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Encyclopedia > Given name
Look up Appendix:Most popular given names by country in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

A given name, first name, Christian name, or forename is a personal name that specifies and differentiates between members of a group of individuals, especially in a family, all of whose members usually share the same family name (surname). A given name is a name given to a person, as opposed to an inherited one such as a family name.[1] Strictly speaking, the term excludes names acquired by other means — such as changing one's name. This article does not generally assume the strict definition. Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Anthroponym. ... For other uses, see Family (disambiguation). ... Last name redirects here. ...


In most European countries and in countries that have cultures predominantly influenced by Europe (North and South America and Australia), the given name usually comes before the family name (though generally not in lists and catalogs), and so is known as a forename or first name (see usage below). But in many cultures of the world, for instance in some African and most of East Asia (e.g. China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam), and also in Hungary, given names traditionally come after the family name. In East Asia, even part of the given name may be shared among all members of a given generation in a family and the family's extensions, to differentiate those generations from other generations. This article is about the geographical region. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ...


Under the common Western naming convention, people generally have one or more forenames (either given or acquired). If more than one, there is usually a main forename (for everyday use) and one or more supplementary forenames. But sometimes two or more carry equal weight. Beyond the fact that forenames come before the surname there is no particular ordering rule. Often the main forename is at the beginning, resulting in a first name and one or more middle names, but other arrangements are quite common. For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ...


Given names are often used in a familiar and friendly manner in informal situations. In more formal situations the surname is used instead, unless it is necessary to distinguish between people with the same surname. The idiom "on a first-name basis" (or "on first-name terms") alludes to the fact that using a person's given name betokens familiarity.

Contents

Usage

The term given name is rarely used in the United Kingdom; forename or Christian name predominate, with the former now used almost universally on official documentation.


The term first name can refer to any forename, not just the very first. In the United States, first name is the most common form, although given name is often encountered on official documents. The term Christian name, on the other hand, has mostly fallen out of favor with officialdom though still remaining popular with the general population[citation needed], especially in rural areas. Christian name may refer to the name taken by converts to Christianity upon baptism. Religious conversion is the adoption of a new religious identity, or a change from one religious identity to another. ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ...


Legality

A child's given name or names are usually assigned around the time of birth. In most jurisdictions, the name at birth is a matter of public record, inscribed on the birth certificate or equivalent. In some jurisdictions, mainly civil-law jurisdictions such as France, Quebec, The Netherlands or Germany, the functionary whose job it is to record acts of birth may act to prevent parents from giving the child a name that may cause him or her harm (in France, by referring the case to a local judge).[citation needed] Even spell-checking of the name is done. The name at birth of a child is his or her name as given by the parents, according to an apparently universal custom. ... Mary Elizabeth Winblad (1895-1987) birth certificate A birth certificate is a vital record that documents the birth of a child. ... For other uses of civil law, see civil law. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain...


Etymology

The etymology of given names includes:

  • Aspiring personal traits (external and internal). For example, the name Clement means "merciful". English examples include Faith, Prudence, Augustus, and Fido (The last coming from the Latin for 'faith').
  • Occupations, for example George means "farmer"[1]
  • Circumstances of birth, for example Thomas means "twin"[2], or the Latin name Quintus, which was traditionally given to the fifth child.[3]
  • Objects, for example Peter means "rock"[4] and Edgar means "rich spear"[5]
  • Physical characteristics, for example Calvin means "bald"[6]
  • Form of another name, for example Pauline or Georgia (especially to change the sex of the name)
  • Surnames, for example Taylor, Harrison, and Ross. Such names are common in upper-class American families and often come from families that are frequently intermarried with the family bearing the individual's surname
  • Places, for example Brittany and Lorraine
  • Time of birth, for example day of the week, as in Kofi Annan, whose given name means "born on Friday," or the holiday on which one was born, for example Natasha, a Russian diminutive of Natalia, which means "Christmas" in Latin
  • Combination of the above, for example the Armenian name Sirvart means "love rose"
  • Names of unknown or disputed etymology, for example Mary[7].

In many cultures, given names are reused, especially to commemorate the dead (namesake), resulting in a limited repertoire of names that sometimes vary by orthography. Sometimes a boy is named after a grandfather. Customs for girls vary. For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see George. ... Look up Thomas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Quintus (the fifth, see Quintus (name)) may refer to: Quintus Caecilius Metellus Nepos Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar (I) Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar (II) Quintus Antistius Adventus Quintus Aurelius Symmachus (c. ... Look up Peter, peter in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... EDGAR, the Electronic Data-Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval system, performs automated collection, validation, indexing, acceptance, and forwarding of submissions by companies and others who are required by law to file forms with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the SEC). Not all SEC filings by public companies are available... Calvin may refer to: Calvin (Calvin and Hobbes) Calvin College, a college in Grand Rapids, Michigan People with the surname Calvin: John Calvin, theologian Melvin Calvin, American chemist Susan Calvin, fictional robopsychologist People with the given name Calvin: Calvin Coolidge, American President Calvin Cheng, fashion mogul Calvin Klein, fashion designer... Pauline is a female given name, originally the French form of Paulina. ... Last name redirects here. ... Taylor is an English surname, originally an occupational surname meaning tailor. [1] Taylor has also been commonly used as a given name in English-speaking countries. ... Harrison (or Harrisson) is a common name with both English and Celtic origins. ... Map of Scotland showing the historic district of Ross Ross (Ros in Scottish Gaelic) is a region of Scotland and a former mormaerdom, earldom, sheriffdom and county. ... Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Lorraine (province). ... Kofi Atta Annan GCMG (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat who served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1, 1997 to January 1, 2007, serving two five-year terms. ... Natasha is a Russian female given name, originally a pet name variant of Natalia. ... Natalia could refer to: Natalia Republic Natalia!, rubber fetishist Natalia (singer), Belgium musician Natalia, a music album of Natalia Kukulska This human name article is a disambiguation page — it may be an article about a human name, but it is a list of pages that might otherwise share the same... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Mary may refer to: // Mary (mother of Jesus), the mother of Jesus of Nazareth Blessed Virgin Mary, the Catholic and Orthodox conception of the mother of Christ See also Islamic view of Virgin Mary Mary Magdalene, devoted disciple of Jesus Mary Salome (disciple), mother of apostles James and John Mary... If a person, place, or thing is named after a different person, place, or thing, then one is said to be the namesake of the other. ... The orthography of a language specifies the correct way of using a specific writing system to write the language. ...


In Western cultures, a number of biblical names are commonly employed. The name Jesus, however, is considered taboo or sacrilegious in many regions (including Germanic-speaking areas) while Mary, now popular among Christians, especially among Roman Catholics, was considered too holy for use as a Christian name until about the 12th century. In traditions that particularly venerated Mary (e.g. in Poland), this was still the case until at least the 17th century (in Poland until the arrival of queens of France named Marie[2]). The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... This article is about cultural prohibitions in general, for other uses, see Taboo (disambiguation). ... Sacrilege is in general the violation or injurious treatment of a sacred object. ... Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies The Germanic languages form one of the branches of the Indo-European (IE) language family, spoken by the Germanic peoples who settled in northern Europe along the borders of the Roman Empire. ... Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Christian name is a term more or less synonymous with forename or given name. It can be seen as an archaism due to the increasing secularisation of what were once compulsorily Christian societies, but it continues to be very widely used, and not just by practising Christians. ...


Most common given names in English (and many other European languages) can be grouped into broad categories based on their origin: The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...

  • Germanic names often are warlike in nature, or have roots meaning "glory." The "-bert" element common in many such names comes from beraht, which means "bright." Examples: Albert, Robert, Alfred, Edward, Roger, Rosalind, Emma, Eric and Matilda.
  • Nicknames Nicknames are often used to distinguish between two or more people with the same given name. Names that are currently in fashion tend to be varied the most. Nicknames are informal forms of names, often made by abbreviating and adding a y. Shortenings reduce the size of a long name, but nicknames can also be the same length as, or even longer than, the original name. Nicknames are often used especially in childhood; in English, Robert may be shortened to Robby and then Rob. In German the names Johann and Margarete are shortened to Hänsel and Gretel in the famous fairy tale. Examples: Vicky, Rob, Danny, Abby, Ali, Max and Steve.

Frequently, a given name has versions in many different languages. For example, the biblical Hebrew name Susanna also occurs in its original Hebrew version, Shoshannah, its Spanish and Portuguese version Susana, and its French version, Suzanne, and its Polish version, Zuzanna. Slavic names are often of a peaceful character, the compounds being derived from word roots meaning "to protect," "to love," "peace," "to praise [gods]," "to give," and so on. Hebrew names are names of Hebrew language origin. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Theophory in the Bible. ... // Much Hebrew theophory occurs in the Bible, particularly in the Old Testament. ... This article is about the given name. ... Joshua, Jehoshuah or Yehoshua. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... For other uses, see Adam (disambiguation). ... Elizabeth or Elisabeth is the Greek form Ελισ(σ)άβετ Elis(s)avet of the Hebrew Elisheva, meaning my God is an oath or perhaps my God is abundance. ... Look up Hannah in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mary may refer to: // Mary (mother of Jesus), the mother of Jesus of Nazareth Blessed Virgin Mary, the Catholic and Orthodox conception of the mother of Christ See also Islamic view of Virgin Mary Mary Magdalene, devoted disciple of Jesus Mary Salome (disciple), mother of apostles James and John Mary... Aramaic is a group of Semitic languages with a 3,000-year history. ... Look up Thomas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Martha (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bartholomew (disambiguation). ... Bert hosting a convention of the National Association of W Lovers meeting Bert is a fictional character, a Muppet on the Public Broadcasting Services long-running childrens television show, Sesame Street. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: Bright Bright can refer to: brightness, the perception of how dark or light a source of luminance is Bright, Victoria, a town in Australia. ... Look up Robert in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Edward in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Roger is primarily a common first name of English, French and Catalan usage, from the Germanic elements hrod (fame) and ger (spear) meaning famous with the spear. The Latin form of the name is Rogerius, as used by a few medieval figures. ... For other uses, see Eric (disambiguation). ... Matilda may refer to: Matilda (novel), a novel by Roald Dahl, illustrated by Quentin Blake Matilda (1996 film), directed by Danny DeVito, based on the novel Matilda (1978 film), about a kangaroo named Matilda Mathilda (novella), by Mary Shelley Matilda tank, a WWII British tank Matilda Mk I, a WWII... The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the Battle of Hastings and the events leading to it. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article describes the conventions for using peoples names in France, including the norms of custom and practice, as well as the legal aspects. ... Look up Robert in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Charles in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Roger is primarily a common first name of English, French and Catalan usage, from the Germanic elements hrod (fame) and ger (spear) meaning famous with the spear. The Latin form of the name is Rogerius, as used by a few medieval figures. ... Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies Celtic languages are a branch of the Indo-European languages. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies Celtic languages are a branch of the Indo-European languages. ... Look up Alan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Brian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In Irish mythology as it is presently constituted, Brigit or Brighit (exalted one) was the daughter of the Dagda (and therefore one of the Tuatha Dé Danann) and wife of Bres of the Fomorians. ... Saint Ciaran (or Kieran) was an early Irish bishop. ... Look up Jennifer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up John in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies Celtic languages are a branch of the Indo-European languages. ... Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies Celtic languages are a branch of the Indo-European languages. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Saints redirects here. ... Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism, apparently the religion of the Iron Age Celts. ... The Greco-Roman period of history refers to the culture of the peoples who were incorporated into the Roman Republic and Roman Empire. ... A listing of Greek mythological beings. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Eleanor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Stephen in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Alexander in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Andrew in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Petros redirects here. ... Look up Gregory in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see George. ... Look up Christopher in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Melissa in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Margaret, a womans first name, may refer to: Margaret I of Denmark Margaret II of Denmark Margaret II of Flanders Margaret II, Countess of Hainaut Margaret Brown (1867-1932), RMS Titanic survivor. ... Look up Nicholas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the hero from Greek mythology. ... For other uses of Timothy, see Timothy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chloe (disambiguation). ... Zoe may refer to: Zoe, an æon of Gnostic belief systems, paired with Logos Zoe (tribe), an indigenous tribe of the Brazilian Amazon Zoe, Byzantine Empress (c. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Laura is a common given name for a female. ... Possibly the best known Victoria, the queen of the United Kingdom from 1837 to 1901: the Victorian era was named after her. ... As a first name, Marcus or Markus is of Roman origin. ... Justin may refer to: Justin (name), a common given name Junianus Justinus, 3rd century Roman historian Justin I (c. ... Look up Felix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Francis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Julia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pascal is a masculine given name derived from the Latin paschalis, in turn from the Hebrew pesach, which means to be born on, or to be associated with, Passover day. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see Gemstone (disambiguation). ... This article is about the shrub of genus Jasminum. ... Species About 25-30, including: Lavandula abrotanoides Lavandula angustifolia Lavandula canariensis Lavandula dentata Lavandula lanata Lavandula latifolia Lavandula multifida Lavandula pinnata Lavandula stoechas Lavandula viridis Lavandula x intermedia The Lavenders Lavandula are a genus of about 25-30 species of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae, native from the... Dawn in Peng Chau, Hong Kong. ... Diversity About 1500 genera and 23,000 species Type Genus Aster L. Subfamilies Barnadesioideae Cichorioideae Tribe Arctotidae Tribe Cardueae Tribe Eremothamneae Tribe Lactuceae Tribe Liabeae Tribe Mutisieae Tribe Tarchonantheae Tribe Vernonieae Asteroideae Tribe Anthemideae Tribe Astereae Tribe Calenduleae Tribe Eupatorieae Tribe Gnaphalieae Tribe Helenieae Tribe Heliantheae Tribe Inuleae Tribe Plucheae... For other uses, see Rose (disambiguation). ... Species See text Iris is a genus of between 200-300 species of flowering plants with showy flowers which takes its name from the Greek word for a rainbow, referring to the wide variety of flower colors found among the many species. ... Petunia is a widely-cultivated genus of flowering plants of South American origin, in the family Solanaceae. ... Species Sorbus subgenus Sorbus Sorbus aucuparia - European Rowan Sorbus americana - American mountain ash Sorbus cashmiriana - Kashmir Rowan Sorbus commixta - Japanese Rowan Sorbus decora - Showy mountain ash Sorbus glabrescens - White-fruited Rowan Sorbus hupehensis - Hubei Rowan Sorbus matsumurana Sorbus sargentiana - Sargents Rowan Sorbus scalaris - Ladder Rowan Sorbus sitchensis - Sitka mountain... Species List of Viola species Violets (Viola) are a genus of flowering plants in the family Violaceae, with around 400-500 species throughout the world, mainly in the temperate Northern Hemisphere but also in Hawaii, Australasia, and the Andes in South America. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up Robert in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Robert in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Robert in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up John in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Margaret is a female first name. ... Gretel tricks the witch Hansel and Gretel ( German: Hänsel und Gretel) is a German fairy tale, collected by the Brothers Grimm. ... Gretel tricks the witch Hansel and Gretel ( German: Hänsel und Gretel) is a German fairy tale, collected by the Brothers Grimm. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Possibly the best known Victoria, the queen of the United Kingdom from 1837 to 1901: the Victorian era was named after her. ... Look up Robert in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Danny is the 101st most common male name in the United States according to the 1990 census. ... Many people have the name Abby. ... For other uses, see Ali (disambiguation). ... Look up Max, max in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Stephen in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Carl in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Stephanie is a female given name. ... For other uses, see Jacqueline. ... Look up Danielle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Paula is a female given name, from the Latin Paulus meaning petite, and the feminine variant of Paul. ... Patricia (pronounced pa-TRISH-ah) is a common female given name of Latin origin. ... Francesca is an Italian female given name, derived from the Latin male name Franciscus meaning free. It is widely used in most romance languages, including Italian, French and Catalan, and etymologists are unsure as to the place of its origin. ... This article describes the Biblical dialects of Hebrew. ... Susanna is the name of one of the women associated with the ministry of Jesus of Nazarath. ... This article describes the Biblical dialects of Hebrew. ... The root is the primary lexical unit of a word, which carries the most significant aspects of semantic content and cannot be reduced into smaller constituents. ...


Chinese and Korean given names are often unique, because meaningful Hanzi and Hanja characters can be combined extensively. However, some parents recycle popular given names as well. The names of famous and successful persons are also reused occasionally. Nevertheless, many Chinese and Korean parents invest a tremendous amount contemplating the names of their newborns before their birth, often with comprehensive dictionaries or with religious guides, formal or informal. Sometimes, especially in traditional families, paternal grandparents are the name-givers. The Chinese language doesn't have a particular set of words that function as given names, which differs from English. Any combination of Chinese characters theoretically can be used as given names, but usually not any combination of English letters are used as given names, which sometimes make Chinese people think that there may be more English-speaking people sharing identical full names than Chinese. This is not the case, due to the much larger set of words used as family names in English. A Korean personal name consists of a family name followed by a given name. ... Technical note: Due to technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... For other uses of dictionary, see dictionary (disambiguation). ... Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngw n) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: H nyǔ, Hu yǔ, or Zhōngw n) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ...


In many Westernized Chinese locations, many Chinese also take on an unofficial English given name in addition to their official Chinese given name. This is also true for East Asian students at colleges in countries like the United States, Canada, and Australia, and people who wish to do business internationally - both as means to ease communication with people who cannot properly pronounce the Romanized Chinese characters. For example, a Chinese man named "Wuen-lin" might become "Willie" in the USA. It's also interesting to note that when Chinese immigrants or students give themselves English given names, they tend to pick an English given name with the initial letter identical to that of their family name[citation needed], e.g. a Chinese lady named "Li Ma" might name herself "Mary Ma" or a Chinese man named "Xiaobing Tang" might name himself "Tony Tang." The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about the geographical region. ... // See William (name) for information about the name. ... Last name redirects here. ... Ma (simplified: 马; traditional: 馬; pinyin: mǎ) is one of the most common Chinese family names. ... Mary may refer to: // Mary (mother of Jesus), the mother of Jesus of Nazareth Blessed Virgin Mary, the Catholic and Orthodox conception of the mother of Christ See also Islamic view of Virgin Mary Mary Magdalene, devoted disciple of Jesus Mary Salome (disciple), mother of apostles James and John Mary... Ma (simplified: 马; traditional: 馬; pinyin: mǎ) is one of the most common Chinese family names. ... Anthony or Antony is a male given name, (ninth most popular male first name in the United States as of 2006), derived from Antonius, a Roman family name. ...


Many female Japanese names, such as Yoko Ono's, used to end in ko (子), which means "(girl-)child." This fell out of favour in the 1980s, and has remained unfashionable since. As a result, while the vast majority of Japanese women born before 1980 have names ending in ko, it is relatively rare for the younger generation. This has reduced confusion among European-Americans, because in some Romance languages, masculine names often end in o, and feminine names often end in a. People used to names like Tino/Tina are surprised that Mariko or Yoko is female. Yamada Tarō (), a typical Japanese name (male), equivalent to John Smith in English. ... For the song by Die Ärzte, see Yoko Ono (song). ... The Romance languages, also called Romanic languages, are a subfamily of the Italic languages, specifically the descendants of the Vulgar Latin dialects spoken by the common people evolving in different areas after the break-up of the Roman Empire. ...


Most names are specifically masculine or feminine, but there are many unisex names as well, such as Jordan, Jamie, Jesse, Alex, Ashley, Chris, Hillary, Lesley, Joe/Jo, Jackie, Pat, Sam. Often, one gender is predominant. A unisex name, also known as an epicene name, is a given name that is often given to either a male or a female. ... Look up Jamie in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Jesse (disambiguation). ... Look up Alex in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ashley may refer to: // Rem. ... Look up Chris in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Hillary in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lesley (Scottish, from the grey fort) can refer to any of the following: Fort Lesley J. McNair, an American army facility Lesley University, an American academic institution The following people bear the first name Lesley: Lesley Turner Bowrey (b. ... Look up Joe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Jo can mean: A name, short for Joann,Jodie Joanne, Joanna, Johanna, Josephine, Joseph. A Saarländisch word for the German Ja, that is English for Yes A four-foot long wooden staff, used in some Japanese martial arts. ... Look up Jackie in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up pat, Pat in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Sam, SAM in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The term Christian name is sometimes used as a general synonym for given name. Strictly speaking, the term applies to a name formally given to a child at an infant baptism or "christening", practised by some Christian groups. Water is poured on the head of an infant held over the baptismal font of a Catholic church in the United States in 2004 In Christian religious practice, infant baptism is the baptism of young children or infants. ...


Popularity distribution of given names

The popularity (frequency) distribution of given names typically follows a power law distribution. In probability theory and statistics, the Zipf-Mandelbrot law is a discrete probability distribution. ...


Since about 1800 in England and Wales and in the U.S., the popularity distribution of given names has been shifting so that the most popular names are losing popularity. For example, in England and Wales, the most popular female and male names given to babies born in 1800 were Mary and John, with 24% of female babies and 22% of male babies receiving those names, respectively.[3] In contrast, the corresponding statistics for in England and Wales in 1994 were Emily and James, with 3% and 4% of names, respectively. Not only have Mary and John gone out of favor in the English speaking world, also the overall distribution of names has changed significantly over the last 100 years for females, but not for males. This has led to an increasing amount of diversity for female names.[4]


Influence of pop culture

Popular culture appears to have an influence on naming trends, at least in the United States and United Kingdom. Newly famous celebrities and public figures may influence the popularity of names. For example, in 2004 , the names "Keira" and "Kiera" respectively became the 51st and 92nd most popular girls' names in the UK, following the rise in popularity of British actress Keira Knightley.[5] In 2001, the use of Colby as a boys' name for babies in the United States jumped from 233rd place to 99th, just after Colby Donaldson was the runner-up on Survivor: The Australian Outback.[6] Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ... Keira Christina Knightley (pronounced IPA: ;[1] born 26 March 1985) is an English[2] film and television actress. ... Colby Donaldson (born April 1, 1974) is an American television actor best known as the runner-up on Survivor: The Australian Outback. ... Survivor: The Australian Outback was the second installment of the popular United States reality show Survivor. ...


Characters from fiction also seem to influence naming. After the name Kayla was used for a character on the American soap opera Days of our Lives, the name's popularity increased greatly. The name Tammy, and the related Tamara became popular after the movie Tammy and the Bachelor came out in 1957. Some names were established or spread by being used in literature. Notable examples include Jessica, a name created by William Shakespeare in his play "The Servant of Two Masters", Vanessa, created by Jonathan Swift; Fiona, a character from James Macpherson's spurious cycle of Ossian poems; and Wendy, an obscure name popularised by J. M. Barrie in his play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up; and Madison, a character from the movie Splash. Lara and Larissa were rare in America before the appearance of Doctor Zhivago, and have become fairly common since. {{Infobox Given Name Revised Kayla Goes To Wilde Lake High School And Is Awsome (Also Look Up Awsome) | name = Kayla | image= | imagesize= | caption= | pronunciation= | gender = | meaning = | region = | origin = | related names = | footnotes = }} For other uses, see Kayla (disambiguation). ... The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A soap opera is an ongoing, episodic work of fiction, usually broadcast on television... Days of our Lives is an American soap opera, which has aired nearly every weekday since November 8, 1965[5] on the NBC network in the United States, and has since been syndicated to many countries around the world. ... Tammy may refer to: Tammy - a girls fashion store in the UK. These stores are located within Bhs stores following their purchase in 2005. ... Look up Tamara in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Tammy and the bachelor is a 1957 Romantic Comedy and the first of the four Tammy Movies. ... Look up Jessica in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the female given name. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... Look up Fiona in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... James Macpherson (October 27, 1736–February 17, 1796), was a Scottish poet, known as the translator of the Ossian cycle of poems (also known as the Oisín cycle). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Oisín. ... Wendy is a female name which may be used as a short form for Gwendolyn, or in its own right. ... Sir James Matthew Barrie, 1st Baronet, OM (9 May 1860 – 19 June 1937), more commonly known as J. M. Barrie, was a Scottish novelist and dramatist. ... This article is about the play and novel by J.M. Barrie. ... Traditionally, Madison was a surname, meaning son of Maud. ... Splash is a 1984 fantasy film and romantic comedy film directed by Ron Howard and written by Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel. ... Lara may refer to: Places: Lara State, a Venezuelan state. ... Larissa (Greek: Λάρισα, Lárisa) is the capital city of the Thessaly periphery of Greece, and capital of the Larissa Prefecture. ... Doctor Zhivago (Russian: Доктор Живаго) is a 1965 film directed by David Lean and loosely based on the famous novel of the same name by Boris Pasternak. ...


Kayleigh became a particularly popular name in the United Kingdom following the release of a song by the British rock group Marillion. Government statistics in 2005 revealed that 96% of Kayleighs were born after 1985, the year in which Marillion released "Kayleigh". Marillion is a British Rock group. ... For the country dance style with pronunciation kayleigh, see Céilidh. ...


Popular culture figures do not seem to have to be admirable in order to influence naming trends. For example, Peyton came in to the top 1000 as a female given name for babies in the United States for the first time in 1992 (at #583), immediately after it was featured as the name of an evil nanny in the film The Hand That Rocks the Cradle.[6] The Hand That Rocks the Cradle is the title of a number of works of art: A poem, The Hand That Rocks the Cradle, by William Ross Wallace A song, The Hand That Rocks the Cradle, (1984) by The Smiths A film, The Hand That Rocks the Cradle, (1992) starring...


In other instances, names become less common because of negative associations in popular culture. For example, Adolf has fallen out of use since the Second World War. Look up Adolf in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Twin names

In some cultures, twins may be given distinctive pairs of names. Twin names are sometimes similar in sound, for example boy/girl twins named Christian and Christina or twin girls named Sudha and Subha, or Ojor and Omon in Nigeria. The names may have a thematic similarity such as Jesse (or Jessica) and James (named after the American outlaw Jesse James) or Matthew and Mark (named after the first two books of the New Testament in the Bible). The oldest ever female twins, who both died in 2000, were named Kin Narita and Gin Kanie, gold and silver respectively in Japanese. Fraternal twin boys in the tub The term twin most notably refers to two individuals (or one of two individuals) who have shared the same uterus (womb) and usually, but not necessarily, born on the same day. ... For other uses, see Jesse (disambiguation). ... Jesse Woodson James (September 5, 1847–April 3, 1882) was an American outlaw, the most famous member of the James-Younger gang. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the chemical element. ...


Name changing

People may change their names for a variety of reasons. In many countries there is a mandatory or voluntary official procedure. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with legal name. ...


Popular reasons for changing one's name include these:

  • professional reasons (as with actors).
  • Name is too common or uncommon.
  • Name is too hard to spell or say.
  • Name is too long.
  • Name is too "foreign-sounding".
  • Name is too "old-fashioned sounding".
  • Family reasons, such as being raised by a step-parent rather than a biological one (most common with children who have no connection to the biological father).
  • One feels that a nickname is more "oneself" than the given name (or vice versa).
  • Name is unisex.
  • Name is not unisex.
  • Name conflicts with one's spiritual belief (popular in Asian countries; and often amongst converts to Islam).
  • To effect a clean break from the past and make a fresh start.
  • A family member has the same name.
  • Name is obscene, vulgar or insulting in another language the name's owner later comes to use.
  • Name is too closely identified with someone who became famous or infamous after that person's birth (for instance, Adolf).
  • To reflect the identity of a transgender person (e.g. Walter/Wendy Carlos; Jonathan/Joan Roughgarden).

For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Hitler redirects here. ... A transwoman with XY written on her hand, at a protest in Paris, October 1, 2005. ... Wendy Carlos (born Walter Carlos, November 14, 1939) is an American composer and electronic musician. ... Joan E. Roughgarden (b. ...

Related articles and lists

Look up Appendix:Names in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Anthroponym. ... The most popular given names vary nationally, regionally, and culturally. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... A unisex name, also known as an epicene name, is a given name that is often given to either a boy or a girl. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... A saint’s name is the name of a saint given to individuals at their baptism within the Catholic Church. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Alias. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Theophory in the Bible. ... // Much Hebrew theophory occurs in the Bible, particularly in the Old Testament. ... Holy name redirects here. ...

By culture

Indo-European
Central Asia, Altaic
Semitic / Near Eastern
East Asia
Africa

Dutch names consist of one or several given name(s) and a surname. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Indian names are based on a variety of systems and naming conventions, which vary from region to region. ... A formal Irish-language name consists of a given name and a surname, as in English. ... // Boys Alef (الف) Aarmin: A dweller of the garden of Eden; son of King Kobad Abadan: Prosperous Abadard: One Who Possesses Prosperity Abadi: Prosperity Abarja: Most Strenuous Abbas: (Arabic) Frowning, Looking Austere; Lion; Name Of Mohammads Uncle Abid: Spark, Fire Abouali: Avicenna, Name Of A Famous Iranian Scientist And Philosopher... By the Republican era and throughout the Imperial era, a name in ancient Rome for a male citizen consisted of three parts (tria nomina): praenomen (given name), nomen (gentile) (name of the gens or clan) and cognomen (name of a family line within the gens). ... Names in Italian are often directly derived from Latin ones. ... This article describes the conventions for using peoples names in France, including the norms of custom and practice, as well as the legal aspects. ... Portuguese surnames, or the conventional formation of first names and family names in countries and communities of Portuguese language have some peculiarities: Complete names are formed as it is generally practiced in Western Europe, i. ... In Spanish-, Portuguese-, and Catalan-speaking regions of the world, people have two surnames. ... Compared to other systems, the Bulgarian name system can be said to be rather simple. ... A Polish personal name, like names in most European cultures, consists of two main elements: imię, or the given name, followed by nazwisko, or the family name. ... This article gives the general understanding of naming convention in the Russian language as well as in languages (countries) affected by Russian linguistic tradition. ... In Slovakia, each day of the year corresponds to a personal name (the original list was the Roman Catholic calendar of saints). ... This article gives the general understanding of naming conventions in the Russian language as well as in languages affected by Russian linguistic tradition. ... // Orthography Modern Hungarian orthography is slightly different (simpler) than that of 18th or 19th century, but many Hungarian surnames retain their historical spelling. ... // (This article is referring to personal naming customs in the state of Mongolia (known prior to 1995 as the Mongolian Peoples Republic). ... The tughra (stylized signature) of Sultan Mahmud II of the Ottoman Empire. ... Hebrew names are names that have a Hebrew language origin, classically from the Hebrew Bible. ... This is a list of names from the Bible, mainly taken from the 19th century public domain resource: Hitchcocks New and Complete Analysis of the Holy Bible by Roswell D. Hitchcock, New York: A. J. Johnson, 1874, c1869. ... Personal names in Chinese culture follow a number of conventions different from those of personal names in Western cultures. ... Indonesia is an archipelago of over 17,000 islands, only 6,000 of which are inhabited, that extends in an arc along the equator. ... The Balinese name is a naming system used by the Balinese people of Bali and neighboring Lombok, Indonesia. ... Javanese people typically have three-part names, each part of which is a personal name. ... Yamada Tarō (), a typical Japanese name (male), equivalent to John Smith in English. ... A Korean personal name consists of a family name followed by a given name. ... Since Malaysia comprises of many cultures and races, different race have different ways of expressing their names. ... In the Philippines, all Filipinos, Spaniards, and Americans follow the conventional American form: First name-Middle name-Surname. ... Vietnamese names generally consist of three parts: a family name, a middle name, and a given name, used in that order. ... Ethnic Tibetan personal names typically consist of two juxtaposed elements. ... The Akan people frequently name their children after the day of the week they were born and the order in which they were born. ...

References

  1. ^ "A name given to a person at birth or at baptism, as distinguished from a surname" – according to the American Heritage Dictionary
  2. ^ http://www.poland.gov.pl/Polish,names,2470.html
  3. ^ First Name Popularity in England and Wales over the Past Thousand Years
  4. ^ Analytical Visions: Names
  5. ^ National Statistics Online
  6. ^ a b Popular Baby Names, Social Security Administration, USA

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Chinese names, Chinese name meaning, Chinese name symbol, Name in chinese, Chinese last names (366 words)
Foremost there is a huge difference between the Chinese names and the western names relating to the order of the given name and the family name.
According to the western tradition, in a name the given name is firstly placed followed by the family name like Bill Clinton, the name has the given name followed by the family name.
In the Chinese culture utmost importance is given to ancestors and family and hence they pay respect to their ancestors by placing the family name ahead of the given name.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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