampden Park (disambiguation). ... Kelvingrove Park is one of the most popular parks in the city of Glasgow. ... The Kelvin Hall in Glasgow, Scotland is a mixed-use arts and sports venue that opened as an exhibition centre in 1927. ... Scotlands National Arena also known as the SECC Arena is a planned indoor arena in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The front of the SECC The Clyde Auditorium with the main SECC building behind it The Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre (SECC), located on the north bank of the River Clyde in Glasgow, is Scotlands national venue for public events. ... Look up velodrome in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dalmarnock is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Parkhead is an area of east Glasgow. ... Tollcross is an suburb north of the River Clyde in Glasgow and has a popular park which is famed for its international rose trials. ...


Transport

Glasgow Central station is the northern terminus of the West Coast Main Line
Glasgow Central station is the northern terminus of the West Coast Main Line
See also: Transport in Glasgow

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1663 KB) Summary Glasgow Central station, photographed from Yates bar, by User:AlistairMcMillan on November 1 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1663 KB) Summary Glasgow Central station, photographed from Yates bar, by User:AlistairMcMillan on November 1 2005. ... Glasgow Central is the larger of the two present main-line railway terminals in Glasgow, Scotland, and is managed by Network Rail. ... The WCML running alongside the M1 motorway at Watford Gap in Northamptonshire A Virgin Pendolino and freight train on the WCML The West Coast Main Line (WCML) is one of the most important intercity railway lines in the United Kingdom, part of the British railway system. ... Route 9, June 1962, shortly before the end of tram services in Glasgow in September The city of Glasgow, Scotland has a transport system encompassing air, rail, road, and an underground rail circuit. ...

Public transport

Glasgow has a large urban transport system, mostly managed by the Strathclyde Partnership for Transport (SPT). The Strathclyde Partnership for Transport (SPT) is a public body which is responsible for planning and co-ordinating regional transport, and especially the public transport system, in the Strathclyde area of western Scotland. ...


The city has many bus services; since bus deregulation almost all are provided by private operators though SPT part-funds some services. Bus deregulation in Great Britain came into force on 26 October 1986, and is formally known as the 1985 Transport Act. ...


Glasgow has the most extensive urban rail network in the UK outside of London with rail services travelling to a large part of the West of Scotland. All trains running within Scotland, including the local Glasgow trains, are operated by First ScotRail, who own the franchise as determined by the Scottish Government. Central Station and Queen Street Station are the two main railway terminals. Glasgow Central is the terminus of the 401 mile long West Coast Main Line from London Euston. All services to and from England use this station. Glasgow Central is also the terminus for suburban services on the south side of Glasgow, Ayrshire and Inverclyde, as well as being served by the cross city link from Dalmuir to Motherwell. Most other services within Scotland - the main line to Edinburgh, plus services to Aberdeen, Dundee, Inverness and the Western Highlands - operate from Queen Street station. A Connex commuter train stands by the platform in Melbourne, Australia Regional rail systems, or commuter rail systems, usually provide a rail service through a central business district area into suburbs or other locations that draw large numbers of people on a daily basis. ... Strathclyde (Srath Chluaidh in Gaelic) was one of the regional council areas of Scotland from 1975 to 1996. ... First ScotRail is the brand under which FirstGroup PLC runs its railway franchise to operate all domestic passenger services within Scotland, as well as the cross-border Caledonian Sleeper service to London. ... The logo of the Governemnt, incorporating the Saltire. ... Glasgow Central is the larger of the two present main-line railway terminals in Glasgow, Scotland, and is managed by Network Rail. ... Glasgow Queen Street (Glaschu Sràid na Banrighinn in Gaelic) is a railway station in Glasgow, Scotland and is the citys second main line terminus. ... The WCML running alongside the M1 motorway at Watford Gap in Northamptonshire A Virgin Pendolino and freight train on the WCML The West Coast Main Line (WCML) is one of the most important intercity railway lines in the United Kingdom, part of the British railway system. ... Facade of Euston Station, London Euston Arch: the original Euston Station, as enlarged, ca 1851 Euston station concourse Euston station (also known as London Euston), is a large railway station in Central London. ...

Map of the Glasgow Subway Network.
Map of the Glasgow Subway Network.

The city's suburban network is currently divided by the River Clyde, and an initiative has been proposed to link them; it is currently awaiting funding from the Scottish Government. The city is linked to Edinburgh by three direct railway links; a further one, the Airdrie-Bathgate Rail Link, is proposed for completion in 2010. In addition to the suburban rail network, SPT operates the Glasgow Subway. The Subway is the United Kingdom's only completely underground metro system, and is generally recognised as the world's third underground railway after London and Budapest.[82] Both rail and subway stations have a number of park and ride facilities. Image File history File links Glasgow-Subway-Map. ... Image File history File links Glasgow-Subway-Map. ... Glasgow Crossrail is a proposed railway development in Central Scotland. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... There are three railway lines linking Glasgow with Edinburgh. ... The Airdrie-Bathgate Rail Link is a proposed railway development in Central Scotland. ... An Inner Circle train arrives at West Street station. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway — usually in an urban area — with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ...


As part of the wider regeneration along the banks of the River Clyde, a Pre-Tram System, using dedicated bus lanes, called Clyde Fastlink is currently planned. For other rivers, see Clyde River (disambiguation) , The River Clyde (Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh, pronounced ) is a major river in Scotland. ... Clyde FastLink is a proposed high frequency dedicated bus link in Glasgow, United Kingdom. ...


Shipping

Ferries used to link opposite sides of the Clyde in Glasgow but they have been rendered near-obsolete, by bridges and tunnels including the Erskine Bridge, Kingston Bridge, and the Clyde Tunnel. The only remaining crossings are the Renfrew Ferry between Renfrew and Yoker, and the Kilcreggan Ferry in Inverclyde, both run by SPT but outwith the city boundary. The PS Waverley, the world's last operational sea-going paddle-steamer,[83] provides services from Glasgow City Centre, mainly catering to the pleasure cruise market. A regular waterbus service links the City Centre with Braehead in Renfrewshire, some 30 minutes downstream. A service by Loch Lomond Seaplanes, connecting the city with destinations in Argyll and Bute started in 2007.[84] The only operational dock left in Glasgow operated by Clydeport is the King George V Dock, near Braehead. Most other facilities, such as Hunterston Ore Terminal are located in the deep waters of the Firth of Clyde, which together handle some 7.5 million tonnes of cargo each year. The Erskine Bridge is a box girder bridge spanning the River Clyde in west central Scotland, connecting West Dunbartonshire with Renfrewshire. ... Kingston Bridge, looking eastward up the River Clyde The Kingston Bridge is a road bridge crossing the River Clyde in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The south entrance of the Clyde Tunnel The Clyde Tunnel is a crossing beneath the River Clyde in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Renfrew Ferry is a ferry service in Scotland linking the North and South banks of the River Clyde between the area of Yoker in Glasgow and the town of Renfrew in Renfrewshire. ... Renfrew (Rinn Friù in Scottish Gaelic) is a town, located six miles west of Glasgow on the west coast of Scotland. ... Yoker is a western district of Glasgow, lying on the northern bank of the Clyde to the east of Clydebank. ... For other uses, see Inverclyde (disambiguation). ... PS Waverley steaming down the Firth of Clyde - additional views at Image:PS Waverley off Brodick castle 1989. ... A paddle steamer, paddleboat, or paddlewheeler is a ship or boat propelled by one or more paddle wheels driven by a steam engine. ... A New York Water Taxi docks at Pier 11 near Wall Street. ... Braehead is a shopping centre located in Renfrew near Glasgow. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... Loch Lomond Seaplanes is an airline based in Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 2nd  - Total 6,909 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Lochgilphead ISO 3166-2 GB-AGB ONS code 00QD Demographics Population Ranked 23rd  - Total (2005) 90,870  - Density 13 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Argyll & Bute Council http://www. ... The Peel Group is a collection of property and transport companies based in the United Kingdom. ... King George V Dock is a dock for ocean-going vessels located near Braehead in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Hunterston Terminal Hunterston Terminal, in North Ayrshire, Scotland, is a coal-handling port on the Firth of Clyde, operated by Clydeport. ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Seamill beach looks south down the outer firth towards southern Arran and Ailsa Craig. ...


Roads

The city is the focus of Scotland's trunk road network and has many road connections to other cities. The main M8 motorway passes through the city centre, and connects to the M77, M73, and M80 motorways. The A82 connects the city to Argyll and the western Highlands. The M74 runs directly south towards Carlisle; the highly controversial M74 completion scheme will extend the motorway from Tollcross into the Tradeston area to join the M8. A legal challenge to stop the extension was withdrawn in 2006, and the road is now scheduled for completion by 2010. A63(T) trunk road A trunk road, trunk highway, or strategic road is a major road—usually connecting one or more cities, ports, airports, etc. ... Kingston Bridge M8 running alongside the Clyde This Stub in the Tradeston area, popularly known as the ski-ramp, is the abandoned interchange for the southern flank of the Glasgow Inner Ring Road For the highway connecting Moscow to Arkhangelsk, see M8 motorway (Russia). ... The M77 motorway is a motorway in Scotland. ... The M73 motorway is a motorway in Scotland. ... The M80 motorway is a major motorway in central Scotland. ... The A82 is a trunk road in Scotland, and is the principal route from Lowland Scotland to the western Scottish Highlands, running from Glasgow to Inverness. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 2nd  - Total 6,909 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Lochgilphead ISO 3166-2 GB-AGB ONS code 00QD Demographics Population Ranked 23rd  - Total (2005) 90,870  - Density 13 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Argyll & Bute Council http://www. ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... M74 near Larkhall. ... For other uses, see Carlisle (disambiguation). ... Tollcross is a section of Glasgow, Scotland, north of the River Clyde. ... Tradeston is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ...


Other road proposals include the East End Regeneration Route, which aims to complete the Glasgow Inner Ring Road around the city and provide easier access to deprived areas of the East End. The Glasgow East End Regeneration Route is a proposed urban road in the East End of Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Kingston Bridge, an integral part of what was planned to become the Glasgow Inner Ring Road. ...


Airports

The city is served by two international airports and a seaplane terminal: Glasgow International Airport (GLA) in Paisley, Renfrewshire (13 km/8 mi west of the city), Glasgow Prestwick International Airport (PIK) (46 km/29 mi to the south-west), and Glasgow Seaplane Terminal, by the Glasgow Science Centre on the River Clyde. There is also a small airfield at Cumbernauld (29 km/18 mi to the north-east). It is anticipated that by 2009, both principal airports will be served by a direct rail link from Glasgow Central railway station on completion of the Glasgow Airport Rail Link project at Glasgow International Airport. Glasgow Airport redirects here. ... For other uses, see Paisley (disambiguation). ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... Glasgow Prestwick Airport from the air Glasgow Prestwick Airport (Scottish Gaelic: ) (IATA: PIK, ICAO: EGPK) is an international airport serving Glasgow, situated north of the town of Prestwick in South Ayrshire, Scotland. ... Cumbernauld Airport (IATA: N/A, ICAO: EGPG) is located 16 nautical miles (29. ... The Glasgow Airport Rail Link (GARL) is a proposed rail link which will link Glasgow Central station to Glasgow International Airport. ...


Twinned cities

Glasgow is twinned with various cities, including:[85] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Montpellier (Occitan Montpelhièr) is a city in the south of France. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cuba. ... This article is about the capital of Cuba. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Torino redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ... This article is about the city in the West Bank. ... This article is about the Palestinian territories as a geopolitical phenomenon. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Nürnberg redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Dalian (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Japanese: Dairen; Russian: Далянь, Dalian or Дальний, Dalny) is the governing sub-provincial city in the eastern Liaoning Province of Northeast China. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...   (Urdu: لاہور, Punjabi: لہور, pronounced ) is the capital of the Punjab and is the second largest city in Pakistan after Karachi. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Central market and Church in Rostov. ...

See also

This article deals with the history of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... This article is intended to show a timeline of the history of Glasgow, Scotland, up to the present day. ... Politics in Glasgow, Scotland, are evident in the deliberations and decisions of the city council of Glasgow (Glaschu in Gaelic), in elections to the council, and in elections to the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) and the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (Westminster). ... The front of the City Chambers, from George Square. ... The Lord Provost of Glasgow is the convener of the City of Glasgow council. ... Red Clydeside is a term used to describe the era of political radicalism that characterised the city of Glasgow in Scotland, United Kingdom, and urban areas around the city on the banks of the River Clyde. ... For other uses, see Bloody Friday. ... Glasgow is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ... Glasgows miles better was a campaign in the 1980s to promote the city of Glasgow for tourism and as a location for industry. ... Geography of Glasgow, relates to the geography, climate and demographics of Glasgow, Scotland Glasgow is located on the banks of the River Clyde, in West Central Scotland. ... Greater Glasgow is the conurbation that includes and surrounds the city of Glasgow in the west of Scotland. ... For other rivers, see Clyde River (disambiguation) , The River Clyde (Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh, pronounced ) is a major river in Scotland. ... The city of Glasgow, Scotland, has many amenities for a wide range of cultural activities, from curling to opera and from football to art appreciation; it also has a large selection of museums that include those devoted to transport, religion, and modern art. ... Glasgow Festivals include festivals for art, film, comedy, folk music and jazz. ... A holiday during the 3rd and 4th weeks of July in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow patter or Glaswegian is a dialect shouted in and around Glasgow, Scotland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Glasgow Central is the larger of the two present main-line railway terminals in Glasgow, Scotland, and is managed by Network Rail. ... Glasgow Queen Street (Glaschu Sràid na Banrighinn in Gaelic) is a railway station in Glasgow, Scotland and is the citys second main line terminus. ... Glasgow Airport redirects here. ... Glasgow Prestwick Airport from the air Glasgow Prestwick Airport (Scottish Gaelic: ) (IATA: PIK, ICAO: EGPK) is an international airport serving Glasgow, situated north of the town of Prestwick in South Ayrshire, Scotland. ... An Inner Circle train arrives at West Street station. ... The south entrance of the Clyde Tunnel The Clyde Tunnel is a crossing beneath the River Clyde in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Kingston Bridge, looking eastward up the River Clyde The Kingston Bridge is a road bridge crossing the River Clyde in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow Caledonian University is a university in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... The University of Strathclyde (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a university in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow Medical School is the medical school of the University of Glasgow, and offers a 5 year MBChB degree course. ... Glasgow School of Art is one of four independent art schools in Scotland, situated in the Garnethill area of Glasgow. ... The Glasgow College of Nautical Studies, viewed from the north bank of the Clyde Glasgow College of Nautical Studies is a further education college of nautical and maritime studies, and a provider of marine and offshore training courses. ... RSAMD The Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (RSAMD), founded in 1845 by the Glasgow Educational Association, is a university of music and drama in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Archbishop of Glasgow is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Metropolitan Archdiocese of Glasgow. ... The Archbishop of Glasgow is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Metropolitan Archdiocese of Glasgow. ... The front of Glasgow Cathedral, from Cathedral Square Glasgow Cathedral and Glasgow Royal Infirmary viewed from Glasgow Necropolis Painting of David Robert shows St. ... Saint Mungo, also known as Saint Kentigern, is by tradition an apostle to the Kingdom of Strathclyde, Scotland, and patron saint and legendary founder of the city of Glasgow. ... Sectarianism in Glasgow takes the form of religious and political sectarian rivalry between Roman Catholics and Protestants. ... Celtic Football Club is a Scottish football club based in Glasgow, which currently plays in the Scottish Premier League. ... For other uses, see Rangers F.C. (disambiguation). ... Partick Thistle Football Club is a Scottish professional football club from the city of Glasgow. ... Clyde Football Club are a Scottish professional football team currently playing in the First Division of the Scottish Football League. ... Queens Park Football Club is a famous Scottish football team, and is the oldest football club in Scotland[1], founded in 1867. ... Official website www. ... The West of Scotland Cricket Club is a large cricket club based in Glasgow. ... For other uses, see Hampden Park (disambiguation). ... Hamilton Crescent is a cricket ground located in the Partick area of Glasgow. ... The Scottish Football Museum is the Scottish Football Associations National Museum of Football, located in Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The 20th Commonwealth Games in 2014 will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. ... Crowd at football match between Celtic F.C. and Rangers F.C. at Celtic Park. ... Buchanan Street looking southward. ... This page is about the soccer stadium in Glasgow. ... Ibrox Stadium, originally Ibrox Park, is the stadium of Rangers F.C. It is located on the south side of the River Clyde in the Ibrox district of Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Clyde Auditorium viewed from across the Clyde. ... The Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) is the City of Glasgows main gallery of contemporary art. ... The Glasgow Museum of Transport is located in the Kelvin Hall in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Glasgow Royal Concert Hall is a music auditorium in the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Willow Tearooms entrance and jewellers shop frontage on Sauchiehall Street. ... Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is Glasgows premier museum and art gallery and has one of Europes great civic art collections. ... The Glasgow Science Centre and the Glasgow Tower The Glasgow Science Centre is a major science and technology museum located in Glasgow, Scotland. ...

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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Learning and Teaching Scotland (LTS or LT Scotland) is a non-departmental public body based in Glasgow, Scotland. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Glasgow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8149 words)
Glasgow (Glaschu in Gaelic; or Glesca/Glesga in colloquial Scots) is the largest city in Scotland and the third largest in the United Kingdom.
Glasgow grew over the following centuries, and the founding of the University of Glasgow in 1451 and elevation of the bishopric to an archbishopric in 1492 increasing the town's religious and educational status.
Glasgow is the largest and most dynamic economy in Scotland and is at the hub of the metropolitan area of West Central Scotland which has a total population of around 2.3 million, nearly half of Scotland's total population.
Glasgow Feature Page on Undiscovered Scotland (996 words)
Glasgow suffered during the depression of the 1930s, but this was only a precursor to the eventual demise of the Clydeside shipbuilding industry in the 1960s and 1970s.
Glasgow's most recent reinvention of itself was based on one of the most remarkable advertising campaigns ever, "Glasgow's Miles Better", aimed as much at those within the city as those beyond it.
From the semi-rural charm of the Forth-Clyde Canal to the wild heights of northern Ayrshire; and from the parklands of Mugdock and the Carron Forest to the Edwardian grandeur of the city centre, the variety of rides is wide and unexpected.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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